Take Me with You
For readers of Rupi Kaur (Milk and Honey) and Cheryl Strayed, a book small enough to carry with you, with messages big enough to stay with you, from one of the most quotable and influential poets of our time.Andrea Gibson explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness with stunning imagery and a fierce willingness to delve into the exploration of what it means to heal and to be different in this strange age. Take Me With You, illustrated throughout with evocative line drawings by Sarah J. Coleman, is small enough to fit in your bag, with messages that are big enough to wake even the sleepiest heart. Divided into three sections (love, the world, and becoming) of one liners, couplets, greatest hits phrases, and longer form poems, it has something for everyone, and will be placed in stockings, lockers, and the hands of anyone who could use its wisdom.

Take Me with You Details

TitleTake Me with You
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherPlume Books
ISBN-139780735219519
Rating
GenrePoetry, Lgbt

Take Me with You Review

  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    Andrea Gibson prefers they/them pronouns, so can you please stop misgendering them in your reviews?!
  • Beatrice Masaluñga
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Since I adore Rupi Kaur's poems, I'm intrgued to give Take Me With You a try. It's a LGBTQ poem collection which explores various topics. The topics that highlighted this book were political and family related poems. Raising their voices as they struggled on being accepted by the society and their love ones. It's written with such rawness and I like it. However, some poems aren't my cup of tea particularly about love. I thought the I received an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Since I adore Rupi Kaur's poems, I'm intrgued to give Take Me With You a try. It's a LGBTQ poem collection which explores various topics. The topics that highlighted this book were political and family related poems. Raising their voices as they struggled on being accepted by the society and their love ones. It's written with such rawness and I like it. However, some poems aren't my cup of tea particularly about love. I thought they're bland and unoriginal.
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  • Romie
    January 1, 1970
    This is probably the purest poetry collection I've ever read.I know poetry is extremely personal, you have to connect to an author's personal experience to really enjoy what this person has to say, and fortunately for me I did connect with Andrea Gibson. They touched my heart on so many levels, reading their poetry collection was a beautiful experience.There is a huge message of hope hiding behind all these poems, and this collection isn't trying to sell you some easy and polished hope, no, it's This is probably the purest poetry collection I've ever read.I know poetry is extremely personal, you have to connect to an author's personal experience to really enjoy what this person has to say, and fortunately for me I did connect with Andrea Gibson. They touched my heart on so many levels, reading their poetry collection was a beautiful experience.There is a huge message of hope hiding behind all these poems, and this collection isn't trying to sell you some easy and polished hope, no, it's telling you ‘here, here's what you can hope for the future, but it won't happen in one day, you'll have to work for it, but trust me it's worth it.’I simply cannot wait to have this poetry collection in my hands.IT'S OKAY.EVERYBODY'SSURVIVAL LOOKSA LITTLE BIT LIKEDEATH SOMETIMES.Thank you Netgalley for providing me an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    I like the idea and sentiment of these poems but I feel like the poet barely scratches the surface. It is more like they are presenting the reader with brief sentiments rather than fully developed poems. I feel like there is a lot more there, and using their themes of the intersection of politics and love, love-as-resistance, etc., I would just say, please do more with these ideas.As they are, they fall into the Instagram/Tumblr poetry category... some compare with Rupi Kaur but I would only agr I like the idea and sentiment of these poems but I feel like the poet barely scratches the surface. It is more like they are presenting the reader with brief sentiments rather than fully developed poems. I feel like there is a lot more there, and using their themes of the intersection of politics and love, love-as-resistance, etc., I would just say, please do more with these ideas.As they are, they fall into the Instagram/Tumblr poetry category... some compare with Rupi Kaur but I would only agree with that if the comparison is to Rupi's one sentence poems. I would have liked to see the same variety in this work. There is also at least one direct trauma mention, and as I've mentioned previously, I think we need a subgenre or a new word for some of this poetry that seems to be coming out of therapy and trauma. It isn't the same as literary poetry and I keep feeling misdirected when I pick it up. This is not the poet's fault. I should throw in my usual caveat, in that if you are ten years younger than me and you are exploring what love looks like, especially in an LGBTQ world, these may connect more directly to you. Thanks to the publisher for providing early access to this through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This volume comes out January 23, 2018.
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  • Agirlcandream
    January 1, 1970
    Go to Andrea Gibson’s website, https://www.andreagibson.org/ and see how they are marketing this little pocketbook of inspirational quotes."A pocket book, by Andrea Gibson. Out January 23rd, 2018A book small enough to carry with you, with messages big enough to stay with you, from one of the most quotable and influential poets of our time.Andrea Gibson explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness with stunning imagery and a fierce willingness to delve into the ex Go to Andrea Gibson’s website, https://www.andreagibson.org/ and see how they are marketing this little pocketbook of inspirational quotes."A pocket book, by Andrea Gibson. Out January 23rd, 2018A book small enough to carry with you, with messages big enough to stay with you, from one of the most quotable and influential poets of our time.Andrea Gibson explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness with stunning imagery and a fierce willingness to delve into the exploration of what it means to heal and to be different in this strange age. Take Me With You, illustrated throughout with evocative line drawings by Sarah J. Coleman, is small enough to fit in your bag, with messages that are big enough to wake even the sleepiest heart." Andrea Gibson is a non-binary spoken word artist whose YouTube videos are heartfelt and powerful. I dare anyone to listen to the video ‘Orlando” and not be affected by her honesty and powerful presence. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNadn...This little pocket book moved me. Gibson distills the thoughts of many of us living on the fringe of accepted society. Well done. eARC received with thanks from publisher via NetGalley for review.
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  • hiltonjenkin
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: Got a pre release ARC copy through Net Galley for an honest review.Expected Publication Date: 13 February, 2018Take Me With You is a collection of LGBTQ poems written by Andrea Gibson. And is divided into three segments: Love, The World and Becoming, through which it explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness.Few of the poems were really well written and touches your heart. But many were just, Just Bad. Among which some were too cliched and some cri Disclaimer: Got a pre release ARC copy through Net Galley for an honest review.Expected Publication Date: 13 February, 2018Take Me With You is a collection of LGBTQ poems written by Andrea Gibson. And is divided into three segments: Love, The World and Becoming, through which it explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness.Few of the poems were really well written and touches your heart. But many were just, Just Bad. Among which some were too cliched and some cringe worthy.(I would have quoted some of the poems from the book so that you all could decide yourselves but I'm not allowed to do so with my ARC.)I will still give it a '3 star' rating as few of the poems were excillent. But again, the all over experience was disappointing. Honestly, reading the title and the blurb I really expected to like this poetry collection.
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  • Brandon Forsyth
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed as much as I cried. It was a huge mistake to take this book out in public.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thoughts after I finished it: The moment I was finished I immediately reread all of it again and I can see myself rereading it over and over again in the near future as well. Full review(originally posted on The Writing Hufflepuff)Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, this means that the author may have made changes in the final print and some of the quotes used in this review may have been changedThis book was absolutely beautiful and it’s s Thoughts after I finished it: The moment I was finished I immediately reread all of it again and I can see myself rereading it over and over again in the near future as well. Full review(originally posted on The Writing Hufflepuff)Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, this means that the author may have made changes in the final print and some of the quotes used in this review may have been changedThis book was absolutely beautiful and it’s so hard to put my thoughts and feelings into words. First, let’s talk about the formatting though, because that confused me a bit at first and looking at some Goodreads review, I wasn’t the only one.This book, as I understood it, consists of three poems. Not multiple short ones, but three long poems. You can distinguish them because they’re numbered and by their names: On Love, On The World and On Becoming, but I can see why some people on Goodreads are confused and thought there are multiple short poems, because I did at first too.Another important thing to know going in this book, is that Andrea Gibson is at the forefront of the spoken word movement. Before I knew that, I thought the poems read like spoken word poetry. Knowing that Gibson is a spoken word poet, I think this was deliberate. Some reviewers on Goodreads criticised the use of all caps, but I read that as Gibson raising their voice, like they do in spoken word poetry.Now that we got that out of the way, let’s talk about the book in more detail. I absolutely love spoken word poetry. I’m not an expert on poetry, but it’s probably my favourite form. Thus, Take Me With You was right up my alley, especially since it’s LGBTQ+ poetry.I found Take Me With You absolutely beautiful, heartbreaking, powerful… I’m starting to feel like Lady Gaga hereBut seriously, I am in awe and in love with this book. I have no words. Once I finished it, I immediately reread it again and cried my eyes out a little bit more. I’ve marked pretty much the entire book on my kindle and I need a physical copy to hold close and take with me* asap.* Ha see what I did thereThere were so many powerful quotes, but I also loved how easily Gibson switched between serious or beautiful and funny''I find great comfort in believing anyone who has ever broken up with me has probably never gotten over my dog.''I cannot for the life of my choose one favourite quote, as there are so many. I laughed, smiled and cried (hard) at this amazing book. Some of the sentences in her poems are pure and wholesome, and like I said funny, others? Broke my heart completely and left me a mess.''When the first responders entered the Pulse nightclub after te massacre in Orlando,they walked through the horrible scene of bodies and called out, ”If you’re alive, raise your hand.” I was sleeping in a hotel in de midwest at the time but I imagine in that exact moment my hand twitched in my sleep – some unconscious part of me aware that I had a pulse,that I was alive''Again, I have no words to describe how I feel about this book, what it meant reading it and how much I love it. I highly recommend picking this one up.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    There were parts of this that I loved, parts I liked, and parts that were okay- but the parts I loved, I really loved. It's not all quite poetry, but lovely bits of words stringed together in interesting and exciting ways. This is my first introduction to Andrea Gibson, but I'm looking forward to what they write in the future!
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  • KayCee K
    January 1, 1970
    Take Me With You by Andrea Gibson is a wonderfully written poetry. It is also a collection of LGBTQ. This is this first for me, I've never read LGBTQ inspired poetry book before. With lines like" You keep worrying you're taking up too much space I wish you'd let yourself be the Milkyway" and "I told myself I was built like a song..." are powerful lines woven into these pages. There's a balance of upbeat poems to deeper more meaningful words. This book shows today's world in these lines of poems Take Me With You by Andrea Gibson is a wonderfully written poetry. It is also a collection of LGBTQ. This is this first for me, I've never read LGBTQ inspired poetry book before. With lines like" You keep worrying you're taking up too much space I wish you'd let yourself be the Milkyway" and "I told myself I was built like a song..." are powerful lines woven into these pages. There's a balance of upbeat poems to deeper more meaningful words. This book shows today's world in these lines of poems that reflect in a truthful way that explores significant themes to today's' world from love to politics to gender, family, and feelings. Take Me With You also has drawings, I also enjoyed the font and layout of the book. This is a must-read for anyone who enjoys poetry.
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  • Loring Wirbel
    January 1, 1970
    Let's say this out loud: This is not a book of the kind of marvelous poetry Andrea Gibson gives us in Pansy or The Madness Vase. Instead, Take Me With You is a set of Zen koans set in large cartoon-style typeface with accompanying illustrations. The small size of the book is intended for it to be used as a collection of pocket aphorisms, and for that I'd just as soon pick Gibson as a guide as well as anyone. While the author is best known in the LGBTQ community, and the first section of the book Let's say this out loud: This is not a book of the kind of marvelous poetry Andrea Gibson gives us in Pansy or The Madness Vase. Instead, Take Me With You is a set of Zen koans set in large cartoon-style typeface with accompanying illustrations. The small size of the book is intended for it to be used as a collection of pocket aphorisms, and for that I'd just as soon pick Gibson as a guide as well as anyone. While the author is best known in the LGBTQ community, and the first section of the book is focused on gay love, Gibson's enthusiasm for life and her insistence on defaulting to joy makes this a fine pocket reference guide.I'll give both Gibson and the publisher credit for name-checking Rupi Kaur's small poetry volume, Milk and Honey, from which this book takes its stylistic reference. But don't think of this as Gibson or Penguin/Random House cashing in on a trend. Rather, Gibson uses the Kaur format to present interpretations of life that are startling, if occasionally a reach. The second two sections takes Gibson into a wide world of broken humanity, reminding us that kindness and joy may be the shortest distance between two points, but kindness also can be a helluva lot of work - even if it's worthy and enriching work (the koan on page 123 of the ARC, on kindness and gardening, is good enough to stand in for the book at large).The only reason I gave this book three stars is because I know the stunning poetry Gibson is capable of giving the reader, and this is not one of those books. It's a simple, straightforward quick read, but one that is quotable for years to come. And hey, it's good to see poetry of any sorts in the bestseller list again. If Gibson and Kaur can sell zillions of copies of this minimalist poetry for dummies, it's a great leap past Richard Brautigan, in any event.
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  • Lenora Good
    January 1, 1970
    Note: Book will not be available until 13 February 2018Disclaimer: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewIf I read at the beginning of this book that Ms. Gibson is a member of the LGBTQ community, it didn't register, because I don't really care. However, if you do care, you need to know, because she is a lesbian, and her poetry shows it.Reading an electronic ARC I missed the white space the printed page would give. I assume each wee poem or aphorism will appear on its Note: Book will not be available until 13 February 2018Disclaimer: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewIf I read at the beginning of this book that Ms. Gibson is a member of the LGBTQ community, it didn't register, because I don't really care. However, if you do care, you need to know, because she is a lesbian, and her poetry shows it.Reading an electronic ARC I missed the white space the printed page would give. I assume each wee poem or aphorism will appear on its own page in the final form. On my eReader (phone) they appear to be on a long, single page, all running together, and the mix of fonts distracted, especially the middle-of-the-word caps, e.g., FIght. Those bothered me the most and threw me out of the book each time I came to one. I had to stop, re-read, decide what I thought she was saying, and determine whether or not it was misspelled.This book, as I read it, is a mix of good, bad, and so-so writings. I felt it was un-polished, and perhaps not up to her normal standard of writing. Even so, I could relate to much of what she wrote.
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  • Marzie
    January 1, 1970
    Boulder, Colorado poet Andrea Gibson has been writing about gender, orientation, and social and political LGBTQ issues for more than a decade. Their eminently quotable work first broke onto the scene with poetry slam performances in the early 2000's. "Take Me With You" is a volume of love found and lost poetry that also touches on one of their frequent themes- being, whether the risks of being yourself, of being lost, or of being here. With beautiful ink and gouache illustrations, the book speak Boulder, Colorado poet Andrea Gibson has been writing about gender, orientation, and social and political LGBTQ issues for more than a decade. Their eminently quotable work first broke onto the scene with poetry slam performances in the early 2000's. "Take Me With You" is a volume of love found and lost poetry that also touches on one of their frequent themes- being, whether the risks of being yourself, of being lost, or of being here. With beautiful ink and gouache illustrations, the book speaks not just to LGBTQ persons but to anyone who has struggled with becoming who they really are, or to those searching, finding, losing love.Gibson, who also records albums of poetry with music, recently released their latest album, "Hey Galaxy."
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Received free from Penguin First to Read, my thoughts are my own.These prose poems sometimes are so short they don't really seem like poems, just short, pithy sayings. There are longer ones, too, enough the book doesn't feel too short. And there are illustrations, some full page, to keep the pages from looking bare.The poems cover love, heartbreak, and gender roles. Many are thoughtful and thought provoking, some take a moment to soak in. Whether you enjoy it is going to depend on what kind of p Received free from Penguin First to Read, my thoughts are my own.These prose poems sometimes are so short they don't really seem like poems, just short, pithy sayings. There are longer ones, too, enough the book doesn't feel too short. And there are illustrations, some full page, to keep the pages from looking bare.The poems cover love, heartbreak, and gender roles. Many are thoughtful and thought provoking, some take a moment to soak in. Whether you enjoy it is going to depend on what kind of poetry you enjoy. If you're not wedded to traditional forms, and enjoy discussions on love and equality, give it a try.
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  • Emma Rund
    January 1, 1970
    This cute little collection of poetry had some beautiful moments, but I would not give it a metal. I really enjoyed the pairing of poems and drawings, and there were a few poems that I loved, but there were also a lot of poems that fell flat for me. I do believe poetry is an extremely personal form of literature, so everyone will react differently. I think if you can relate to the author's struggles you might really enjoy this.
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  • Jessica Ciarcz
    January 1, 1970
    I really did not enjoy this book mostly because I had a lot of trouble following it.
  • Joshua Moneda
    January 1, 1970
    Truth be told, the title and the author's background is really interesting -- but it didn't quite live up to my expectations. There are poems that are just too cliche/mainstream and I just can't seem to find the author's voice when she wrote those, it's almost as if she's just reiterating them. When it comes to choice of words, most of the poems appear weak and lacking. Im not also a fan of how they used ALL CAPS throughout the book because by doing so, it made the poems monotonous.On the bright Truth be told, the title and the author's background is really interesting -- but it didn't quite live up to my expectations. There are poems that are just too cliche/mainstream and I just can't seem to find the author's voice when she wrote those, it's almost as if she's just reiterating them. When it comes to choice of words, most of the poems appear weak and lacking. Im not also a fan of how they used ALL CAPS throughout the book because by doing so, it made the poems monotonous.On the bright side, I found one poem that actually made me stop, close my eyes, and shed some tears (It's the last one she wrote). Lastly, It's also hard not to compare it with Rupi Kaur's "Milk and Honey" (which im also not a big fan of) because they actually marketed it that way saying something like "for readers of Milk and Honey" and as a bookseller I've seen people buy M and H then return it a day after. It's a bestseller because it's mainstream, and some people just want to jump on to the bandwagon.I really want to love this book and it's author, but I just can't.
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  • adik miftakhur
    January 1, 1970
    ** I got an E-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review**I loved this one pretty much. Once I opened up the very first page, I thought that it would be my kind of book to read, and yess. it was. You'd find lots of illustrations inside, like those made the book so much prettier than having no pictures inside. :3I loved the way Andrea jotted down words as well, it's simple and understand-able. So you don't have to re-read it to make yourself understand. And yess, the story was pretty rel ** I got an E-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review**I loved this one pretty much. Once I opened up the very first page, I thought that it would be my kind of book to read, and yess. it was. You'd find lots of illustrations inside, like those made the book so much prettier than having no pictures inside. :3I loved the way Andrea jotted down words as well, it's simple and understand-able. So you don't have to re-read it to make yourself understand. And yess, the story was pretty relatable to our lives. That would make another extra wonderful point out of this lovely one though. :))So, finally, if you're a big fan of poetry, I highly recommend this book to read, considering this one will be on the store next year, just wait and see for it. Or you can as well request it on NetGalley. :))
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  • Caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, so much of this was relatable, and even those small parts that were meant to be somewhat dark made me laugh because it was relatable for me. I see the reviews saying that it wasn't that great. Keep in mind, you are most likely reading this from an uncorrected format proof - a digital galley. There are of course, formatting issues, but the main thing is this was such a great read. I really can't wait to see the finalized small copy that I can take with me everywhere, because make no mistake, Wow, so much of this was relatable, and even those small parts that were meant to be somewhat dark made me laugh because it was relatable for me. I see the reviews saying that it wasn't that great. Keep in mind, you are most likely reading this from an uncorrected format proof - a digital galley. There are of course, formatting issues, but the main thing is this was such a great read. I really can't wait to see the finalized small copy that I can take with me everywhere, because make no mistake, I absolutely *will* be keeping this in my purse for whenever I need it!
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  • Bri (girlwithabookblog.com)
    January 1, 1970
    Before receiving an ARC of this book from Penguin's First to Read program, I was unfamiliar with poet and activist Andrea Gibson. This was the perfect little collection of poems to read while I was visiting family (and their related tensions) over the holiday season.The collection is broken into three main sections (1: On Love, 2: On the World; and 3: On Becoming) and I found that most of the poems that resonated with me were in the second section (On the World), which is likely partially influe Before receiving an ARC of this book from Penguin's First to Read program, I was unfamiliar with poet and activist Andrea Gibson. This was the perfect little collection of poems to read while I was visiting family (and their related tensions) over the holiday season.The collection is broken into three main sections (1: On Love, 2: On the World; and 3: On Becoming) and I found that most of the poems that resonated with me were in the second section (On the World), which is likely partially influenced by the fact that I spent the holidays in a house helmed by a conservative patriarch.A lot of the poems in the first section (On Love) will probably be enjoyed by those that adore the Instagram poems about love -- some were a little too gooey for me personally, but will probably also be the ones that are recreated with pretty lettering on Tumblr and Instagram. The third section (On Becoming) discusses coming out experiences in different ways (coming out of certain religious ideologies, not strongly identifying with the strict confines of gender, and who Gibson becomes romantically entangled with) and I can imagine they will be beautiful, reassuring messages to read when navigating similar experiences.Some of the poems struck me more as mantras and calls to action than poems, but because this collection is written by an activist, they didn't feel too out of place when included here.The poems are all untitled so it's hard for me list which poems I enjoyed the most, but I've included my two favorites below."They want you thinking you'rebad at being a girl instead ofthinking you're good at beingyourself. They want you to buyyour blush from a store insteadof letting it bloom from your butterflies. They're telling youto blend in, like you've neverseen how a blender works. likethey think you'venever seen the messfrom the blade." (p. 96)"Promise that who weweep and fight andtear down the sunfor will not onlybe our own faces in the mirror." (p. 87)Disclaimer: I was provided with a digital copy of this book for free from Penguin via First to Read. All opinions expressed in the review are my own and have not been influenced by Penguin or First to Read.For more reviews, check out www.girlwithabookblog.com!
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  • Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    (Originally posted https://thereviewmeistersite.wordpres...)I really, really wanted to like this poetry collection. The author, Andrea Gibson, is non-binary and writes LGBTQ poems. I am a non-binary person who writes poems about being lesbian as fuck. On paper, it seems a perfect match.However, this collection wasn't for me. I don't know if this was because of my Kindle formatting, or if Gibson's work really is all over itself on the page, with random letters capitalised. I found it difficult to (Originally posted https://thereviewmeistersite.wordpres...)I really, really wanted to like this poetry collection. The author, Andrea Gibson, is non-binary and writes LGBTQ poems. I am a non-binary person who writes poems about being lesbian as fuck. On paper, it seems a perfect match.However, this collection wasn't for me. I don't know if this was because of my Kindle formatting, or if Gibson's work really is all over itself on the page, with random letters capitalised. I found it difficult to work out where a poem ended and where another began.I'm also not a fan of free verse poetry. It seems like a cop out to me, and Gibson's work reads more like abstract prose. Give me a terza rima or a sonnet any day of the week. Gibson also uses pop culture references that sour the poem, such as 'You look like Marilyn Monroe and it makes me wanna run … for President'.However, I just wanted to write down my favourite lines to prove that I actually did like some of the poetry! I can't work out what poems these are actually from, but I hope you enjoy these lines too.'Do you know the night you told me you have a crush on my ears I swore to never become Van Gogh? [And look. They're both still here.] The use of Van Gogh brings about this overwhelming idea of sadness and depression, and cutting bits of yourself up to offer up to other people. The second line also gives Gibson power, that she made a promise, and for once, she managed to keep it.'They want you to buy your blush from a store instead of letting bloom from your butterFlies'. Again, I'm not sure if the random F is just my kindle app playing up, but I love the alliteration of the line. It could do with some pruning, and for most of this book I wish I could go over it with a red pen, but I love the bloom and blush and butterflies.'It's cold where I come from, I learned to drown young'. This is the type of line that I want to tattoo onto my rib cage, it makes goosebumps rise on my skin. Gibson's past is summed up in one line, of feeling different, and wrong, and hurting constantly.My final favourite line is this 'half of us already dead to our families before we die'. A powerful representation of LGBTQ children, and how we are cast out from our families, ignored and forgotten, and never spoken about again.In conclusion, this collection will only be getting two stars from me. I only liked a certain few lines from the odd mismatch of poems, but I hope that Gibson will produce more interesting works in the future. Thank you NetGalley for sending me an ARC in exchange for a review.
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  • Angie
    January 1, 1970
    I was halfway through this book before I realized that I was familiar with the writer from their spoken word pieces, available on Youtube. “Any feminist who has ever taken the high road will you the high road gets backed up and sometimes we need to take a detour straight through the belly of uncensored rage.” I read that line, yelled “YES!” because it’s perfection, and realized who the writer was. Gibson dances in out of a multitude of thems – love, politics, LGBTQ+, gender, feminism, and the h I was halfway through this book before I realized that I was familiar with the writer from their spoken word pieces, available on Youtube. “Any feminist who has ever taken the high road will you the high road gets backed up and sometimes we need to take a detour straight through the belly of uncensored rage.” I read that line, yelled “YES!” because it’s perfection, and realized who the writer was. Gibson dances in out of a multitude of thems – love, politics, LGBTQ+, gender, feminism, and the human condition. I ultimately would rate this about 3.5 stars out of 5. Some are fantastic (see snippets of greatness below) and others weren’t that good. Or at the very least, they didn’t speak to me, which is fine as I’m a cishet white woman so I’m not the target audience for a lot of it. When Gibson gets it right though, it’s so good.”Patriarchy taught me how to take a punch better than I could take a compliment.” I mean. Amazing. “America wakes me in the middle of the night, tells me she had a bad dream, one where the bootstraps hung from trees, one where the morgue pinned flowers on prom suits, one where the casket was a full stomach, growling for more. In the dream, American finally elected a president who the truth, who didn’t bother wearing a sheet, who knew his shoes would be recognized on Wall Street. In the dream, the scaled of justice were busy discussing Miss America’s weight. And all they of hate is that it couldn’t beat the love out of me…” Some snippets hit home. “The hardest people in the world to forgive are the people we once were. The people we are trying desperately not to stir into the recipe of who we are now.” Overall, it’s a solid collection that has its ups and downs but the hits make the misses worth it. Take Me With You will be available for purchase February 13, 2018. I received a free advanced digital copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This has no effect on my opinion, rating, or review.
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  • Carly
    January 1, 1970
    To start my review I just want to clarify that to my knowledge Andrea Gibson uses gender neutral pronouns (they/them) so I will be respecting that during this review. Andrea Gibson was one of my first introductions into spoken word and I have been obsessed with their poetry ever since. When I saw Take Me With you was available as an ARC I was beyond stoked and was so lucky so be able to review this. Andrea Gibson has collected pieces of some of her past works (I recognized a line from their full To start my review I just want to clarify that to my knowledge Andrea Gibson uses gender neutral pronouns (they/them) so I will be respecting that during this review. Andrea Gibson was one of my first introductions into spoken word and I have been obsessed with their poetry ever since. When I saw Take Me With you was available as an ARC I was beyond stoked and was so lucky so be able to review this. Andrea Gibson has collected pieces of some of her past works (I recognized a line from their full length poem "Photograph" in here) as well as some new pieces I have not heard or read before, and added some wonderful illustrations that help the writing hit home in a new way. As all of Andrea's works you will find this book filled with poetry centred around gender, self love, self acceptance, anxiety and mental illness, feminism and LGBT politics. Their work is so powerful that I almost have no words. I cried, I felt empowered, I felt almost every piece speaking directly to my soul. Their words are profound but simple, aggressive in thinking but soft in tone, they will challenge you. When you read this, you feel that urge to do better, to be better, to forgive yourself, to call yourself out for lack of political action and complacency. This book will stay with you, as does all of Andrea's works. I highly recommend anyone who wants to get into poetry or are already fans to read this. As some passages taken from their full works are indeed less powerful and sometimes can feel a bit cliched, I would recommend to go online and find some of Andrea's spoken word performances, as they pack a bit more power. Quite simply this book may change your life. Thank you to the Penguin First To Read Program for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Adiba Jaigirdar
    January 1, 1970
    I think the formatting of this book, really let it down. I don't know what was the actual formatting of the poems, and what was formatting messed up due to it being an e-book. As it stood, many of the poems appeared without line breaks. More like paragraphs, or disjointed sentences. Which... I'm not sure if that was how the poet intended it to be read? I also just didn't know where the poems ended and where they began. Subjects would change at the flip of a page, or from one sentence to the next I think the formatting of this book, really let it down. I don't know what was the actual formatting of the poems, and what was formatting messed up due to it being an e-book. As it stood, many of the poems appeared without line breaks. More like paragraphs, or disjointed sentences. Which... I'm not sure if that was how the poet intended it to be read? I also just didn't know where the poems ended and where they began. Subjects would change at the flip of a page, or from one sentence to the next but nothing indicated this was a new poem, or that there had been a shift at all. Which made reading this... kind of, weird? I don't know. I think with poetry it's good to have the definites. Reading a poem with the definite beginning and end gives it that punch. You know what feeling you're supposed to get from the poem by the time you're there at the end. I didn't get a lot of feelings reading this. Or when I felt something, it diminished so quickly because I was like huh? why are we onto something else now?? Maybe it was because of the formatting issues, or maybe it was because of something else (or maybe both), but I just couldn't connect to this poetry collection. There were some poems that I did really like, but most of them just didn't work for me. There were some lovely illustrations though that I really liked!I wouldn't discourage anyone from picking up this book because I think poetry is so so subjective and what works for one person won't work for another. And again, all of the issues with formatting did really hinder my ability to properly read or enjoy this. If you do decide to read it, I would suggest a print copy though. That should have the proper formatting, and will probably be a lot better for the illustrations as well!
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  • Amber Garabrandt
    January 1, 1970
    Summary:Accompanied by illustrations by Sarah J. Coleman Gibson had given us a small collection of poems that vary in theme from: politics, love, gender, family, forgiveness and sexuality.  Gibson is an American poet and considers themselves to be gender neutral.  A lot of her feelings toward gender and the socially approved “norm” come through in her poetry.My thoughts:I really liked these poems.  they felt fresh and real, an insight into an intriguing soul.  I actually wish I could add a few o Summary:Accompanied by illustrations by Sarah J. Coleman Gibson had given us a small collection of poems that vary in theme from: politics, love, gender, family, forgiveness and sexuality.  Gibson is an American poet and considers themselves to be gender neutral.  A lot of her feelings toward gender and the socially approved “norm” come through in her poetry.My thoughts:I really liked these poems.  they felt fresh and real, an insight into an intriguing soul.  I actually wish I could add a few of the poems just to show what I mean, but as I was given an advanced copy I need to wait until it is published incase something changes.  I will tell you that as soon as the last poem was read I went on line and bought the paper copy of the book.  Amazon will deliver it on or near the 23rd.Many have likened Gibson to Rupi Kaur, and I guess I can see why, but I felt like it had a different flavor.  Sassy, sometimes (but not often) bitter, hopeful, loving and honest; these are poems I will want access to again and again.  Please don’t get me wrong, I liked Kaur’s work… but I think it left me feeling more drained than Gibson’s did.  For me this was a five star book.  On the adult content scale, these poems do delve into sexuality and have some coarse language.  I would give it a seven.  While I think it is alright for older teens (17 and above), I would not give this to my niece just yet.  I was lucky enough to receive an eARC of this book from First to Read in exchange for an honest review.  My thanks
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  • Siina
    January 1, 1970
    Andrea Gibson's Take Me with You sounded very interesting and I hardly ever read poetry although I write poems myself. Perhaps it was the LGBTQ approach that peeked my interest, even though it wasn't the driving force in the book. First and foremost I have to congratulate Gibson for the wonderful cover and the visuals of the book are awesome too. The font is perfect and how the poems are visually constructed along with the art. There could me more art though, since it fits the book and style. Th Andrea Gibson's Take Me with You sounded very interesting and I hardly ever read poetry although I write poems myself. Perhaps it was the LGBTQ approach that peeked my interest, even though it wasn't the driving force in the book. First and foremost I have to congratulate Gibson for the wonderful cover and the visuals of the book are awesome too. The font is perfect and how the poems are visually constructed along with the art. There could me more art though, since it fits the book and style. The first third of the book is more poetry-like actually and light and grave at the same time. This is because the theme is love and Gibson surely has some interesting analogies and such, which were very poignant. When we moved from love to other things the book kind of loses the grip. The style changes and the poems are more like mini essays with somewhat cliched views. There were those awesome points too, but when the poem-structure breaks, the content loses focus too. The themes varied and the love one was the best. The political ones were slightly out of place, but I did like the ones about being and feeling different as well as loving the same gender. I wish there had been more of this inner turmoil and thoughts instead of mundane stuff, since Gibson nails that. Still, a good collection.
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  • Isaiah
    January 1, 1970
    I got an ARC in return for an honest review from NetGalley.I got this book because I knew the name. I didn't really know anything else. I had seen some of her spoken word performances on youtube from when I was a baby queer. I was only thirteen or fourteen the first time I heard the name. I never really stopped to appreciate what was before me. This book jumps around from topic to topic, line to line, in a frenzied pace. It was wonderful. It was like reading the thoughts of someone who is brilli I got an ARC in return for an honest review from NetGalley.I got this book because I knew the name. I didn't really know anything else. I had seen some of her spoken word performances on youtube from when I was a baby queer. I was only thirteen or fourteen the first time I heard the name. I never really stopped to appreciate what was before me. This book jumps around from topic to topic, line to line, in a frenzied pace. It was wonderful. It was like reading the thoughts of someone who is brilliant from experience, not studying. So many of the lines related to my life growing up queer, though out queerness is a bit different in the end. There were lines that called back what I had learned in college in my Women and Gender Studies classes. The idea that anyone could classify their love as political or just writing a poem with a pronoun change could be dangerous or wonderful. That feeling I had then of how wrong some things are and how they need to change, only grew more powerful reading that someone else had that thought and it seemed so nonchalant. This book did things to me. I swear I will be a fan of poetry if this trend of liking poetry books keeps happening.To see more reviews check out https://mibookreviews.wordpress.com/
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I requested this book on a whim, even though I don't read much poetry because it sounded interesting and why not. Now that I am on Winter Break *cheers of joy* I have a month to read all that I want. As the synopsis said there are three sections to this book: love, the world, and belonging. I especially enjoyed "the world" section as it was had the poems that I related to the most. I did not care for the "love" section because some were weird (or very, very weird) and I just couldn't connect wit I requested this book on a whim, even though I don't read much poetry because it sounded interesting and why not. Now that I am on Winter Break *cheers of joy* I have a month to read all that I want. As the synopsis said there are three sections to this book: love, the world, and belonging. I especially enjoyed "the world" section as it was had the poems that I related to the most. I did not care for the "love" section because some were weird (or very, very weird) and I just couldn't connect with all of them. But some were heartfelt and had me going "aww, that's adorable". One thing that I do suggest when reading this book is don't do what I did and read it in an hour. These poems, especially the ones on love, are I think meant to be thought out and dissected like you are back in your AP English class and you have a 3 page paper on it. But hey that is just my opinion and you can read it however you desire. My favorite part of the book was the illustrations that were included on some of the pages; those were beautiful. Overall, this was a lovely collection of poetry and though I did not connect with all of the poems maybe in a few years I will go back and read it again to see if my opinions had changed. 
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  • Jenny Houle
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free ARC from FirstToRead.com for an unbiased review of TAKE ME WITH YOU.In the beginning, I struggled with the one liners and half sketched illustrations that seemed to litter the pages. It took me a bit to process what I was looking at. I know that might sound weird, but...it didn't follow any particular kind of flow and my brain couldn't quite catch up.And then it did. And Gibson's work spoke to my heart in a way I hadn't expected. Lines like "We have the nerve to 'support our tr I received a free ARC from FirstToRead.com for an unbiased review of TAKE ME WITH YOU.In the beginning, I struggled with the one liners and half sketched illustrations that seemed to litter the pages. It took me a bit to process what I was looking at. I know that might sound weird, but...it didn't follow any particular kind of flow and my brain couldn't quite catch up.And then it did. And Gibson's work spoke to my heart in a way I hadn't expected. Lines like "We have the nerve to 'support our troops' with pretty yellow ribbons while giving nothing but dirty looks to their outstretched hands" ignited anger in me, a fury that reminded me I'm not alone in thoughts like this. "We have to create. It is the only thing louder than destruction" shall become my mantra for 2018.I think there's a piece within this collection for every single person to relate to, even if they feel the rest of the book does not connect with them. Almost every page made me think of at least one person in my life. Read it. Share it. Tell others about it. Take it with you wherever you go.
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  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    Take Me With You is an exploration of life through poetry. It covers a wide range of topics, all starting with personal experience, but expanding ideas to be universal. In terms of subject matter and its relation to the poet, this collection seems to come from the Rupi Kaur School of Poetry, which is a big trend right now. However, where Gibson differs from Kaur is that the collection isn't really a bunch of pieces put together, but seems to be a single entity because it's hard to tell where one Take Me With You is an exploration of life through poetry. It covers a wide range of topics, all starting with personal experience, but expanding ideas to be universal. In terms of subject matter and its relation to the poet, this collection seems to come from the Rupi Kaur School of Poetry, which is a big trend right now. However, where Gibson differs from Kaur is that the collection isn't really a bunch of pieces put together, but seems to be a single entity because it's hard to tell where one piece ends and the next one begins. What I did enjoy the most about this collection is that while there are plenty of line drawings to check out, there is also a variety of fonts sizes, text color, and bold emphasis that help to transform the poetry from the page. I could imagine the way a voice would interpret these text changes into a moving performance. And although a lot of this collection is written in paragraph form (which isn't my favorite way to read poetry), the breakup of the text like this helps you digest each thought. *Book provided by NetGalley
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