Steal the Stars
Steal the Stars, a debut novel by Nat Cassidy, is based on the debut science fiction podcast from Tor Labs. Dakota “Dak” Prentiss guards the biggest secret in the world. They call it “Moss.” It’s your standard grey alien from innumerable abduction stories. It still sits at the controls of the spaceship it crash-landed eleven years ago. A secret military base was built around the crash site to study both Moss and the dangerous technology it brought to Earth. The day Matt Salem joins her security team, Dak’s whole world changes. It’s love at first sight—which is a problem, since they both signed ironclad contracts vowing not to fraternize with other military personnel. If they run, they’ll be hunted for what they know. Dak and Matt have only way to be together: do the impossible. Steal Moss and sell the secret of its existence.And they can’t afford a single mistake.At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Steal the Stars Details

TitleSteal the Stars
Author
ReleaseNov 7th, 2017
PublisherTor Books
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Young Adult

Steal the Stars Review

  • Jemima
    January 1, 1970
    Title: Steal The Stars Author: Nat Cassidy Genre: Science Fiction, Romance, Young Adult, New Adult I love anything science fiction.. and I grew up watching X-Files etc so I was really intrigued to read this book. Aliens, extra terrestrials beings... who wouldn't want to read about it right?!I have a confession to make, I waited a while to review this book..... why? because I wanted to listen to the Podcast. Steal The Stars in based on a Podcast by Mac Rogers and I really wanted to listen to it Title: Steal The Stars Author: Nat Cassidy Genre: Science Fiction, Romance, Young Adult, New Adult I love anything science fiction.. and I grew up watching X-Files etc so I was really intrigued to read this book. Aliens, extra terrestrials beings... who wouldn't want to read about it right?!I have a confession to make, I waited a while to review this book..... why? because I wanted to listen to the Podcast. Steal The Stars in based on a Podcast by Mac Rogers and I really wanted to listen to it first before I reviewed it.Why? Cause I got bored half way reading the book. If you really want to read this book, i'd suggest you listen to the Podcast instead.Don't get me wrong.. This book wasn't bad... I love the whole concept of the book- The secret facility, the love story between Dak and Matt... I loved it! But I just found the whole book to drag on ..and I found Dak's 'inner-monologues' to be ...hmmm...how should I put it? I just wanted to roll my eyes.This whole review is sounding so weird but I am torn.. Loved the Podcast... the book?Not so much. which is weird cause it's basically the same thing (almost) but the experience was entirely different for me. That being said, I wouldn't have loved the Podcast as much if I hadn't read the book first because the Podcast does leave some information hanging (But if you've read the book, you know it all).Note: The whole narration is done by Dak.. and I have a love/hate thing going on with all her "You said's". It a different style of writing for me and I'm not sure whether I like it or not. I also gave it 4 stars because of the Podcast.For more reviews and giveaways follow my blog at www.jemimajamir.com  
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  • Laura Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    When I realized this was based on a podcast series I thought I’d listen to them first. Glad I didn’t so I can compare them now.This is a very different take on discovering aliens exist. They’ve had Moss, the alien, hidden away for a long time. If you are chosen to work at the facility, you are an employee for life. No quitting allowed. And just going to work each day is a whole bunch of weird, complicated check points.Dak won me over right away. She’s something else. You wouldn’t want to get on When I realized this was based on a podcast series I thought I’d listen to them first. Glad I didn’t so I can compare them now.This is a very different take on discovering aliens exist. They’ve had Moss, the alien, hidden away for a long time. If you are chosen to work at the facility, you are an employee for life. No quitting allowed. And just going to work each day is a whole bunch of weird, complicated check points.Dak won me over right away. She’s something else. You wouldn’t want to get on her bad side. But she’s also vulnerable, lonely. When Matt, a handsome, eager younger man joins her security team, she’s immediately smitten, as is he. But fraternizing between employees in any way is expressly forbidden and could get them sent to the far corners of the planet, or worse.I know, sounds like insta love. Sure, they fall for each other quickly, but working for such a secretive project doesn’t allow you many opportunities to connect and the mushy stuff isn’t a focal point in the story.Their decision to run away and take Moss with them isn’t as simple as it sounds. I got nervous just reading how they had to plan and sneak and lie. I felt for sure one or both would trip up.Very suspenseful reading. And the ending isn’t anything I was prepared for. All I could think was I liked how it concluded and, it figures.Great science fiction and now I must listen to the podcasts.I received a complimentary copy. My review is voluntarily given.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Hey! Fair warning, the publisher gave me access to the first five episodes ahead of time in exchange for my review, BUT the podcast is free and available at your podcast location of choice. I use Pocket Casts, and the first three episodes are already up. A link to get to them is here.Steal the Stars is part of a new project by Tor, Tor Labs, which will apparently be putting out serialized fiction -- basically audio drama -- podcasts in the future. Think about stuff like The Truth, Limetown, The Hey! Fair warning, the publisher gave me access to the first five episodes ahead of time in exchange for my review, BUT the podcast is free and available at your podcast location of choice. I use Pocket Casts, and the first three episodes are already up. A link to get to them is here.Steal the Stars is part of a new project by Tor, Tor Labs, which will apparently be putting out serialized fiction -- basically audio drama -- podcasts in the future. Think about stuff like The Truth, Limetown, The Bright Sessions -- this one belongs right in those hallowed halls right alongside them. Steal the Stars begins with a mystery -- what the hell is this weird alien thing? It's huge, and seemingly mostly dead, and covered in moss, and in a crashed ship, with a thing.... but that's honestly not what the podcast is about. It's more about the human drama of the people surrounding him in the secret paramilitary base trying to figure out their own lives -- and figure out the mystery going on at the center of it. This is slightly more romantic in nature than I really expected it to be, but I'll tell you what -- I loaded this thing up on a four hour driving trip, and my husband, who isn't really into my fiction podcasts, kept asking for the next one. We listened to all five episodes we were provided in one sitting, and I'm dying to listen to the rest of them now. Very diverting and very worth listening to. Five stars.
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  • Kiera
    January 1, 1970
    Wow.I think my heart rate has come down enough to review this now.This was fantastic. The premise and key story elements alone are great. A Bonnie and Clyde love story. A secret military facility. A 20-minutes-into the future overly-corporatized America. A real Area 51 complete with alien. But it’s the intrigue and pacing layered over the top of these that really lifts this story into five-star range.Steal the Stars is a story in two parts. Where the first part is interesting, with lots of quest Wow.I think my heart rate has come down enough to review this now.This was fantastic. The premise and key story elements alone are great. A Bonnie and Clyde love story. A secret military facility. A 20-minutes-into the future overly-corporatized America. A real Area 51 complete with alien. But it’s the intrigue and pacing layered over the top of these that really lifts this story into five-star range.Steal the Stars is a story in two parts. Where the first part is interesting, with lots of questions and world building, the second half hares off into the desert and over a cliff. It’s a fairly stark turn and it might put some readers off, but I loved both parts equally and I was surprised at how nicely both story elements synced up in the one narrative.I started listening to the podcast version of Steal the Stars before switching to the novelisation, so I feel I can comment a bit on both here. The podcast is really well produced. The acting and audio production are excellent. I can find radio plays a bit disorienting, but Dak’s first person perspective really helps to guide the listener through what’s going on. The voice actors bring a lot of charisma to their roles and set up emotional connections with the characters a lot faster than could be done in text. Lloyd, for example (fun fact: voiced by Nat Cassidy who wrote the novelisation), I loved from his first sentence. There’s a warmth and charm there that you can get from 30 seconds of conversation that takes a bit more to convey on the page.Having said that, Cassidy has done an excellent job with the novelisation. The prose style retains the feel of Dak’s narrative voice in the podcast, while providing the description and background information required for transitioning the work to text. I found in some ways the text was more comprehensive, and more clearly conveyed some actions and world building elements which were less clear in audio cues or weren’t able to be included in the podcast due to space.It would have been easy to go bare-bones on the additional information and fleshing out in the novel and stick to just what was required to convert the story to a text version of the podcast. But I was pleasantly surprised at how much additional material Cassidy slipped in without losing the tone, pacing and sequence of the podcast. Special shout out specifically to how well Cassidy worked in ‘Dak-style’ metaphors and similes.Dak herself is a different strong, female protagonist which I appreciated. Middle aged. Stocky. Physically competent. Practical. Her trajectory and character arc over the course of the story is fascinating to watch. It’s internally consistent and yet quite extreme. Each step of the way felt inevitable, but in a way that felt driven by Dak’s choices and as if it could never have gone any other way. Particularly the second half had this increasing tension and pace to it that felt like it was hurtling headlong into a doom with only a slim chance of survival and the window just kept getting narrower the further you went.The romance and chemistry between Dak and Matt was intense and well-depicted. This wasn’t a slow burn or a coy young love. This is two consenting adults in one of those once-in-a-lifetime crazy chemistry encounters.I found the ending strange, but not problematically so. Without spoilers, I enjoyed the reinterpretation of well-known facts in a way that was logical in hindsight but not obvious as you went through. I found it a bit abrupt and in some ways unsatisfying for it, but overall I think I liked it. I like the questions it raises about what happens next. I like the neatness of some elements of the ending and the significant can of worms opened by it as well. I liked having some answers - but not all of them - and getting to see a glimpse of the next story to come.Whatever format you check this out in, Steal the Stars is a worth experiencing. It’s different to a lot of other scifi out at the moment. It’s punchy and fast. The style and tone are unique and vibrant, and it’ll leave you wanting to rant and debrief with your friends.An advance copy of this book was kindly provided by Tor Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This review was first published on Chapters in Flux: (http://wp.me/p5WG8T-fO)
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an open and honest review Review:That ending….wow… I can’t actually decide if I liked the last chapter, but the rest of this book was phenomenal.Steal the Stars is the novelization of a podcast of the same name from Tor Labs. To clarify, I have not listened to the podcast, but after reading the book, it’s certainly being added to my podcast list. I can’t say how close the book is to the podcast in terms of plot and narration, but by from the ra I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an open and honest review Review:That ending….wow… I can’t actually decide if I liked the last chapter, but the rest of this book was phenomenal.Steal the Stars is the novelization of a podcast of the same name from Tor Labs. To clarify, I have not listened to the podcast, but after reading the book, it’s certainly being added to my podcast list. I can’t say how close the book is to the podcast in terms of plot and narration, but by from the rather atypical narration style and pacing, I’m going to guess it’s pretty close.This book is about the lives of Dak Prentiss, chief security guard of Quill Marine, and Matt Salem, a recent hire. Quill Marine, which disguises itself as an innocent marine research base, is actually one of many top-secret research laboratories owned by the Sierra Corporation; Sierra being a vague yet menacing corporate entity that may or may not secretly run the US Government. The overall mood of this book is rather morose and pessimistic and feels like a painfully accurate reflection of today’s political climate. However, unlike many science fiction stories, the spotlight of this book is not on Sierra and the happenings in Quill Marine, but on Dak and Matt themselves. This story follows their lives, their emotions, and their relationship as they live in a science fiction backdrop.Dak and Matt are not your normal protagonists. Dak is portrayed as a solitary and aggressive person who does what she needs to, regardless of consequences. In the first chapter, we see her getting into bar fights. She uses (and occasionally abuses) her authority, manipulates her connections, and flat-out lies her way out of situations. Matt we only see through Dak’s perspective. While he’s portrayed as the perfect man, given his job description and previous career choices, there’s likely more than one skeleton in his closet. Together, they make an interesting duo of very flawed people existing in a very flawed world.The narration is done in an interesting combination of first- and second-person. Dak is narrating the story, but while doing so, she’s often addressing Matt, using ‘you’. It’s a very intimate way of story-telling and given how emotional this can book get, a very successful one too.The pacing is also VERY slow, perhaps the slowest I’ve read in terms of plot. The events in the summary don’t actually happen until more than half-way through. However, because the focus of the first half is on the development of Dak and Matt’s relationship, I never found the slowness frustrating. It also helps that as their relationship develops, the world does too. We’re slowly introduced to all the interesting technology and aliencraft inside Quill Marine, as well as a very accurate depiction of scientists floundering while trying to decrypt alien tech and xenobiology. The pacing does pick up significantly in the last third, and by the end, the action comes at a rapid-fire pace.My one problem with this book was the ending. While I don’t want to give too much away, I thought the final chapter largely destroyed the set up of the rest of the book. To me, the second-to-last chapter would have made a fantastic ending that would take the story on a path not often tread for endings. This is not to say I didn’t find the revelations in the last chapter interesting, but just that I didn’t think they fit with the rest of the story.Overall, I rate this book a 4.5/5. It would have been a 5 without the last chapter. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in a very character-driven science fiction novel.
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  • Ryan Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    I like books that close with the end of the world.
  • Deanna Reads Books
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books Earlier this week I featured the podcast Steal The Stars here on the blog for my podcast feature, Deanna Listens. I was also able to get my hands on an advanced reader copy of the novelization thanks to Netgalley that was written by Nat Cassidy. If you listen to the podcast, and I really think you should, you may know him as Lloyd.I wasn't sure if the novelization was right for me. I liked the podcast a lot, and I love that s This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books Earlier this week I featured the podcast Steal The Stars here on the blog for my podcast feature, Deanna Listens. I was also able to get my hands on an advanced reader copy of the novelization thanks to Netgalley that was written by Nat Cassidy. If you listen to the podcast, and I really think you should, you may know him as Lloyd.I wasn't sure if the novelization was right for me. I liked the podcast a lot, and I love that stories are being told in this medium, so I wasn't sure if the novelization was just going to be a complete rehash of what I just listened to. At times it is pretty identical to the podcast itself, but there are also these really great similes that I don't remember being in the podcast. I think Cassidy did a really good job of giving us more insight into the characters. I think the novel also give us a little more background on the Sierra Corporation, and why they suck! I don't recall finding out why the character only known as X is in prison, but this is told pretty explicitly in the book. It really hammers in why Sierra is the worst!I still have so many questions. Like how did Sierra come to take over the world so quickly? I think these are questions for the reader to ask, and are not necessarily something that is answered within the story. This story is a sneaky dystopia, it's so very subtle and looks like our world right now or the not too distant future that you don't realize what has happened to the world until much later in the book.One thing that is different about the podcast vs. this novelization in the tense that it's written in. Dak our main character is telling the story again to Matt, with all the "you saids." I thought this was an interesting writing style, and I don't think I've read a book that employs this before. We also find out right off the bat that Dak's life took a turn for the worst, when in the podcast we are left in suspense and are not really sure what is happening yet.I liked this book a lot, but I also wonder if I liked it so much because I liked the podcast too? I don't think you need to do both forms of this story, but you can if you want. Podcasts aren't for everyone, so if that medium doesn't work for them I think it's great that there is a book out there that they can read. The book tells the same story, so you are not missing anything if you don't listen to the podcast first. I am very interested to see what people who haven't listened to the podcast feel about it this book. I enjoyed it a lot, and if you like subtle dystopia and military sci-fi I highly recommend it!*I received an ecopy of this book in exchange for my honest review via NetGalley.com. This in no way influenced my review.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    WOW. WOW. WOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOW. This blew me away. I know it's not an "actual" book yet, but I'm pretty sure the story finished in podcast format yesterday, and OH MY GOD. This was one of the best stories I've ever encountered in a long time. The actors were excellent, and the story was fast-paced and fascinating. Find this story in its podcast form STAT. You need this in your life.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    This review is for the podcast. I thought the presentation was fantastic, and it was really fun to listen to while I was taking some long drives, but the story kind of lost me in places. The whole idea of Moss was really cool though.
  • Anne girl
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't want to put this book down. And so I didn't and greedily polished it off, nom nom nom. Really so much about this book is a treat--female protagonist narrator who's got it bad for You; a great bunch of human and otherwise characters surrounding her; vivid settings like The Hangar and The Walnut. The prose was sparkling overall, so fun, great pace. But then I did need to go back and re-read a few passages because: hang on, I think that was a beautiful, capital T-truth back there-yes it wa I didn't want to put this book down. And so I didn't and greedily polished it off, nom nom nom. Really so much about this book is a treat--female protagonist narrator who's got it bad for You; a great bunch of human and otherwise characters surrounding her; vivid settings like The Hangar and The Walnut. The prose was sparkling overall, so fun, great pace. But then I did need to go back and re-read a few passages because: hang on, I think that was a beautiful, capital T-truth back there-yes it was! Highly recommend this read!
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  • Elena Love
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own!*First of all, the concept of this book is more than fascinating and I feel like it's worth reading just because of its uniqueness and authenticity. Second of all, the beginning was a bit confusing which is something I wanted to mention before moving on with this review, just because it's what kept me from being completely blown away by it. It took a while for me to get used to what was going o *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own!*First of all, the concept of this book is more than fascinating and I feel like it's worth reading just because of its uniqueness and authenticity. Second of all, the beginning was a bit confusing which is something I wanted to mention before moving on with this review, just because it's what kept me from being completely blown away by it. It took a while for me to get used to what was going on and the writing style didn't really help. This particular narrative isn't one that I'm too fond of, generally speaking, but as the story progressed more and more, I really got into it and by the end, it wasn't such a huge problem after all.I would also like to mention that, the book itself is based on a podcast which I would have loved to listen to before actually reading Steal the Stars because that would make the experience even more interesting and exciting but, unfortunately, that didn't happen. I cannot say whether this particular novelization is exactly the same as the novel itself or if the narrative is similar or completely different so, if you have the chance to listen to the podcast, definitely go for it!Moving on, the story follows Dak, a very different main heroine from what we're used to in Fiction and books in general. She's all about taking action first and asking questions later, which makes her quite aggressive and very determined to achieve her purpose. She's portrayed as a flawed character who lives in this extremely flawed world and always gets her way, through manipulating and lying. She uses her authority to get out of difficult situations and even abuses the power she's given, in order to see things done her way. She hides a lot of skeletons in her closet and I'd go as far as saying that, she's completely relatable. She's, in a sense, the perfect reflection of the society she lives in and probably, the one we're asked to live in today. Which doesn't make her a bad or evil person at all. Quite the opposite actually. She's strong, physically and mentally, practical and knows how to make the choices she has to make, no matter the consequences. Same goes for Matt. Based on how he's portrayed through Dak's eyes, he appears to be the perfect man but, he has a lot of demons to deal with on his own. Which makes their relationship very interesting to read about. Their romance was very intense and well written, as was their chemistry. It definitely felt like one of those once in a lifetime experiences that you don't come across that often in life! And they definitely delivered!While the narrative wasn't my cup of tea, I can't deny that it was quite interesting. I'm coming back to it because I feel like it's one of the most important parts of the story and something that readers will definitely appreciate! It's the combination of the first and second POV, which I personally haven't encountered in a while. Dak is the narrator of the story and actually addresses Matt as ''you'', which is what I personally found difficult to get used to when I started reading the book. It is an intimate way of telling a story, which not a lot of authors can see through successfully.The pacing, for me at least, was extremely slow and started picking up way after the middle of the book. I prefer fast paced stories but was very glad that the story picked up after a while. The beginning was more of an introduction which I really appreciated because it cleared some things up, but I enjoyed the fast paced part of it a bit more. As Dak and Matt's relationship develops, so does what is happening around them. We're slowly introduced to everything that makes up this very peculiar story and it's like the setting and the world develop alongside these very interesting characters!Lastly, the ending blew me away in the best and worst way possible. It really messed with my mind and my entire being which means that, it was perfect! I'm still not sure what happened and how it happened, which is something I've never encountered before. Don't get me wrong, I'm still confused and I had to read the last chapters a couple of times to get somewhere. But it really surprised me, both in a good and a bad way, that I still need a couple of days to process everything that happened. Overall, Steal the Stars is definitely a book worth reading because of its very different way of narration and development!
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  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    January 1, 1970
    Written by Nat Cassidy, this is based on the podcast everyone is currently talking about, Steal the Stars, which was written by Mac Rogers.First things first - I haven’t yet listened to the podcast, wanting to provide a review from the aspect of someone behind on the times and not yet invested. I assumed the majority of reviews would be from people who are already fans, and so while I download each episode as they come out, I haven’t yet jumped in.What strikes me immediately about this is the se Written by Nat Cassidy, this is based on the podcast everyone is currently talking about, Steal the Stars, which was written by Mac Rogers.First things first - I haven’t yet listened to the podcast, wanting to provide a review from the aspect of someone behind on the times and not yet invested. I assumed the majority of reviews would be from people who are already fans, and so while I download each episode as they come out, I haven’t yet jumped in.What strikes me immediately about this is the sense of self of Dak (Dakota) - the novel is written in a very personal view which helps, but her attitude and thought patterns shine through. It’s written with stark honesty, which, in a place of secrecy is a weird justification that makes for writing you simply can’t put down.You’re drip-fed facts. We know she works for a company that is a front for something that freaks out the locals. They think they deal in weapons, that there’s a chance for something like Chernobyl, or god knows what. From the outside it appears to be a company that has ‘marine’ in the title, but it certainly doesn’t repair boat motors. We see her enter her place of work and that immediately there’s a deadline, but also a ridiculous amount of security that needs to be passed… and left wondering why.Of course we’re given a new guy to follow, which is the easiest way to introduce the readers - everything has to be explained to him, and we get to learn alongside. And he, too, is someone instantly likeable. Possibly because we know Dak doesn’t want to have to shoot him in the back of the head, so we don’t, either. Also because he’s taking in all this utterly batshit crazy circumstances pretty cooly, and is in awe of Dak herself.I always love seeing that. Two highly-capable people who respect and appreciate the abilities the other has - and especially when the man is military also and knows the woman could kick his highly-skilled ass? Excellent. I’m hooked.From here it gets real pretty quickly. I won’t say much more because 1. Spoilers, and 2. I’m still reading and don’t want to waste any more time here. Let’s just say this book gets the full five stars, and I’ll be listening to the podcast tonight. Coz I’ll certainly be done with the book by then.(Review written previously and set to auto-post closer to publication date of the book. Podcast will have long since be enjoyed so come talk to me about it!)
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Steal the Stars is a novelization of the Tor Labs podcast of the same title. The story fits neatly into two well-known categories of the genre. The most obvious for much of the story, is in its setting in a very-near-future of our world where government has been completely privatized. All government functions are performed by large corporations that are much more efficient at most governmental operations - but also much more mercenary and considerably more invasive. It takes place at a research Steal the Stars is a novelization of the Tor Labs podcast of the same title. The story fits neatly into two well-known categories of the genre. The most obvious for much of the story, is in its setting in a very-near-future of our world where government has been completely privatized. All government functions are performed by large corporations that are much more efficient at most governmental operations - but also much more mercenary and considerably more invasive. It takes place at a research lab funded by one of these mega-government companies as the corporation decides to monetize its investment in studying the first alien known to have landed on earth, just as one of its team members decides to make one last reach for freedom, for herself, her lover, and the alien who is about to be vivisected. However, things twist in the end from a flight from corporate greed to an entirely different type of story, one where the humans discover that everything they have thought about the aliens they have been studying has been utterly and radically wrong - that nothing is as it has seemed.VERDICT: Recommended for SF readers who like stories where the protagonists fight against seemingly impossible odds, and/or those who enjoy stories where the ending forces the reader to re-think everything that has gone before.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the podcast version of the story.It's hard to enjoy a story when you don't accept the premise. Even in a super secure pseudo-military facility, an absolute non-fraternization policy doesn't make any sense. If you can get past that, the story is really quite good up until the ending where the whole tone of the story changes. It isn't a bad change, just abrupt and the story ended without really fleshing out the aftermath and what it means for the main characters.
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  • Alexander Pyles
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audio drama version of this work and it was excellently produced by Gideon Media from Tor Labs. I have no doubt the novelization is just as good. The characters are rich and full-bodied, who make their own decisions and drive the plot. Every time the narrative seemed to go over familiar ground it took a sharp turn and surprised me instead. Overall, great listen and highly recommended.
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    January 1, 1970
    This one has a interesting punch at the end. Something is not as it seems and the main character just does not get it until the end. This was a pod cast first and then the story was released as a book. Dakota “Dak” Prentiss is the head of security and she tells the story starting with her obsession with Matt Salem. That drives the story with all of its twists and turns. Interesting read.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    This is a review of the audio podcast as I haven’t read the novelization. But seriously, great story and cast. Wonderful.
  • Joe Madrigrano
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting gruff crime drama/love story mixed with elements of sci-fi. The story kept the tension all the way to the end in a stripped down dialogue only narrative.
  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    I am a pretty big fan of Science Fiction so when I was offered the chance to read Steal the Stars I didn’t hesitate. I haven’t listened to the podcast yet and maybe I never will, if I’m being honest. I guess I’m not big on podcasts. I haven’t found a love of audio books either. I can’t concentrate when someone is reading to me. My mind wanders and I have no idea what’s going on. Maybe that’s why I shy away from podcasts also. Anyway, the book.Fantastic storyline and remarkable world-building wit I am a pretty big fan of Science Fiction so when I was offered the chance to read Steal the Stars I didn’t hesitate. I haven’t listened to the podcast yet and maybe I never will, if I’m being honest. I guess I’m not big on podcasts. I haven’t found a love of audio books either. I can’t concentrate when someone is reading to me. My mind wanders and I have no idea what’s going on. Maybe that’s why I shy away from podcasts also. Anyway, the book.Fantastic storyline and remarkable world-building with just the right amount of romance tucked into a thrilling adventure. The characters are well fleshed out, but I’ll admit…I was more a fan of Matt than Dak. Perhaps I wasn’t completely satisfied with the way Dak narrated parts of the story? I haven’t quite put my finger on it. The pacing dragged at times, but overall I enjoyed the story and will certainly recommend the book to all fans of Science Fiction. Just be ready for the ending because… WOW! I can’t get into details, of course. You’ll have to read the book to learn what I’m referring to… and trust me, you want to find out!
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  • Cmoore
    January 1, 1970
    Boy I just finished the last episode of this wonderful podcast performance... And boy, I did not see that coming... I totally stand by my assessment of Mac Rogers in that he is EVIL... LOL... I recommend that everyone take the time to listen to this or get the book and read this fantastic book... and if you want more Mac Rogers goodness look up these fine podcasts... The Message, and Lif-e.af/ter... (they're free) so what are you waiting for?
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  • Nat Cassidy
    January 1, 1970
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