Counting Wolves
The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward.Milly’s evil stepmother commits her to a pediatric psych ward. That’s just what the wolf wants. With bunk mates like Red, who’s spiraling out of control; Pig, a fire-bug who claims Milly as her own—but just wants extra dessert—Vanet, a manic teen masquerading as a fairy godmother with wish-granting powers as likely to kill as to help; and the mysterious Wolfgang, rumored to roam for blood at night; it doesn’t take long for Milly to realize that only her dead mother’s book of tales can save her.But Milly’s spells of protection weaken as her wolf stalks the hospital corridors. The ward’s a Dark Wood, and she’s not alone. As her power crumbles, she must let go of her magic and discover new weapons if she is to transform from hunted to hunter.

Counting Wolves Details

TitleCounting Wolves
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 14th, 2017
PublisherThe Publishing House
ISBN-139780993757952
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Fantasy, Fairy Tales, Retellings

Counting Wolves Review

  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    The synopsis begun with "The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward", and I needed to know nothing more to be intrigued!This was a superbly clever novel that used recognisable fairy tale imagery to depict the harsh reality of mental illness. Protagonist, Milly, is both heroine and sufferer. She guides the reader through her world of fear and mistrust and, through her eyes, we begin to see and to feel that whilst all that haunts her might be in her head i The synopsis begun with "The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward", and I needed to know nothing more to be intrigued!This was a superbly clever novel that used recognisable fairy tale imagery to depict the harsh reality of mental illness. Protagonist, Milly, is both heroine and sufferer. She guides the reader through her world of fear and mistrust and, through her eyes, we begin to see and to feel that whilst all that haunts her might be in her head it is no less real and harmful because of that fact.The grace and sensitivity mental illness is treated with made this a poignant and heartfelt read. The characters also added a degree of hilarity and authenticity to this piece in the way they reacted to the suffering of both those around them and themselves (political correctness is clearly not a concern!). It was actually refreshing to see how mental illness can be confronted with brutal honesty and an often off-humour colour and yet not become debilitating because of this. This was an inclusive and authentic portrayal that used fantastical elements to draw out the truth of a very-real illness. If only more books could confront an issue in such a complexly clever and effortlessly illuminating way!A received a copy of this in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Michael F. Stewart for this opportunity.
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  • katwiththehat
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this book turned out to be nothing like what I imagined from the title or blurb... I was expecting something paranormal or fairy tale related, but I totally loved what it was. Michael F Stewart has crafted a world that feels so real in Milly's mind. Without spoiling things, he does a fantastic job of immersing you in what it feels like to live her experience, so that for the first part of the book, you aren't entirely sure what is real and what is not real, just like Milly. Just fabulously Wow, this book turned out to be nothing like what I imagined from the title or blurb... I was expecting something paranormal or fairy tale related, but I totally loved what it was. Michael F Stewart has crafted a world that feels so real in Milly's mind. Without spoiling things, he does a fantastic job of immersing you in what it feels like to live her experience, so that for the first part of the book, you aren't entirely sure what is real and what is not real, just like Milly. Just fabulously done. 5/5 stars.Please excusse typos. Entered on screen reader.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Romila "Milly" Malone is committed to a pediatric psych ward by her evil stepmother, Adriana. With ward mates like Red - whose only getting worse, Pig - whose love for fire is bigger than life, Vanet - a manic teen who grants wishes most likely to harm rather than do good, Peter - a boy who wishes he could fly, Sleeping Beauty - who's usually in a comatose state, Wesley - who believes he's dead and rotten inside and Wolfgang - rumored to be a blood thirsty escapist constantly searching for his n Romila "Milly" Malone is committed to a pediatric psych ward by her evil stepmother, Adriana. With ward mates like Red - whose only getting worse, Pig - whose love for fire is bigger than life, Vanet - a manic teen who grants wishes most likely to harm rather than do good, Peter - a boy who wishes he could fly, Sleeping Beauty - who's usually in a comatose state, Wesley - who believes he's dead and rotten inside and Wolfgang - rumored to be a blood thirsty escapist constantly searching for his next victim; it doesn’t take Milly long to realize that only her dead mother’s book of tales, and her magic 100 count spell can save her (and hopefully the rest of the world, too). The ward's a dark wood, and Milly's protective spells fade the more her wolf stalks her and invades her dreams. As her power fails, she realizes that she must become the hunter instead of the hunted if she wants to survive. In oder to do that, she needs to let go of her magic and find new weapons to use against the deadly wolf. But who or what is the wolf that haunts her? And will she ever be able to defeat the wolf and save herself? Counting Wolves by Michael F. Stewart is a YA psychological contemporary story that revolves around youth mental health and has dark underlying themes. The synopsis described this book as " The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward. " Which was enough to convince me that this book was sure to be amazing! But truthfully, I think it would be more accurate if described as " Girl Interrupted meets Grimm's Fairy Tales... "Milly sees the world as a fairy tale and most of the people around her as character's from her dead mother's fictional book. I won't tell you what Milly or anyone else is diagnosed with, but I will say that I loved how the author intertwined fictional stories with real life matters such as mental health. He uses stories such as Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Peter Pan and so many others to describe mental illnesses like OCD, anxiety, depression and so on. While I'm not an expert on mental health, from what I do know about certain disorders/illnesses, they were portrayed sensitively and fairly accurately. All of the characters in this book are all so raw, colorful and lively and are all dealing with problems of their own. I enjoyed them all for different reasons (even if I didn't like some at first, lol). However, I would have loved if some characters were explored a bit more and given more depth. For example, Milly's boyfriend Billy, he's a secondary character. We don't see much of him, but from what we do see, he seems nice and caring enough. Until all of a sudden he becomes a possessive jerk at one point, and it just sort of felt random. But maybe that was just to reveal his own flaws and show he's not as "perfect" as he and his friends believe him to be when compared to Milly? I would have also liked more back story on Milly's mother and her father. Michael F. Stewart does a great job of keeping his readers guessing on what's real and what isn't (especially during the first half of this book). For people who suffer from delusions, huluicinations, and any other mental illness/ disorders - the things they experience are REAL to them. No matter how "silly" you may think it is, that is their reality. And the author does a great job of making you see the world through Milly's eyes and guessing what's real and what isn't right alongside her. I loved how almost all of these characters had "wolves" of their own and came to recognize them and work to overcome them (although not all of them do by the end of this book). I had such a hard time putting this book down, I practically read it in one go. Its fairly short at just over 200 pgs, but its paced well so you won't feel like you've finished it before you could enjoy it. By the end, I was wishing there was more. I'll definitely be keeping an eye out for more of this author's work. If you're looking for a YA book that focuses on teen mental health and have a love for fairy tales and dark themes then I recommend this book to you. **** I received an eBook copy of this title via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.****
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    *4.25 Stars*I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Counting Wolves tells the story of Milly, who is committed to an adolescent psych ward after she passes out from a panic attack.The characters were really interesting and touching. The story was captivating, I couldn’t put it down. I really empathized with Millie and she even made me doubt what was real or not.I’m not sure how accurate the portrayal of OCD was but the anxiety portrayal seemed relevant to me, it real *4.25 Stars*I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Counting Wolves tells the story of Milly, who is committed to an adolescent psych ward after she passes out from a panic attack.The characters were really interesting and touching. The story was captivating, I couldn’t put it down. I really empathized with Millie and she even made me doubt what was real or not.I’m not sure how accurate the portrayal of OCD was but the anxiety portrayal seemed relevant to me, it really was a great story overall.
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  • Dani - Perspective of a Writer
    January 1, 1970
    Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...Committed to an adolescent psych ward due to her OCD, Milly blames it all on her stepmother who is in league with the wolf stalking her night and day. Kept from the safety of her room, Milly is forced to interact with Red, Pig, Vanet, Peter and the mysterious Wolfgang, each with their own connections to the Dark Wood. As she learns to use other tools to replace her counting Milly uncovers the truths of the fairy tales that her mother left behind Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...Committed to an adolescent psych ward due to her OCD, Milly blames it all on her stepmother who is in league with the wolf stalking her night and day. Kept from the safety of her room, Milly is forced to interact with Red, Pig, Vanet, Peter and the mysterious Wolfgang, each with their own connections to the Dark Wood. As she learns to use other tools to replace her counting Milly uncovers the truths of the fairy tales that her mother left behind. I love mental health and have OCD tendencies (don't we all!) but this is true blue OCD and I still loved it! It's inexplicable, it's crazy and it's due to a deep emotional trauma that is not being dealt with properly... You can find some real gems during book tours and this is another one! I really loved how our time was confined to this adolescent psych ward and the other teens Milly met there. We all have an understanding of what a psych ward looks like but this time it was characterized by all its doors! We know this to be true but it really spoke to me and gave this feel of a dark wood. And each character was someone who would have come from the fairy tales that Milly is obsessed with.The cover is not my favorite but like the title it does its job which is to tell me what the book is about. The chair circle is contemporary and the disco ball gives you a hint as to the thrust of the climax. And counting wolves hits the spot! It feels a little clinical and there is definitely that mental illness vibe to it!Oh the characters (such excellent storycraft)!! HOW I LOVED THEM! This girl is nicknamed Pig and for good reason (she's fading due to the poor lunch service...) and she has a problem with fire. There is this perfect juxtaposition that speaks to your heart... this is a real person, dude, she is slightly messed up due to her parents and does NOT handle stress well! Red's mother died in a car wreck where Red survived her... yeah, definitely something worth freaking out over... was a wolf involved in that accident? Vanet! Totally fulfilled some twisted fairy tale godmother role, man could he figure out how to get things done! And nothing was out of the realm for this amoral youth. There is no stretch to envision the connections these young people have to the fairy tales but at the same time you wouldn't be surprised to know they live out in the real world...Wolfgang was the most intriguing of characters... I was hoping that he would play a bigger role in the story. He was a tad contrived simply because he only saw him twice. Technically what was done with him was enough but maybe because I wanted to know more and have a little more from him he was not quite as well developed as the other three secondary characters. Still he fulfilled the purpose he had for Milly... (When a book is so good you want every aspect to be as good!)The writing is equally as strong as the storycraft! There is this atmosphere that is created that is surreal and yet totally accurate... Milly is mentally ill all right and you start to see her growth as she does as the doctor asks her with regard to her workbook. You get into her head and understand why she feels the way she does about the wolf and her counting even as you see that she can fight her way to the truth... The plot was well developed to help Milly to slowly come to terms with her counting. She makes mistakes (hello Peter!) and learns from them. Perhaps she wouldn't have overcome her counting in such a swift amount of time if not for some of the more unusual happenings (for a psych ward). This was okay with me... the point wasn't that she is cured and can now date and live a happy college bound life but was about seeing the truth and being willing to let go of your delusions for your future!I really appreciated how Doctor Balder was presented as someone who has been trained and knows his business. It wasn't some love interest that helped Milly but the doctor and her experiences applying what she learned about truth. I loved how the other counselor and the nurse used known techniques in dealing with group sessions and discussions. These people are trained! And it showed... Milly had this core group of other teens around her... Red and Pig her roommates plus sleeping beauty and then the three guys, Vanet, Wesley and Peter plus Wolfgang the loner. And they all contribute through their relationship with her to varying degrees. Adrianna, the evil stepmother... when new people come into our lives we don't always see them for what they are nor understand why those (like her father) brought them into our lives... really its all about what we choose to see and Milly putting on those glasses.I was so surprised by how much I enjoyed this book by the time I got to the end. At first I was like 100 count is WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY too long... Too long especially to have food in your month before you can chew... Later (MUCH LATER) this is explained and I accepted the 100 count from that point on. It is freaky and weird and NO WAY could I have slimy food in my mouth that long... This freakyness goes a long to you getting the sense that NO, NO Milly you ARE NOT OKAY! And it made for a hell of a ride... Grief can mess us up especially when it is run through with major guilt... Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of... we all have our own ways to process grief, the point is to move on and keep living...Premise & World Building>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Cover & Title>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Development & Storycraft>⭐⭐⭐⭐Writing & Narrative>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Plot & Pacing>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Relationships>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Feelings>⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐BOTTOM LINE: Fairy Tale Filled Mental Health... learn about OCD... you will not regret it!! Michael F. Stewart's other books are worth looking into...Thanks to Xpresso Book Tours and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.______________________You can find this review and many others on my book blog @ Perspective of a Writer. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter...
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  • Melissa Souza
    January 1, 1970
    **Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for sending me an ARC of this book in return for an honest review.5 glorious stars!!!Okay, deep breaths before I start actually writing a review for this book. I just have to say, I so did not expect this book to turn out the way it did. I was expecting a retelling of the fairytales with a twist. But, it took me completely by surprise and in an amazing way. So, as you can see there are all smiles here. :DFirstly, I absolutely loved the concept of the no **Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for sending me an ARC of this book in return for an honest review.5 glorious stars!!!Okay, deep breaths before I start actually writing a review for this book. I just have to say, I so did not expect this book to turn out the way it did. I was expecting a retelling of the fairytales with a twist. But, it took me completely by surprise and in an amazing way. So, as you can see there are all smiles here. :DFirstly, I absolutely loved the concept of the novel. The idea of setting the story in a psychiatric ward was interesting. The fact that the book was referred to as The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales was intriguing and the author, Michael F. Stewart, has pulled it off brilliantly. I loved his writing style as well. The story was filled with beautiful prose and imagery. The descriptions weren't overly detailed but it created enough of a fantastical feel for the reader to get immersed in. I also loved the intertwining fantasy elements set against the starkness of such a clinical environment. It made for the perfect setting and added a depth of richness to the story.Secondly, I adored the characters. Each and every one of them were fleshed out and portrayed in a uniquely complex manner. I really applaud the author for such intricacies and the fact that the story lacked the usual love triangle made it even more refreshing. This book definitely steered clear of the usual YA cliches. Thank goodness for that. I really liked how the wackiness of the characters really jumps off the pages. The MC Milly (or Romila Malone) was described well. I liked how the author didn't focus on how the character looked but how she dealt with her issues and faced her fears. She comes across as a very resilient girl albeit having to overcome some deep seeded insecurities and vulnerabilities. I also liked how she was willing to stand up for herself and own up to her mistakes. I think the characters had a rawness and authenticity to them which I greatly appreciated.But at the heart of this story, I think what blew me away was how the author portrayed mental illness. It wasn't described in a harsh light but was shown in the most beautifully humane way. The way the fairytales were interwoven with PTSD, OCD, bi-polar disorder, etc made for a gorgeous read. The way the MC deals with anxiety is shown with such emotion and rawness left me speechless. I could so relate to her. All of us go through times in our lives when we are paralysed by our pasts or circumstances, but we are called to push past our inadequacies. I think the author does an amazing job of bringing these to light. This book is about love, relationships, overcoming fear and embracing your quirks. It's about not letting a mental-illness define you and that's what I loved about it. Overall, it was a fantastic read. I might have read it faster as the pacing was brisk. Unfortunately, Uni got in the way and I read it a bit slowly. Alas, it's still going on my favourites. I can't wait to read more books by Michael F. Stewart. I'd definitely recommend reading this one, you will not be disappointed in the least :D
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  • Ash †Reviews of a FearStreetZombie†
    January 1, 1970
    Why is it always the damn stepmother? The evil stepmother who betrays me and Snow White and poor Gretel- and who won't let me leave the ER. And all these doors. This book was NOTHING like I expected and it will stay with me for as long as I live. Ugh there is so much I want to say about this book but I don't want to give anything away! I don't want to take the magic away from any reader who will pick this book up. Because that is was this book was to me. Magic. I can promise you that when you r Why is it always the damn stepmother? The evil stepmother who betrays me and Snow White and poor Gretel- and who won't let me leave the ER. And all these doors. This book was NOTHING like I expected and it will stay with me for as long as I live. Ugh there is so much I want to say about this book but I don't want to give anything away! I don't want to take the magic away from any reader who will pick this book up. Because that is was this book was to me. Magic. I can promise you that when you read the blurb, you will think it is about one thing and when you read the book, your socks will be blown off. You will not expect how this book goes. It is a short read but SO POWERFUL! I loved every single one of the characters. Which I can confess is very very very rare. There is always a character or two or more that I hate, but not in this book. The writing was so amazing and so smooth it was like silk. It just flowed with no bump at all and it keeps you so enthralled. You will NOT want to put this book down because from page one, you will want to know how this ends. I am so in love with this book and so so so happy I was able to read it. Counting Wolves is a book I would HIGHLY recommend.**In addition, I have read a LOT of books involving all kinds of mental illnesses... and this one is the best one I have every read, hands down.
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  • mells_view
    January 1, 1970
    Counting Wolves is the story of Milly Malone. A girl who is being stalked by the Wolf. A wolf who will claw at her and drag her to the Dark Wood if she doesn't use her magic to stop it. Milly's evil step mother checks her into a hospitals psych ward, exactly where the Wolf wants her. A ward run by witches and toads, where she meets other teens who are fairytale characters come to life. Will Milly get out of the psych ward before the Wolf gets her? Read Counting Wolves and see.I really enjoyed th Counting Wolves is the story of Milly Malone. A girl who is being stalked by the Wolf. A wolf who will claw at her and drag her to the Dark Wood if she doesn't use her magic to stop it. Milly's evil step mother checks her into a hospitals psych ward, exactly where the Wolf wants her. A ward run by witches and toads, where she meets other teens who are fairytale characters come to life. Will Milly get out of the psych ward before the Wolf gets her? Read Counting Wolves and see.I really enjoyed this story. It wasn't what I expected from the blurb. It says Breakfast Club meets Grimm's fairytales, and I definitely see that, but I also get a lighter Donnie Darko. Counting Wolves was a unique take on mental illness and a young mind. The perfect mixture of coming of age and illness. Do I think that this story is perfectly accurate, probably not, but it FEELS pretty close. It feels right. The way Stewart has the story written makes you really feel what's going on in Milly's mind. You believe her. You trust her. You're right there with her. Which makes all of the revelations feel that much more rewarding. Each layer that unfolds as you read is exciting and even sometimes upsetting. I laughed as I read. I teared up as I read. I even got a little angry as I read. An emotional read.This was such a good read. If you like YA that isn't all that it seems then this is the story for you!*ARC provided by NetGalley for an honest review!*
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  • Moira
    January 1, 1970
    Number of pages: 216Number of times read (including the time before this review): 1Rating (out of five stars): 3Release Date: August 14th 2017*Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing a copy in exchange for a review. My opinions are honest and my own.I’m going to do an updated review for Counting Wolves once I get my hands on a finished copy and find the time to read it, because I think this one deserves a second chance. I think the reason this is only getting 3 stars is mainly bec Number of pages: 216Number of times read (including the time before this review): 1Rating (out of five stars): 3Release Date: August 14th 2017*Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for providing a copy in exchange for a review. My opinions are honest and my own.I’m going to do an updated review for Counting Wolves once I get my hands on a finished copy and find the time to read it, because I think this one deserves a second chance. I think the reason this is only getting 3 stars is mainly because I kept expecting it to be something it wasn’t. The synopsis on Goodreads makes it sound like a fairy tale retelling adventure type book, and the first few chapters make it seem like something it’s not.Let’s get this out of the way; this is a mental illness book, plain and simple. That is not a spoiler. If that is intended to be a spoiler, I will think twice about supporting this author. I’m not going to share with you what Milly’s mental illness is, not because it would spoil the book for you, but because it’s really not necessary for me to do so, and I cannot speak to the accuracy of the portrayal. However, as a person with depression, I can say that the character with depression was well done based on my experience with the illness. I cannot speak on the representation of OCD, PTSD, or bipolar disorder (I am also going off what is stated in the book for the diagnosis of the characters).The first chapter opens with a scene in a high school that is frankly over-described. Within the chapter, it seems like the author is trying to set a fairy tale esque tone for the novel, but this dies after the first few chapters. This is where my perception of what I thought the book was trying to do got in the way. I thought the fairy tales would have more meaning than they did, especially the ones thrown in along with commentary from Milly on the moral of the tale, leading to confusion on my end. Some of the tales included simply did not need to be there.From what I remember of being 15, Milly as a character was well done. At times her voice was young, while at other times she was fairly mature. She also makes mistakes and experiences a lot of growth in Counting Wolves.Overall, while it almost made me emotional a few times, my perception of what Counting Wolves was about made the novel less enjoyable, earning it 3 stars out of 5. I will give it another try at some point in the future.You can read more of my reviews on my blog.
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  • Lisa Mandina
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me a lot of the book Liar, by Justine Larbalestier. Throughout the beginning of the book, I wondered, is this really a magical story, or is it just a girl who is dealing with psychological issues that cause her OCD and nightmares. I really liked how the author took the different illnesses and conditions of the patients in the psych ward and made them into aspects of a fairy tale. This is part of what kept me guessing the entire time on which way the story was actually going to This book reminded me a lot of the book Liar, by Justine Larbalestier. Throughout the beginning of the book, I wondered, is this really a magical story, or is it just a girl who is dealing with psychological issues that cause her OCD and nightmares. I really liked how the author took the different illnesses and conditions of the patients in the psych ward and made them into aspects of a fairy tale. This is part of what kept me guessing the entire time on which way the story was actually going to go. All of the characters were really well developed and had interesting stories, except maybe Red. While she definitely had a great back story and symptoms/aspects of a fairy tale, I don't know that I got to really "see" her character as I read it. But Pig was very easily pictured, as well as Vanet and Peter. Another interesting bit is how everyone had the name or nickname that fit them into the fairy tale. That was another detail the author wove throughout the story that kept me on my toes looking to see just what was real and what was not. You can read my full review on my blog, Lisa Loves Literature.
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  • Amy Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so hard to put down! I read it in two sittings only because I HAD to sleep. This story is so magical and so is this author's writing style. The story just flows so beautifully. Yes, fairy tales are a huge part of Molly's story and so is her mental illness. I don't want to spoil anything for you in this book but it is intriguing, eye opening and life changing. It will stick with you. I highly recommend this novel, you won't be disappointed! I absolutely loved this book!Copy given by This book was so hard to put down! I read it in two sittings only because I HAD to sleep. This story is so magical and so is this author's writing style. The story just flows so beautifully. Yes, fairy tales are a huge part of Molly's story and so is her mental illness. I don't want to spoil anything for you in this book but it is intriguing, eye opening and life changing. It will stick with you. I highly recommend this novel, you won't be disappointed! I absolutely loved this book!Copy given by publisher and NetGalley for a fair & honest review.
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  • Adena
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an ebook copy of this title via NetGalley*Romila (though she prefers Milly) is a counter. She always has to count to 100 (never more, never less) to walk through doorways, to take bites of her food, before she talks... all to keep the wolf away. The stress of counting at school catches up with her, causing her to faint and get sent to the hospital. The doctors and Adriana (Milly's stepmother) decide it is best for her to stay at a psych ward when all Milly wants to do is go home and *I received an ebook copy of this title via NetGalley*Romila (though she prefers Milly) is a counter. She always has to count to 100 (never more, never less) to walk through doorways, to take bites of her food, before she talks... all to keep the wolf away. The stress of counting at school catches up with her, causing her to faint and get sent to the hospital. The doctors and Adriana (Milly's stepmother) decide it is best for her to stay at a psych ward when all Milly wants to do is go home and attend her school's dance. During her time in psychiatric care, Milly meets and becomes friends with a group of patients who find some comfort in being with other "crazies."Wow... wow, wow. I can't remember how I found this book, but I remember thinking it was a fairy-tale retelling. The characters are all there: an evil stepmother, Pig, Red, a fairy godmother, the wolf. It's just not in the way you would imagine. And I loved it. It does get repetitive as far as mentioning the wolf and the Dark Wood. However, that's how anxiety can be. It's not something that comes, then goes away. It's constant, and I believe Counting Wolves provides a great insight into its effects. This is a must-read!
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  • S.L. Dearing
    January 1, 1970
    Let me begin by saying, I have NEVER read a first person present POV I have liked, let alone loved, until now. Counting Wolves by Michael F. Stewart is an amazing book. The main character is Millie, and Stewart has given her voice the resonates with the world of the mentally ill. She is likable, smart, and seriously mentally ill. I loved the way that Stewart weaves the images in Millie's mind. You can feel how intense everything is and how she really doesn't understand. The characters at school, Let me begin by saying, I have NEVER read a first person present POV I have liked, let alone loved, until now. Counting Wolves by Michael F. Stewart is an amazing book. The main character is Millie, and Stewart has given her voice the resonates with the world of the mentally ill. She is likable, smart, and seriously mentally ill. I loved the way that Stewart weaves the images in Millie's mind. You can feel how intense everything is and how she really doesn't understand. The characters at school, as well as the other kids in the mental ward, all feel true. I could see everything happening and I felt as if I was there, watching.As someone who is not suffering from mental illness, I felt like I could finally understand, as much as a person can who doesn't suffer from this illness. I was riveted from the first page. Stewart's writing is exceptional and I'm looking forward to reading more from him.I would suggest this book be read by all. Young and old, regardless of mental health. It is an exceptional read.*I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know where to begin. This book is about mental illness. It's fictional with a twist. Mental Illness is not a nasty word. In my family, I have seen a unit like where this one takes place in. So this isn't a world unfamiliar to me. There are a few things that couldn't have happened in real life (at least not at the facility I know.) But anyway this story ends so powerfully I was in tears. And I almost gave up reading it because it was a little to close to my own heart for me! I like how th I don't know where to begin. This book is about mental illness. It's fictional with a twist. Mental Illness is not a nasty word. In my family, I have seen a unit like where this one takes place in. So this isn't a world unfamiliar to me. There are a few things that couldn't have happened in real life (at least not at the facility I know.) But anyway this story ends so powerfully I was in tears. And I almost gave up reading it because it was a little to close to my own heart for me! I like how things were realistic. The different problems and personalities worked well in the story. I love how the characters nicknames fell into her world. Watching her heal was like a balm to my soul! You have to read this story to get the full effect!If you like stories about mental illness, abuse, cancer, dysfunctional families, and stories with a little twist then this might be for you!
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  • Mrs. Europaea
    January 1, 1970
    I was disappointed. I'd read so many great reviews and it just didn't come together the same way for me. I LOVED the concept. I liked Milly, Vanet was interesting but I felt like he could have been developed more. I love the twist at the end but there was a lot of foreshadowing that dulled the impact of the final reveal. I also think Milly came around to self-realization far to quickly. Especially in highly stressed and violent situations, it didn't seem plausible for someone who hopped through I was disappointed. I'd read so many great reviews and it just didn't come together the same way for me. I LOVED the concept. I liked Milly, Vanet was interesting but I felt like he could have been developed more. I love the twist at the end but there was a lot of foreshadowing that dulled the impact of the final reveal. I also think Milly came around to self-realization far to quickly. Especially in highly stressed and violent situations, it didn't seem plausible for someone who hopped through doorways for 3 years to be that level-headed and aware in just a few days time. I think the author played it safe in a few parts. I mean, you have this psychiatric hospital as a perfect setting for some real hallucinations/delusions, and it was all just kind of... meh. I guess it was more of a book about coping with anxiety than the bat-shit-crazy I was hoping for.
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  • Theresa Grissom
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC copy of this book!Wow! This is the second book I have read by Michael F. Stewart and I'm quickly becoming a fan. I wasn't sure what to expect when I started but it's been a while since I've finished a book so quickly. I literally could not put this down. I laughed, then felt bad for laughing, then figured it was ok... We are all crazy in our own way! I loved the characters! They each have their own set of issues to deal with and that is what made me love them. So w Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC copy of this book!Wow! This is the second book I have read by Michael F. Stewart and I'm quickly becoming a fan. I wasn't sure what to expect when I started but it's been a while since I've finished a book so quickly. I literally could not put this down. I laughed, then felt bad for laughing, then figured it was ok... We are all crazy in our own way! I loved the characters! They each have their own set of issues to deal with and that is what made me love them. So who cares if your friend thinks he's a fairy? Thanks for this book, Michael Stewart! Looking forward to seeing what else you have coming!
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    *received from Netgalley*Check out my review here
  • Minx -The Genre Minx Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    When I sat down to read Counting Wolves I was more than a little surprised. I was expecting to read a fantasy but what I received was so much more. By the time I had finished this story I was deeply moved by Milly’s journey. If you are looking to read a fantasy understand that this story takes characteristics of well-known fairytales and applies those characteristics to the characters of this story but it is not a re-telling or a fantasy story.What Counting Wolves really is about is Milly and ho When I sat down to read Counting Wolves I was more than a little surprised. I was expecting to read a fantasy but what I received was so much more. By the time I had finished this story I was deeply moved by Milly’s journey. If you are looking to read a fantasy understand that this story takes characteristics of well-known fairytales and applies those characteristics to the characters of this story but it is not a re-telling or a fantasy story.What Counting Wolves really is about is Milly and how her mother’s life and death affected her. Milly has a compulsion and it has created a very negative environment that has impacted not only her and her family but her health as well. After collapsing at school Milly was taken to the hospital and subsequently committed to a pediatric psych ward by her step-mother who claims to be concerned about Milly’s welfare.At the ward, referred to the “Dark Wood,” is where Milly meets other young adults that are suffering with various mental health issues. Each teen has characteristics that are in-line with the fairytale theme that Milly sees the world as and she assigns them their own “role” in her world. These characters are given such care in their crafting, I found that every character grabbed my attention and held it. They are all so very unique and what they add to the plot cannot be expressed without spoiling it for you.I can say that I am truly blown away by how the author was able to take a tough subject, make it entertaining and relatable but still treat the subject matter with respect. By the time I had finished this book I understood the message of the book and it was very clear. Although Counting Wolves was not a fantasy like I was expecting it was truly a meaningful book that had a wonderful mixture of humor, resilience, and hope.This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Xpresso Book Tours. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.Find this review and more at The Genre Minx Book Reviews
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  • Chelsea Fryou
    January 1, 1970
    Original review can be found at Freeing Fantasy. You can also follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and Bloglovin.  ARC of Counting Wolves provided through Xpresso Book Tours for an honest review. Counting Wolves was such an amazing surprise! When I first started reading this book I wasn't exactly sure what to expect but I did not expect the awesomeness that unfolded page after page!In the synopsis, it does not say why Milly is in the psych ward so unfortunately, I can't dive into that part of her cha Original review can be found at Freeing Fantasy. You can also follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and Bloglovin.  ARC of Counting Wolves provided through Xpresso Book Tours for an honest review. Counting Wolves was such an amazing surprise! When I first started reading this book I wasn't exactly sure what to expect but I did not expect the awesomeness that unfolded page after page!In the synopsis, it does not say why Milly is in the psych ward so unfortunately, I can't dive into that part of her character. But let me just say that it's really good. What I can say is that Milly is an awesome lead character. For someone with so many issues, she has a unique strength to her. Sure she feels as if her quirks are some what embarrassing but she also has an "I don't care" attitude towards it, well sometimes. I loved her thought process and how she looked at the world around her. Even if her depiction of it wasn't always accurate it was still awfully entertaining.As for the other kids in the psych ward, well there really is something to be said about having an awesomely quirky cast of characters. They really helped to make this book something special, each and every one of them. With even one of them missing from this book, it would not be what it is.Two of the things that made this book such a work of brilliance was the fairy tale references and the look into mental illness in teenagers.The fairy tales are such a strong aspect of this book. If the fairy tales aren't being out right mentioned then they are being squeezed in here and there. Heck, even a good portion of the characters were a subtle nod to different fairy tales. This book even included other less known tales which was really interesting. As a fan of those classics, it really made Counting Wolves extra fun to read.The look into mental illness in teenagers was wonderful. In some cases, it felt like there wasn't really an illness so much as a scared child trying to find a safe place. With those with an actual illness, it was interesting to get their point of view on something they considered normal while also getting the outsiders look from either Milly, other patients, or the hospital staff. Having so many different points of views on the subject raises a lot of questions as a reader.How far gone was too far gone? Could the patient actually control it? How much was part of their illness and how much was over exaggerated? Should they learn to accept it or change it? With all these different questions I developed reading this book, I felt like I was getting answers in one way or another. Or at least I was getting Milly's answers, which worked for me, at least in reference to the characters around her.Honestly, I could go on and on about little bits and pieces of this book that caught my attention. Everything from what I've already mentioned, to the different family dynamics, to how health care actually takes care of those in need, to the humor that actually had me laughing out load. Counting Wolves has so many different layers and keeps the reader entertained all the way through. You would be CRAZY(hint, hint) not to read this one!
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This is a really different but unique fairy tale retelling. I guess I should say fairy tales, actually, since there are so many different ones mixed in there. There's Peter Pan, Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty, the Three Little Pigs, and Cinderella, to name a few. The characters taken from these stories are really easy to identify, but that doesn't make th I received a copy of this book from the publisher on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This is a really different but unique fairy tale retelling. I guess I should say fairy tales, actually, since there are so many different ones mixed in there. There's Peter Pan, Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty, the Three Little Pigs, and Cinderella, to name a few. The characters taken from these stories are really easy to identify, but that doesn't make them one-dimensional. In fact, it adds a really interesting depth that takes them from mere characters to archetypes. It was very interesting to discover where each one was going to go. The main character is based on Cinderella and her name is Milly. Milly is a girl with compulsions, specifically counting. She must count to 100 before she can go through doorways, before she can speak, before she can eat and before she can swallow. If she's touched while she's counting, she needs to start over, and if she's interrupted while talking, she needs to restart her count. If she doesn't, something bad will happen- the wolf will come. These compulsions rule her entire life, and after fainting in gym class, she's taken to the hospital by her stepmom. Milly's real mom died when she was 12, and since then, she sees her step-mom as a wolf, someone who's aim is to ruin her life. And one of the ways she does that is by having Milly admitted to a psych ward. In the ward, Milly meets many different people, and they all have their issues. One of the things I really liked about this book was the representation of different mental illnesses. There's bipolar disorder, anxiety, PTSD, OCD, depression, and others. It was nice to see so many represented in, from what I know, a realistic way. I'm not positive that all of these illnesses were represented accurately, or the treatments, but I did like the diversity in the mental illnesses portrayed. Speaking of diversity, there were different races also represented here, which I also enjoyed seeing. It shows that diversity isn't limited to just one check in another box, but sometimes multiple. That's what real diversity is. One thing I didn't like about this book was that Milly's diagnosis wasn't very clear, even at the end. At first, the doctor's believe she has anxiety and OCD, along with an eating disorder and depression. From there, her diagnosis gets narrowed down, but we never really figure out what exactly Milly has. Maybe that's realistic, but it did frustrate me because I wanted to know. I also am curious about how accurate the description of the treatments were for each illness. And finally, I really disliked patients using other patient's mental illnesses against them. There was a scene where a character was forced into a panic attack because of two other characters, who did so deliberately, and then those characters never really apologized for it. And that was super difficult to read. Maybe that's realistic, I don't know, but it was really not my favorite part. Plus, the panic attack and the way it was described made me very anxious. That's not the book's fault, but I wanted to address it in case people who are also affected by that read this book.Overall, I really enjoyed this book and thought that the fairy tale retelling aspect was unique and fun to read about. This was a clever book about mental health, and all together it's an exciting, quick read that leaves you satisfied but wanting more.
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  • Elena Love
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book for free, in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.*I knew this book was going to be extraordinary, before I even started reading! Its unique storyline is enough to draw you in and make you want to keep reading. It's also quite unpredictable and you might end up getting lost in its complicated nature. The characters themselves are some of the weirdest - in a good way - and most fascinating people I've read about recently and I immensely enjoyed *I received this book for free, in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.*I knew this book was going to be extraordinary, before I even started reading! Its unique storyline is enough to draw you in and make you want to keep reading. It's also quite unpredictable and you might end up getting lost in its complicated nature. The characters themselves are some of the weirdest - in a good way - and most fascinating people I've read about recently and I immensely enjoyed getting to know them and their stories. The plot was captivating and unlike anything I've read before. The story takes place in a psych ward, which is quite unusual and extremely interesting. It follows the life of Milly, who is admitted into a psychiatric hospital by her stepmom...Evil stepmother vibes, anyone? She' s trying to count her way out of the wolf's dangerous intentions The counting is obsessive, but it does a great job at keeping the wolf at bay. This results in her being checked into the psych ward, where the wolf is waiting for her...There, she meets some very unique and kind of weird characters. They all have their own stories, which makes them even more interesting, and struggle with different things from the very beginning. Milly was such a complicated, but at the same time likable, character. She feels everything so intensely that, you cannot help but feel it alongside her. The images in her mind become so vivid and show her hidden strength, that won't be deterred by any mental illness. She's determined to destroy the wolf and overcome her fears, in order to live a happily ever after. Her development throughout the story was very impressive and I really enjoyed being a small part of her journey.The rest of the characters definitely added a touch of something different, something that hasn't been explored before, in the story and made it even more interesting to read. Every single one of them had something special to offer and it was quite obvious from the impact they had on the plot and how it progressed. I feel like the book wouldn't have been what it is without them. I'm not going to sit here and talk about every single one of them because it would be so much better for you guys to get to know them and explore their true natures while you're reading the book so, I'll just say that they do come from fairy tales and that is enough to make you fall in love with them!Overall, Counting Wolves was quite the spooky mix of all fairy tales. And if not all, definitely most of them. The plot was dark and mysterious, the characters so likable and easy to connect to, and the writing absolutely beautiful and captivating. I knew I would enjoy this one just by reading its synopsis and I'm so glad that I wasn't disappointed. I would definitely recommend it to those of you who are looking for something different to read and of course, enjoy! Also, I would suggest going into this with an open mind and without really knowing a lot!
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  • Rebecca June
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on my blog, June Reads Books. "It reminds me that these people may all be crazy, but they're still people. With dreams and fears. (Chapter 11) I am extremely grateful to Xpresso Book Tours, Michael F. Stewart, and The Publishing House for a free advanced reader’s copy in return for an honest review. Milly doesn’t think she needs help. She’s counting to save the world from the big bad wolf by maintaining her magic spell. Honestly, her evil stepmother just doesn’t This review was originally posted on my blog, June Reads Books. "It reminds me that these people may all be crazy, but they're still people. With dreams and fears. (Chapter 11) I am extremely grateful to Xpresso Book Tours, Michael F. Stewart, and The Publishing House for a free advanced reader’s copy in return for an honest review. Milly doesn’t think she needs help. She’s counting to save the world from the big bad wolf by maintaining her magic spell. Honestly, her evil stepmother just doesn’t want anything to do with her, which is why she’s locked her up in this psych ward, right?When admitted into the ward, Milly meets a strange cast of characters that resemble those from the fairytales her mother used to read her before she died. All of them are stuck in this place until the doctors figure out how to fix them. All of the patients are quirky and angsty—I would definitely say the Breakfast Club vibes are there. But as Milly spends more time with them, she begins to care for each of them and seek ways to give them confidence that she doesn’t have. Though her meddling isn’t always helpful, it’s as if these desires to help her new friends are loosening the chains to her counting spell.All of the characters have struggles and traumatizing events that just pull at your heartstrings until you can’t bare it anymore. Each of their quirks and mental illnesses seem to stem out of these experiences and chain them to those memories. If that doesn’t make your empathy for each character go through the roof, I’m not sure what will.The more time Milly spends at the ward, the more the wolf seems to take shape and she sees what she’s really running from, what she’s trying to save the world from. Will she be able to stand face to face and banish him, or will she have to cast her spell until it kills her?Michael F. Stewart writes a quirky, dark, engaging story about how fear manifests itself. This book was original, heartbreaking, and funny—I can’t wait until you get into the heads of this ragtag group of teens and watch as your heart melts for them. Stewart’s characters have layers of depth and their struggles end up bringing each other closer in support. If you pick up this book, you won’t want to put it down.
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    January 1, 1970
    Because it was described as Breakfast Club meets Grimm’s Fairy Tales I had a certain idea of what I thought it was going to be but when I actually started reading it – WOW, my mental picture was WAY OFF! In some ways though it did have a faint reminiscent retelling of the aspect of Alice in Wonderland’s story when she learns to face her fears and overcome them.This book will not be what you expect especially after you read the synopsis, just be prepared to be blow away. It’s not very long so I h Because it was described as Breakfast Club meets Grimm’s Fairy Tales I had a certain idea of what I thought it was going to be but when I actually started reading it – WOW, my mental picture was WAY OFF! In some ways though it did have a faint reminiscent retelling of the aspect of Alice in Wonderland’s story when she learns to face her fears and overcome them.This book will not be what you expect especially after you read the synopsis, just be prepared to be blow away. It’s not very long so I highly recommend tuning out from the world for a bit because it’s so much better if you can just binge your way through it in one sitting. His characters with a fairy tale bent will endear themselves to you and you will find yourself wanting to know how their lives go beyond the pages.Stewart has created a world that feels so real you will become absorbed in this book and begin to forget the world around you as reality and fantasy begin to melt together just like what his characters are going through. There is a touching balance between humor and heartfelt in a novel that at its heart shows the simplicity in finding normalcy in an out of control world. I did appreciate the compassionate and beautiful way the author dealt with mental health issues.I actually envy all new readers to this book because you get to experience the magic of this for the first time. Enjoy the feelings of amazement and wonder that will follow you through this fantastical journey of finding friendship in the place you least expect it.
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  • Nancy (The Avid Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    Counting wolves is Milly's story of how she deals with her fear. Of how it affects her life from day to day; from minute to minute; of how she comes to terms with her fear. The challenges that she has to face day after day, the hiding, the covering up of the lies that live within her. Milly has this wolf that hunts her day in and day out, nightmare after nightmare that will tear her limb from limb if it catches her. She has to use her magic to keep the wolf from attacking her and the ones she lo Counting wolves is Milly's story of how she deals with her fear. Of how it affects her life from day to day; from minute to minute; of how she comes to terms with her fear. The challenges that she has to face day after day, the hiding, the covering up of the lies that live within her. Milly has this wolf that hunts her day in and day out, nightmare after nightmare that will tear her limb from limb if it catches her. She has to use her magic to keep the wolf from attacking her and the ones she loves and cares about. After she passes out in gym class her evil stepmother has her committed in a physic ward where she meets a lot of new friends that help her deal with her wolf while she in return helps them to deal with their wolf. When I read the summary for Counting Wolves with Milly and her wolf and using her magic to stop the wolf lead me to believe that it was a totally different story than I was anticipating. But that definitely didn't stop me from enjoying it. I have loved reading Milly's story and I hope that I have not given too much away because I do think that this is Milly's story to tell so I am going to let her tell it. Counting Wolves is a brilliantly written story one which I think would benefit a lot of people. Counting Wolves is one of those stories that will stay with me for a long time to come if not forever. I believe that Milly's story will help me with my own wolf. If you like a little magic and fairy tales in your life then Counting Wolves is just the story for you. Pick up your copy today and join Milly on her journey with fighting her wolf.
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  • J.B. Rockwell
    January 1, 1970
    Breakfast Club with a dash of Grimm's fairy tales. Counting Wolves is a poignant story of a young girl struggling for control in an oft overwhelming world. Bereft after the loss of her mother, Milly clings to the her one last connection to her: a book of fairy tales that might be magic--a spellbook, the solution to every problem hidden in its pages--or might just be a crutch. A way to deny the reality of the world her. One where there is no mother, just a stepmother Milly mostly hates and, so Mi Breakfast Club with a dash of Grimm's fairy tales. Counting Wolves is a poignant story of a young girl struggling for control in an oft overwhelming world. Bereft after the loss of her mother, Milly clings to the her one last connection to her: a book of fairy tales that might be magic--a spellbook, the solution to every problem hidden in its pages--or might just be a crutch. A way to deny the reality of the world her. One where there is no mother, just a stepmother Milly mostly hates and, so Milly believes, mostly hates her too. A world condensed down into the psychiatric hospital where said stepmother sent her--a place filled with kids with fairy tale names, and very un-fairy tale like emotional problems.Like Milly. Milly and her counting--the one thing that keeps the wolf at bay.I thoroughly enjoyed this book both for the raw, emotional reality of it, and the subtle fairy taleu-esque details. Funny at times, touching at other, Counting Wolves is a story about trying to find your center and something normal in a world that seems well out of your control. It's a girl struggling with loss during those most difficult and vulnerable early teens years. Most of all, it's a story about finding friendships in the most unexpected of people, and unlikely of places. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it.
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  • Joanne Myers
    January 1, 1970
    The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward. This line alone was enough to get me super excited to read this book. I love The Breakfast Club AND I love any books that are retellings, reimaginings or even just linked to/crossed over with standard fairy tales. Michael F Stewart brings us Milly's world. Milly and her counting. Milly and the Wolf. Milly and the Psych Ward. Milly and her fellow patients. It's all about Milly. Milly suffers from OCD (Obsessive The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward. This line alone was enough to get me super excited to read this book. I love The Breakfast Club AND I love any books that are retellings, reimaginings or even just linked to/crossed over with standard fairy tales. Michael F Stewart brings us Milly's world. Milly and her counting. Milly and the Wolf. Milly and the Psych Ward. Milly and her fellow patients. It's all about Milly. Milly suffers from OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and is a counter. It keeps the wolf away.Firstly, the main character is really intriguing right from the beginning. She is a fascinating girl who is coping in her own way with her wolf. The side characters, Pig, Red & Vanet (to name a few) are equally fascinating. They all have their own issues and their own ways of dealing with what life throws at them.The book is a really quick read. It pulls you in from the first chapter and I, for one, felt like I was in the psych ward with all the characters.An absolutely fantastic book that has gone straight into my favourite reads list. I can't wait to read something else by this author.This book was recommended to me by a fellow netgalley member and I was accepted by the publisher for a copy of the book in exchange for a review (through netgalley).
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  • J.M. Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting book. I love all things fairy tale so when I read the blurb for this story, I was really excited. The thing is, Counting Wolves didn't match with what I was anticipating at all. That being said, I enjoyed the story and I loved the fact that Milly was able to face and overcome her fears to vanquish the wolf. The author did a really good job describing her fears and writing her character in such a way that I was kept guessing what was going to happen through the whole story This was an interesting book. I love all things fairy tale so when I read the blurb for this story, I was really excited. The thing is, Counting Wolves didn't match with what I was anticipating at all. That being said, I enjoyed the story and I loved the fact that Milly was able to face and overcome her fears to vanquish the wolf. The author did a really good job describing her fears and writing her character in such a way that I was kept guessing what was going to happen through the whole story. Overall, I liked it.Ultimately, I ended taking a star off because it just didn't meet what I was expecting. The description built up my hopes for an incredible retelling (which I am a total sucker for), and even though I appreciate the nods to fairy tales and common fairy tale characters, this just wasn't it. I would probably still recommend this to fantasy readers and fairy tale fans, however I wouldn't bill it to sound like a retelling. If I had gone into it with a closer expectation to what the plot line actually was, I might have rated this higher.**I received a free book of this in exchange for an honest review**
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  • Bonnie Keck
    January 1, 1970
    Not kindle unlimited {where get most of my books most times} but this was one of those freebie here's a free book we really hope you like it, and maybe get around to reviewing it. I don't like thrillers in particular, not quite sure why, but the remade or sorta kinda fairy tale thing, yeah.The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward.Milly’s evil stepmother commits her to a pediatric psych ward. That’s just what the wolf wants. With bunk mates like Red, wh Not kindle unlimited {where get most of my books most times} but this was one of those freebie here's a free book we really hope you like it, and maybe get around to reviewing it. I don't like thrillers in particular, not quite sure why, but the remade or sorta kinda fairy tale thing, yeah.The Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward.Milly’s evil stepmother commits her to a pediatric psych ward. That’s just what the wolf wants. With bunk mates like Red, who’s spiraling out of control; Pig, a fire-bug who claims Milly as her own—but just wants extra dessert—Vanet, a manic teen masquerading as a fairy godmother with wish-granting powers as likely to kill as to help; and the mysterious Wolfgang, rumored to roam for blood at night; it doesn’t take long for Milly to realize that only her dead mother’s book of tales can save her.But Milly’s spells of protection weaken as her wolf stalks the hospital corridors. The ward’s a Dark Wood, and she’s not alone. As her power crumbles, she must let go of her magic and discover new weapons if she is to transform from hunted to hunter.
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  • Lisa Dess
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book for review via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The main character, Milly, gets hospitalized in the psychiatric ward for her OCD tendencies which, in her mind, keep the wolf away and anxiety issues. While in the psychiatric ward she meets other teens with mental health issues. Throughout this book Milly is challenged to confront her tendencies and anxiety.Milly's is quirky but relatable to a certain degree. The portrayal of her anxiety and OCD tendencies I received an ARC of this book for review via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The main character, Milly, gets hospitalized in the psychiatric ward for her OCD tendencies which, in her mind, keep the wolf away and anxiety issues. While in the psychiatric ward she meets other teens with mental health issues. Throughout this book Milly is challenged to confront her tendencies and anxiety.Milly's is quirky but relatable to a certain degree. The portrayal of her anxiety and OCD tendencies was good and believable. I got a real sense of how these impacted her. Milly was able to be open minded and could see the other teens in the hospital in a different light than others.The other characters, Wolfgang, Pig, Vanet, and Red were great secondary characters. This book flowed well and kept my attention. There were times that I thought something supernatural was happening which kept me on my toes. Overall, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to those of you that read young adult.
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  • John Kilgallon
    January 1, 1970
    The book blurb describes "Counting Wolves" as the Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward. That's exactly what this thriller is.Milly is an interesting character. Her mind lives on the edge of reality and fantasy. As she interacts with the staff and other patients in the psychiatric ward the lines blur between reality and the Dark Forest where the Wolf is just at the edge, waiting for her to stumble. Her counting and hopping are her coping mechanisms, but The book blurb describes "Counting Wolves" as the Breakfast Club meets Grimm's Fairy Tales in the lair of an adolescent psych ward. That's exactly what this thriller is.Milly is an interesting character. Her mind lives on the edge of reality and fantasy. As she interacts with the staff and other patients in the psychiatric ward the lines blur between reality and the Dark Forest where the Wolf is just at the edge, waiting for her to stumble. Her counting and hopping are her coping mechanisms, but they fall away as the story progresses. Convinced her stepmother wants her put away for good, Milly finds help among the other patients. She also, though at times inadvertently, helps them as well.With the emphasis of the wolf in pursuit and, in her dreams, her dead mother's solace, I kept expecting a wolf or wolf creature manifestation. That's the horror fan in me. This tight psychological thriller provides a unique, and satisfying, resolution to Milly's disorder. Counting Wolves is both a great psychological thriller and a highly satisfying read!
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