The Glass Forest
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Bookseller comes a gripping literary suspense novel set in the 1960s about a deeply troubled family and three women who will reveal its dark truths.In the autumn of 1960, Angie Glass is living an idyllic life in her Wisconsin hometown. At twenty-one, she’s married to charming, handsome Paul, and has just given birth to a baby boy. But one phone call changes her life forever.When Paul’s niece, Ruby, reports that her father, Henry, has committed suicide, and that her mother, Silja, is missing, Angie and Paul drop everything and fly to the small upstate town of Stonekill, New York to be by Ruby’s side.Angie thinks they’re coming to the rescue of Paul’s grief-stricken young niece, but Ruby is a composed and enigmatic seventeen-year-old who resists Angie’s attempts to nurture her. As Angie learns more about the complicated Glass family, staying in Henry and Silja’s eerie and ultra-modern house on the edge of the woods, she begins to question the very fabric of her own marriage.Through Silja’s flashbacks, Angie’s discovery of astonishing truths, and Ruby’s strategic dissection of her parents’ state of affairs, a story of love, secrets, and ultimate betrayal is revealed.

The Glass Forest Details

TitleThe Glass Forest
Author
ReleaseFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherTouchstone
ISBN-139781501172090
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

The Glass Forest Review

  • Sarah Joint
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully written, exquisitely detailed novel that unravels slowly. There's not a lot of action, it's more of a character study of some of the most interesting people I've read about recently. Sometimes books are written in a way that you can imagine yourself there with the characters, sometimes they're not. I'm happy to say this is the former. I could feel what they were feeling. After reading the blurb, I was nervous about keeping track of the three characters we get perspectives from, but A beautifully written, exquisitely detailed novel that unravels slowly. There's not a lot of action, it's more of a character study of some of the most interesting people I've read about recently. Sometimes books are written in a way that you can imagine yourself there with the characters, sometimes they're not. I'm happy to say this is the former. I could feel what they were feeling. After reading the blurb, I was nervous about keeping track of the three characters we get perspectives from, but they all have their own voice and it's very easy to keep track.Angie Glass is living her version of an ideal life. It's 1960, she's married to a charming and handsome older man, and raising their baby boy. Her husband Paul is passionate and caring, and she couldn't be happier. She knows exactly how her life will end up... a happy marriage, more babies, and staying in love with her husband forever.Ruby is the seventeen year old niece of Paul, Angie's husband. She calls their home one day with terrible news... her father has killed himself and her mother is missing. Paul almost travels to attend to this family business by himself, but Angie insists on coming along. She thinks Ruby will need her. They don't know each other well, but this is the time a girl needs a mother figure... but Angie is still young, only a few years older than Ruby and often confused for a teenager herself. Ruby doesn't seem to be interested in Angie at all. She barely wants to speak to anyone.Silja we see from flashbacks, the mother of Ruby and wife to Paul's brother, Henry. She's nowhere to be found. A career woman who provided her family, how could she possibly abandon her daughter? The note she left saying she needed to get away offers no clues as to her whereabouts. The chapters from the past explain the marriage between her and Henry in vivid detail... the end of which take place in the modern glass house in the woods that Angie, Paul, and Ruby are now staying in as they try to figure out what steps to take next.Having known Paul for only a bit over a year, there may be lots of things Angie doesn't know about her husband and his family. Love that begins with the purest of intentions can become twisted.I'd recommend this book to fans of slow burning novels that take you deep into the mind and heart of the characters. I could feel their frustration and heartbreak and cared about them.Touchstone kindly sent me an advanced review copy of this book. This in no way affects my review, which is honest and unbiased.
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  • Zoeytron
    January 1, 1970
    Copy furnished by Net Galley for the price of a review.Henry and Paul Glass are brothers, movie star handsome with their dark eyes and slow easy smiles.  Is there something slightly off about one of them?  Could one or both be acting?  Troubling secrets and falsehoods are bubbling to the fore, doing real damage and eroding trust.  Their respective families are about to be shattered.The slow build works perfectly here in a look at family dynamics that rest soundly on the darkish side.  No twists Copy furnished by Net Galley for the price of a review.Henry and Paul Glass are brothers, movie star handsome with their dark eyes and slow easy smiles.  Is there something slightly off about one of them?  Could one or both be acting?  Troubling secrets and falsehoods are bubbling to the fore, doing real damage and eroding trust.  Their respective families are about to be shattered.The slow build works perfectly here in a look at family dynamics that rest soundly on the darkish side.  No twists of the type that leave you with whiplash, but sometimes that is a good thing. I happily settled for the creeping sense of dread that stayed with me throughout the read.
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  • Theresa Alan
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This is a very different book than Swanson’s debut novel, The Bookseller, but equally compelling with the same attention to historical accuracy that makes you feel like you’re in the 1940s/1960s.Told from the alternating points of view of three women, the story gets off to a slow start, but once you get into it, you won’t be able to put it down. Stilja’s story begins in 1942 when she meets Henry and has a whirlwind love affair and a quick marriage before he goes off to war. The war changes Wow. This is a very different book than Swanson’s debut novel, The Bookseller, but equally compelling with the same attention to historical accuracy that makes you feel like you’re in the 1940s/1960s.Told from the alternating points of view of three women, the story gets off to a slow start, but once you get into it, you won’t be able to put it down. Stilja’s story begins in 1942 when she meets Henry and has a whirlwind love affair and a quick marriage before he goes off to war. The war changes him, and not for the better, but Stilja has already given birth to Ruby.Angie and Ruby’s stories begin in 1960 after Stilja has left a note saying she’s leaving them and the dead body of Henry is found outside their glass house in the forest with a cup of poisoned tea. Where is Stilja? Did she kill Henry or was it really suicide because he was so depressed about her leaving? Also, what truths does Angie have to discover about her much older husband, the painter Paul, the brother of Henry?The way this story unravels is deeply gratifying and the history is fascinating. It makes you appreciate the way things have improved for women, even if we still have a long way to go. Thanks so much to NetGalley and Touchstone for the opportunity to review this book, which RELEASES FEB. 6, 2018.For more of my reviews, please visit: http://www.theresaalan.net/blog
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 35% Will leave rated. Just so plodding got slow, and I'm just not feeling anything.
  • MomIsReading
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this...a family who is tied together by a web of lies. How much do you really know someone? What separates this from the myriad of thriller/suspense books is the time period. This takes place in 1960 and the atmospheric feel of that era is touchable. Two brothers - Henry and Paul. Paul's new wife Angie and their baby. Henry's wife Silja and their teenage daughter Ruby. Silja's story is laid out in flashbacks from when she meet Henry. It all becomes tangled together and character I really enjoyed this...a family who is tied together by a web of lies. How much do you really know someone? What separates this from the myriad of thriller/suspense books is the time period. This takes place in 1960 and the atmospheric feel of that era is touchable. Two brothers - Henry and Paul. Paul's new wife Angie and their baby. Henry's wife Silja and their teenage daughter Ruby. Silja's story is laid out in flashbacks from when she meet Henry. It all becomes tangled together and characters are developed in a slow burn towards the ultimate ending. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC of this novel. Publishing date is projected for February 6, 2018.
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  • Touchstone Books
    January 1, 1970
    Cynthia Swanson is BACK ladies and gents and IMHO, better than ever. This is a rich, atmospheric suspense novel that sweeps you up in the mysteries of the Glass family and immerses you completely in their world.
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really good, very creepy suspense novel. At first, it just seems like a family drama, then you slowly start to realize that it's really dark and twisted. Highly recommended for fans of good suspense novels. It has a similar tone to author Ruth Ware's thrillers.
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  • Jessica Strawser
    January 1, 1970
    Atmospheric and unsettling, THE GLASS FOREST depicts, with razor-sharp edges, the walls we don't see until we find ourselves trapped within them--and the chilling, emotional panorama of the view from the inside looking out.
  • Mainlinebooker
    January 1, 1970
    A slow burner, character driven novel that pulled me in with distinct voices that resonated throughout the novel. Even figuring out how the novel would end did not detract from the events and timeline of the novel. When the story opens we find teenage Ruby calling her uncle to let him know that her mother is missing and her father dead of an apparent suicide. Her young aunt, a naive young woman married to her Uncle Paul, travel to her side with their young infant to help Ruby process this untowa A slow burner, character driven novel that pulled me in with distinct voices that resonated throughout the novel. Even figuring out how the novel would end did not detract from the events and timeline of the novel. When the story opens we find teenage Ruby calling her uncle to let him know that her mother is missing and her father dead of an apparent suicide. Her young aunt, a naive young woman married to her Uncle Paul, travel to her side with their young infant to help Ruby process this untoward turn of events. However, as they are there, things unfold and another story begins to come to the forefront. Told in alternating chapters between the aunt and Ruby, including flashbacks from the past, the novel presents a world that is very evocative of the time and place.If you are looking for a fast paced drama this is not the novel for you but if you want to delve inside character's heads and discover the nature of love and the power of secrets, this is a sure bet.
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  • Kelly Long
    January 1, 1970
    I read an advace copy of this book. This was a slow moving book but overall pretty good. I did like the rotating points of view; that worked well for this story.
  • Sonja Yoerg
    January 1, 1970
    I admired so much about Swanson's debut, The Bookseller, but was particularly enthralled with her gift for storytelling. This gift is on full display again in The Glass Forest. It starts off as a character-driven family drama centered on the putative suicide of Henry, around whom the relationships swirl. As we get to know the finely drawn cast, the lights dim, the pace accelerates and the smoldering questions catch fire. I raced through the second half, compelled to discover what drove these peo I admired so much about Swanson's debut, The Bookseller, but was particularly enthralled with her gift for storytelling. This gift is on full display again in The Glass Forest. It starts off as a character-driven family drama centered on the putative suicide of Henry, around whom the relationships swirl. As we get to know the finely drawn cast, the lights dim, the pace accelerates and the smoldering questions catch fire. I raced through the second half, compelled to discover what drove these people to act as they had, to find the truth of their entanglements. Don't miss this one when it comes out in February; The Glass Forest is taut suspense--completely credible and utterly engrossing.
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  • Claudia
    January 1, 1970
    Angie is a young woman from a small town in Wisconsin, at 21 she married to Paul, a handsome older man. When they receive news about that her brother-in-law Henry was dead, and that their niece was living by herself since her mother, Silja was missing, they decided to travel to Stonekill, New York to be by Ruby’s side. Angie thinks that she could help Ruby’s with her loss, but later discovered that she wasn't an average 17 year old. Angie, Silja and the baby were the only normal characters in th Angie is a young woman from a small town in Wisconsin, at 21 she married to Paul, a handsome older man. When they receive news about that her brother-in-law Henry was dead, and that their niece was living by herself since her mother, Silja was missing, they decided to travel to Stonekill, New York to be by Ruby’s side. Angie thinks that she could help Ruby’s with her loss, but later discovered that she wasn't an average 17 year old. Angie, Silja and the baby were the only normal characters in this book, I had a hard time writing this review but I would recommended it if you do not mind reading about a Sociopath Family!
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  • Susan Wright
    January 1, 1970
    Has your life not turned out like you thought it would? Me neither and sometimes I feel bad about that until I read a book like "The Glass Forest" and realize I am not alone. An unexplained death set in a time when women had fewer choices, this book will make you see clearly how every choice counts. Cynthia Swanson's writing is masterful and this tale is told with exquisite detail and perfect unravelling. "The Glass Forest" is an excellent book, especially for lovers of nostalgia and mystery.
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  • Caryn
    January 1, 1970
    This story felt so unique to me, in the way it was told, in its plot, in its characters. Told from alternating points of view between Angie, a 21-year-old mother; Silja, a woman swept off her feet in a wartime romance; and Ruby, Silja’s teenage daughter. When Angie gets a call from Ruby saying her mother has disappeared and her father is dead, she and her husband immediately fly out to comfort her. As the story moves forward from Angie and Ruby’s point of view, we start from Silja’s childhood to This story felt so unique to me, in the way it was told, in its plot, in its characters. Told from alternating points of view between Angie, a 21-year-old mother; Silja, a woman swept off her feet in a wartime romance; and Ruby, Silja’s teenage daughter. When Angie gets a call from Ruby saying her mother has disappeared and her father is dead, she and her husband immediately fly out to comfort her. As the story moves forward from Angie and Ruby’s point of view, we start from Silja’s childhood to uncover many secrets about this family.I ultimately had no idea where the story was going but was pleasantly surprised by its unveilings. I felt for the women in this story as they made discoveries about their situations. This book’s short chapters made me itching to keep reading and the story will stay with me for a long while.My thanks to the publisher for a copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsStanding ovation! This book swept me along for the ride and kept me on pins and needles as I wondered how it would resolve itself. I will definitely put Swanson on my list of go to authors.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A good way into reading Cynthia Swanson’s The Glass Forest, I asked myself why I was turning each page with a mixture of eagerness and dread. After all, nothing remotely graphic had happened, other than a suicide that was reported early on. There were plenty of hints, though, that something terrible could occur at any moment. Escalating tension in a marriage. Signs of something dark and twisted about the dynamics within the Glass family. A mystery about the fate of an intelligent career woman wh A good way into reading Cynthia Swanson’s The Glass Forest, I asked myself why I was turning each page with a mixture of eagerness and dread. After all, nothing remotely graphic had happened, other than a suicide that was reported early on. There were plenty of hints, though, that something terrible could occur at any moment. Escalating tension in a marriage. Signs of something dark and twisted about the dynamics within the Glass family. A mystery about the fate of an intelligent career woman whose efforts weren’t appreciated. The premise: in 1960, Angie Glass, a young wife besotted with her handsome older husband, Paul, and their baby son, travels with her family from bucolic Door County, Wisconsin, to her brother- and sister-in-law’s modern home along the Hudson. Paul’s brother Henry has been found dead, an apparent suicide. Henry’s wife, Silja, has taken off for parts unknown, leaving a note saying she couldn't stay any longer.Henry and Silja’s daughter Ruby, aged 17, appears strangely composed; perhaps she’s in shock? But Angie wonders if it’s more than that. As Ruby’s aunt-by-marriage, Angie feels it’s her role to mother and comfort Ruby, a quiet and friendless girl, but their closeness in age – she’s just 21 herself – makes her attempts awkward. There were moments I winced at Angie’s naïveté, but I worried alongside her as she gradually absorbed the truth about her husband’s family. The viewpoint revolves among Angie and Ruby in the novel’s present day, and that of Silja starting in 1942, when she was a bespectacled 20-year-old college student from Brooklyn’s Finnish-American community whose experience of love came from feature films. When Silja meets a Cary Grant lookalike, a GI about to leave for war, she's thrilled – which leads her into an impulsive decision, and a life, that she comes to regret. Mentions of movie stars, popular singers, and the Nixon-Kennedy television debates denote the timeframe, but what brings the period alive more vibrantly is the author’s evocation of social mores. This was a time when men ruled the household, even if they weren’t the breadwinner, and women had few options for escaping an unwanted marriage. This novel’s psychological suspense is well articulated, and – without giving anything away – the sense of fear is occasionally generated by what does not happen as much as what does. Because it makes you keenly aware of what people are capable of. First reviewed at Reading the Past; thanks to the publisher for the e-ARC.
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  • Ashley Rae
    January 1, 1970
    The Glass Forest is a little bit of mystery, little bit of suspense, and a whole lot of awesome. The characters are rich in detail, and the “whodunit” is quite a shocker. I loved every minute of it.The quality of writing in The Glass Forest is superb. It’s easy to feel immersed in the 1950/1960s when you’re reading this book.The plot is so intriguing! Ruby’s dad commits suicide and her mother is missing. It seems like a straightforward story of heartbreak and abandonment . . . but is it? While r The Glass Forest is a little bit of mystery, little bit of suspense, and a whole lot of awesome. The characters are rich in detail, and the “whodunit” is quite a shocker. I loved every minute of it.The quality of writing in The Glass Forest is superb. It’s easy to feel immersed in the 1950/1960s when you’re reading this book.The plot is so intriguing! Ruby’s dad commits suicide and her mother is missing. It seems like a straightforward story of heartbreak and abandonment . . . but is it? While reading the story, you get to jump back and forth between the perspectives of Ruby, her aunt Angie, and her mother Silja. The different perspectives really help you get in deep with the story, and the pacing is swift and engaging. The author does a phenomenal job of unpacking the mystery slowly but surely, one piece at a time. I flew through the last 20% of the book–I couldn’t wait to find out how it ended!I absolutely loved the ending. Honestly, it was a WOW! I don’t know if I can say it was a happy ending, but it was a very satisfying ending.The characters in The Glass Forest are richly complex. Even with all of Silja’s quirks and flaws, I found myself feeling very sympathetic towards her. Yes, she’s materialistic and wants the best of the best, but she also works hard, provides for her family, and holds up a marriage that is less than ideal. Silja, in my mind, was like a trapped bird in the book. I wanted very much for her to be free.Ruby is another interesting character in the book. She’s somewhat standoffish and sneaky, but she also possesses a strength that few other characters in the book have.Admittedly I was somewhat indifferent to Angie, Paul’s wife. Paul is Henry’s (Ruby’s father) in the book. She’s sweet and naive, and gets caught up in a bad situation. I did enjoy the last half of the book, seeing how she reacted when her “ideal world” bubble was popped.And then there’s Henry and Paul. I loved their characters–they were so well done.This is a book you could easily read in a single sitting. It was so easy to read and very enjoyable.Seriously . . . this book should be on your TBR shelf!Thank you to NetGalley for providing the Kindle version of this book in exchange for an honest review.(This review will be posted on my blog on Friday, February 2, 2018.)
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Won in the First Reads giveaway.Very engaging mystery. Even if I did guess the gist of it, the journey was still good. Some of the writing seemed awkward, especially Angie's first person chapters. Also, "buttock cheek"? I felt like the word "buttock" was used way too often. Some people may be annoyed by Angie at first, but give her time.The book also seemed very timely with the portrayal of the two Glass brothers. One being (view spoiler)[a fanatic similar to an alt-right person and the other be Won in the First Reads giveaway.Very engaging mystery. Even if I did guess the gist of it, the journey was still good. Some of the writing seemed awkward, especially Angie's first person chapters. Also, "buttock cheek"? I felt like the word "buttock" was used way too often. Some people may be annoyed by Angie at first, but give her time.The book also seemed very timely with the portrayal of the two Glass brothers. One being (view spoiler)[a fanatic similar to an alt-right person and the other being a pedophile. (hide spoiler)]Now to be nitpicky with the cover, those little people in the windows don't look 40's-60's. Could have done without them.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    From start to finish, I enjoyed every word of this book. Often, books with a mystery as the core plot are predictable. The Glass House was never predictable, it kept me guessing from the beginning and I truly couldn’t guess what would be revealed by the end. I think the character development was also on point. At the beginning the female characters are portrayed as weak, smitten, passive. By the end they have grown or revealed their inner strength. I personally appreciate a book with female char From start to finish, I enjoyed every word of this book. Often, books with a mystery as the core plot are predictable. The Glass House was never predictable, it kept me guessing from the beginning and I truly couldn’t guess what would be revealed by the end. I think the character development was also on point. At the beginning the female characters are portrayed as weak, smitten, passive. By the end they have grown or revealed their inner strength. I personally appreciate a book with female characters who stand for themselves and don’t depend on others for their own wellbeing and happiness. Thank you Simon and Schuster for sending this to me, I’m so glad I was able to read and experience this book. Cynthia Swanson, you absolutely crushed this and I can’t wait to read more from you.
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  • Renee (itsbooktalk.com)
    January 1, 1970
    I really felt the premise of this story was strong and I was intrigued with the initial pages and set up. The story alternates perspectives between Angie, Ruby, and Silja and while I didn't love this it worked ok to propel the story forward. My main critique is this is a very meandering plot and even by 50 % I was wondering if anything was going to happen. It seemed to be mainly a character study and the only character I cared at all for was Silja. I kept hoping the pace would pick up but it rea I really felt the premise of this story was strong and I was intrigued with the initial pages and set up. The story alternates perspectives between Angie, Ruby, and Silja and while I didn't love this it worked ok to propel the story forward. My main critique is this is a very meandering plot and even by 50 % I was wondering if anything was going to happen. It seemed to be mainly a character study and the only character I cared at all for was Silja. I kept hoping the pace would pick up but it really didn't until finally at around 75% things started happening. By then the plot twists were unremarkable and pretty predictable. I read mainly to find out about Silja's character and in the end I can't say this worked for me. I think those who enjoy drawn out character studies with subtle unreliability and can hold out until the very end for things to transpire may like this.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    A phone call from her teenage niece she's only met once puts Angie's life in a spiral. The niece, Ruby, frantically reports that her mother, Silja, has gone missing and her father, Henry, is dead from an apparent suicide. Running to tell her beloved husband Paul that his brother is dead and his sister-in-law is missing, Angie only wants to help the family heal. Paul, Angie and their baby son, PJ, all board a plane going from Wisconsin to Stonekill, New York to be at Ruby's side.As the story unfo A phone call from her teenage niece she's only met once puts Angie's life in a spiral. The niece, Ruby, frantically reports that her mother, Silja, has gone missing and her father, Henry, is dead from an apparent suicide. Running to tell her beloved husband Paul that his brother is dead and his sister-in-law is missing, Angie only wants to help the family heal. Paul, Angie and their baby son, PJ, all board a plane going from Wisconsin to Stonekill, New York to be at Ruby's side.As the story unfolds, Angie becomes aware of past events in the families' lives that makes her question what really happened. Learning that terrible war trauma caused paranoia in Henry so deeply that he believes that anyone with a thought differing from his is a Communist - including his own wife. Silja's chaste life creating a deep desire for any form of companionship which leads to a hidden relationship outside of her marriage. To, worse of all, the revelation that her amazingly handsome. loving, faithful husband was run out of Stonekill years back due to accusations of inappropriate advances toward a minor. How well does Angie know anything about this family or her life she's made?Only once Angie is able to break through the barrier that her niece has constructed of self-preservation, does she realize that there is danger not only for Ruby, but for Angie herself and her baby. The truth must be revealed but only at the assurance that they all three will remain unharmed. Ruby, a much stronger and mature woman than anyone is aware, navigates how all is brought to light. The question becomes, how well does Angie know Ruby and to what extent does she extend her trust. A truly gripping tale that is highly recommended.
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  • Jason McKinney
    January 1, 1970
    2 1/2 stars.Not terrible but pretty predictable and way too much of a slow burn along the way. It takes over half the novel until the gears really start clicking and even then things continue to move pretty slowly. The three female lead characters are also unfortunately not that interesting and thankfully, Swanson is a decent writer because otherwise, this would potentially be an interminable slog. The suspense here should have been tightened up a lot more considering the type of novel she was t 2 1/2 stars.Not terrible but pretty predictable and way too much of a slow burn along the way. It takes over half the novel until the gears really start clicking and even then things continue to move pretty slowly. The three female lead characters are also unfortunately not that interesting and thankfully, Swanson is a decent writer because otherwise, this would potentially be an interminable slog. The suspense here should have been tightened up a lot more considering the type of novel she was trying to write.
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  • stardustreader
    January 1, 1970
    A slow burn mysterying, The Glass Forest is the perfect book to pick up this year.I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and at the end of the, I was blown away. I couldn't believe the plot twists, elegantly crafted characters, and beautiful prose This started off slow, but as time went on the pieces fell into place. My mind was blown by the end of this book and while I knew it reached the end, I was craving more! 5/5 star!
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    oh I just loved this book, more than the bookseller, and I really enjoyed that one. Yes, this story is a slow burn but the foreshadowing offered enough lure for me that I couldn't put it down. as others have noted, the second half moves faster than the first, but I had no problems getting sucked into the story from the first few pages. I can't recommend this book enough.
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  • Melanie Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a slow-burn creep-fest set in the 1960’s when life was much different for women. Paul and Angie are newly married with a baby when they get a call that Paul’s brother is dead and his sister-in-law is missing. Paul and Angie quickly fly to be with their 17 year old niece to try to figure out what happened to their family. This isn’t fast paced, but it is so good. There are a lot of layers and it was a quick read for me. I think this could be one of the best of 2018.
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  • Shannon Dyer
    January 1, 1970
    Round up to 4.5 stars. Utterly captivating. Review to come at AAR.
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    This was an outstanding book and seeing as how she is a local Denver author, I would definitely love to pick her brain about how the story came to be. Set in the 1960s with different points of view presented, it's a story about how every family has secrets. I very much enjoyed this book and read it in about 4 days because I simply could not put it down. Debuts in February and I highly recommend that you grab a copy as soon as it comes out.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Angie Glass is living a quiet simple life in her small Wisconsin town. She comes from a large family and has lived there her entire life. Just twenty one years old, Angie has a baby and is newly married to Paul, a stranger she met last summer with Hollywood good looks who arrived with little more than a bag and a charming smile. When the phone rings one day in their small house in the woods, their lives are changed forever. Paul’s niece Ruby has called to inform them that her father, Paul’s brot Angie Glass is living a quiet simple life in her small Wisconsin town. She comes from a large family and has lived there her entire life. Just twenty one years old, Angie has a baby and is newly married to Paul, a stranger she met last summer with Hollywood good looks who arrived with little more than a bag and a charming smile. When the phone rings one day in their small house in the woods, their lives are changed forever. Paul’s niece Ruby has called to inform them that her father, Paul’s brother is dead and her mother, Silja, has disappeared. Angie insists she and the baby accompany Paul to upstate New York to help Ruby and find out what has really happened to Henry. From the moment they arrive in the house that is literally made of glass, every step Paul makes leaves Angie questioning who her husband really is. Ruby seems standoffish and Angie can’t discern whether she is shy or hiding something. With each passing days the clues become more sinister. It is hard to tell in this complicated family if anyone is ever telling the truth. Flashing back through Silja’s young life, Henry’s controlling ways had left her desperate and afraid. This twisted, creepy, literary thriller is filled with a cast of characters so quietly deceptive even they start to believe their own lies. Highly recommend this well written, suspenseful novel. You will not be able to put it down (or walk in the forest alone.)
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  • Tracie
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't expecting to like this nook as much as I did. At first I thought it was just your typical dysfunctional family drama. But it was so much more. Silja, Henry, Ruby, Anjie and Paul (what a weirdo!) A lot of times I will gloss over descriptions or other parts of a novel that become too tedious. But I didn't (nor did I want to) with this novel. Such a great story and so unpredictable! I received this as a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Mom2nine
    January 1, 1970
    This book opens with a run-away wife and a husband who has just committed suicide. From there it goes back and forth between present and past, becoming a family drama. This develops into a mystery and then suspense, until the story reaches its climax turning it into a 5 star novel- covering all of the bases. It was one of the most engrossing books that I have read for awhile. received in goodreads contest
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