The Daisy Children
Inspired by true events, in Sofia Grant’s powerfully moving new novel a young woman peels back the layers of her family’s history, discovering a tragedy in the past that explains so much of the present. This unforgettable story is one of hope, healing, and the discovery of truthSometimes the untold stories of the past are the ones we need to hear...When Katie Garrett gets the unexpected news that she’s received an inheritance from the grandmother she hardly knew, it couldn’t have come at a better time. She flees Boston—and her increasingly estranged husband—and travels to rural Texas.There, she’s greeted by her distant cousin Scarlett. Friendly, flamboyant, eternally optimistic, Scarlett couldn’t be more different from sensible Katie. And as they begin the task of sorting through their grandmother’s possessions, they discover letters and photographs that uncover the hidden truths about their shared history, and the long-forgotten tragedy of the New London school explosion of 1937 that binds them.

The Daisy Children Details

TitleThe Daisy Children
Author
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062693457
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Adult

The Daisy Children Review

  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Heading back to Texas after her grandmother died since she was named in the will was the last thing Katie expected to be doing, but it might have been something good since she and Liam were having some problems.On her way to the airport, she and Liam were mugged and the only thing Katie had was a maxed-out credit card, sixteen dollars, and her driver's license that she managed to keep from the mugger. He took her phone, her computer, and all of her clothes.Other obstacles were waiting for Katie Heading back to Texas after her grandmother died since she was named in the will was the last thing Katie expected to be doing, but it might have been something good since she and Liam were having some problems.On her way to the airport, she and Liam were mugged and the only thing Katie had was a maxed-out credit card, sixteen dollars, and her driver's license that she managed to keep from the mugger. He took her phone, her computer, and all of her clothes.Other obstacles were waiting for Katie when she arrived in Texas. Her mother as usual wasn't there to help, but her cousin Scarlett picked her up in a monster truck, took her to grandmother Margaret's home, and left her to the memories in the house until Scarlett could come back the next day.THE DAISY CHILDREN takes us back and forth from the time of the explosion in 1937 of a school in New London that killed at least three hundred children and subsequently caused the birth nine months later of siblings of the children killed in the explosion to present day family members and situations. Sofia Grant has written a captivating tale that takes us to Texas as we follow Margaret's granddaughters, Katie and Scarlett, as they find family secrets while cleaning out her home. As Katie and Scarlett search through things in their grandmother's house, secrets come out about many things that were unknown.THE DAISY CHILDREN has an interesting story line based on this true event accompanied by Ms. Grant's beautiful writing and marvelous descriptions that take you inside the story with the characters and allow the reader to perfectly visualize everything. Ms. Grant's beautiful writing style quickly pulls you into the book's story line and historical telling of the 1937 event.The characters are genuine and true to their era and add a wonderful dimension to the book. Most of the characters are likable.THE DAISY CHILDREN is a lovely, heartwarming saga revealing family secrets through letters and photographs with the story being wrapped around this little known historical event. Women's fiction fans will adore this book and will want to recommend it to everyone who loves family drama, family history, and family secrets.The ending was terrific, and I didn't want the book to end. 5/5This book was given to me as an ARC. All opinions are my own.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    Before I get into my review of the book, I want to talk a little about the true event mentioned in the blurb, as it is a subject I've previously read about and was amazed that few people are aware of it today. On March 18, 1937, the deadliest school disaster in American history happened at New London, Texas, when an explosion ripped through the school and killed an estimated 296 students and teachers. Others ultimately wouldn't survive the injuries they received that day, bringing the death toll Before I get into my review of the book, I want to talk a little about the true event mentioned in the blurb, as it is a subject I've previously read about and was amazed that few people are aware of it today. On March 18, 1937, the deadliest school disaster in American history happened at New London, Texas, when an explosion ripped through the school and killed an estimated 296 students and teachers. Others ultimately wouldn't survive the injuries they received that day, bringing the death toll to 311.The cause of the explosion was a natural gas leak—undetected due to its invisible, odorless nature—that ignited when an unsuspecting teacher flipped a switch to turn on a sander. It was this deadly explosion that moved the Texas legislature to mandate the addition of a malodorant, Mercaptan, to natural gas; its unmistakable scent warns of a gas leak. I shudder to think how many more fatal gas explosions might have happened, were it not for the practice of adding a smelly scent, and it astonishes me that so few people are aware of the reason why it's added, because it's important to know that it happened because of the terrible loss of lives of the New London school 81 years ago.Okay, that's the end of the history lesson. Let's talk about the book, shall we?Obviously, the history behind the setting of this story is what first intrigued me about this book. I wanted to see how the stories of the characters in the present day (cousins Katie and Scarlett) would come together with the story set in the past, having to do with their grandmother, Margaret. Not to mention, I wanted to find out if the title, The Daisy Children, had any sort of relevance to the story, or if it was just a nice title. (Without going into any details, the title did prove to have relevance to the story, which I loved!)I'd be hard-pressed to pick which timeline—past or present—I liked best. Both were enthralling in their own way, and each had events happening that I loved reading about. It was particularly interesting how the after-effects of that long-ago disaster were felt by future generations of the family... whether they realized it or not.Grant's writing is superb throughout, weaving together a engrossing story with a foundation—the New London school explosion—that I've never before seen used in such a fascinating way.I think this book will be of particular interest to readers who love historical fiction with a foundation based on actual events—and I have a feeling it will inspire readers to look into the tragedy of the New London school explosion.I received an advance review copy of this book courtesy of William Morrow Paperbacks via Edelweiss.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    In 1937, a gas explosion ripped through a New London, Texas school killing nearly 300 children and their teachers. The event devastated the nation and for many families, the loss was immeasurable. A group of mothers decided to all get pregnant soon after the tragedy and 9 months later giving birth to the "replacement" children. This story follows one such family and how a single horrific moment in time can send ripple effects lasting for generations. This story is based on true events and would In 1937, a gas explosion ripped through a New London, Texas school killing nearly 300 children and their teachers. The event devastated the nation and for many families, the loss was immeasurable. A group of mothers decided to all get pregnant soon after the tragedy and 9 months later giving birth to the "replacement" children. This story follows one such family and how a single horrific moment in time can send ripple effects lasting for generations. This story is based on true events and would make a wonderful read for book clubs.
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  • Charlie
    January 1, 1970
    Thought I would enjoy this story ---- but really didn't. So, I had to fast flip thru pages after pages until I was done and then I had another reader to give me their view on this story. Some of you might like this kind of story ---- I did not. The other reader -- sorta.Early on in the story, an explosion in Texas killed many people including many children. So, the story begins. Families that lost their children wanted to start over with ----- replacements. And there you go -- the stories begin.
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    🌼 FABULOUS historical fiction! Definitely on my list of best hist fic for the year..Thanks to TLC Book Tours and William Morrow for this free review copy!.Set in Texas and based on the true events of the New London School Explosion of 1937, Sofia Grant managed to do what almost no one else has for me recently in fiction ~ introduce a NEW historical event into my reading life..The Daisy Children alternates between present day and events of the past, tying together 4 generations of women in a hear 🌼 FABULOUS historical fiction! Definitely on my list of best hist fic for the year..Thanks to TLC Book Tours and William Morrow for this free review copy!.Set in Texas and based on the true events of the New London School Explosion of 1937, Sofia Grant managed to do what almost no one else has for me recently in fiction ~ introduce a NEW historical event into my reading life..The Daisy Children alternates between present day and events of the past, tying together 4 generations of women in a heartbreaking and surprising way. I absolutely loved it! Top recommendation for US historical fiction fans!
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  • Janelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much TLC Book Tours and William Morrow Books for providing my free copy of THE DAISY CHILDREN by Sofia Grant - all opinions are my own.This is a well-written, well-researched novel inspired by true events. The story centers on the New London, Texas school explosion in 1937 that occurred due to an undetected natural gas leak killing around 300 students and teachers. The story behind this novel is nothing I have ever read about before so I was reading through this book like a crazy pe Thank you so much TLC Book Tours and William Morrow Books for providing my free copy of THE DAISY CHILDREN by Sofia Grant - all opinions are my own.This is a well-written, well-researched novel inspired by true events. The story centers on the New London, Texas school explosion in 1937 that occurred due to an undetected natural gas leak killing around 300 students and teachers. The story behind this novel is nothing I have ever read about before so I was reading through this book like a crazy person.Katie Garrett receives an unexpected inheritance from her grandmother, Margaret, who she hardly knew, so she sets off to rural Texas to meet up with her distant cousin, Scarlett. Scarlett and Katie are polar opposites as Scarlett is vivacious and impulsive while Katie is more serious and sensible. Together they go through their grandmother’s possessions, including photographs and letters only to unearth secrets about their shared family history.The story alternates between past and present connecting four generations of women in such a unique and brilliant way. The characters are well developed and the dysfunctional family dynamics are expertly written. This is such a tragic and heartbreaking moment in time and I still cannot believe I never knew about it. Of course, I had to do a little research and found that after this explosion a malodorous chemical was added called Mercaptan, which acts as a warning and gives that distinctive sulfurous smell. And why is this incredible novel called THE DAISY CHILDREN? You’ll have to read to find out.
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  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    The Daisy Children is the fictional story of a family affected by a historic disaster, an explosion at a school in 1937 that killed many children and adults.  The story mainly concerns itself with Margaret - spoiled, headstrong, one of the so-called 'Daisy Children' who were meant to comfort parents grieving a loss - and her estranged grand-daughter Katie.  As Katie travels to Texas for a reading of her grandmother's will, subjected to one disastrous occurrence after another, she has nowhere to The Daisy Children is the fictional story of a family affected by a historic disaster, an explosion at a school in 1937 that killed many children and adults.  The story mainly concerns itself with Margaret - spoiled, headstrong, one of the so-called 'Daisy Children' who were meant to comfort parents grieving a loss - and her estranged grand-daughter Katie.  As Katie travels to Texas for a reading of her grandmother's will, subjected to one disastrous occurrence after another, she has nowhere to turn except her complete opposite, twice-removed-or-something cousin Scarlett.  Katie quickly sees that her cousin has followed the family tradition of women who make poor choices in men, but is only slowly beginning to recognize issues in her own marriage as she begins to uncover her mother and grandmother's pasts.  And as the reader experiences both Katie and Margaret's stories, we discover the different ways in which the four generations of women bear the scars of that 1937 disaster.  There was more than one moment when I thought to myself "she needs Jesus," but this isn't that book.  These are stubborn, difficult women who,  while less so in the case of  Katie and Scarlett, challenge the reader to find a way to understand them.  And while I didn't agree with many of the moral choices they made, the two storylines kept me engaged.  Though this is the story of generations of damaged women, the story wraps up with a brighter feel and the final chapter left me smiling after wading through all of the misery, poor choices, and missed chances of these women's lives.  For those who enjoy women's fiction, multi-generational stories, dual timelines, family secrets uncovered, and women discovering strength within themselves.  Includes adult content and language.This review refers to an uncorrected proof paperback won in a GoodReads giveaway, courtesy of the publisher.  Goodreads giveaway terms encourage but do not require reviews.  All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Weaving seamlessly back and forth in time, The Daisy Children by Sofia Grant is a multi-generational novel that is based on a real life tragedy.In 1937, several young lives are tragically taken when a gas leak causes an explosion at their school. Several families immediately have “replacement” children which are referred to as the "Daisy Children". Caroline and Hugh Pierson are one of the families whose “replacement” daughter Margaret is quite willful and stubborn which often puts her at odds wi Weaving seamlessly back and forth in time, The Daisy Children by Sofia Grant is a multi-generational novel that is based on a real life tragedy.In 1937, several young lives are tragically taken when a gas leak causes an explosion at their school. Several families immediately have “replacement” children which are referred to as the "Daisy Children". Caroline and Hugh Pierson are one of the families whose “replacement” daughter Margaret is quite willful and stubborn which often puts her at odds with her mother. As an adult, Georgina’s memories of her childhood are dramatically different from Margaret’s and her mother is somewhat flabbergasted at some of Georgina’s accusations.  Margaret ends up making an impetuous decision to marry a man who cannot forget his family’s loss in the explosion and their union is passionate yet volatile. Margaret’s relationship with her daughter, Georgina, is deeply troubled which results in a lifelong estrangement after Georgina leaves home. Georgina’s relationship with her daughter, Katie, is also dysfunctional, but Katie is willing to overlook her mother’s more annoying traits. After Margaret passes away, will her surprise bequests to Katie and Katie's cousin Scarlett repair the long running rift in their family?The inheritance comes at a good time for Katie since she at loose ends and could use some time away from home. Her trip hits quite a few snags and once she arrives in Texas, this hiatus from Boston proves to be quite the catalyst for future changes. Her marriage to her husband, Liam, is not in a good place but it takes distance from her regular life to gain much needed perspective to view her marriage (and her husband) more clearly.Katie is surprised by how much she enjoys spending time with Scarlett as they work together to fulfill the stipulations of Margaret’s will. As she and Scarlett clean out Margaret’s home, there are a few surprises awaiting them. Letters hint at family secrets and Katie hopes to glean some background information on her mother’s relationship with Margaret. Katie clearly sees her mother's flaws and their relationship works best with Katie spending minimal time with Georgina.With real life events serving as the story’s backdrop, The Daisy Children is an engaging and interesting novel. The women in the Pierson family are not exactly the warm and cuddly types but some of their standoffishness is understandable given their family history. With some unexpected twists and turns, Sofia Grant brings this multi-layered novel to an uplifting conclusion that will delight readers.
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  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    In 1937 in the community of New London, Texas, a school exploded, killing nearly 300 children and teachers. One of the richest districts in the state, the school was located in the ‘oil rich’ area, the first with a lighted football field, and heated, not with a central system, but through individual gas heaters throughout the building. In a cost-cutting measure, the decision was made to ‘tap into’ another source: not illegal, but also not safe. Unfortunately, the worst happened, at the school ex In 1937 in the community of New London, Texas, a school exploded, killing nearly 300 children and teachers. One of the richest districts in the state, the school was located in the ‘oil rich’ area, the first with a lighted football field, and heated, not with a central system, but through individual gas heaters throughout the building. In a cost-cutting measure, the decision was made to ‘tap into’ another source: not illegal, but also not safe. Unfortunately, the worst happened, at the school exploded – killing nearly 300. Parents, grieving and lost often rushed to replace the lost children, and here is where our story begins, several years later as a ‘replacement child’ makes her mark after her death. Mostly a story of Katie, granddaughter of Margaret, a replacement child, as she returns for a reading of Margaret’s will. Nothing in Katie’s trip is smooth, and she’s put into contact (again) with a cousin, Scarlett. The two are COMPLETE opposites: Scarlett seems to have followed the ‘family tradition’ in poor choices, while Katie’s marriage and considered choices are her watchword. But, she’s started to see (when she looks, infrequently) cracks in her own marriage, and this return may be a way to get answers to questions she’s always had. Perhaps Scarlett had them too?Oh the search back through Margaret’s story was intriguing: a replacement child, she was indulged in ways that made a disagreeable and often angry person, unable to translate love onto her own daughter. Uncovering questions, answers and even discovering how similar she and Scarlett are: stubborn, entitled, perhaps a bit angry, the task with this novel is to understand the women and their choices, but I found empathy for their stories, or even caring deeply about them was more of a challenge. It wasn’t the choices, not really, it was the walls and obstructions both built with attitude and anger that held me at a remove. The dual storylines were intriguing, if not wholly engaging to me, and kept me reading.I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via Edelweiss for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
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  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    So, I will admit, I ended up liking The Daisy Children more than I thought I would. It was a bit slow in the beginning, but I ended up finding myself 3 hours later almost done with the book. I had a couple of issues with the story, but overall, it's a bitter sweet tale about mother/daughter relationships and how tragedy can affect a family for generations. The book goes between the present, where Katie finds out she inherited part of her estranged grandmother's estate and the past, where we find So, I will admit, I ended up liking The Daisy Children more than I thought I would. It was a bit slow in the beginning, but I ended up finding myself 3 hours later almost done with the book. I had a couple of issues with the story, but overall, it's a bitter sweet tale about mother/daughter relationships and how tragedy can affect a family for generations. The book goes between the present, where Katie finds out she inherited part of her estranged grandmother's estate and the past, where we find out what happened to Caroline, Margaret and Georgina in the years following the tragic school explosion. Of all four women, I felt the most bad for Margaret. While all four women were definitely results of their upbringing, her story was the most heart breaking for me. The twist in the end just confirmed that she got the rawest deal in the entire situation. I did like the ending and loved where Katie and Scarlett ended up.There were just a couple of things I didn't like about the book. I know it's a small thing, but honestly, if you were mugged on the way to the airport, wouldn't you put off the trip for a day or two to get your affairs in order? I found that entire scenario with Katie and Liam weird and not very realistic. I also wasn't happy with the decision she made regarding Jam. I know she was kind of at a crossroads with Liam, but I was disappointed the author chose to go the route she did with that story-line. Anyway, I wouldn't say this was really a historical fiction. The explosion plays a smaller part in the book than I though it would. I do recommend this one. It's one I will be thinking about for a long time.
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  • Meg - A Bookish Affair
    January 1, 1970
    "The Daisy Children" is the story of Katie, a young woman whose perfect life is spinning out of control. When her grandmother's (who she barely knew) death presents her with an escape route to go to Texas to sort through family secrets. When she gets there, she reconnects with her distant cousin and she and Katie could not be more different. They are left to sort the remainders of their grandmother's life and will learn much about their family along the way. This was a good read full of twists a "The Daisy Children" is the story of Katie, a young woman whose perfect life is spinning out of control. When her grandmother's (who she barely knew) death presents her with an escape route to go to Texas to sort through family secrets. When she gets there, she reconnects with her distant cousin and she and Katie could not be more different. They are left to sort the remainders of their grandmother's life and will learn much about their family along the way. This was a good read full of twists and turns!This book had so many things going for it! I love books about family secrets! It's always so interesting to me that some of the most surprising things can be found in your own families. I thought the author did a really good job of slowly unfolding what Katie's family was hiding to keep you wanting to find out more. The pacing was great!I also was very interested in learning about the school explosion in New London, Texas. I had heard of the event before but didn't know many details of this terrible tragedy. Much of the book focuses on the aftermath of this tragedy and on the "replacement" children that the families who lost children in the tragedy. These "replacement" children are well aware that they exist in order to fill a void of the children that were lost. It's such an interesting position to be in and I really liked how the author explored this.The writing of the book was good! The author does a good job of capturing the personalities of the different characters and really bringing them to life. While some of the events in the book were quite sad, this book also had a great sense of hope about it, which made for good reading!
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  • Courtney McGrale
    January 1, 1970
    I waver between 3 and 4 stars here. While the background to the story was hugely compelling and heartbreaking, I got confused by the constant change in the timeline. I loved the writing, but had to look back in the book a few times to recall which character Grant was writing about. The history behind this book was completely news to me, and I was horrified by it. I did really enjoy the multigenerational aspect to this book, I just felt a bit lost at moments. I only found the family tree as I app I waver between 3 and 4 stars here. While the background to the story was hugely compelling and heartbreaking, I got confused by the constant change in the timeline. I loved the writing, but had to look back in the book a few times to recall which character Grant was writing about. The history behind this book was completely news to me, and I was horrified by it. I did really enjoy the multigenerational aspect to this book, I just felt a bit lost at moments. I only found the family tree as I approached the middle of the book, which was helpful. (Note taken to flip through and preview future reads!). All in all, a worthwhile read.
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  • Carla Suto
    January 1, 1970
    THE DAISY CHILDREN by Sofia Grant is heartfelt story of love, loss and family secrets. It is a work of fiction based around a true event that took place in New London, Texas in 1937. A powerful natural gas explosion at the town’s elementary school took the lives of hundreds of children and teachers and changed the lives of their families forever. New children born to these grieving families soon after the tragedy were called the “Daisy Children”. They essentially became “replacements” for the bo THE DAISY CHILDREN by Sofia Grant is heartfelt story of love, loss and family secrets. It is a work of fiction based around a true event that took place in New London, Texas in 1937. A powerful natural gas explosion at the town’s elementary school took the lives of hundreds of children and teachers and changed the lives of their families forever. New children born to these grieving families soon after the tragedy were called the “Daisy Children”. They essentially became “replacements” for the boys and girls lost on that horrific day. The story follows four generations of mothers and daughters in one affected family, alternating between the past and the present. The characters are well-developed and their dysfunctional relationships were expertly portrayed. The plot is well-paced, leading up to a dramatic twist at the end. I enjoyed this well-written family drama depicting how secrets, lies and life choices can affect many generations to come. I am thankful to the publisher for providing me with an early copy.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    An ARC was provided in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence my thoughts in any way. The Daisy Children is based on the real life story of the New London Texas School explosion in 1937. Several hundred people perished, mostly children. This book tells the fictional story of one of the Daisy Children, conceived to replace their lost sibling. This book is so heartbreaking and moving. It shows, with great compassion and caring, what these families went though and how it forever affe An ARC was provided in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence my thoughts in any way. The Daisy Children is based on the real life story of the New London Texas School explosion in 1937. Several hundred people perished, mostly children. This book tells the fictional story of one of the Daisy Children, conceived to replace their lost sibling. This book is so heartbreaking and moving. It shows, with great compassion and caring, what these families went though and how it forever affected them, even generations later. I really loved it and I look forward to more books from this author. 4 1/2 stars!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to my friend, Tina Wilson, for sending me a copy of this book!
  • Nancy Reynolds
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC copy in a Goodreads Giveaway contest by William Morrow Books and this is my HONEST review. The story was inspired by true events. I always enjoy that aspect of a book. However, I found all the characters very negative and ... sad. Other than Scarlet. But I found I had to really force myself to keep reading. And it got really complicated to figure things out - as both Katie and Scarlet found, too. I hate writing a negative review, but I feel honor bound to write my honest feelings. I I won an ARC copy in a Goodreads Giveaway contest by William Morrow Books and this is my HONEST review. The story was inspired by true events. I always enjoy that aspect of a book. However, I found all the characters very negative and ... sad. Other than Scarlet. But I found I had to really force myself to keep reading. And it got really complicated to figure things out - as both Katie and Scarlet found, too. I hate writing a negative review, but I feel honor bound to write my honest feelings. I see others really enjoyed the story - and I'm glad they did. For some reason, this book just never struck a happy chord in me.
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  • Caroline Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book. I agree with the other reader who thought that throwing in a romance was the wrong way to go. The book would have been even better if the main character would have found her inner strength and joy without another romance. I won this book from Good reads.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway.The writing was exceptional but I found the attempt to add romance into the story a bit too much.
  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Author Sofia Grant's novel The Daisy Children begins with a true event. In 1937, an elementary school in New London, Texas, exploded, killing nearly 300 people, mostly children. Her storyline alternates between the aftermath of that event, and the toll it took on one family, and present day Boston.In Boston, Kate has just lost her job, and she and her husband are having problems conceiving a baby. Kate's husband works crazy hours at his job, and has become more distant. When Kate gets a letter i Author Sofia Grant's novel The Daisy Children begins with a true event. In 1937, an elementary school in New London, Texas, exploded, killing nearly 300 people, mostly children. Her storyline alternates between the aftermath of that event, and the toll it took on one family, and present day Boston.In Boston, Kate has just lost her job, and she and her husband are having problems conceiving a baby. Kate's husband works crazy hours at his job, and has become more distant. When Kate gets a letter informing her that she has inherited something from her late grandmother Margaret in Texas, she is shocked. She only met the woman once, and her own mother Georgina didn't get along with her mother, seeing her rarely, and often expounding about what a terrible mother Margaret was.Margaret was what was known in New London as a "Daisy Child." After the horrific explosion, eleven babies were born to families who lost children there. The mothers of those children formed a support group, and worked to keep the memories of their deceased children alive.Margaret didn't get along with her mother Caroline almost from the beginning. She was headstrong, and mean to other children, lording it over them that her father was an important oil man, and their fathers merely worked for hers.She fell in love with Hank, the older brother of her best friend, and a survivor of the explosion. Hank suffered from what we today would call PTSD, and he had problems with alcohol and anger issues. Margaret thought her love could help him.Caroline was dead-set against Margaret marrying Hank, and did everything in her power to turn Margaret against Hank. When Margaret had a daughter of her own, Georgina, she got a taste of her own medicine. Georgina clashed with her mother, and counted down the days until she could leave home.Meanwhile, Kate meets her cousin Scarlett in Texas, and learns a little more about her grandmother as they go about cleaning Margaret's house. Margaret is described by a neighbor as "mean as a wasp and tough as a skewed skunk".Secrets are uncovered, including a whopper of a one near the end that I didn't see coming. Young Margaret states early on "if there was one thing (she) had learned in her eleven years on earth, it was that everyone had something they were hiding." Truer words were never spoken.Grant describes the day of the explosion as Caroline tells Margaret what happened. The descriptions of parents rushing in to look for their children brings to mind the horror of the Newtown massacre and 9/11. Caroline's husband found his daughter Ruby's body, and he "identified her by her shoes that he'd helped her buckle that morning." What a heartbreaking sentence.The Daisy Children is about the often painful relationship between mothers and daughters, and how we never really know what is going on in someone's life, even if we are close to them. This book may make you want to sit down with your grandmother, and ask her to talk about her life. You may be surprised. If you enjoy books about mother/daughter relationships, put The Daisy Children on your reading list.
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  • Annie Camp
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book but was disappointed by the ending. I never really understood Georgina’s hatred of Margaret, or any part of Katie’s relationship with Liam. Felt like a rush job.
  • Janette Mcmahon
    January 1, 1970
    A novel of family secrets and tragedy. The ramifications of choices made and how they linger generation after generation. For readers of Wiseman and de Rosnay.
  • Jan P
    January 1, 1970
    I received this Advanced Reading Copy in exchange for an honest review.The Daisy Children is a novel based 1937 school explosion that killed many children in a rural Texas town. Many of the families reproduced within the year, replacing their lost sons and daughters. This is the fictionalized story of one family and four generations. The focus is on the women, their offspring daughters and the fraught relationships the mothers and daughters had and the secrets they kept. It begins in present day I received this Advanced Reading Copy in exchange for an honest review.The Daisy Children is a novel based 1937 school explosion that killed many children in a rural Texas town. Many of the families reproduced within the year, replacing their lost sons and daughters. This is the fictionalized story of one family and four generations. The focus is on the women, their offspring daughters and the fraught relationships the mothers and daughters had and the secrets they kept. It begins in present day Boston where 4th gen Katie lives with her husband though she questions their future together. Katie's grandmother, 2nd gen, (whom she only met once) dies in TX and she is mentioned in the will. So Katie flies to Texas to attend the reading of the will. The chapters flip back and forth: from the grandmother growing up as a replacement child who could never live up to the sister who was killed in the explosion; to her child, 3rd gen, (who happens to be Katie's mother); and, to Katie herself as she seeks to resolve why these women had such dysfunctional relationships. The story is intriguing and I did enjoy the ending but I didn't think the writing was very good and I found myself getting lost between the generations and ancillary family that popped up here and there. But there is an interesting bit of history here and a story about "the ties that bind" us forever.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    The Daisy Children is inspired by the New London School explosion of 1937; the "Daisies", as they were called, is purely fictional.This story is filled with generations of secrets left for Katie and Scarlett, cousins who have been named in Margaret's will, to discover. Katie has only met her grandmother, Margaret, one time while Scarlett was very close to her. I really enjoyed this book and thank William Morrow for the advanced copy won in a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Fast and easy read-fictional story centered around the real life New London school explosion of 1937. 3 generations of complicated Mother/Daughter relationships.
  • Gayle Slagle
    January 1, 1970
    The Daisy Children by Sofia Grant is a fictional account based on an actual historical event. In 1937, a gas explosion destroyed the school in New London, Texas, killing over 300 children and teachers. The emotional devastation in the town was understandably profound. A group of mothers who had lost their children decided to try to get pregnant following this tragedy and nine months later, their "replacement" children were born. These babies were referred to at The Daisy Children. The book follo The Daisy Children by Sofia Grant is a fictional account based on an actual historical event. In 1937, a gas explosion destroyed the school in New London, Texas, killing over 300 children and teachers. The emotional devastation in the town was understandably profound. A group of mothers who had lost their children decided to try to get pregnant following this tragedy and nine months later, their "replacement" children were born. These babies were referred to at The Daisy Children. The book follows the lives of Margaret, one of these Daisy children. her daughter Georgina, and Georgina's daughter Katie. Each of these characters are impacted by the fact that Margaret was a Daisy child. The relationship between each mother and daughter is examined in detail and explores how an event from the past can impact families for generations. The characters are well developed and their relationships are expertly defined. While the romantic aspects of the book seem somewhat awkward and unconvincing, the story of the mothers and daughters makes this an enjoyable book to read.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    I wish that there was a 4 and a half star option to rate this book because I really liked it more than 4 stars but I save the 5 star rating for the top books of all times. I won this book in a giveaway and don't know if I would have bought it on my own because reading some of the information on this book I thought perhaps it was a really sad read about the children who perished in the 1937 fire. While it does touch upon this a bit, there is much more to the story than that. I love how it tells t I wish that there was a 4 and a half star option to rate this book because I really liked it more than 4 stars but I save the 5 star rating for the top books of all times. I won this book in a giveaway and don't know if I would have bought it on my own because reading some of the information on this book I thought perhaps it was a really sad read about the children who perished in the 1937 fire. While it does touch upon this a bit, there is much more to the story than that. I love how it tells the story from the perspective of three generations of women. Katie's story (set in present day) is a very entertaining tale and I loved how things all seemed to work out in the end for her.
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book that jumps back and forth between generations. Although I don't typically enjoy this style I found myself enjoying the story line. Katie's Grandmother dies and she gets a summons for the reading of the will. She meets her cousin Scarlet. This begins an adventure learning about her grandma and her life and her mother's life. G going through Gomma's things Katie and Scarlet discover things they had never heard before. Thank you to Goodreads for giving me this book to review.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    The March 1937 explosion at the New London School claimed a generation in this small Rust County, Texas town. Some two hundred ninety-five children and teachers lost their lives, changing families and lives forever.This unalterable truth is the basis for the fictional story of the Daisy children. They are the children born the year after the brothers and sisters they will never know were lost in the disaster. They are the replacement children, meant to take the place of the angelic child stolen The March 1937 explosion at the New London School claimed a generation in this small Rust County, Texas town. Some two hundred ninety-five children and teachers lost their lives, changing families and lives forever.This unalterable truth is the basis for the fictional story of the Daisy children. They are the children born the year after the brothers and sisters they will never know were lost in the disaster. They are the replacement children, meant to take the place of the angelic child stolen from their parents far too soon. The narrative spins out a story encompassing generations of mothers and daughters. The unspoken truth of being a replacement lies beneath the mothers’ stories; their relationships with their daughters and of those daughters with their own daughters are, for the most part, drenched in sadness. Whether this is because the mothers could never accept the replacement child for the lost child, or because they simply lacked mothering skills, remains for the reader to decide. Strong, realistic [although mostly unlikeable] characters populate the heart-wrenching tale of struggling, dysfunctional relationships. The plot twists, unfolding slowly as the truth reveals itself; readers are not likely to foresee the stunning twist near the end. The writing captivates the readers, drawing them into the somber narrative. It’s a story that is sometimes difficult to read; a story with motivations that are sometimes difficult to understand. And yet, readers continue to turn the pages, hoping for an outcome that will finally break the lingering spell of the Daisy children.Highly recommended.
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Very slow start to a unique tale of a Texas school that suffers a gas explosion in late 1930s killing some 300 schoolchildren and the social repercussions that follow. The family and social backwash from the tragedy are continuous and transcend generations; even reaching those born so long after the explosion that they no longer know what happened. These later generations have no context within which to place the information they ultimately receive, as two vaguely named ‘cousins’ inherit their l Very slow start to a unique tale of a Texas school that suffers a gas explosion in late 1930s killing some 300 schoolchildren and the social repercussions that follow. The family and social backwash from the tragedy are continuous and transcend generations; even reaching those born so long after the explosion that they no longer know what happened. These later generations have no context within which to place the information they ultimately receive, as two vaguely named ‘cousins’ inherit their last remaining relative’s house in the town where it all happened. The story begins to pick up about three-quarters of the way through and by the end it has become excellent. Unfortunately, some readers may not have the patience to wade through the beginning to get there. I was glad I stuck with it but not sure why I had; I re-read parts so often I was ready to give up. I just could not keep names and characters straight. Ultimately there’s good twists and surprises at the end. I received my copy from the publisher through edelweiss.
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  • Christi Massey
    January 1, 1970
    LOVED this! What an emotional journey, with twists and turns to the end! I know this is a standalone, but I almost wish it were the start of a series. Great characters, great story!
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