The Cackle of Cthulhu
TOP AUTHORS POKE FUN AND PAY TRIBUTE TO H.P. LOVECRAFT'S CTHULHU MYTHOS.Knock, knock! Who’s there?Cthul. Cthul who?Exactly! I've come to tickle your funnybone.Oh, and also to eat your soul. In 1928, Weird Tales debuted “The Call of Cthulhu” by H.P. Lovecraft, and the Cthulhu Mythos was born. In the 90 years since, dozens of writers have dared play within HPL’s mind-blowing creation—but never with such terrifyingly funny results. Now top authors lampoon, parody, and subvert Lovecraft’s Mythos. See Cthulhu cut short his nap at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean to invade North Korea! Watch the Unspeakable Eater of Souls solve crimes on the pulpy streets of Innsmouth! And speaking of largish Elder Gods, listen to a plastic Elvis doll dispense folksy advice straight from the heart of the Emperor of Dread! Again Ol’ Tentacle-Face is confronted by frail humans who dare defy the Incarnation of Ultimate Evil—but this time not by brave monster hunters and terrified villagers, but by fan fiction writers, clueless college students, and corporate lawyers (okay, we realize it’s hard to know who to root for in that confrontation). Twenty-three mirthful manifestations within the Cthulhu Mythos from best-selling and award-winning authors Neil Gaiman, Mike Resnick, Esther Friesner, Ken Liu, Jody Lynn Nye, Laura Resnick, Nick Mamatas, and many more! Guaranteed to leave you howling. Because if you look at it just right, there’s nothing funnier than a soul writhing in cosmic horror before a tentacled maw of malevolence. As HPL himself saith: “From even the greatest of horrors irony is seldom absent.”  Praise for the Unidentified Funny Objects anthologies, edited by Alex Shvartsman: “This book is a delight. There are a lot of giggles here, and every now and then you’ll laugh your head off. This is a hoot from start to finish.”—Galaxy’s Edge “Shvartsman delivers a wonderful anthology and if you want to broaden your humorous SFF reading, Unidentified Funny Objects is a great place to start.”— A Fantastical LibrarianPraise for Alex Shvartsman: “Shvartsman is an entertaining writer who can take on many voices and make them his.” –Locus “Alex Shvartsman’s comedy is bright and direct with clever dialogue of both the inner and outer sort.”—Tangent OnlineComplete Contributor List: Neil Gaiman Jody Lynn Nye Mike Resnick Ken Liu Nick Mamatas Esther Friesner David Vaughan Kevin Wetmore Shaenon K. Garrity Brian Trent Alex Shvartsman Rachael Klahn Jones Yvonne Navarro Scott Huggins Gini Koch Aidan Doyle Konstantine Paradias Amanda Helms Laura Resnick Matt Mikalatos Laura Pearlman Lucy A. Snyder Original stories by David Vaughan, Jody Lynn Nye, Mike Resnick, Brian Trent, Yvonne Navarro, G. Scott Huggins, Gini Koch, Aidan Doyle, Amanda Helms, Laura Resnick, Laura Pearlman, Lucy Snyder, and Nick Mamatas. Reprints by Esther Friesener, Kevin Wetmore, Shaenon K. Garrity, Alex Shvatsman, Ken Liu, Rachael K. Jones, Neil Gaiman, Konstantine Paradias, and Matt Mikalatos.

The Cackle of Cthulhu Details

TitleThe Cackle of Cthulhu
Author
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherBaen
ISBN-139781481483001
Rating
GenreHorror, Short Stories

The Cackle of Cthulhu Review

  • Mark Catalfano
    January 1, 1970
    The Shunned Trailer by Esther Friesner (reprint): A college student stumbles into a trailer park stuffed with Lovecraftian monsters, trying to summon Cthulhu. It seemed like it was just throwing as many jokes as possible at the wall and seeing what stuck.Captain in Yellow by David Vaughn: Here's the obligatory "what if this took place in Star Trek?" story. Actually, it works pretty well with Lovecraft's setting.My Little Old one (TM) by Jody Lynne Nye: This one was pretty fun, as a terrible todd The Shunned Trailer by Esther Friesner (reprint): A college student stumbles into a trailer park stuffed with Lovecraftian monsters, trying to summon Cthulhu. It seemed like it was just throwing as many jokes as possible at the wall and seeing what stuck.Captain in Yellow by David Vaughn: Here's the obligatory "what if this took place in Star Trek?" story. Actually, it works pretty well with Lovecraft's setting.My Little Old one (TM) by Jody Lynne Nye: This one was pretty fun, as a terrible toddler who never sleeps finally starts seeming to calm down when getting a Cthulhu doll. the mother's benign innocence makes the story.Tales of a Fourth Grade Shoggoth by Kevin Wetmore (reprint): A boy wins a small Chuthulu and his brother with tentacles eats it and he turns out to be able to summon away vile creatures that want to eat kids on the playground. Didn't like it, but I tend to not like kid or YA stories.Friday Night at Brazee's by Mike Resnick: Cthulhu gets invited over for poker in order to take the place of a man he's hunting. This one was great.To Whatever by Shaenon K. Garrity (reprint): A pretty silly story about a roommate who has a monster living in the walls of his apartment but only communicates through letters.The Doom that Came to Providence by Brian Trent: After the monsters win, a gangster has a secret weapon: HPL himself.Shoggoths Old Peculiar by Neil Gaiman (reprint): An American visiting Britian wanders into Innsmouth and the Cultists there have amusing conversations but are basically inept.HP and Me by Gini Koch: HPL leads a new group of undead students, ie vampires and werewolves, into his own world as a training exercise.The Greatest Leader by Adrian Doyle: A group of hackers have stopped Lovecraftian monsters from coming into our world, but now in North Korea new patches are coming out.But Someone's Gotta Do it by Konstantine Paradias: The janitor at Miskatonic University has seen--and been paid to turn a blind eye away from-- some creepy things.The Call of the Unincorporated Intellectual Property by Amanda Helms: A movie about Vagalith is making whoever watches it go mad.Explaining Cthulhu to Grandma by Alex Shvartsman (reprint): A pawn shop gets Cthulhu, but all potential buyers aren't really interested in paying.The Call of the Pancake Factory (reprint) by Ken Liu: A corporate spy for a theme park stumbles on an island full of cultists.The Innsmouth of the South (reprint) by Rachel K Jones: A Lovecraft theme park gets replaced by real monsters who give the evil park owner what he deserves.WWRD by Yvonne Navarro: A girl gets a Cthulhu Elvis doll who gives her dating advice.In the Employee Manual of Madness by G. Scott Huggins: A pizza company makes toppings which are more for Elder Gods and less for the poor humans who work there.Cthulhu, PI by Laura Resnick: After retiring from the Elder God business, Cthulhu takes the streets as a detective for hire.A Stiff Bargain, by Matt Mikalatos: A vampire and the ghost of his old servent have to stop Cthulhu from prank calling the town.The Shadow over My Dorm Room by Laura Pearlman: The narrator's roommate is turning into a monster day by day.The Tingling Madness by Lucy A. Snyder: A woman gets a TV with 3 new channels: two are cults and one is a Chuck Tingle channel warning about the first two.The Girl Who Loved Cthulhu by Nick Mamatas: A writer goes to a Lovecraft convention where everyone asks how the mental hospital was.
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  • James Bowman
    January 1, 1970
    A adequately decent anthology of humorous stories inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos. Most of the stories are good though not great. The more interesting stories included "The Captain in Yellow" (which fuses Cthulhu with Star Trek), "My Little Old One" (whatever could go wrong with a line of Mythos-inspired toys?), "To Whatever" (being roomies with an interdimensional horror, told in letters), "The Greatest Leader" (the Mythos in North Korea), and "The Shadow Over My Dorm Room" (the tale of a market A adequately decent anthology of humorous stories inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos. Most of the stories are good though not great. The more interesting stories included "The Captain in Yellow" (which fuses Cthulhu with Star Trek), "My Little Old One" (whatever could go wrong with a line of Mythos-inspired toys?), "To Whatever" (being roomies with an interdimensional horror, told in letters), "The Greatest Leader" (the Mythos in North Korea), and "The Shadow Over My Dorm Room" (the tale of a marketing student at Miskatonic). On the other hand, I wasn't a huge fan of "In the Employee Manual of Madness" and "H.P. and Me", the latter feeling like it was there to promote the author's other fiction. Overall, it's worth reading once. (B)
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  • M.E.
    January 1, 1970
    Most of the stories in this collection ranged from entertaining to really quite good but there were a couple that didn't appeal to me. A nice digression for horror, especially Lovecraft, aficionados to take a break from the serious, get a few laughs and absorb all the inside jokes that abound in this tome.
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