In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills
Follow the intertwining stories of three women from diverse backgrounds, all searching for family and personal peace in post-genocide Rwanda. At the heart of this inspiring novel that bestselling author Wally Lamb calls "an evocative page-turner" and Caroline Leavitt calls "blazingly original" is the discovery of grace when there can be no forgiveness.In 1968, Lillian Carlson left Atlanta, disillusioned and heartbroken, after the assassination of Martin Luther King. She found meaning in the hearts of orphaned African children and cobbled together her own small orphanage in the Rift Valley alongside the lush forests of Rwanda.Three decades later, in New York, Rachel Shepherd, lost and heartbroken herself, embarks on a journey to find the father who abandoned her as a young child, determined to solve the enigma of Henry Shepherd, a now-famous photographer.When an online search turns up a clue to his whereabouts, Rachel travels to Rwanda to connect with an unsuspecting and uncooperative Lillian. While Rachel tries to unravel the mystery of her father's disappearance, she finds unexpected allies in an ex-pat doctor running from his past and a young Tutsi woman who lived through a profound experience alongside her father.

In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills Details

TitleIn The Shadow of 10,000 Hills
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 1st, 2018
PublisherCentral Avenue Publishing
ISBN-139781771681339
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Cultural, Africa, Fiction, Literary Fiction

In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills Review

  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    Lillian knew what her life was about. She felt a personal responsibility to do her part in changing the world. She wanted to use her gift of her education to teach children.Her clarity of purpose took her too Rwanda. By the time we meet her - she’s been living in Rwanda for 30 years. She is no longer teaching in a school - she takes malnourished orphan kids into her home....on her farm. Lillian raised and educated 48 orphans....still taking more. Many of these kids - or infants - saw their mothe Lillian knew what her life was about. She felt a personal responsibility to do her part in changing the world. She wanted to use her gift of her education to teach children.Her clarity of purpose took her too Rwanda. By the time we meet her - she’s been living in Rwanda for 30 years. She is no longer teaching in a school - she takes malnourished orphan kids into her home....on her farm. Lillian raised and educated 48 orphans....still taking more. Many of these kids - or infants - saw their mother’s get slaughtered. Lillian said Genocide was far too polite. We don’t enjoy reading that line - but she’s damn right.Lillian not only makes the children super-power cookies packed with protein - but as her friend Henry Shepherd once said about her.....”Lillian’s enthusiasm was as good as a blood transfusion that pumped energy into his dull existence”. That’s just the type of woman that Lillian was - with ‘everyone’. Her kids blossom - got healthy - got stronger - felt better about themselves because of Lillian. Tucker - African American- was also living in Rwanda (Daniel Tucker) - He left UCLA nine years earlier......disappointing his father by not following in his footsteps to become a doctor. “He could have been another young backpacker in need of a shower, stopping in Mubarak’s to get water before heading into the Virginia Mountains to track gorillas. But there was that squirming bundle he held to his chest, wrapped in a dirty pink blanket. And then, there were his meticulously squared nails rimmed with dirt-crusted cuticles: the hands of a surgeon in a war zone”. Tucker worked hard on Lillian’s farm - building a three-room clinic where parents could from Mubaro could bring their children for free vaccinations or get a limb set. Then - most evenings Tucker slept in a tent at the edge of the forest instead of his room in the farmhouse. Tucker brought kids to Lillian....and stayed with her on and off. He medically cared for the orphans as well as families who live in the mountain villages between Mubaro and Uganda border. One of the kids that Lillian raised - Nadine - went off to the University of Nairobi. Nadine loves to sing and learn more about music. There is much more you'll learn about Nadine!!!! Her story is gripping.Rachel - had recently lost her mother, Marilee, and had a miscarriage.....(a child she named Serena and talked to daily). Rachel’s grief for the loss of her child - and her mother was putting a strain on her marriage with Mick. Mick had his own grief- even guilt. He was at work when Rachel needed to be rushed to the hospital. But something else was pulling at Rachel - obsessively- even understandably- given the timing of her losses- she wanted to try to resolve the mystery about her father, Henry. She had not seen him since she was 8 years of age. When she was cleaning out her mother’s things, after her death, she found a photo of a woman whose name is Lillian Carlson. NOTE: You’ll have to read the story to —— haha....TO GET THE STORY!!! - page turning intimate storytelling, by author Jennifer Haupt. However, getting from step A to Z.....Rachel stepped off the plane in Kigali... the capital and largest city of Rwanda. Tucker had his green Jeep. He met Rachel at the airport—-they played twenty questions on their drive to meet Lillian. I laughed —- trying to keep up with them: I couldn’t......BECAUSE...sometimes when you’re reading a novel, enjoying the dialogue between two people....you stop and realize WHERE YOU ARE .....All of a sudden I had this elated feeling.....as if I were driving along in that green Jeep —a country I had never been in where the landscape was changing all around me. Right when that feeling hit me, that same feeling hit our leading character, Rachel. She started to notice the shades of the clouds. She was taking in the scenery of the banana trees and clusters of flowers. She saw women and children wrapped in swaths of colorful fabrics. She saw some women with babies swaddled to their backs. ..... and then Rachel thought of her father because he was a photographer and she was imagining him taking photographs. THIS WAS A HAPPY MOMENT....There are HORRIFIC MOMENTS ALSO.....If you’re like me ... you’ll cry in one or two or three places. For the rest of this story .... the meat of what happens.... I HIGHLY RECOMMEND READING IT YOURSELF.......This novel was inspired by - in honor of — the genocide in Rwanda during the mid 1990’s.....at a time when we should have already learned that race, religion and culture didn’t matter. It’s a powerful story….beautifully written… and it convincingly captures the experience that the leading characters each go through......ultimately experiencing love, courage, grief, sadness, shock, hope, injustice, justice , peace, and forgiveness.Thank You Netgalley, Central Avenue Publishing, and the very talented author Jennifer Haupt
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  • Jeffrey Keeten
    January 1, 1970
    ”After her family was murdered, she didn’t speak for a month Maman tells her, although it felt longer. She stayed in her bedroom, listening to the rustle of the pines in the forest that seemed to cry for her; the fear had drained her of tears. Most of the people in her village were dead. It was being alive, not the deaths, that was somehow shocking. Her existence seemed to be an accident of fate, her life spent waiting in this room in Lillian’s home, this room that was not hers. She was paralyze ”After her family was murdered, she didn’t speak for a month Maman tells her, although it felt longer. She stayed in her bedroom, listening to the rustle of the pines in the forest that seemed to cry for her; the fear had drained her of tears. Most of the people in her village were dead. It was being alive, not the deaths, that was somehow shocking. Her existence seemed to be an accident of fate, her life spent waiting in this room in Lillian’s home, this room that was not hers. She was paralyzed, for the inevitable correction.”The inevitable correction, when the universe finally realizes that she is still alive. It doesn’t have to be a boy with a machete and a wild look in his eyes. It could be a Biblical bolt of lightning from the sky, or maybe she just falls down dead as if her life string has been plucked.It is hard to live when being alive feels like an offense against the natural order. When being alive feels like a mistake, as if the angel of death just missed scooping her off the earth by a fraction of inches. The swoop of the scythe makes a sound of displaced air as it...misses her. Nobody escapes this life without losses, but for most of us it is a slow trickle spaced out over decades, so the burden grows, and we can adjust to the weight even though we feel whittled down, weaker, exposed, moved up in line to be the next one to be taken. We are the only species on Earth who knows, without a shadow of a doubt, that we will die. As children we are barely aware of that inevitability, but as we age that awareness grows steadily to the point that we have to even start preparing for it. For Nadine, a lifetime of loss is crunched into two minutes of madness. During the Rwandan genocide, a million people, most of them of the Tutsi tribe, were massacred in a matter of a 100 days. 10,000 people a day. Rape has always been an unfortunate part of war, but in the Rwandan genocide it was used as an act of war. It was an insidious tactic to instill fear and make sure that even the survivors were left forever scarred. This story is not about the genocide, but about the ability of people to grieve and find the scattered pieces of themselves so that they can forge a path to a new life. It is the story of three women. I’ve already introduced you to Nadine. Let me give you an idea of the woman Lillian Carlson. She is an activist in the United States. When Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated, she is disillusioned with her ability to make a difference. She finds that she can make a difference in the lives of orphans in Rwanda. She takes in as many as she can and even more than she should have, but when children have no one she chooses to be their someone. The third woman is Rachel Shepherd, who is searching for her father. He disappeared when she was a child. With some amateur sleuthing and the benefit of the internet, she traces him to Kwizera, the place of hope built by Lillian in Rwanda. Henry ties these three women together. He knew Lillian in Atlanta and never forgot her. He is the perfect father for Rachel, attentive, fun, and always as interested in her as he is interesting for her. He proves to be the same great substitute father for Nadine when he comes to Rwanda to find Lillian again. He proves to be an enigma for all three women. He is amazing, and then he just disappears. He is a famous photographer, and maybe, just maybe, he sees things too clearly through the aperture of his camera. How about this for a snapshot of Kwizera? ”The backyard, if you can call it that, is more of the same, a slash of red dirt and scrubby bushes with some kind of irrigation ditch tricking down the center like a tear. But it’s not totally hopeless. There’s a tall stack of lumber to one side, a rusty green tractor that may or may not work, and an assortment of shovels and rakes splayed on the ground. Two monkeys sit atop the tractor, examining a purple gardening glove. One flicks his tongue at it like a child might test the flavor of a lollipop.”To some, all they see is desolation in that scene, but for me, all I see is a chance to make paradise. Jennifer Haupt spent a month in Rwanda interviewing victims of the genocide. She was there as a journalist, but came home with a story that she felt compelled to tell. It is a novel, but like many novels nothing in this book is untrue. We must tell the stories to try to keep the dangerous fallacies of the past from becoming the future. I came away from this book thinking about how life continues after tragedy. I thought about how important it is for survivors to continue to live for those who perished. I thought about how hard it is to find a path when the universe feels so arbitrarily brutal. This book is about finding a place beyond grief and about gathering those around you who need you as much you need them and discovering together a path that will raise you all up together. I want to thank Jennifer Haupt and Central Avenue Publishing for sending me an advance reading copy in exchange for an honest review. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.comI also have a Facebook blogger page at: https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars "Here's a bit of wisdom from your old man: It's the search that really matters, the adventure of living your life."Rachel Shepherd has been thinking about her father who abandoned her as a small child. Her Mother has recently passed away and Rachel is dealing with loss and heartbreak. She yearns to connect to her father and learn why he left her all those years ago. She would also like to find him in hopes of reconnecting with him. When Rachel finds a link to her father online, she beg 4.5 Stars "Here's a bit of wisdom from your old man: It's the search that really matters, the adventure of living your life."Rachel Shepherd has been thinking about her father who abandoned her as a small child. Her Mother has recently passed away and Rachel is dealing with loss and heartbreak. She yearns to connect to her father and learn why he left her all those years ago. She would also like to find him in hopes of reconnecting with him. When Rachel finds a link to her father online, she begins to send emails to Lillian Carlson, whom her father photographed years ago. She hopes that Lilian will answer her emails and provide her with some insight. Lilian was a teenager when she was photographed by Rachel's father Henry. She and Henry shared a romance before he left her, and she moved on with her life, finding love and loss along the way. Lilian decided to leave Atlanta in 1968 after the assassination of Martin Luther King. She still wants to change the world and decides she will do so by moving to Africa and helping orphans in Rwanda. There she eventually resumes her relationship with Henry Shepherd and they live in happiness until once again he leaves.Believing she has been invited to Rwanda, Rachel makes the journey only to learn that Lilian is not expecting her and is somewhat uncooperative to talk to her in detail about her father. Learning that her father has disappeared again, Rachel goes on a quest to find answers, but comes up with more questions.Rachel and Lilian are not the only characters in this book dealing with loss. Tucker has lost a woman he loves and the support of his family. Nadine, in two minutes time, has lost everything. The effects of the Rwandan genocide are shown in this book. Violence, mutilation, rape, are shown and how survivors such as Nadine are scarred for life but still find a way to keep living."It is not so easy to judge the ones you love."Rachel, Lilian and Nadine are all tied to Henry Shepherd, who has become a famous photographer and, in the process, become tied to each other. In one way or another he has left all three of these women but for different reasons. Through him, or perhaps because of him, the women slowly form a bond and begin to open up to each other and each gets answers. Will the answers be the ones they are looking for?This is a powerful and moving book about love, loss, grief, abandonment, starting over, finding your true calling, the effects of violence, fear, vengeance, secrets, and what makes a family. This book goes back and forth through time from the 1960's Civil Rights movement in Atlanta to the Rwandan Genocide in the 1990's. Lilian and Henry are the characters who experienced both events, but their experiences have shaped not only their lives, but their relationships, and their careers. How does experiencing violence shape one's life? How does abandonment? How does love?This book is extremely well written, and the descriptions are detailed. I imagine this book will be very popular with book clubs and for good reason. There is a lot to talk about here! This is not a page turner in the edge-of-your-seat-suspense sense but in the I-want-to-know-what-happened-sense. I enjoyed how nothing felt rushed or drawn out in this book. I felt the pacing was spot on and the characters and the readers gain insight and answers at the right spots in the story. I especially enjoyed how the "secrets" or "reveal" are shown naturally though the story. What really happened that fateful night? Where has Henry gone and why? Will Rachel ever learn the truth? What secrets does Lilian hold? Will the characters find amarhoro (peace) upon learning the truth?I love when a book can evoke emotion, educate and captivate me all at the same time. This book did all three! I highly recommend!Thank you to Jennifer Haupt, Central Avenue Publishing and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com
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  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    I remember when I saw the film, Hotel Rwanda . I was horrified and ashamed that I had paid so little attention to what happened in Rwanda in 1994. I wondered why the world had done so little to stop this genocide with over 800,000 people murdered. While this novel is about the horrors of the genocide, it’s also about how deep sorrow and inexplicable loss give people the strength and power to move forward and take care of each other, to find peace - amahoro . Jennifer Haupt in a brief introductio I remember when I saw the film, Hotel Rwanda . I was horrified and ashamed that I had paid so little attention to what happened in Rwanda in 1994. I wondered why the world had done so little to stop this genocide with over 800,000 people murdered. While this novel is about the horrors of the genocide, it’s also about how deep sorrow and inexplicable loss give people the strength and power to move forward and take care of each other, to find peace - amahoro . Jennifer Haupt in a brief introduction to her novel in her own review reflects on this : “I began writing this story, without knowing it, while visiting Rwanda in December 2006, as a journalist, interviewing survivors of the genocide 12 years earlier and humanitarian aid workers drawn to this still-grieving country. During that month, I discovered the stories of amahoro that would serve as the bones of a novel, including my own longing for a kind of peace that I had been searching for as long as I could remember but never knew how to name.” https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...In Rwanda in 1994, in the midst of the genocide, a young girl named Nadine suffers inexplicable brutality, loses her family, yet she survives. In New York City in 2000, a woman named Rachel is grieving her own personal losses. She thinks about her father who left many years before begins again to wonder where he is now, why he never came back. In Rwanda in 2000, Lillian a woman who has been there 30 years, cares for orphans, including Nadine, who is now a college student. An activist in the Civil Rights Movement, she was broken after the assassination of Martin Luther King and a relationship that seemed impossible. These three women have something in common - they all love Henry Shepherd and he has abandoned all of them . He’s Rachel’s father and left when she was a child. He is the love of Lillian’s life, but was not always there when she needed him. He saved Nadine’s life and was like a father to her when her parents were killed but is no where to be found when she needs him now. Through the eyes of these women I came to know some things about Henry which made me wonder about this man, the photographer, the father . Is he a good man or a selfish man concerned for his own sense of adventure? It is through the stories of these women that we discover the man. While the story centers on this, my favorite character was Tucker, the young doctor who first came to Rwanda as a Red Cross worker. He has chosen to remain because this life is much more meaningful to him than the comfortable life he led in California and because he too has been affected by losses during the genocide. He stays mostly because of a little girl named Rose. The narrative moves around in time and between places so I had to pay attention to the chapter headings which indicated the year and place. While that felt a little disjointed at first, the rhythm of the story eventually blended well the past and present. The difficult chapters were those in 1994 Rwanda when the brutal killings are described vividly. These are offset by beautiful descriptions of the landscape and by the parts of the narrative that do not take place in 1994. I can’t do anything except highly recommend this book. I found it to be so many things - beautifully written, stunningly enlightening and informative of the horrors, more than heartbreaking in its depiction of the depth of grief that haunts these characters, and amazingly uplifting when it didn’t seem possible.I received an advanced copy of this book from Central Avenue Publishing through NetGalley.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars”’You must tell, so that justice can be served. It’s your responsibility.’ No she will not tell anyone about the massacre at the church that they called the Hutu glory. She will not remember, at least not during the daylight. But late at night when she becomes so tired that it is impossible to stay awake even with the Internet, that’s when the punishment begins all over again. There is no controlling what comes to her in dreams.” The stories of three women, Rachel, Lillian, and Nadine, 4.5 Stars”’You must tell, so that justice can be served. It’s your responsibility.’ No she will not tell anyone about the massacre at the church that they called the Hutu glory. She will not remember, at least not during the daylight. But late at night when she becomes so tired that it is impossible to stay awake even with the Internet, that’s when the punishment begins all over again. There is no controlling what comes to her in dreams.” The stories of three women, Rachel, Lillian, and Nadine, are woven together with the story of Henry and Tucker, and the genocide of over 800,000 people in 1994, slightly more than 23 years ago. The majority of those murdered were Tutsi. Men. Women. Children. The massacre lasted 100 days.It’s hard to believe this happened ever, harder still to comprehend how recently this occurred, knowing that the rest of the world stood by silently. Lillian’s story begins when she decides to leave Atlanta following the assassination of Martin Luther King, 1968. She settles in the area, working as a teacher, at first, and then later she devotes herself to the orphaned children of Africa, creating her own small orphanage, caring for herself by caring for these children too young to care for themselves. She came here looking for a life of peaceful meaning, and with this she feels she is fulfilling those dreams. Rachel’s story begins as she faces a personal test of faith, herself, and decides she will never fully understand the world, her life, until she can find her father, Henry Shepherd. A photographer who gained some degree of fame during the years before the massacre, who had left to capture images globally, but made another home, as well, in Rwanda. And so Rachel leaves New York and heads to Rwanda herself, hopeful for answers, something that will fill that emptiness inside her, hoping Lillian will have some of the answers she seeks.Natalie’s family is fractured, and she’s tormented by memories that invade her dreams. During the day, her mind drifts to the family she has left, and those who have become her family. The past haunts her, but the present demands she revisit it, again and again. Raised by Lillian, Natalie is one of the 48 orphaned children Lillian raised.Tucker works on Lillian’s farm / orphanage / school / home, he builds a clinic there for the local families. He was destined to be a surgeon in the footsteps of his father, but wanted a more personally meaningful way to live his life. And then there’s Henry, an enigma of a man. A photographer, but a man who has demons of his own that he must either learn to fight, or they will destroy him. Destruction. Genocide. Two words that don’t seem to fit the overall feeling of this story, there’s such a sense of the author’s respect and love for these people who endured so much, an awe for the nature and beauty of grace. How all these people’s lives are woven together, the stories they have to share … it’s all lovingly woven together into a beautiful story that is about love, grace, forgiveness, the atrocities of war, and those sorrows that never really leave you but that fade to random moments of memories softened by time. It may not be the picture you had in your mind when you began your journey, but you can see the beauty that was created in its place at the end.Pub Date: 01 Apr 2018Many thanks for the ARC provided by Central Avenue Publishing
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  • Jennifer Haupt
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so pleased to kick off the prelaunch of my debut novel, out April 2018. (Enter the current Goodreads ARC giveaway and get a notice when it’s available for pre-order!) I began writing this story, without knowing it, while visiting Rwanda in December 2006, as a journalist, interviewing survivors of the genocide 12 years earlier and humanitarian aid workers drawn to this still-grieving country. During that month, I discovered the stories of amahoro that would serve as the bones of a novel, incl I’m so pleased to kick off the prelaunch of my debut novel, out April 2018. (Enter the current Goodreads ARC giveaway and get a notice when it’s available for pre-order!) I began writing this story, without knowing it, while visiting Rwanda in December 2006, as a journalist, interviewing survivors of the genocide 12 years earlier and humanitarian aid workers drawn to this still-grieving country. During that month, I discovered the stories of amahoro that would serve as the bones of a novel, including my own longing for a kind of peace that I had been searching for as long as I could remember but never knew how to name. I returned home to Seattle wanting to tell interweaving stories of finding amahoro, the Kinyarwanda word for peace, from the viewpoints of three women from vastly different cultures. It took me eleven years to weave together all of these connected stories set against a political backdrop that is not so different than the one drawing deep tribal lines between racial, cultural and partisan groups in our country today. Now, more than ever, I believe the world needs stories of amahoro.
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  • Anna Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Amohoro’ means ‘peace be between us in this encounter’ and is the common greeting used in Rwanda—the primary setting for this exquisite novel. Haupt vividly captures the respect and depth of amohoro as she relays an extraordinary multicultural account of women, men and children attempting to knit together hope and forgiveness from horrific pain and turmoil. Offering us rare insights about the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, the 1990’s Rwandan genocide, and the complexities of family, we can’t hel ‘Amohoro’ means ‘peace be between us in this encounter’ and is the common greeting used in Rwanda—the primary setting for this exquisite novel. Haupt vividly captures the respect and depth of amohoro as she relays an extraordinary multicultural account of women, men and children attempting to knit together hope and forgiveness from horrific pain and turmoil. Offering us rare insights about the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, the 1990’s Rwandan genocide, and the complexities of family, we can’t help but reconsider all we thought we knew about race, culture, love and war. "In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills" is a timely, haunting book you won’t be able to put down—and one you’ll be grateful to have read.
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  • Caroline Leavitt
    January 1, 1970
    This blazingly original novel is about the illusions of love, the way memory can confound or release you, and the knotted threads that make up family—and forgiveness. Profound, powerful, and oh, so, so moving.”
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful well written novel about a horrific event in world history - the genocide in Rwanda in the 1990s. It's about love and creating our families not from blood but from the people who mean the most to us.The book follows the intertwining stories of three women. Lillian who left the US after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King and went to Rwanda hoping to help children in Rwanda. She runs a small orphanage taking care of children both physically and mentally. Nadine, one of This is a beautiful well written novel about a horrific event in world history - the genocide in Rwanda in the 1990s. It's about love and creating our families not from blood but from the people who mean the most to us.The book follows the intertwining stories of three women. Lillian who left the US after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King and went to Rwanda hoping to help children in Rwanda. She runs a small orphanage taking care of children both physically and mentally. Nadine, one of the children raised by Lillian is now a college student but has terrible memories of a massacre in her village. Rachel, an American girl who is searching for her father who abandoned her as a child to follow Lillian and become a photo-journalist in Rwanda. These three women share a deep bond of loss and love and hopefully forgiveness set against a backdrop of the beauty of Africa. I am normally a very fast reader but read this book slowly because the writing is so beautiful and the descriptions of the country are so lovely. It honestly is one of the best books that I've read in a long time.The author dedicates her book "To all of those searching for amarhoro." The word amarhoro translates to 'peace' but in Rwanda it conveys sorrow for the past and hope for the future. Amarhoro is something that we all need in our lives.Thanks to the author for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt's debut novel is a stunner. "In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills" weaves the devastation of Rwanda's genocide inside the emotional trauma of abandonment. Haupt does not shy from this country's horror. Front and center, it plays out as we travel with the main character, a woman named Rachel, who is determined to find the father who left her when she was a young child. Although we have questions --What happened to Henry, Rachel's father, a photographer who bore witness to the murders? Wha Jennifer Haupt's debut novel is a stunner. "In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills" weaves the devastation of Rwanda's genocide inside the emotional trauma of abandonment. Haupt does not shy from this country's horror. Front and center, it plays out as we travel with the main character, a woman named Rachel, who is determined to find the father who left her when she was a young child. Although we have questions --What happened to Henry, Rachel's father, a photographer who bore witness to the murders? What is Tucker, the kind doctor saving lives in the hills, hiding? And what moves Lillian, the woman who replaced Rachel's mother, to finally embrace Rachel with an open heart? So many questions but all deftly answered by the end. Written in beautiful prose with a lyricism impossible to ignore, this debut is a page-turner with a heart.
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  • Dianah
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt's heartbreaking novel is set in Rwanda, a few years after the mid 90's genocide. Rachel, an American, travels to Rwanda to try to track down her father, Henry, who disappeared when she was a child. Her search leads her to Lillian, who spent 20 years living with Henry. Rachel is at a crossroads; wracked with grief, in search of answers to her questions, and she longs to resume her relationship with her father. What Rachel ultimately finds in Rwanda is much more valuable than she im Jennifer Haupt's heartbreaking novel is set in Rwanda, a few years after the mid 90's genocide. Rachel, an American, travels to Rwanda to try to track down her father, Henry, who disappeared when she was a child. Her search leads her to Lillian, who spent 20 years living with Henry. Rachel is at a crossroads; wracked with grief, in search of answers to her questions, and she longs to resume her relationship with her father. What Rachel ultimately finds in Rwanda is much more valuable than she imagined. Told in lovely prose, Haupt clearly knows her subject, and pens a beautiful, poignant tribute to Rwanda. Exploring themes of grief, abandonment, loss, love, healing, the horror of violence, the barbarism of prejudice, and the complications of family, this novel is a glittering gem.
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  • Jessica Keener
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt is a gifted writer and a big talent. Her beautifully told story manages--with grace and compassion and deep wisdom--to embrace the journey of heartache and restoration of an American woman in search of her father's truth as she wrestles with the mysteries and vagaries of love. This debut has a timeless quality to it. Splendid and memorable--put this one at the top of your reading list.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer is a master at evoking a particular time and place in history. Her writing gently invited me to discard what I thought I knew about the US Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and the Rwandan genocide in the late 1990s, in order to gain a more complex and intimate understanding of some of the stories that emerged. Her sensory descriptions make it easy to step into each scene, particularly the landscapes and townscapes of Rwanda. I have never traveled there but Jennifer's writing made me f Jennifer is a master at evoking a particular time and place in history. Her writing gently invited me to discard what I thought I knew about the US Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and the Rwandan genocide in the late 1990s, in order to gain a more complex and intimate understanding of some of the stories that emerged. Her sensory descriptions make it easy to step into each scene, particularly the landscapes and townscapes of Rwanda. I have never traveled there but Jennifer's writing made me feel as if I know it. I also loved the plot twists that kept me turning pages all the way to the end. I highly recommend!
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills is unlike any other book I've ever read. In Jennifer Haupt's review of her novel, she says it took her 11 years to bring this story together, and I personally believe that hard work really paid off for her. This novel is so original, and I felt the author's connection to the story she's presented here. The prose is earnest and astute, the characters so well formed, the story so engaging. This book took me on a journey and evoked feelings of yearning and desperation In The Shadow of 10,000 Hills is unlike any other book I've ever read. In Jennifer Haupt's review of her novel, she says it took her 11 years to bring this story together, and I personally believe that hard work really paid off for her. This novel is so original, and I felt the author's connection to the story she's presented here. The prose is earnest and astute, the characters so well formed, the story so engaging. This book took me on a journey and evoked feelings of yearning and desperation while also giving me hope. On the same note, there were times when I had a hard time staying invested in the story, and I still don't know why that is. There were instances where I did not feel ready or willing to return to the story, and I don't know if that is because I was lacking any personal connection to the story and/or its characters, or if it was because the historical relation was just too brutal for me to read for extended lengths of time. Over all, I absolutely recommend this book. I think it's an important read for the historical aspects, but I also really think Jennifer Haupt did an incredible job writing a story that was clearly very personal and heartfelt to her. You could feel her admiration for these characters and their stories in the ways she chose to portray them.Thank you to NetGalley, Central Avenue Publishing and Jennifer Haupt for a digital ARC of this novel in exchange for my honest review. Intended publication set for April 1, 2018.
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  • James Martin
    January 1, 1970
    How does one create a novel out of the unspeakable horror that occurred in the mid-nineties in Rwanda? One way would be to look at it from the present, weaving in characters affected, directly or indirectly, by the genocide of some 800,000. Then create one character whose actions, whereabouts, and links to the other characters provide a mystery readers will want solved. Add to this some dazzling description that takes you from London to New York to the lushness of a Rwanda forest. Once pain, rev How does one create a novel out of the unspeakable horror that occurred in the mid-nineties in Rwanda? One way would be to look at it from the present, weaving in characters affected, directly or indirectly, by the genocide of some 800,000. Then create one character whose actions, whereabouts, and links to the other characters provide a mystery readers will want solved. Add to this some dazzling description that takes you from London to New York to the lushness of a Rwanda forest. Once pain, revenge, justice, and forgiveness are added, only one thing is missing: Heart. But in that, author Jennifer Haupt was most generous. Highly Recommended.
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  • Linda Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt has written a book that leaves the reader numb upon completion. We live in a society that sometimes forgets how horrendous life can be for others in the world and Haupt reminds the reader to count their blessings. The story follows the journey of a young woman, Rachel, in search of her father, Henry Shepherd, who has been missing for decades. He was a famous photographer and it's one of his photos that leads her to Lillian. Lillian runs an orphanage in Rwanda and has had a connect Jennifer Haupt has written a book that leaves the reader numb upon completion. We live in a society that sometimes forgets how horrendous life can be for others in the world and Haupt reminds the reader to count their blessings. The story follows the journey of a young woman, Rachel, in search of her father, Henry Shepherd, who has been missing for decades. He was a famous photographer and it's one of his photos that leads her to Lillian. Lillian runs an orphanage in Rwanda and has had a connection to Henry, the missing photographer.Rwanda is a nation whose inhabitants are still reeling from years of abuse, oppression and genocide. So much hurt and pain - Lillian's small orphanage is a beacon of hope for some of the young people.Will Rachel finally find her father? Will she recover from the loss and despair she is dealing with? Is Lillian holding the key to inner peace for her? The author worked as a journalist in Rwanda a decade following the genocide that occurred there so she knows of what she writes. Her way with words and character building are superb. This is an outstanding debut novel and I hope to read much, much more from this gifted author.I received an Advance Review Copy from the author. All opinions are my own.
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  • Kim Pet
    January 1, 1970
    A tapestry of lives revolving around one man; a father, a husband, a lover, who inadvertently brings together the different women in his life. Centered around both the US Civil Rights Movement and the 1994 Rwandan slaughter, Haupt entwines the histories of two nations within the stories of these women who are searching for hope, humanity and love, and who ultimately find themselves and the peace they need. The subject matter is tragic, raw and heartbreaking, yet Haupt shines that light of hope t A tapestry of lives revolving around one man; a father, a husband, a lover, who inadvertently brings together the different women in his life. Centered around both the US Civil Rights Movement and the 1994 Rwandan slaughter, Haupt entwines the histories of two nations within the stories of these women who are searching for hope, humanity and love, and who ultimately find themselves and the peace they need. The subject matter is tragic, raw and heartbreaking, yet Haupt shines that light of hope throughout. This one is powerful.*I received an arc from the publisher through NetGalley for an honest review
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  • Amy Doan
    January 1, 1970
    In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is a searing, large-hearted and beautifully written novel about three women whose lives connect in Rwanda post-genocide. It’s a difficult subject, but Haupt manages to find the light within the shadows, the "amahoro" that endures after loss both personal and global. The plot is intricate but gripping; in page after page of luminous prose, Haupt skillfully braids one moving story out of three seemingly disparate lives. Lovely and true.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I had the pleasure of reading the ARC and found it to be a very moving story. It's based on historical events and gave me a deeper understanding of what went on in in the area. It is also a personal story of pain and forgiveness on many levels. The characters are well developed and totally believable. This is an excellent read, a book written from the heart. Loved it!
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  • Kim Williamson
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt’s debut novel is simply superb. Its rich plot and vivid narrative will have you eager to turn each beautiful, haunting page. Powerful and so very timely.
  • Susan Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    This hauntingly beautiful novel weaves it’s storylines like a Bach Cantata. From grief and loss to self-discovery and grace, Jennifer Haupt’s new novel will echo in heart and mind long after you turn the last page.
  • Hannah (Sakurahan or ForeverBooks18)
    January 1, 1970
    Hi ForeverBookers, I finished “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” this morning! It was really good. It pulled at my heartstrings quite a bit as well as being uplifting as well. It’s really a conjecture of opposites. Thanks to NetGalley for this e-arc! “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” releases on April 1st 2018. I’m reading this for the True Crime prompt of the Popsugar 2018 challenge, because although the story is fiction it’s about the real Rwandan genocide epidemic that took place in 1994.. “In The Hi ForeverBookers, I finished “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” this morning! It was really good. It pulled at my heartstrings quite a bit as well as being uplifting as well. It’s really a conjecture of opposites. Thanks to NetGalley for this e-arc! “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” releases on April 1st 2018. I’m reading this for the True Crime prompt of the Popsugar 2018 challenge, because although the story is fiction it’s about the real Rwandan genocide epidemic that took place in 1994.. “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” is the debut novel for author, Jennifer Haupt. The novel was certainly well researched and could have been her second or third novel, I thought. 4.5 Stars (5 on Goodreads)!Spoilers Below...“In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” focuses on the devastation of the Rwandan genocide and its after effects on the people of Rwanda. We follow a young, American woman called Rachel, who’s pregnant at the beginning of novel. She goes through trauma of lots of different kinds throughout the story. She’s trying to find her father, Henry. Does she, though?Rachel isn’t the only one who suffers. A male character, called Tucker, who is a doctor and who’s looking after a little girl, Rose for the majority of “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” is also suffering as well as Rose, herself. As well as those characters, Lillian, the woman who Rachel seeks out for information about her father is suffering as well as a girl she looks after, Nadine. There is clearly A LOT of suffering throughout “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” in a miscarriage for a character, as well as a marriage breakup, as well as death, as well as potentially loosing someone close, but there’s also hope scattered throughout the novel too! With all this suffering, though, there are hopeful moments, in a romance that develops between two characters and just an outpouring of love from other characters. “It’s this place, so beautiful and full of promise. Rwanda, the people and the land, draw you in, take everything you have and make you dig deep in your soul, willingly, to keep searching for more”, is a prominent quote because the majority of the novel takes place in Rwanda. It’s also meaningful because it draws you in and leaves you wanting more, I think...I don’t want to write any major spoilers or more quotes because I think this is a book where it’s best to go into it blind and be surprised by how good it is. Also, because it deals with real world problems it’s realistic and doesn’t play with the facts of death. What did I like about “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills”? I liked the relevance the novel bought to problems in the real world that most don’t see. I certainly didn’t know about the Rwandan genocide before reading this story. I liked the characters and how each one bought something different to the story. I liked the descriptions of the settings. The African ones, are described in great detail because most reading this, probably won’t have experienced them. What didn’t I like about “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills”? I didn’t like how we’re thrust into the past for 5 or so chapters in the middle of “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills”. I understand this was showing us what life was like before the genocide but the characters that I really cared about were all in the current story, not the past, so I skim read those. If we’d of had present day chapters breaking the past chapters up, I think it would have been better. I’m giving “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills” 4.5 Stars because I really enjoyed it. The characters seemed like they could just jump off the page and into real life, they were written so well. I enjoyed every storyline brought up, particularly the romance. My favourite characters were Rachel, Tucker and Rose. They were the ones I felt closest to while reading, maybe because I’m the same sort of age as Rachel or just younger than her. Will you be reading “In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills”? Does it sound interesting to you?Stand by for my next review coming soon...
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  • Breakaway Reviewers
    January 1, 1970
    In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is the best novel I have read in a long time! In her deeply lyrical voice, Jennifer Haupt ensnares the reader into the worlds of three very different women. The exquisitely distinct Rwanda is where they each seek their own peace. In 1970, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr drives the strikingly complex Lillian Carlson to travel from Atlanta to Rwanda. She dreams of setting up an orphanage in the Rift valley. In this way, she’ll fulfil her wish of making the In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is the best novel I have read in a long time! In her deeply lyrical voice, Jennifer Haupt ensnares the reader into the worlds of three very different women. The exquisitely distinct Rwanda is where they each seek their own peace. In 1970, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr drives the strikingly complex Lillian Carlson to travel from Atlanta to Rwanda. She dreams of setting up an orphanage in the Rift valley. In this way, she’ll fulfil her wish of making the world a better place. Many years later, Rachel Shepherd leaves New York City and her job as a bartender, to find her father in Rwanda. He’d abandoned her, during his time away from home, which coincided with the genocide in Rwanda. In finding him, she hopes to find herself too. She meets Lillian, a young woman, who is inextricably linked to her father. Rachel is about to find out just how much… The women do not find what they expected. But they do find something even more precious, in the midst of all the traumatic secrets. Haupt’s superbly rounded characters linger long after the last page is turned. The novel is richly textured and the research around the genocide, thorough. The vivid descriptions of the Rwandan countryside, make me want to visit as soon as possible. A steady pace and the slow reveal of important information is expertly organised by Haupt and I felt myself to be in the hands of a master story-teller. This novel will linger for many weeks to come. It may be one of those rare books I read a second time!GailBreakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review.
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  • Amy Spungen
    January 1, 1970
    It’s easy to pass over a novel dealing with a difficult subject for something less fraught. Don’t do it in this case! In her novel about the Rwandan genocide of 1994, Jennifer Haupt draws on her background as a journalist to tell a compelling story, one that transcends the horrible history she accurately describes and leaves readers with a sense of hope. In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is the quest of a daughter grieving the loss not only of her own child but of her childhood, who decides to find It’s easy to pass over a novel dealing with a difficult subject for something less fraught. Don’t do it in this case! In her novel about the Rwandan genocide of 1994, Jennifer Haupt draws on her background as a journalist to tell a compelling story, one that transcends the horrible history she accurately describes and leaves readers with a sense of hope. In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is the quest of a daughter grieving the loss not only of her own child but of her childhood, who decides to find her mysteriously absent father by traveling to Rwanda, where he last worked as a photojournalist. In searching for him she enters a universe offering truths far beyond anything she expected to discover. It’s a tale of civil rights, racism, murder, love, forgiveness, and even “fake news” (example: how the Hutus dehumanize the Tutsis through media, making it easier for neighbor to slaughter neighbor). Haupt guides readers seamlessly back and forth from the 1960s to the present, leading them from Atlanta to New York to the rugged, beautiful, blood-soaked terrain of Rwanda. Entering Haupt’s world is well worth the trip.
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  • Lindy
    January 1, 1970
    Every now and again a book comes along, an extraordinary book that one curls themselves into, that takes your breath away and this is Jennifer Haupt's In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills. She has woven a mesmerizing and beautiful tale, her writing like a silver thread weaving through soft silk. This magnificent saga spans many decades and many miles. Ms. Haupt has given us a story of pain and loss and love, emotional struggles and looking for the truth. Where is Henry Shepherd and what drove him to l Every now and again a book comes along, an extraordinary book that one curls themselves into, that takes your breath away and this is Jennifer Haupt's In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills. She has woven a mesmerizing and beautiful tale, her writing like a silver thread weaving through soft silk. This magnificent saga spans many decades and many miles. Ms. Haupt has given us a story of pain and loss and love, emotional struggles and looking for the truth. Where is Henry Shepherd and what drove him to leave his wife and 8 year old daughter, Rachel, in NY in the 70's? Where is Henry Shepherd and what drove him to leave his long time love from the Civil Rights days, Lillian Carlson, meeting again in Rwanda, decades later? Where is Henry Shepherd, wonders Nadine, the girl he saved from the genocide that occurred there? In The Shadow Of 10,000 Hills is steeped in history and emotion, that takes the reader from the horror of that time to finally some understanding and peace for these three women, who loved him so. An absolutely beautiful read that will leave you breathless and wanting many, many more words from this wonderful writer.
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  • Sonja Brisson
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Haupt's elegiac debut novel traces the journey of three women who are linked by the horrific Rwandan genocide in different ways. The book richly details the inner lives of its main character Rachel, who begins her journey to healing in New York City, and two women living in Rwanda who are struggling for solace after their own shattering experiences. Although In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is about the sorrows of separation and war, ultimately it's about our common internal battle: the di Jennifer Haupt's elegiac debut novel traces the journey of three women who are linked by the horrific Rwandan genocide in different ways. The book richly details the inner lives of its main character Rachel, who begins her journey to healing in New York City, and two women living in Rwanda who are struggling for solace after their own shattering experiences. Although In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is about the sorrows of separation and war, ultimately it's about our common internal battle: the difficulty and necessity to forgive. The theme is an important one for all of us to consider in a world that seems bent on blame, rage, and hostility -- particularly now. I highly recommend this beautiful book for its skillfully drawn characters, intriguing story, and deep craft but also as an inspiration to move away from vengeance and into the personal potential for peace.
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  • Michal Nortness
    January 1, 1970
    In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills is beautiful and haunting meditation on the trauma of war and its aftermath (does it ever really end?), on forgiveness and reconciliation, and on the immense complexity of family. I thought a lot about what makes a family a family as I read. Often biology is the least of it, as seen in the lives of Lillian, Rachel, Tucker and all the others. Watch for it in April 2018 - you'll love it.
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  • Elana Zaiman
    January 1, 1970
    A novel of stunning intertwining stories of loss and love, searching, sorrow, and grace. Haupt is a gifted storyteller. Each time I had to set the book down, I found myself longing to return. Haupt transported me to a place I haven't yet visited and into the shadow of a violent history that lurks around every corner and in every heart. A must read.
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  • Gail Gilbride Bohle
    January 1, 1970
    I rarely need a contemporary novel twice. This one is going to be one of those exceptions. Stunning writing. superb characterization and thorough research on Rwanda. This should be on your 2018 reading list :)
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    View my reviews at www.drinkreadrepeat.comThey say we are the sum of our experiences. And, although my preference for reading over math has never been a secret (sorry, math nerds) I entirely believe this to be true.When reading, I find it so much easier to meaningfully connect with characters with whom I share some digits in the otherwise distinctive equations of our lives.Oddly, though I may outwardly appear dissimilar to the characters that populate In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills, the events th View my reviews at www.drinkreadrepeat.comThey say we are the sum of our experiences. And, although my preference for reading over math has never been a secret (sorry, math nerds) I entirely believe this to be true.When reading, I find it so much easier to meaningfully connect with characters with whom I share some digits in the otherwise distinctive equations of our lives.Oddly, though I may outwardly appear dissimilar to the characters that populate In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills, the events that shaped me are quite parallel to those that impact the protagonist of this moving Jennifer Haupt novel.While this book is about many things, the spine of the tale is the protagonist – Rachel’s – search for her father, Henry, a man who abandoned her and her mother when Rachel was quite young. (And I low-key love that his name is Henry, because it made me think of “What a Girl Wants” constantly #Afirthianado)Since her father’s difficult-to-understand-especially-for-a-child disappearance, Rachel has wondered about him on numerous occasions. But as she undergoes the rigors of bedrest, preparing for the birth of her first child, the frequency of these thoughts increases exponentially.To child Rachel, his departure confusing.To adult Rachel, it’s incomprehensible. Sitting in her bed, six months pregnant, she already feels such a bond to the little life kicking around inside of her. How could her father, who she thought cared about her, walk away from everything – including her?If Rachel had proceeded through her pregnancy and gotten her happily ever after, the thoughts about her father would have probably remained just that – fleeting notions in her brain that didn’t produce any real action. *Spoiler Alert *But, when she experiences a late pregnancy miscarriage she, quite understandably, falls into deep despair.With the loss of her pregnancy, her once-certain future is rocked and she is left with more questions than answers. While only time will provide the certainty about her future that she needs to truly heal, she can seek resolution to the unanswered questions that fill her past by searching for her long-absent father. * End Spoilers *Unfortunately for Rachel, finding her father – who didn’t run away to another town or even another state, but instead to Rwanda – won’t be an easy feat. (But, really, nothing’s been easy for her for a while, so it’s kinda par for the course, TBH)Though Rachel is the central protagonist of this tale, the sweeping saga is told through many perspectives, including that of Lillian, the woman her father was chasing after when he went to Rwanda in the first place (because, let’s face it ladies, men are always chasing after some woman or another). But Lillian is not just another home wrecking bimbo (and, in truth, the home established by Rachel’s parents wasn’t really much to wreak anyways). She is, instead, an important figure from his past.Henry, a photojournalist, first met Lillian when he was but a cub, tasked with photographing the then up-and-coming Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. As Rachel comes to discover, her father and Lillian have a history that pre-dates her and a connection that, at least it would seem, can’t be severed.Like most sagas this story is about the characters and the gossamer threads of relationship that bind them, but it’s also about a place.In this case, Rwanda.You see, Henry and Lillian were trying to map out their futures, and make their marks on the lives of those less fortunate, in the early 1990s. This time period, as it would turn out, is pretty much the worst possible time to be in Rwanda. Settling in this place at this time forces them to face with the horrors of the Rwandan genocide, a 100-day period in which an estimated 1 million Rwandans were brutally slain. And just as the horrific events of this period have undoubtedly left their mark on those who still call Rwanda home, they leave an indelible impact on our characters and their actions. Vastly different from many of the other books that fill my shelves, this novel was powerful, profound and provocative. It asked hard questions, provided difficult answers and forced readers to move away from black and white and deal instead in shades of gray.Haupt was able to produce the true emotion that this novel elicited by building rich and realistic characters that spoke to her readers.That spoke to me. As I cradle my toddler, born after a very difficult pregnancy – complete with my own stint of modified bedrest – and reflect on my life as a daughter who has never met her father, I felt a deep connection to Rachel and a meaningful desire to see her reach an if-not-perfect-at-least-happy resolution.In a postcard, Rachel’s father dispenses the sage advice that you would expect from a proud parent, telling her:“It’s the search that really matters. The adventure of living your life. You can quote me on that.”And he’s right. It is. We are the sum of our experiences and the product of our journeys – both physical emotional. A difficult but important read, this book will stay with me for quite some time.I give it an enthusiastic 5 out of 5 cocktails.
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