Gunpowder Moon
A realistic and chilling vision of life on the Moon, where dust kills as easily as the vacuum of space…but murder is even quicker—a fast-paced, cinematic science fiction thriller, this debut novel combines the inventiveness of The Martian, the intrigue of The Expanse, and the thrills of Red Rising.The Moon smells like gunpowder. Every lunar walker since Apollo 11 has noticed it: a burnt-metal scent that reminds them of war. Caden Dechert, the chief of the U.S. mining operation on the edge of the Sea of Serenity, thinks the smell is just a trick of the mind—a reminder of his harrowing days as a Marine in the war-torn Middle East back on Earth.It’s 2072, and lunar helium-3 mining is powering the fusion reactors that are bringing Earth back from environmental disaster. But competing for the richest prize in the history of the world has destroyed the oldest rule in space: Safety for All. When a bomb kills one of Dechert’s diggers on Mare Serenitatis, the haunted veteran goes on the hunt to expose the culprit before more blood is spilled.But as Dechert races to solve the first murder in the history of the Moon, he gets caught in the crosshairs of two global powers spoiling for a fight. Reluctant to be the match that lights this powder-keg, Dechert knows the lives of him and his crew are meaningless to the politicians. Even worse, he knows the killer is still out there, hunting.In his desperate attempts to save his crew and prevent the catastrophe he sees coming, the former Marine uncovers a dangerous conspiracy that, with one spark can ignite a full lunar war, wipe out his team . . . and perhaps plunge the Earth back into darkness.

Gunpowder Moon Details

TitleGunpowder Moon
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherHarper Voyager
ISBN-139780062676085
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Mystery, Fiction

Gunpowder Moon Review

  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    The Moon has been a hot topic in science fiction lately. Ian McDonald has his elegantly overstuffed Luna trilogy; Andy Weir gave us an intricately detailed, but overly mechanical procedural, Artemis; John Kessel snuck under the radar with his magnificent utopian epic The Moon and the Other. The cover and description of David Pedreira’s debut novel, Gunpowder Moon, seems to promise a good old-fashioned murder mystery. It’s a no-brainer, really. Humans have no earthly business living on the moon – The Moon has been a hot topic in science fiction lately. Ian McDonald has his elegantly overstuffed Luna trilogy; Andy Weir gave us an intricately detailed, but overly mechanical procedural, Artemis; John Kessel snuck under the radar with his magnificent utopian epic The Moon and the Other. The cover and description of David Pedreira’s debut novel, Gunpowder Moon, seems to promise a good old-fashioned murder mystery. It’s a no-brainer, really. Humans have no earthly business living on the moon – any reason for being there (namely, profit) would have to come with a set of standards and protocols geared toward the safety of its inhabitants. Murder would be easy from a technical standpoint – as Weir pointed out in The Martian, space wants to kill you, so killing someone would hardly call for exceptional effort of the part of the killer. However, it is expensive to put someone on the moon. The people who get there would hardly be considered expendable, and even if motive could be established, you’d better have a damn good reason to kill someone and an even better plan, because there’s really nowhere to go afterward. You’re stuck on the moon, after all.That Pedreira conjures up a believable motive and opportunity makes it all the more disappointing that the murder mystery angle is Gunpowder Moon’s weakest element. The story follows Dechert, commander of an American helium-3 mining operation on the moon in the year 2072. He runs a tight ship, with no accidents or deaths under his watch – a welcome departure from his time as a marine fighting in (predictably) the middle east. But a bomb goes off on one of his diggers, killing the youngest member of his team, and evidence points to a conspiracy that could spark an international incident as China and Russia also have mining interests on the moon, and control of the energy supply is the best leverage a super power has over the world and possibly the solar system.As a mystery, the novel never really gets off the ground. The protracted setup labors over establishing character and setting, but we never really get to know anyone, except for Dechert, particularly well, and while the mining operation itself is detailed enough to be believable, I find it very hard to believe that any government could convince anyone (In this case, four men and one woman) to live in such a cramped space for several years with no down time or recreational options or that they would all manage to keep their sanity under such conditions with no alcohol or sexual activity of any kind – but that appears to be the case. Once the young miner Cole is murdered, and Dechert is compelled with some urgency to uncover the truth, the search for the killer is postponed as the American government immediately militarizes its operations on the moon in order to respond to their perception of the bombing as a Chinese threat. This development turns out to be a blessing for the reader: as a military thriller with tense and believable depictions of what combat might be like in space, the novel almost takes off. I say almost because this doesn’t happen until about halfway through, before shifting back to murder mystery mode a few chapters later, just in time to reveal the culprit – a reveal that happens through no real effort on the part of the hero. It is, and always shall be, a terrible mistake to set up a mystery and then solve it with literally no intervention on the part of the story’s protagonist. After which, the denouement is nearly as drawn out as the beginning and is only there to set up a prospective sequel/series.Gunpowder Moon is executed at a fairly steady pace and has its entertaining moments, but the uneven story development and humdrum worldbuilding keep it from standing out among its peers.Thanks to the author, Harper Voyager and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read this DRC.
    more
  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/02/19/...When I first found out about Gunpowder Moon, I knew I had to read it. I’m a sucker for a good sci-fi mystery in space, and the novel’s lunar setting further sold me on it.But this is not just another one of your simple murder mysteries, and the main protagonist is not your typical detective. It is the year 2072, and Caden Dechert is a former Marine heading up a US mining operation on moon. He’s a good leader, drawing fro 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/02/19/...When I first found out about Gunpowder Moon, I knew I had to read it. I’m a sucker for a good sci-fi mystery in space, and the novel’s lunar setting further sold me on it.But this is not just another one of your simple murder mysteries, and the main protagonist is not your typical detective. It is the year 2072, and Caden Dechert is a former Marine heading up a US mining operation on moon. He’s a good leader, drawing from his war experience back on Earth as he mentors his team and takes the new recruits under his wing, teaching them all about safety and survival on the lunar surface. Anything from a small leak in a suit to a speck of moon dust getting in the machinery can lead to fatal results, and no one is more diligent or careful than Dechert when it comes protecting his crew.So when an explosion occurs, killing one of his young miners, everyone is shocked. No one believes it to be an accident, and sure enough, an investigation finds clear signs of sabotage. There are plenty of suspects to go around, but the top brass arriving from Earth are quick to point fingers at the Chinese, who run a rival mining company near the Americans’ base of operations on the edge of the Sea of Serenity. Dechert, however, is not so sure. He knows tensions between the countries are already on edge, with both sides itching for a fight. Unwilling to jump to conclusions—and hoping to avoid an all-out war—he launches his own investigation in search for evidence.It’s a straightforward enough story, and in fact, Gunpowder Moon is not a very long book, its streamlined plot leaving little room for much filler or downtime. The driving pace gave this novel the feel of a high-octane thriller, making it a very quick and easy read. If anything, I thought the narrative could have used some slowing down, especially during pivotal moments where the author could have furthered increased the tensions or emphasized suspense.To Pedreira’s credit though, he didn’t skimp on characterization or world-building. Caden Dechert was a wonderful protagonist, well-written and fleshed out. I was able to sense his commitment to his work and to his crew in everything he said and did. I also enjoyed the flashbacks to his life in the military, fighting in the Middle East. These sections gave us a deeper understanding into his personality, as well as possible insight into why he valued the status quo on the moon. War on Earth was ugly, and Dechert would do anything to stop all that death and violence from coming into his new life.Gunpowder Moon also painted an intriguing picture of lunar life. The desolate landscape notwithstanding, everything about the moon—sights, smells, tastes, and sounds—was described and brought to life in stunning detail. That said, it’s the social aspects I found even more compelling. An entirely different culture exists on the moon that newcomers from Earth would never understand, giving a whole different dynamic to the relationships between the characters. A code of honor among lunar residents was strongly implied, especially for the miners who put their lives on the line every day. It didn’t matter who you were or where you came from; if someone was in need of help, people were always willing to give it, even if those involved were from a rival corporation or country. Thus, a murder meant that the killer had to be extremely motivated, a sticky fact that made Dechert’s quest for the truth that much more complicated and difficult.No doubt, sci-fi fans seeking fast-paced action and clever intrigue would enjoy Gunpowder Moon. Ironically though, I found that the novel’s mystery plot actually played second fiddle to the wonderful depictions of the politics and culture of lunar life. But while the story could have been stronger, David Pedreira made up for it with excellent world-building and character development, which I felt were the book’s greatest strengths. An entertaining read overall.Audiobook Comments: Time simply flew by as I listened to Gunpowder Moon, which featured a story that was well-suited to the audio format. Jeffery Kafer was a skilled narrator, successfully bringing out the tensions and excitement in the author’s storytelling. He seldom varied his voices for different characters though, which would have been my only criticism, but otherwise this audiobook was a great listen and I would recommend it.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I’m giving it 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. This is a murder mystery set on the moon. Moon related fiction seems to be a popular trend right now, but I’m not complaining.The writing in this book was excellent. The author does a very good job of expressing the cold desolate landscape. He described various ridges, the way the moon dust levitates in the air as night turns to day, and let’s not forget the smell. Moon dust smells like cordite, or more simply, gunpowder. Hence the name, Gunpowder Moon, a I’m giving it 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. This is a murder mystery set on the moon. Moon related fiction seems to be a popular trend right now, but I’m not complaining.The writing in this book was excellent. The author does a very good job of expressing the cold desolate landscape. He described various ridges, the way the moon dust levitates in the air as night turns to day, and let’s not forget the smell. Moon dust smells like cordite, or more simply, gunpowder. Hence the name, Gunpowder Moon, and for whatever reason the title and the description really stuck with me through the novel. I also enjoyed the characters. They were mostly men, but I guess in a world where no women have actually set foot on the moon yet (ahem) I shouldn’t be all that surprised. The one woman, Lane, had a pretty major role and wasn’t cast in a stereotypical way. She was strong and fearless and makes smart decisions. I enjoyed her character arc as well as the arc of the main character, Dechert. My only complaint with Dechert was that I never really got a sense of how old he was. I kept thinking of him as an old man because he was a grizzled war veteran, but upon reflection I get the feeling he was supposed to be about middle aged. He felt very human to me. Flawed and sort of tragic.For you hard sci-fi lovers, there was plenty of science to go around. They are mining for HE-3 deposits. There’s talk of magnetic fields and g forces and .6 gravity etc. I did find this slowed the pace occasionally because the science was above my head. (Also- I read another review on Amazon that said the science was not entirely accurate, I can’t comment on this because I wouldn’t know enough to tell you either way.)On to the story itself, there were things I liked and things I didn’t. To start with, I didn’t really feel like this was set far enough in the future to suspend my disbelief that apocalypse level climate change happened everywhere, leading nations became the new third world nations, wars broke out, and then lunar He-3 deposits are discovered as the answer to all the world’s problems. The other result of this mini apocalypse- is apparently that everyone is suddenly very theistic (and America is of course very Christian, and top brass doesn’t really like when the people working for them aren’t). I’m not sure where this falls on the plausibility scale. I live under a rock and I know religion isn’t going away anytime soon, but to have America just become a bunch of religious zealots didn’t sit quite right with me either. (Isn’t it equally plausible that they all became atheists in the name of science?)These are small parts of the book and only detracted from the story as minor annoyances. I did like the conspiracy theory level mystery. Layers being uncovered one after another. Evidence trickling in from various sources. The need for secure channels and evacuation plans. I love a good conspiracy theory- so I never mind a trip down the rabbit hole.Where it lost me again, was the way the mystery was solved. It was too immediate. Too convenient. I’m not a fan of the “epiphany” as a source of solution. The action scenes were a blast and I think the author wrote them very well. It was very reminiscent of Star Wars. Shuttles flying blind through canyons and craters, skimming the dusty lunar surface. Navigation via a basic green and black grid. These scenes were show stealers. To sum it up: excellent writing, fantastic setting, lots of science and human characters made for a good overall story. I’d recommend this to readers of hard sci-fi or anyone in the mood for a good lunar tale.Thank you to Harper Voyager for the ARC!
    more
  • Kaethe
    January 1, 1970
    That was fun. Highly recommended for fans of Cormoran Strike and military fiction: Dechert leads a team of quirky alpha men (and one clever not too girly woman) in a constant battle against the lunar elements. Now he has to try and keep them safe from a murderer, and possibly, a war. A strong space mystery, the tone and cast are reminiscent of the first book in The Expanse. A tad broody, but it's mostly fast paced and cynical and a promising first novel.ARC from publisher
    more
  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided a galley of the book by the publisher.A murder mystery on the moon. It's as simple as that, and as awesome as that. Dechert is the chief of a lunar mining operation. He's not young. He's had substantial military experience. He's on the moon to get away from that past and to be the gruff father to his eccentric crew of misfits. But when incidents of sabotage crop up and one of his miners is killed in an explosion, the higher echelons of American forces blame a rival Chinese mining I was provided a galley of the book by the publisher.A murder mystery on the moon. It's as simple as that, and as awesome as that. Dechert is the chief of a lunar mining operation. He's not young. He's had substantial military experience. He's on the moon to get away from that past and to be the gruff father to his eccentric crew of misfits. But when incidents of sabotage crop up and one of his miners is killed in an explosion, the higher echelons of American forces blame a rival Chinese mining operation without genuine evidence, drawing the two nations to the brink of war--a war both sides seem to want. Dechert investigates a murder that could be the first of millions.This book is everything that I hoped Andy Weir's Artemis would be. It's smart and savvy, based solidly in real science but still totally approachable to laymen. Dechert is easy to relate to as a protagonist, and you can't help but love his strong bonds with his quirky crew. His experience makes him a fantastic investigator like the greats of the genre. The book is a fast read, too. It hooked me from the start and I had to read through in about a day.
    more
  • Aristotle
    January 1, 1970
    Murder on the Moon"People living on the moon. Jesus. Just fifty feet away from us it's two hundred and eighty below zero in the shade and pure vacuum, enough to boil the water out of your body before you get the chance to freeze. We have no business being here" -QuarlesSo why is man on the Moon? Helium-3. A non-radioactive isotope that will power the Earth for the next 1000 years. The super powers are willing to kill to control its production.A bomb is planted on an American transporter killing Murder on the Moon"People living on the moon. Jesus. Just fifty feet away from us it's two hundred and eighty below zero in the shade and pure vacuum, enough to boil the water out of your body before you get the chance to freeze. We have no business being here" -QuarlesSo why is man on the Moon? Helium-3. A non-radioactive isotope that will power the Earth for the next 1000 years. The super powers are willing to kill to control its production.A bomb is planted on an American transporter killing one astronaut and setting us on a path to full scale war with China.The writing was ok for a first time author. More dialogue was needed to get a better feel for the characters. To much time was spent on Dechert's ptsd flashbacks.As a murder mystery it fell a little short. There were only so many suspects so not much suspense.Four men and one woman stuck on the Moon with no holodeck, sex, or espresso. Who would sign up for that? Sounds like a prison sentence. No coffee would be a deal breaker for me.Was it better than Artemis? Yes, but Jazz would have jazzed things up for sure.
    more
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I don't read a ton of sci-fi, and I really enjoyed Gunpowder Moon. This is a book about resource mining on the moon, and the first murder that occurs up there. It was intriguing and had some good suspenseful parts. I think there were a few too many characters to keep track of, but it was manageable enough. Some of the science was a bit over my head, but it wasn't too bad - this book is definitely readable for a science dummy like me. This was a good read, and I would definitely read more from th I don't read a ton of sci-fi, and I really enjoyed Gunpowder Moon. This is a book about resource mining on the moon, and the first murder that occurs up there. It was intriguing and had some good suspenseful parts. I think there were a few too many characters to keep track of, but it was manageable enough. Some of the science was a bit over my head, but it wasn't too bad - this book is definitely readable for a science dummy like me. This was a good read, and I would definitely read more from this author. Thank you to Harper Voyager for sending me a copy of this! Gunpowder Moon will be out on 2/13!I also must say that I LOVE the title and cover of this book!
    more
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    This was an book that takes place on the moon, where various countries are mining. The people on the moon are very close and look out for each other, due to the harsh living conditions. I enjoyed the characters, along with the plot of the book. It has a bit of action and a mystery, however, there were times where the book was slow. With that said, it was an enjoyable book. If you are looking for a quick easy sci-fi read this is a good book.
    more
  • Christopher Farrell
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI think this was a really interesting, realistic approach to resource mining on the Moon. Pedreira did a really good job making this story feel like a real possibility, and I'll admit that I was really involved in the storyline. No crazy amounts of technobabble, no clichés, and good rounded character growth.Although, I feel the reveal at the end needed some work - everything felt a little moustache- twirling villain in the last few chapters - but this is a solid, good sci fi read, and a 3.5 starsI think this was a really interesting, realistic approach to resource mining on the Moon. Pedreira did a really good job making this story feel like a real possibility, and I'll admit that I was really involved in the storyline. No crazy amounts of technobabble, no clichés, and good rounded character growth.Although, I feel the reveal at the end needed some work - everything felt a little moustache- twirling villain in the last few chapters - but this is a solid, good sci fi read, and a good lead in with anyone that enjoyed The Martian .
    more
  • H.
    January 1, 1970
    I walked into Gunpowder Moon thinking of it as a mystery, but it is really more of a thriller. It benefits the most from the strength of the lead—Caden Dechert—and the carefully drawn vision of a plausible future on the moon.Gunpowder is more of a thriller than a mystery, but it isn’t entirely effective as the former. The plot never reaches inside you and squeezes an organ or two like the best thrillers do. At least not until the end, when things truly teeter on the brink of lunar war. The best I walked into Gunpowder Moon thinking of it as a mystery, but it is really more of a thriller. It benefits the most from the strength of the lead—Caden Dechert—and the carefully drawn vision of a plausible future on the moon.Gunpowder is more of a thriller than a mystery, but it isn’t entirely effective as the former. The plot never reaches inside you and squeezes an organ or two like the best thrillers do. At least not until the end, when things truly teeter on the brink of lunar war. The best parts were the science fiction aspects. Especially when things start heating up at the end and Pedreira throws a lot of cool military SF at us—bullet-size smart rockets and smart antimissile arrays and shoulder-fired micro-EMPs. Pedreira does a great job sketching out a future on the Moon, and really hammers in just how dangerous operating on the Moon will be. The characterization is a bit of a mixed bag. Pedreira does a really good job with the characters who get his attention, but too few do. Pedreira sketches a plausible future where the United States and China are engaged in a new space race—this time to mine the Moon. The United States was left on the level of China by the Thermal Max. “Two trillion tons of methane hydrate had bubbled out of the Pacific Rim with almost no warning in the North American spring of 2058, enveloping the planet in a Venusian shroud.” That environmental catastrophe—and the human fallout—left three billion dead.Gunpowder Moon is a fine example of the sort of near-ish future hard science fiction I’ve been digging lately, whether it is The Dark Side or The Martian.Pedreira has the annoying habit of occasionally switching between referring to characters by their last names and referring to them by their first names, much to my confusion. Disclosure: Harper Voyager sent me a(n unsolicited) review copy of Gunpowder Moon.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    It's my general browsing technique to grab a book and take in the first few pages then skip to the middle for a few more . I do that because it's my theory that authors invest the most time w/the opening...that's where you'll find their best pitches. It's the middle innings where the yeoman's work of great stories come together. Show me an author that carefully crafts the middle as much as the endpoints and I'll show you a 4-5 star book usually. That's what Gunpowder Moon offers. The writing is It's my general browsing technique to grab a book and take in the first few pages then skip to the middle for a few more . I do that because it's my theory that authors invest the most time w/the opening...that's where you'll find their best pitches. It's the middle innings where the yeoman's work of great stories come together. Show me an author that carefully crafts the middle as much as the endpoints and I'll show you a 4-5 star book usually. That's what Gunpowder Moon offers. The writing is crisp & exciting. I like the fresh areas of science the author weaves in with characters that are rich, but not overly distracting with layers. I loved "The Martian" by Andy Weir. I was a little bit underwhelmed by "Artimis". If you you have both in your hand I'd give a nod to Gunpowder Moon. Look forward to more from Mr. Pedreira!
    more
  • Sean Sherman
    January 1, 1970
    Gunpowder Moon is a sci-fi thriller taking place at a mining colony on the moon in the late 21st century. A collection of interesting characters focusing on the base commander helped move the story forward at a good pace keeping things interesting. There were a couple of weak points in the story, but nothing that would ruin it.The Earth is recovering from a major environmental catastrophe that took place in the mid-21st century. The helium-3 on the Moon is vital to the Earth's recovery. Politics Gunpowder Moon is a sci-fi thriller taking place at a mining colony on the moon in the late 21st century. A collection of interesting characters focusing on the base commander helped move the story forward at a good pace keeping things interesting. There were a couple of weak points in the story, but nothing that would ruin it.The Earth is recovering from a major environmental catastrophe that took place in the mid-21st century. The helium-3 on the Moon is vital to the Earth's recovery. Politics between the great powers leads to a threat of war on the lunar surface. The threat of war and the isolated & dangerous environment of a lunar base add to the tension of the book. It is a real page turner.(for full disclosure I won an advanced reader copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway)
    more
  • Matthew Bleckley
    January 1, 1970
    Gunpowder Moon captures the rapid pace of life of mining resources on the moon. Unlike many other sci-fi books that utilize outlandish (and frankly unbelievable) technology, Gunpowder Moon has a solid grasp on what humans could obtain in the next 50-100 years. The dynamic between the various countries and their respective miners was particularly interesting, as was the underlying glimmer of the hope of the greater good. The climax of the story was well executed, with only minimal monologging fro Gunpowder Moon captures the rapid pace of life of mining resources on the moon. Unlike many other sci-fi books that utilize outlandish (and frankly unbelievable) technology, Gunpowder Moon has a solid grasp on what humans could obtain in the next 50-100 years. The dynamic between the various countries and their respective miners was particularly interesting, as was the underlying glimmer of the hope of the greater good. The climax of the story was well executed, with only minimal monologging from the primary nemesis (view spoiler)[Thatcher (hide spoiler)]. Expect to be completely immersed in this book, due to the precision of details throughout every aspect of the story. Enjoyable read, and looking forward for the series to continue.
    more
  • SA Schlueter
    January 1, 1970
    Following the decades of cataclysmic environmental devastation, the moon is the source and setting of the energy and economic base for the expansion to the stars. An uneasy peace that has nations and subordinate mining corporations working in unwritten rapport is about to explode. In a tense and gritty thriller, Gunpowder Moon follows a site of U.S. mining operations, an ex-marine now chief mining director, and the techs running the operation as a murder of one of their own threatens to destroy Following the decades of cataclysmic environmental devastation, the moon is the source and setting of the energy and economic base for the expansion to the stars. An uneasy peace that has nations and subordinate mining corporations working in unwritten rapport is about to explode. In a tense and gritty thriller, Gunpowder Moon follows a site of U.S. mining operations, an ex-marine now chief mining director, and the techs running the operation as a murder of one of their own threatens to destroy everything.I received an Advance Reader Copy from Edelweiss and Harper Voyager in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Honey
    January 1, 1970
    Story gets 4 stars, however, this is a book for guys. As a woman who loves sci-fi, I had a hard time relating to the characters and some of their relationships—and I had military time in real life! The narrator almost ruined the audible version for me. Half way through the book, I increased the read speed to 1.25 and found that picking up HIS paced helped my enjoyment of the story. I'd never done that before, but had read where people had...and it worked. so 3 stars on the audio version, but 4 s Story gets 4 stars, however, this is a book for guys. As a woman who loves sci-fi, I had a hard time relating to the characters and some of their relationships—and I had military time in real life! The narrator almost ruined the audible version for me. Half way through the book, I increased the read speed to 1.25 and found that picking up HIS paced helped my enjoyment of the story. I'd never done that before, but had read where people had...and it worked. so 3 stars on the audio version, but 4 stars for the story.
    more
  • Joe Crowe
    January 1, 1970
    This one is a crime drama on the Moon. I'm in. You don't have to tell me any more about it.It has political intrigue and a compelling cast that pulls it all together. The whole thing is an action flick in convenient book form. It's just good meat and potatoes stuff, with a thrilling murder mystery and a depth of character and style. It's just fun. Are you reading it yet? Why not? How about now?
    more
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent sf thriller on the moon. Total page turner. Who is sabotaging the mining operation? Is it the neighboring friends at the Chinese mining operation or someone else? I wanted to skip a dinner event to finish it!
  • Vince Home
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good, fast read. Liked it a lot better than Artemis but isn't as commercial as that is. It could have benefited from being longer going more into the political sphere of the different space agencies and what not.
  • Jason Braida
    January 1, 1970
    A good quick read. It reminds me of Outland in terms of the setting of a mining station in an inhospitable environment. Entertaining.
Write a review