A Murder for the Books (Blue Ridge Library Mysteries #1)
Fleeing a disastrous love affair, university librarian Amy Webber moves in with her aunt in a quiet, historic mountain town in Virginia. She quickly busies herself with managing a charming public library that requires all her attention with its severe lack of funds and overabundance of eccentric patrons. The last thing she needs is a new, available neighbor whose charm lures her into trouble.Dancer-turned-teacher and choreographer Richard Muir inherited the farmhouse next door from his great-uncle, Paul Dassin. But town folklore claims the house’s original owner was poisoned by his wife, who was an outsider. It quickly became water under the bridge, until she vanished after her sensational 1925 murder trial. Determined to clear the name of the woman his great-uncle loved, Richard implores Amy to help him investigate the case. Amy is skeptical until their research raises questions about the culpability of the town’s leading families... including her own.When inexplicable murders plunge the quiet town into chaos, Amy and Richard must crack open the books to reveal a cruel conspiracy and lay a turbulent past to rest in A Murder for the Books, the first installment of Victoria Gilbert’s Blue Ridge Library mysteries.

A Murder for the Books (Blue Ridge Library Mysteries #1) Details

TitleA Murder for the Books (Blue Ridge Library Mysteries #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 12th, 2017
PublisherCrooked Lane Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Cozy Mystery, Romance

A Murder for the Books (Blue Ridge Library Mysteries #1) Review

  • Rebbie
    January 1, 1970
    This book has so much depth and richness to it that it's almost unfair to only call it a cozy mystery. It's so much more than that, although its roots do stay firmly planted within the cozy mystery genre, especially in regards to the wonderful way its written.A librarian named Amy Webber embarks on a trail to do the seemingly-impossible: help her neighbor Richard clear the name of the woman who was accused of murdering his great-uncle back in 1925 (his great-uncle's wife).This turns out to be mu This book has so much depth and richness to it that it's almost unfair to only call it a cozy mystery. It's so much more than that, although its roots do stay firmly planted within the cozy mystery genre, especially in regards to the wonderful way its written.A librarian named Amy Webber embarks on a trail to do the seemingly-impossible: help her neighbor Richard clear the name of the woman who was accused of murdering his great-uncle back in 1925 (his great-uncle's wife).This turns out to be much more complicated than originally thought, because it involves family secrets that some people might not want discovered. If you like murder mysteries a la cozy-style, then you should love this one because there's actually more than one murder mystery to solve in this novel. This was a highly enjoyable story, and I can't wait to read the next book in the series.Thanks to Netgalley.
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    After leaving a horrid relationship Amy Webber moved in with her aunt in a quiet small town in Virginia. Taking a job as a librarian in the small town Amy always has her share of run in's with the quirky town residents but what she never expected was to find one of them dead in the archives. Richard Muir is new to town after moving into the farmhouse he'd inherited from his great uncle. Richard's family home comes with a bit of town folklore though being that it's rumored that the original owner After leaving a horrid relationship Amy Webber moved in with her aunt in a quiet small town in Virginia. Taking a job as a librarian in the small town Amy always has her share of run in's with the quirky town residents but what she never expected was to find one of them dead in the archives. Richard Muir is new to town after moving into the farmhouse he'd inherited from his great uncle. Richard's family home comes with a bit of town folklore though being that it's rumored that the original owner was poisoned by his wife. Wanting to look into the matter Richard headed to the local library but instead of family history he finds himself in the middle of a current crime. Richard and Amy end up working together to see if they can solve the murders in their town. A Murder for the Books by Victoria Gilbert is the first book in the cozy Blue Ridge Library Mysteries series. This first book is one that has the characters trying to solve more than one mystery so I would have expected to be completely caught up in this story but unfortunately that wasn't the case. I never really could put my finger on any one thing within that didn't grab me as much as I would like with this book but it didn't pop out and grab me either. I think I just didn't connect with these characters as much as I would like to and it was also a tad slow for my taste. The writing was good and normally with more going on I'd rate higher but in the end this one was just average to me. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Amy Webber was an academic librarian, before catching boyfriend Charles in a compromising position and making a scene. Beating a hasty retreat, she is now working at Taylorsford Public Library and living with her beloved Aunt Lydia. Although money is tight, she is happy working with her assistant, Sunny, and getting to know her regulars. One is Doris Virts, who is known to suffer from dementia. When she goes missing, both Amy and Sunny keep an eye out for her. However, when Amy’s handsome new ne Amy Webber was an academic librarian, before catching boyfriend Charles in a compromising position and making a scene. Beating a hasty retreat, she is now working at Taylorsford Public Library and living with her beloved Aunt Lydia. Although money is tight, she is happy working with her assistant, Sunny, and getting to know her regulars. One is Doris Virts, who is known to suffer from dementia. When she goes missing, both Amy and Sunny keep an eye out for her. However, when Amy’s handsome new neighbour, dance instructor and choreographer, Richard Muir, asks to see the library archive, they virtually trip over the body of elderly Doris Virts. Who would want to kill an old lady and why was she in the library archive anyway?This is a fun mystery, which sees Amy team up with Richard; not only to investigate the murder of Doris Virts, but also to research an old case. Richard’s Great-Uncle, Paul Dassin, wrote a novel based on the case of Eleanor Cooper, who was accused of killing her husband. Secrets run deep in a small town and Amy and Richard will have to work hard to lay the past to rest to rest.I suspect this will be the first in a series and so there is a lot about setting the scene and introducing us to all the characters; from property developing mayor, Robert Blackstone, to Bradley Tucker, the County Sheriff’s Chief Deputy. The small, meandering town, consisting mainly of one long main road, is also virtually a character in itself, while there is more than a hint of romance between the two main characters. An enjoyable and gentle crime novel, which will appeal to lovers of cosy crime. I received a copy of this book from the publishers, via NetGalley, for review.
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  • Melindam
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received via Netgalley by the Publisher in exchange for an honest review.While I have had some share of cosy-mystery books, altogether I am not a big fan of the genre. I found that with most of them I had to work too hard to suspend the disbelief muscle (Police is not capable to accomplish what a self-made sleuth without training, background or clue can do - YEAH, RIGHT!) and it much diminished the entertainment value.I don't know exactly what attracted me to this book -possibly the cover &a ARC received via Netgalley by the Publisher in exchange for an honest review.While I have had some share of cosy-mystery books, altogether I am not a big fan of the genre. I found that with most of them I had to work too hard to suspend the disbelief muscle (Police is not capable to accomplish what a self-made sleuth without training, background or clue can do - YEAH, RIGHT!) and it much diminished the entertainment value.I don't know exactly what attracted me to this book -possibly the cover & title & setting, I can't seem to resist books about books -but I was pleasantly surprised this time. The story was both credible and entertaining. Maybe because the crimes that are investigated have their roots in the past and the main character, Amy, as a librarian has access to archived documents and her family turns out to be deeply involved both in the past and present instances.Also the setting of quirky town with close-knit community worked well. The plot was very well-structured with hidden agendas, slowly growing-tension, emerging closet skeletons. The romance between Amy and Richard was OK, but HEA was happening a bit too fast, even though they are a likeable couple.Altogether a very pleasant read and I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.
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  • Laurie • The Baking Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 STARS --- Disclaimer: This ARC was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This is the first book in a new Cozy Mystery series and as a Library Assistant myself I enjoyed that the main character is a librarian. I appreciated that Gilbert realistically showed what life can be like for library staff -- quirky patrons, the library as a community space where library staff aren't pinched-faced shushers but instead love books and want to share their know 3.5 STARS --- Disclaimer: This ARC was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This is the first book in a new Cozy Mystery series and as a Library Assistant myself I enjoyed that the main character is a librarian. I appreciated that Gilbert realistically showed what life can be like for library staff -- quirky patrons, the library as a community space where library staff aren't pinched-faced shushers but instead love books and want to share their knowledge of researching and the library's numerous services with the public etc. Libraries are cool, y'all!!There is a good mystery here and it was more complex than I was expecting. Actually, there's not one but three mysteries, in two time frames, that are being solved! This raised this book up to a Cozy Mystery 2.0 designation - it has all the makings of a typical Cozy but with the additional mysteries and the tension at the end it gives readers a little something more.The writing was good (if overly descriptive at times) and I think this was a solid start to a new series. There are a lot of characters to keep track of which became a little messy and convoluted figuring out how people were related to each other. But within this group, Gilbert gives her readers a gaggle of shady characters, each of whom could plausibly be the culprit, to keep her readers guessing. There is a romance (but of course!) but I wasn't quite as smitten with it as the characters were with each other. It had an Insta-Love vibe and smelled strongly of fromage. I think the story could have easily done without it.While the book felt a little sluggish in the beginning the energy ramps up considerably in the end for a solid conclusion. Overall, this was a good start to a new series with a solid community of characters, a nice small town feel and a main character who can get into enough scrapes to keep things interesting. Readers are also left with some questions regarding certain secondary characters which could prove to be good fodder for future story lines.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder for the Books is book #1 in the Blue Ridge Library Mysteries. This is a debut novel by Victoria Gilbert. A very enjoyable read that combines mystery with romance. I love the front cover of the book, so bright and vibrant. Amy Webber works in Taylorsford public library – a Carnegie library in need of a little TLC. Sunny, Amy’s best friend also works there as her assistant. Since moving to Taylorsford after leaving her previous job under a cloud, Amy has been living with her Aunt Lydia.Do A Murder for the Books is book #1 in the Blue Ridge Library Mysteries. This is a debut novel by Victoria Gilbert. A very enjoyable read that combines mystery with romance. I love the front cover of the book, so bright and vibrant. Amy Webber works in Taylorsford public library – a Carnegie library in need of a little TLC. Sunny, Amy’s best friend also works there as her assistant. Since moving to Taylorsford after leaving her previous job under a cloud, Amy has been living with her Aunt Lydia.Doris Virts used to be a volunteer at the library, but unfortunately is now going senile and keeps saying that someone is following her. Her daughter Bethany looks after her. However, Doris sometimes goes astray and quite often ends up at the library. Doris has gone missing again, so Bethany has asked for people to keep an eye out for her and to phone her if she turns up at the library.Richard Muir turns up at the library. Turns out he has moved into the old Cooper house next door to Aunt Lydia. Richard says that he is aiming to prove that Eleanora Cooper did not poison her husband and has come to the library to look through historical records. His great uncle, Paul Dassin, a writer, who’d owned the Cooper house before his death, firmly believed that Eleanora did not kill her husband Daniel and Richard wanted to confirm what his great uncle had always believed. Amy is unable to find the keys to the archives, but fortunately as director, she has spare keys for all the doors. She thought to herself that Doris probably took the key. When Richard and Amy arrive at the door to the archives, they find the door unlocked. Richard offers to go in first, but Amy says if Doris is in there, she doesn’t want to spook her. However, when Amy switches on the light, they see a body lying face down in a pool of blood. Richard phones 911.Sheriff Bradley Tucker is quickly on the scene. He confirms that Doris was killed by gunshot. Tucker is told about what Doris had said about someone following her and about the strange black Jaguar car that Sunny had seen parked outside earlier. Everyone who is at the library is interviewed, then sent home. The library is then locked and closed until further investigations have taken place.Amy and Richard, as they live next door to each other, walked back home together. Amy invites Richard in to meet Aunt Lydia. According to Aunt Lydia, Richard’s uncle, Paul Dassin, was in love with Eleanora Cooper. Evidently Rose Baker Litton, Lydia’s grandmother, was a key witness for the prosecution in Eleanora’s trial. Rose, who was 17 at the time, had seen Eleanora writing recipes in a herbal book and firmly believed Eleanora had poisoned her husband. Rose’s testimony relied on the herbal book, but the vital pages were missing, so Eleanora was aquitted and the book returned to Rose. Eleanora left town leaving everything behind – house, lumber lots, land – all of which she supposedly killed her husband for. Strange that she left everything, but she never returned. Lydia said that after Rose’s death, she donated the herbal book to the library, even though Rose on her death bed had asked for the book to be burnt. Amy said that she had not come across the book in the library. Lydia said that evidently the book went missing very soon after she had donated it to the library.After Richard left, Amy decides to do some gardening. She started to dig up a dead rose bush that her great grandmother Rose had planted many years ago. As she is digging she finds a brooch. The following day, Amy decides that she is going to do some research on the brooch. The library is closed due to the murder investigation, but Amy has keys and firmly believes that it is ok for her to enter the library, so off she pops. On route, she meets Richard, who was out for a run. Telling him her plan, Richard decides that he will tag along. Amy switches on the computer and is going to use this to search for info. She asks Richard to start searching through his great uncle’s novel ‘False Falsehood’ to see if there is any info in that about the brooch. Pulling the book from the shelf, Amy spots something behind Dassin’s book – it is the herbal book – title page Eleanora Amaryliss Heron 1916. After much research via the computer, Amy finds a newspaper article showing a photo of Eleanora during her trial. Lily, as Eleanora’s husband used to call her, was wearing the brooch that Amy had found. Evidently the brooch was given to Lily on her wedding day by her husband and was heard to say during the trial that she would wear the brooch every day for the rest of her life. Richard said as she wore it every day, why would she leave town without it. Amy gave the brooch to Richard saying that it belongs in his house.Kurt Kendrick (previously known as Karl Klass) was a foster child of Paul Dassin for 6 years. He is now a very wealthy art collector and has a second home just outside of town. Richard is going to visit Kurt and asks Amy if she will accompany him. When Amy and Richard meet Kurt, his teeth and smile remind Amy of the big bad wolf in the fairytale. When talking about Eleanora, Kurt says that Eleanora’s health improved whilst she was in jail awaiting trial. Amy spots the black Jaguar car that Sunny saw.Not long after spouting to everyone in the diner about a cover up story, Clark Fowler is found dead – killed by gunshot. Fowler firmly believed that Blackstone’s father and other town members hushed up the true reason why his mother and the orphanage children had all died. Fowler said that his mother and the children had all been sick for ages prior to eating the mushrooms and that it was not poisoned mushrooms that had killed them. Most people tended to ignore his rants because they had heard it all before, many times.Blackstone is trying to develop the land where the orphanage once lay, but many people in the town are against this. Sunny organises a peaceful demonstration, but Blackstone and his lawyers try to get the sheriff to disperse the crowd saying that the demonstrators are trespassing on his land. The following day nobody seems to know where Sunny is. Blackstone is found in his car barely alive. Is anyone in town safe? Amy firmly believes that Kurt Kendrick has something to do with all of this, after all it was his Jaguar car that was parked outside the library – the car that Sunny saw and now Sunny is missing. Can she get to the bottom of the mystery without putting herself in danger?I received a digital copy of this book from Netgalley in return for the above review.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    The first book in the Blue Ridge Library series and a new author for me. This is not the last book by this author as I will read her again. This is listed as a mystery but it is much more. There is a strong romance. A cold case that needed solving and an unusual motive for the murders. The characters are complex and descriptions will settle you into a mountain town's feelings. I especially liked the cesspool scenes, both times. I deducted one star because I felt the plot has been a number times. The first book in the Blue Ridge Library series and a new author for me. This is not the last book by this author as I will read her again. This is listed as a mystery but it is much more. There is a strong romance. A cold case that needed solving and an unusual motive for the murders. The characters are complex and descriptions will settle you into a mountain town's feelings. I especially liked the cesspool scenes, both times. I deducted one star because I felt the plot has been a number times.Amy Webber and Richard Muir join together to find an answer of how his Great-uncle, Paul Dassin die. Richard wants to prove his wife did not kill his uncle. As they searched archive records, two new murders occur. Both victims had ties to the to Paul. There are a number of suspects to keep you guessing. The murders and the cold are skillfully brought together as one. The closing part was hectic and I felt Any went through more than enough danger, some of it unnecessary.Disclosure: I received a free copy from Crooked Lane Books through NetGalley for an honest review. I would like to thank them for this opportunity to read and review this book. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Kirsti
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the chance to read this book! Cozy mysteries and libraries just go together so well. Librarians make great sleuths, and are able to research and just KNOW things us poor average Joes don't. Amy is the perfect librarian, and although she doesn't know it, she makes a perfect leading lady .as well. Add to the mix a cast of excellent secondary characters and a super hot love interest ( A MALE DANCER!? -drool-) and you've got yourself an outstanding first Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the chance to read this book! Cozy mysteries and libraries just go together so well. Librarians make great sleuths, and are able to research and just KNOW things us poor average Joes don't. Amy is the perfect librarian, and although she doesn't know it, she makes a perfect leading lady .as well. Add to the mix a cast of excellent secondary characters and a super hot love interest ( A MALE DANCER!? -drool-) and you've got yourself an outstanding first novel.I particularly liked the historical build up behind the current murder mystery. It's just something not too many cozies do, and I can see the small town and it's history will be a forefront of books to come. The web of characters and their connections was great too.This is a fast paced mystery that keeps you on the edge of your seat. There's plenty of action and plenty of suspects to keep you guessing. Just who knows what doesn't get fully revealed to the end. An excellent first book, I highly recommend this one for cozy mystery lovers. Five stars!
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  • Nicole (Read Eat Sleep Repeat)
    January 1, 1970
    I was really excited to read A Murder for the Books – between the cover and the description, I was anticipating a cozy mystery that would be perfect for curling up with when the weather cooled down in December. And I definitely got what I was looking for!A cozy mystery with some depth, this story revolves around librarian Amy Webber, her family, and the small town she lives in with her aunt. I found all of the characters to be intriguing and Amy in particular to be incredibly relatable. In addit I was really excited to read A Murder for the Books – between the cover and the description, I was anticipating a cozy mystery that would be perfect for curling up with when the weather cooled down in December. And I definitely got what I was looking for!A cozy mystery with some depth, this story revolves around librarian Amy Webber, her family, and the small town she lives in with her aunt. I found all of the characters to be intriguing and Amy in particular to be incredibly relatable. In addition to the mystery, there was also a romantic storyline that was both realistic and fun to read.With clear, concise writing and clever plotting, all the necessary clues were planted throughout the story for the reader to figure out the mystery alongside Amy. In fact, this was so well done I hadn’t even realized that A Murder for the Books was Victoria Gilbert’s debut novel until after I finished reading it!Ultimately, this was an entertaining and easy read and I’m looking forward to the next book in this series, Shelved Under Murder, expected to be published in July 2018. Definitely recommended.*Thanks to the publisher for providing an arc of this edition via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder for the Books by VIctoria Gilbert is the first in a new series about a librarian who has had bad luck in love, moved in with her ailing aunt and stumbled upon a new neighbor and together they find the murdered body of a former Library volunteer. With a crooked town leader, decades old mysteries to solve and some really good hunches Amy and her new neighbor discover town secrets, and cover ups all while getting to know each other a little better. This is a charming start to the series fo A Murder for the Books by VIctoria Gilbert is the first in a new series about a librarian who has had bad luck in love, moved in with her ailing aunt and stumbled upon a new neighbor and together they find the murdered body of a former Library volunteer. With a crooked town leader, decades old mysteries to solve and some really good hunches Amy and her new neighbor discover town secrets, and cover ups all while getting to know each other a little better. This is a charming start to the series for sure.
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  • Peggy R
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book in the Blue Ridge Library series by Victoria Gilbert. I was initially drawn to this story because I am a fan of those series that involve books or libraries. For reasons I can't quite put my finger on, I had a hard time getting into this book. The murder happens relatively soon so it wasn't like it took a long time for the mystery to get established. I did have a hard time connecting with the characters, which always makes it difficult for me to become engaged in a book. I This is the first book in the Blue Ridge Library series by Victoria Gilbert. I was initially drawn to this story because I am a fan of those series that involve books or libraries. For reasons I can't quite put my finger on, I had a hard time getting into this book. The murder happens relatively soon so it wasn't like it took a long time for the mystery to get established. I did have a hard time connecting with the characters, which always makes it difficult for me to become engaged in a book. I think perhaps with more development these characters could be more engaging. I also felt the plot need to be a bit tighter.I voluntarily read an advanced review copy provided to me by the publisher through Netgalley.
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  • Lisa Morin
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder For The Books is an exciting start to a new series.I love reading books that have a brighter vibrant cover and the description definitely piqued my interest.Amy is a librarian, living in a small town and living with her aunt.Amy returned home after a disastrous relationship and she just wants to live a quiet life.Even though her aunt is determined to find a love interest for Amy, she is a great character and her love for Amy is apparent throughout the story.Working alongside her friend A Murder For The Books is an exciting start to a new series.I love reading books that have a brighter vibrant cover and the description definitely piqued my interest.Amy is a librarian, living in a small town and living with her aunt.Amy returned home after a disastrous relationship and she just wants to live a quiet life.Even though her aunt is determined to find a love interest for Amy, she is a great character and her love for Amy is apparent throughout the story.Working alongside her friend Sunny, Amy thrives as a librarian. When a patron inquiries about a mysterious death years ago, Amy has no idea that the simple question will set in motion murder, secrets, lies and deception.This is a really great start to this new series. The story is well written and the words flowing smoothly without any confusion as to each individual character.I'm looking forward to reading more in this exciting series.I voluntarily read an ARC of this book provided by the publisher and NetGalley.
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  • Keith Willis
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to win an ARC of Victoria Gilbert’s debut mystery, A Murder for the Books. It just meant I got to read this wonderful story a little earlier than I’d planned—I’d already been waving my wallet and shouting “take my money” while I waited for the book to be released (pub date 12/12/17), because I was positive it was going to be a terrific read, and I was not disappointed.This is the first book in the planned “Blue Ridge Library Mystery” series, and A Murder for the Books kick I was fortunate enough to win an ARC of Victoria Gilbert’s debut mystery, A Murder for the Books. It just meant I got to read this wonderful story a little earlier than I’d planned—I’d already been waving my wallet and shouting “take my money” while I waited for the book to be released (pub date 12/12/17), because I was positive it was going to be a terrific read, and I was not disappointed.This is the first book in the planned “Blue Ridge Library Mystery” series, and A Murder for the Books kicks off the series with fine panache. From the very first line, which induced a chuckle and a knowing nod, Ms. Gilbert serves up a delightful cozy mystery tinged with a budding romance and bathed in small-town charm, secrets, and lies. Ms. Gilbert knows her way around the library (as well she should, being a library director herself), and so the setting for the story is spot on. Her characters are appealing and engaging, and have a surprising level of depth, from the smart-and-spunky (and vulnerable) new library director Amy Webber, who is thrown into a mysterious murder right from chapter one, to her hunky new neighbor Richard, who comes to Amy for help in righting an old wrong in his family’s past. No cardboard cutouts here, but flesh and bone people with lives full of hopes and dreams and failures and fears. The supporting characters are nicely developed as well, something that all too often tends to be neglected in this genre. The mystery itself is intriguing and twisty, well steeped in the history, tradition, and pride inherent in small towns, and Ms. Gilbert kept me guessing all along the way. Her voice, plotting, pacing, and writing style are impeccable, the prose flowing with such ease that you feel like Amy is telling the story directly to you. The sign of a great writer is when that writer disappears into the background, and that’s the case here. If you don’t have this book on your #mustread list, you need to correct this grievous oversight immediately, and pre-order a copy of Victoria Gilbert’s smart, fun cozy, A Murder for the Books. Highly Recommended.
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  • Barbara Hackel
    January 1, 1970
    A great start to a new series about a librarian who leaves a university position to rid herself of bad memories of a serious break-up as well as a faux-paus in her position to move in with her aunt in the small town at the edge of the Blue Ridge mountains. There she accepts the directorship of the local library and assists her aunt who has had some physical problems.Sworn off men, Amy has a hard time resisting her new neighbor, Richard, who is a dancer and choreographer who teaches at the same u A great start to a new series about a librarian who leaves a university position to rid herself of bad memories of a serious break-up as well as a faux-paus in her position to move in with her aunt in the small town at the edge of the Blue Ridge mountains. There she accepts the directorship of the local library and assists her aunt who has had some physical problems.Sworn off men, Amy has a hard time resisting her new neighbor, Richard, who is a dancer and choreographer who teaches at the same university she left. When they get tangled up in a series of murders, they become more than friends.The author did a wonderful job of developing the different personalities of her characters. It seemed some were strong and fully developed (Aunt Lydia, Richard) and others (Amy, Brad) became less rigid and more likeable as the book continued.This is a fascinating look at a small town's problems and local history. I enjoyed the way Amy and Richard researched the time period and people involved, but was especially impressed at the way Richard's personal situation actually gave them clues that had been well hidden. I was compelled to read to the end as quickly as time allowed, and was not disappointed with the way the author resolved the old and new crimes! I recommend this to anyone who likes a good cozy mystery! I am anxiously waiting for the next book in the series!
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  • Lisa Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. It had a lot of depth in terms of the history and the characters and cold cases as well as the contemporary crime. It was well plotted and written and very satisfying. But it's the first book in a series and there's nowhere to go with this story. The story has been told so I don't understand how this can be the launchpad for a series and where the characters will go forward. I loved the book but I think it's a stand alone.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    This galley is the first for this author, and is an enjoyable cozy mystery. Amy is a librarian, fleeing the university library to find herself in a small town public library. There is mystery, murder, romance and a crew of fun characters. Recommend for cozy mystery lovers, and library lovers!
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come on release date
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Review posted on http://myshelf.comA Murder for the Books is the debut novel in the Blue Ridge Library Series. Amy Webber moves in with her aunt who lives in Taylorsford, a small, quaint town in the mountains of Virginia. Amy leaves her job as a university librarian after a very public and embarrassing breakup with her boyfriend. She now manages the town’s public library. Which is underfunded, needs updating but has no lack of personality thanks to its patrons. Long buried town secrets are unear Review posted on http://myshelf.comA Murder for the Books is the debut novel in the Blue Ridge Library Series. Amy Webber moves in with her aunt who lives in Taylorsford, a small, quaint town in the mountains of Virginia. Amy leaves her job as a university librarian after a very public and embarrassing breakup with her boyfriend. She now manages the town’s public library. Which is underfunded, needs updating but has no lack of personality thanks to its patrons. Long buried town secrets are unearthed my Richard Muir moves into to the farmhouse he inherited from his great-uncle. According to town folklore, Eleanora Cooper poisoned her husband who was the original owner of the farmhouse. Eleanora was a known herbalist and considered a witch by some of the townspeople. There was a highly public murder trial and Eleanora disappeared after she was acquitted. Richard believes that Eleanora was innocent and is determined to clear her name. Amy has been investigating her own family history and offers to help Richard with his research. As they pour through the archival information it becomes clear that there are many unanswered questions that still surround Eleanora’s trial. Amy and Richard learn that many of the town’s leading families were entangled in the mystery. Many of those buried secrets are entangled in Amy’s family tree. Taylorsford is not about to give up these long buried secrets easily. As Amy and Richard learn more about Eleanora and the trial, someone is silencing those who may have answers. All of a sudden Taylorsford becomes a very dangerous place to live as the body count goes up. Can Richard and Amy find out the truth about what happened in the past in time enough to find out who wants to put an end to their investigation? Victoria Gilbert has crafted a intricate cozy mystery. She has woven together whodunits from the past and the present. She sprinkles in a bit of romance with the relationship between Richard and Amy. The author uses a large number of characters to tell the story, and this adds to the complexity of the plotline. What makes this book an interesting read is that it is not your basic cozy mystery. A Murder for the Books is a great start to a new series that has great promise.
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  • Kathy Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Amy Webber has come home to a small mountain town to live with her aunt after a love affair went wrong. She is now the library director of the Carnegie public library which is underfunded and in need of repair. One day she takes a trip to the Archives and finds the body of a local resident with dementia. Doris Virts has been shot. Amy, being sensible with a strong sense of what she is good at, leaves the investigation to the local police. She's busy doing her kind of research helping her new nei Amy Webber has come home to a small mountain town to live with her aunt after a love affair went wrong. She is now the library director of the Carnegie public library which is underfunded and in need of repair. One day she takes a trip to the Archives and finds the body of a local resident with dementia. Doris Virts has been shot. Amy, being sensible with a strong sense of what she is good at, leaves the investigation to the local police. She's busy doing her kind of research helping her new neighbor Richard Muir investigate the history of his house. Local legends claim that the original owner was poisoned by his wife who was acquitted of the charges largely because of the efforts of Richard's great-uncle Paul who was a reporter and in love with Eleanora. However, Eleanora disappeared right after her acquittal in 1925 leaving a mystery behind her. Amy is attracted to Richard but is hesitant to start anything with another artistic type. Richard is a dancer and choreographer who is now teaching at Clarion. Besides the historical research she and Richard are doing, they also get involved in a more contemporary mystery regarding Richard's land which once held an orphanage that suffered a tragedy when the cook and some students died in 1956. Suspicions were that the cook mistakenly included some poisonous mushrooms in her cooking. There is still another contemporary issue. Town leaders are trying to sell some land for development despite various protests including one organized by Amy's best friend and library assistant Sunny. All of these plot threads come together as old family secrets and rivalries are discovered and another murder is committed. Amy even learns some secrets about her own family in the course of the investigation.I liked Amy and Richard's romance. I liked the way they worked together on their research. I thought that the town politics and relationships were well-done. There were a number of possible suspects but I will admit that I didn't pick the right one when I was trying to figure out the killer. But then neither did Amy which led to traumatic things happening to her.This was an engaging mystery with great characters and a nicely complex plot. There is even a possibility that ghosts are involved.
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  • Kendrea Parsons
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder For the Books by Victoria Gilbert is a great start to an interesting mystery series. As a book lover, I really enjoy mystery series featuring librarians as the sleuth and main character. I really liked Amy Webber, a small town librarian who's trying to start a new chapter in her life after a bad break-up. She was very likeable and easy to root for. Most of the other characters were likeable as well, but other than Amy's Aunt Lydia and their next door neighbor, Richard Muir, they weren't A Murder For the Books by Victoria Gilbert is a great start to an interesting mystery series. As a book lover, I really enjoy mystery series featuring librarians as the sleuth and main character. I really liked Amy Webber, a small town librarian who's trying to start a new chapter in her life after a bad break-up. She was very likeable and easy to root for. Most of the other characters were likeable as well, but other than Amy's Aunt Lydia and their next door neighbor, Richard Muir, they weren't as fully developed as I would've liked. But I hope we learn more about those characters in the next book. Honestly, I would've given this book five stars, but there were a couple of things that annoyed me a little bit. One thing was how Amy talks to herself in her head a lot while she's interacting with other characters. Sure, this is something most of us do sometimes, but Amy did it far too often. It slowed down the momentum of what was going on on the page. That's something I hope the author cuts back on in the next book. Another thing that annoyed me was how resistant Amy was to a new romantic relationship. Again, I get that she had her heart broken before, but it seems to be a running theme in cozy mysteries. Most of them start out with a single, female sleuth who bristles at the idea of going out with a man who's interested in them romantically. Life experience tells me that most women, broken-hearted or not, don't react so harshly to new men coming into their life after a failed relationship. So, it annoyed me that the author wrote Amy like that. I won't give anything else away, but I will say that I did enjoy the big reveal of who the killer was. To be honest, I kind of expected it just a little, but the other parts of the plot that went along with it I didn't expect. All in all, this was a wonderful mystery that I really didn't want to put down. I will definitely read more books in this series when they are published.Note: I received an advance copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for my fair and honest review. All opinions expressed are mine and mine alone.
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  • Verena
    January 1, 1970
    While browsing the NetGalley website, I saw a cozy looking cover with a bookshelf and a table with a stack of books (oh, and a gun). The title said something with „books“. I got curious and clicked on the image to read what the book was about. „A Murder for the Books“ doesn’t sound like my normal reading and although the book was in the category Mystery & Thrillers and was about a murderer, I requested the ebook.My opinionWhen I think about Mystery & Thrillers, I have other books in mind While browsing the NetGalley website, I saw a cozy looking cover with a bookshelf and a table with a stack of books (oh, and a gun). The title said something with „books“. I got curious and clicked on the image to read what the book was about. „A Murder for the Books“ doesn’t sound like my normal reading and although the book was in the category Mystery & Thrillers and was about a murderer, I requested the ebook.My opinionWhen I think about Mystery & Thrillers, I have other books in mind. Books I never read. Dark covers. „Gone Girl“ or something like that. But the description (see at the end of the article) of „A Murder for the Books“ sounds more like my usual romance/women’s fiction with a bit of suspension. The plot is also similar: a woman, working at a university library and who doesn’t look like a cover model, is cheated on by her boyfriend and moves to her aunt to look after her. A new life, new job at the local library and of course – this is where she meets a good looking man who, by coinsidence, moves at the house next door to her aunt’s. His new home has a bit of history and because of what happend in the past someone is killed. Amy and Richard investigate by using the library and archive for their research on the history and they find interesting things.There was some cover-up in the past including water from the well in Richard’s garden and there are also some family secrets. It seemed more or less realistic to me.What I find a bit… let’s say strange is the fact that Amy, who is only one or two years older than me, had a great-grandmother until she was 14 and her aunt is in her sixties and is described as an old woman. 65 is old?! What is my father now at 75? An old old man? I never knew my great-grandparents because they died when my parents where a child or at least young. I know that some children still have their great-grandparents, but until their youth?All in all: it was a nice read (well, aside from the murderers and kidnapping). This book will be published on 12 december, so you have to wait a bit. There is a second book planned for next July.(thanks to NetGalley for the arc!)
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  • Louise-Ellen Denham
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder for the BooksTitle: A Murder for the BooksAuthor: Victoria GilbertFirst Published: Dec 2017Publisher: Crooked Lane BooksI got this book as an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book follows Amy Webber, after a bad break-up Amy moves in with her aunt in an old historic town in the mountains of Virginia. After getting a job running the local library, life seems to be getting back on track for Amy. Suddenly a handsome stranger called Richard Muir moves in a A Murder for the BooksTitle: A Murder for the BooksAuthor: Victoria GilbertFirst Published: Dec 2017Publisher: Crooked Lane BooksI got this book as an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book follows Amy Webber, after a bad break-up Amy moves in with her aunt in an old historic town in the mountains of Virginia. After getting a job running the local library, life seems to be getting back on track for Amy. Suddenly a handsome stranger called Richard Muir moves in after inheriting the house next door from his great-uncle. Richard is a dancer and choreographer and it is not long until Amy catches his eyes. All off a sudden murders are happening in this quiet little town. Amy and Richard find themselves right in the middle of it all. Can they get out all in once piece.I found this book really good. I very much enjoyed it. I particularly enjoyed reading how Amy and Richards relationship grew and how Amy slowly put down her walls and let someone in. I found the plot easy to follow and it kept me interested throughout. This book kept me guessing throughout as to whom the killer was, when the killer was finally revealed I found I was only partially right in guessing who the killer was. This is book is the first in a series called The Blue Ridge Library Mysteries and I must say I am looking forward to what is coming up next. I have chosen to give this book four out of five stars. Reviews for this book can be found on:Amazon under Lu's ReviewsGoodreads,Net Galley,My Blogs at www.lu-ellensreadingandreviewingblog....www.lusreviewsblog.wordpress.comLinks to this review can be found on:Twitter: @lusreviewsFacebook: @lusreviews Instagram: lusreviews
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  • Anisaa
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder for the Books is the first book in the Blue Ridge Library Mystery series! While working at the library one day, Amy Webber, the main character, stumbles upon a dead body in the library archives. The murder victim was an old library volunteer—a senile old woman who had no enemies. As she investigates the murder with her sexy new neighbor, she uncovers some town and family secrets that might just make the killer want her dead…This was a very fun and enjoyable cozy! It had a slow start, bu A Murder for the Books is the first book in the Blue Ridge Library Mystery series! While working at the library one day, Amy Webber, the main character, stumbles upon a dead body in the library archives. The murder victim was an old library volunteer—a senile old woman who had no enemies. As she investigates the murder with her sexy new neighbor, she uncovers some town and family secrets that might just make the killer want her dead…This was a very fun and enjoyable cozy! It had a slow start, but once I got past the first few pages, everything was great! Amy was very smart, clever and down-to-earth. Very easy to connect to, and I totally related to her, especially when it came to her insecurities and hangups. I could see a piece of myself in her. Richard, the love interest, was a breath of fresh air. Usually cozies have the heroine hook up with some cop, PI, lawyer or something along those lines, so I was surprised when Richard turned out to be a dancer. I really liked that—it’s something new and unpredictable. He was elegant, graceful, romantic and very cute! I loved the interactions between Richard and Amy—and I loved how their romantic relationship progressed and blossomed. My favorite thing though was the multiple mysteries that needed to be solved. It was cool how the author entwined a present mystery with a past mystery. They were both very interesting and captivating. Some elements of the mysteries were predictable—I guessed the ending/motive of one mystery, but not the other. But even so, I still had an enjoyable reading experience. This was a great start to a new series, and I can’t wait for the next one.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Formulaic mystery with a small town atmosphere and a refreshing romance.Amy Webber has run back to her aunt's house in small town Taylorsford Virginia following a disastrous and public breakup with her boyfriend. Her job as a public library Director with only one employee, Sunny Fields, is fun but not high-paying. When a person is found murdered in the library's archives the game is afoot for Amy and Sunny. Amy also stumbles upon an old family secret and a possible town scandal.I enjoyed the rom Formulaic mystery with a small town atmosphere and a refreshing romance.Amy Webber has run back to her aunt's house in small town Taylorsford Virginia following a disastrous and public breakup with her boyfriend. Her job as a public library Director with only one employee, Sunny Fields, is fun but not high-paying. When a person is found murdered in the library's archives the game is afoot for Amy and Sunny. Amy also stumbles upon an old family secret and a possible town scandal.I enjoyed the romantic aspect of Murder for the Books much more than the three mysteries within the plot. One problem with setting mysteries in small towns is that there are not enough suspects to make the mystery difficult to solve. Plus it seemed as though the debut author, Victoria Gilbert, tried to shove too many plots into one book. There were the three mysteries, romances for three couples in town, and even a potential ghost story within this short book. Hopefully, the next entry in the Blue Ridge Library series will limit its focus by including only one romance and mystery while also using the unique rural library setting much more. While I was underwhelmed by the mystery plots, I totally enjoyed Amy and Richard's romance especially how the body issues were handled. Therefore, I recommend Murder for the Books more for romance readers than mystery ones. However, I will read the next book in the series, Shelved Under Murder, to see where the author leads the characters after its publication in July 10, 2018. Thanks to the publisher, Crooked Lane Books, and NetGalley for an advanced review copy.
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  • Allie Grace
    January 1, 1970
    A Murder for the Books is a cozy mystery novel focusing on three mysteries simultaneously: one is a murder of an elderly woman in the archives room of the library in a small Virginia town, the second is a murder in the same town around the 1950s, and the third is a number of deaths even further back in history. This is ambitious, as it means there are a lot of characters to keep track of, and then remembering who all is related can get rather tangled (maybe this comes in part from not growing up A Murder for the Books is a cozy mystery novel focusing on three mysteries simultaneously: one is a murder of an elderly woman in the archives room of the library in a small Virginia town, the second is a murder in the same town around the 1950s, and the third is a number of deaths even further back in history. This is ambitious, as it means there are a lot of characters to keep track of, and then remembering who all is related can get rather tangled (maybe this comes in part from not growing up in a small town). Luckily, plucky librarian Amy is on the case. She's much better at keeping track of everybody than I am, and she's aided by a number of interesting people like her Aunt Lydia and her sexy neighbor Richard (we'll get to him later). Amy's also a crackerjack researcher, a good skill to have when attempting to solve mysteries from before you were born.The mystery part is interesting (if sometimes confusing) but the romance elements with Richard fell kind of flat for me. I think Amy responded pretty realistically, but Richard was kind of creepy and definitely cheesy at times, adding up to making me feel awkward reading some of their exchanges (I think some of this could be because everything is told from Amy's point of view, so we can't tell what's going on with Richard).The ending was my favorite part, and overall I think the book was worth it to get there. A fun cozy mystery, great for mystery fans, but if you're looking for "romance with a side of mystery" this probably isn't your book.Copy provided by netgalley.
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  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    Amy has moved to Taylorsford to live with her Aunt Lydia and work as the Library director at the local library. When her new neighbor Richard asks her help to research a murder that occurred in his house decades ago, both of them find a dead body in the archives. When they start digging deeper into both the historical and current murders, with the help of Lydia and her old friends, another body turns up. There are a bunch of shady characters who all seem plausible for the murders and Amy tries t Amy has moved to Taylorsford to live with her Aunt Lydia and work as the Library director at the local library. When her new neighbor Richard asks her help to research a murder that occurred in his house decades ago, both of them find a dead body in the archives. When they start digging deeper into both the historical and current murders, with the help of Lydia and her old friends, another body turns up. There are a bunch of shady characters who all seem plausible for the murders and Amy tries to use the evidence her research turns up to find the culprit. What follows is more suspense, more drama and the confluence of events that lead to all the murders.This is a proper cozy mystery. It has all the entertaining elements – murders, mystery, haunted houses, romance, humor. I love the way the romance between the leads is developed and how they help each other overcome their insecurities. I loved the side characters, especially Aunt Lydia and Amy’s friend Sunny. They are both lively and cheerful and brought a lot of humor to the proceedings. The mystery is well conceived and I couldn’t guess the culprit until it was revealed. But there is one fact that needs a special mention – the male lead here is a dancer/choreographer which breaks the stereotype of the usual fictional macho hero and I really applaud the author for it.PS: Thanks to Crooked Lane Books and Netgalley for providing me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Carolyn Comings
    January 1, 1970
    This book combines a couple of mysteries, murders both contemporary and in the past. Overall, I found the plot enjoyable, although it was a bit challenging to keep track of all the players and how they were related to each other. I got a little impatient with the romantic elements; the heroine fell too hard too fast for the cute neighbor and didn't listen to her instincts that told her to slow down. But as another reviewer pointed out, at least this story didn't follow the usual cozy mystery cli This book combines a couple of mysteries, murders both contemporary and in the past. Overall, I found the plot enjoyable, although it was a bit challenging to keep track of all the players and how they were related to each other. I got a little impatient with the romantic elements; the heroine fell too hard too fast for the cute neighbor and didn't listen to her instincts that told her to slow down. But as another reviewer pointed out, at least this story didn't follow the usual cozy mystery cliche in that the heroine's love interest was NOT the sheriff, the detective, or the chief of police. *** Spoiler alert *** I was totally put off by the sudden end-of-book revelation that blamed several events on ... a ghost? Yes, there were a few mysterious events earlier in the book, but when a story is supposed to have paranormal elements, it really needs to be set up from the beginning. It was stipulated that some people had thought one of the houses might be haunted, but the alleged paranormal manifestations could have very easily been explained as naturally-occurring events. After all, older houses settle and creak and have drafts. And objects falling off shelves could easily be explained by seismic activity. Just ask anyone who lives in earthquake country. So the whole ghost revelation rang false to me.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    A messy break-up prompted Amy Webber to leave her job at a university library, accepting the position as director of a small town library where her aunt resides. The missing Doris Virts turns up dead in the library's archives. Amy meets dance instructor Richard Muir who purchased the home next to hers. The two begin researching his home's history. A lot of old family skeletons begin to rattle. This first installment felt more like a romance novel than a mystery. Some characters, such as Brad,the A messy break-up prompted Amy Webber to leave her job at a university library, accepting the position as director of a small town library where her aunt resides. The missing Doris Virts turns up dead in the library's archives. Amy meets dance instructor Richard Muir who purchased the home next to hers. The two begin researching his home's history. A lot of old family skeletons begin to rattle. This first installment felt more like a romance novel than a mystery. Some characters, such as Brad,the lead official investigator, needed more development--and needed to be utilized more in the novel. There were some issues with the plot. For example, a cell phone was confiscated by a "bad person" but in a scene shortly afterwards, the owner was using it once again without an opportunity to get it back. Still the book showed some promise. Those likely to be recurring characters are mostly likeable. One character still has a mystery about him which could become fodder for a future plot. As is the case with most cozy mysteries, readers need to suspend believability for some parts of the narrative. Fun read with a likeable setting. The review is based on an advance electronic copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This cozy mystery weaves present day murders with mysteries from the past, making the story layered and interesting. There is also a potential love story, though the main character resists it, leaving the reader to cheer for her to change her mind and give her charming neighbor a chance. And of course the librarian in me enjoyed the book's library setting and librarian main character.I solved the mysteries halfway through the book, which usually takes away from my liking a mystery, but the plott This cozy mystery weaves present day murders with mysteries from the past, making the story layered and interesting. There is also a potential love story, though the main character resists it, leaving the reader to cheer for her to change her mind and give her charming neighbor a chance. And of course the librarian in me enjoyed the book's library setting and librarian main character.I solved the mysteries halfway through the book, which usually takes away from my liking a mystery, but the plotting and the character development were strong so I still enjoyed it. Two bits about the writing wore on me, though since I read a advance copy hopefully they will be fixed before publication. In dialog, the author constantly uses fragments that omit the word(s) at the beginning of the sentence. For example: "Never really wandered into the trees. Too much underbrush back there." instead of, "I never really wandered into the trees. There is too much underbrush back there." When used occasionally this can make conversations feel more casual, but the constant usage felt awkward. The phrases "you see" and "you know" were also overused by many of the characters.I look forward to the next book in the series!I received an ARC from NeyGalley. It will be released on a December 12, 2017.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    Fleeing a love affair gone wrong, university librarian Amy Webber moves back to her old family home in Virginia. While living with her aunt, she works as the director of the local public library. When Richard Muir, a dancer, and choreographer, moves in next door, he asks Amy’s assistance on an old murder case. After circumstances about the investigation are unearthed, and a woman is found dead in the library’s archives, Amy wonders if the town is ready for another scandal.A good mystery, in my e Fleeing a love affair gone wrong, university librarian Amy Webber moves back to her old family home in Virginia. While living with her aunt, she works as the director of the local public library. When Richard Muir, a dancer, and choreographer, moves in next door, he asks Amy’s assistance on an old murder case. After circumstances about the investigation are unearthed, and a woman is found dead in the library’s archives, Amy wonders if the town is ready for another scandal.A good mystery, in my eyes, is when I get so involved that I lose track of time reading. It was hard to get into this novel because the author seemed almost tentative. In the first couple of chapters, all Amy could do was clench and unclench her fingers. This repetition took me out of the story. Fortunately, the hesitation abated and I was able to enjoy a very well plotted whodunit with a wonderful surprise ending. I will look forward to Ms. Gilbert’s next mystery. I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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