Fascism
A personal and urgent examination of Fascism in the twentieth century and how its legacy shapes today’s world, written by one of America’s most admired public servants, the first woman to serve as U.S. secretary of stateA Fascist, observes Madeleine Albright, “is someone who claims to speak for a whole nation or group, is utterly unconcerned with the rights of others, and is willing to use violence and whatever other means are necessary to achieve the goals he or she might have.” The twentieth century was defined by the clash between democracy and Fascism, a struggle that created uncertainty about the survival of human freedom and left millions dead. Given the horrors of that experience, one might expect the world to reject the spiritual successors to Hitler and Mussolini should they arise in our era. In Fascism: A Warning, Madeleine Albright draws on her experiences as a child in war-torn Europe and her distinguished career as a diplomat to question that assumption.Fascism, as she shows, not only endured through the twentieth century but now presents a more virulent threat to peace and justice than at any time since the end of World War II.  The momentum toward democracy that swept the world when the Berlin Wall fell has gone into reverse.  The United States, which historically championed the free world, is led by a president who exacerbates division and heaps scorn on democratic institutions.  In many countries, economic, technological, and cultural factors are weakening the political center and empowering the extremes of right and left.  Contemporary leaders such as Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un are employing many of the tactics used by Fascists in the 1920s and 30s.Fascism: A Warning is a book for our times that is relevant to all times.  Written  by someone who has not only studied history but helped to shape it, this call to arms teaches us the lessons we must understand and the questions we must answer if we are to save ourselves from repeating the tragic errors of the past.

Fascism Details

TitleFascism
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062802231
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Politics, North American Hi..., American History, Social Issues

Fascism Review

  • Jayne
    January 1, 1970
    Received this ARC from Westwinds Bookshop, Duxbury, MAA timely read. Easy to understand. Recommend it to a High School student- our future voters should be aware of fascism and its followers.
  • Owlseyes
    January 1, 1970
    Will We Stop TrumpBefore It’s Too Late?Fascism poses a more serious threat now thanat any time since the end of World War II.in: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/06/op...BUT, IS IT REALLY LIKE MUSSOLINI?WHAT MAY HAPPEN IN THE CASE HE IS NOT STOPPED?BUT, IS HE REALLY A FASCIST?Check here:"So next time you hear someone label Trump a fascist, educate them."in: http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Trump-is...and here:https://www.vox.com/the-big-idea/2017...and here:https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/no...and Will We Stop TrumpBefore It’s Too Late?Fascism poses a more serious threat now thanat any time since the end of World War II.in: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/06/op...BUT, IS IT REALLY LIKE MUSSOLINI?WHAT MAY HAPPEN IN THE CASE HE IS NOT STOPPED?BUT, IS HE REALLY A FASCIST?Check here:"So next time you hear someone label Trump a fascist, educate them."in: http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Trump-is...and here:https://www.vox.com/the-big-idea/2017...and here:https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/no...and here:https://www.theguardian.com/commentis...and here:https://extranewsfeed.com/why-donald-... (bee OR WASP?) (OWL AIN'T BAD(view spoiler)[BUT, CAN YOU SEE THE SKULL TOO?? (hide spoiler)])https://www.economist.com/news/books-...
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  • viktoria
    January 1, 1970
    via Publisher's Weekly, 3/5/18: "Yes, it can happen here... After probing accounts of the fascist models of Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, she finds that toxic brew in present-day Venezuela, Turkey, Hungary, Poland, Russia, North Korea, and right-wing parties generally. And then, she writes, there's Donald Trump, 'the first anti-democratic president in modern U.S. history,' whose bluster, 'paranoid bigotry' against Muslims and immigrants, America-firstism, and rhetorical attacks on the via Publisher's Weekly, 3/5/18: "Yes, it can happen here... After probing accounts of the fascist models of Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, she finds that toxic brew in present-day Venezuela, Turkey, Hungary, Poland, Russia, North Korea, and right-wing parties generally. And then, she writes, there's Donald Trump, 'the first anti-democratic president in modern U.S. history,' whose bluster, 'paranoid bigotry' against Muslims and immigrants, America-firstism, and rhetorical attacks on the press and judiciary set a fascistic example for world leaders and abdicate America's role as global protector of democracy."Get it, girl.
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  • Gary Moreau
    January 1, 1970
    Oh how I wanted to rate this book a 6. This is a timely book by a brilliant person who had a front row seat to the tragedy that was Europe in the Mid-20th Century. There is little doubt that the world is starting to look fearfully like it did at the beginning of those dark hours, starting with the tyranny of Hitler and Mussolini and culminating in the Cold War and the gulags of the Soviet Union.Figuratively speaking, this is really three books. The first will be the most divisive and may, in fac Oh how I wanted to rate this book a 6. This is a timely book by a brilliant person who had a front row seat to the tragedy that was Europe in the Mid-20th Century. There is little doubt that the world is starting to look fearfully like it did at the beginning of those dark hours, starting with the tyranny of Hitler and Mussolini and culminating in the Cold War and the gulags of the Soviet Union.Figuratively speaking, this is really three books. The first will be the most divisive and may, in fact, quite unfortunately, relegate the book to practical irrelevance. The second book is extremely insightful and informative. And the third book, honestly, is pure gold and vintage Madeleine Albright.The first book begins with a contradiction. Albright openly acknowledges that Fascism has become a meaningless epithet, hurled, as it is, by opposing politicians of every stripe and at parents merely attempting to limit the cell phone usage of their children. She goes on to defend the titular use of the term, however, by clarifying her use of the term: “To my mind, a Fascist is someone who identifies strongly with and claims to speak for a whole nation or group, is unconcerned with the rights of others, and is willing to use whatever means are necessary—including violence—to achieve his or her goals.”At that point, however, she hasn’t really narrowed the list of politicians who qualify for the pejorative label at all. Every reader will conclude that his or her political enemies fit the bill. She seals the fate of this portion of the book, however, when she asks, on page 4 of the book, “…why, this far into the twenty-first century, are we once again talking about Fascism?” And answers, “One reason, frankly, is Donald Trump. If we think of Fascism as a wound from the past that had almost healed, putting Trump in the White House was like ripping off the bandage and picking at the scab.” And she goes on to make thinly veiled comparisons between Trump, Mussolini, and Joseph McCarthy.And, unfortunately, I fear, she, in one fell swoop of prose, both fuels the fires of division while exiling the book to practical irrelevance. In the end, she will likely only energize both political extremes, and, I suspect, the reader ratings of this book will ultimately reflect that.That is most unfortunate because without those opening pages this would be a terrific book. It chronicles both relevant history and the recent past to a degree that few other people on the planet could. The second part of the book is devoted to an analysis of recent political events in Hungary, Poland, Turkey, Venezuela, the Philippines, Russia, North Korea, and, of course, the United States. All, to varying degrees, she maintains, are showing signs of a slide toward Fascism and the decline of post-war liberal democracy. It is an informative analysis and unless you are a political junkie, you will learn a lot.In the third part of the book she truly hits her stride. She notes, for starters, that the Fascist epithet may be appropriate for the US today for reasons having more to do with economics than populism. The Fascist Party of Italy, which gave rise to general use of the term, was the ultimate merger of the corporate and political states. And that is, in fact, what has happened here in the US.The incorporation of America has been going on since the conservative movement of the 1980s, however, and while Trump is carrying the corporate water at the moment, he can hardly be blamed for allowing Wall Street and Silicon Valley to take control of Washington. The incorporation accelerated greatly during the dot-com 90s when young entrepreneurs were preaching disruption and libertarianism. It is ironic, indeed, that tech’s “democratic” perspective has now produced among the biggest and most powerful corporations the world has ever known. And they pulled it off, actually, while the anti-trust regulators in both Republican and Democratic administrations stood by and watched. To me what we have today is not so much analogous to the Fascist or Nazi parties of the mid-20th Century as it is the power of the church in Medieval Europe. The kings and queens of Washington may wear the crowns, but it is the corporate “popes” of Wall Street and Silicon Valley that are really calling the shots.Which is why both parties, I think, should be fearful of whatever happens in the mid-term elections. Be careful what you wish for. Neither party has defined an agenda that addresses the issues that originally brought Trump to power. And until that happens I believe Albright’s Fascist warning will remain valid.In the final chapters of the book Albright notes that putting American interests first invites Russia, China, and others to do the same. And it is here that she lowers her partisan guard (we all have one) and calls for unity through the recognition of our common humanity and the rejection of extremism that favors one group over another. It is here that she also seems to soften her position on ideals of post-war democratic liberalism and focuses more on compassion, integrity, and fairness. I think of it as defining a new standard of shared obligation and responsibility that includes those countries and those people that aren’t rushing to implement an Electoral College and to copy our form of bare-knuckle individualism, but those are my words, not hers.In the end she notes that spend her time on issues like: “…purging excess money from politics, improving civic education, defending journalistic independence, adjusting to the changing nature of the workplace, enhancing inter-religious dialogue, and putting a saddle on the bucking bronco we call the Internet.” It’s a perfect ending to what is a very good book by an inspiring individual.I do recommend you read it.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    The title and cover make this seem like a polemic, but it's more a full-throated defense of democracy, with some lessons from history. Very well written as expected. I read it in two sittings.
  • Karen Roth
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant! Secretary Albright writes of her own family experience leaving Checoslavaquia because of Fascists leaders rounding up Jews and murdering them and fleeing for the freedom in the U.S..She utilizes history to remind the readers of prior Fascists and what the do, how they do it, how they act and react and then she warns us of the U.S. future with the individual in The White and where he I'd taking America.Excellent book and highly recommended.
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  • Deedee
    January 1, 1970
    Dewey 320.533 FAY-PT; CLAY-HQ
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