Baby Monkey, Private Eye
Who is Baby Monkey? He is a baby. He is a monkey. He has a job. He is Baby Monkey, Private Eye! Lost jewels? Missing pizza? Stolen spaceship? Baby Monkey can help... if he can put on his pants! Baby Monkey's adventures come to life in an exciting blend of picture book, beginning reader, and graphic novel. With pithy text and over 120 black and white drawings accented with red, it is ideal for sharing aloud and for emerging readers. Hooray for Baby Monkey!

Baby Monkey, Private Eye Details

TitleBaby Monkey, Private Eye
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 27th, 2018
PublisherScholastic Press
ISBN-139781338180619
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Mystery, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels

Baby Monkey, Private Eye Review

  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Brian Selznick. Honey. We’ve got to talk.Now look, it was all well and good when you started getting a little crazy and shaking up notions of what an “illustrated book” actually means. Winning the Caldecott for a novel? Never been done before. And the fact that Hugo Cabret and its companion novels Wonderstruck and The Marvels push every conceivable envelope, in terms of what a visual novel can be, is not just noteworthy but historic. But now you’re getting all slick on us. It wasn’t enough to c Brian Selznick. Honey. We’ve got to talk.Now look, it was all well and good when you started getting a little crazy and shaking up notions of what an “illustrated book” actually means. Winning the Caldecott for a novel? Never been done before. And the fact that Hugo Cabret and its companion novels Wonderstruck and The Marvels push every conceivable envelope, in terms of what a visual novel can be, is not just noteworthy but historic. But now you’re getting all slick on us. It wasn’t enough to conquer the middle grade illustrated novel, eh? Now you’re just fudging the lines between early chapter books and picture books in ways I’ve honestly never seen before. Baby Monkey, Private Eye is, as anyone looking at the cover could tell you, freakishly adorable. And funny. But it may also be the most subversive little number to hit our shelves in a very long time. Got a crime? Then who you gonna call? Forget Sam Spade and his ilk. The true brains in this town belong to Baby Monkey. He’s a baby, he’s a monkey, and he’s a crime fighting genius. With every client that crosses the threshold of his office, he has a routine in place. Examine the evidence. Take notes. Have a snack. Put on some pants (that particular part of the job is a bit on the trying side). And solve that crime! Baby monkey always gets his man (slash zebra/lion/snake/mouse). But when his final case involves a missing baby, that’s when things start getting personal. Have a seat. I need to tell you a story. About three years ago I got wrapped up in a wave of hubris that almost knocked me flat. I had been suggested by an academic friend to contribute a chapter to a Routledge resource on picture books. Please bear in mind that I have almost no experience with academia in any form. Blithely I agreed and was subsequently floored when it became eminently clear that I was in over my head. My assigned chapter was “Picturebooks and Illustrated Books”, a distinction that I wasn’t overly familiar with. It all worked out in the end (thanks to the intervention of a friend who knew this territory better than I) and I got a crash course in the difference between an “illustrated book” and a “picture book”. Would that Baby Monkey, Private Eye had been available when I was determining these distinctions. As it turns out, there is a very good reason that press for this book calls it “a winning new format”. I'll break it down for you.Let us first pick up our copy of the book and just give it a good going over. As you can see, it’s your standard 5-1/4 X 7-3/4 inch sized novel. 192 pages in length. Seems pretty standard stuff. And yet from the moment you open it up it’s pretty clear that the bulk of the book is going to be art rather than text. Though it contains five chapters, a Key, an Index, and a Bibliography (more on that later) the actual book is perfect for very young readers. It is also perfect (and I cannot stress this enough) for reading ALOUD to large groups of very young readers. This realization had me pondering what it would have looked like if Selznick and Serlin had kept the page count but pulled a Bolivar and made the pages picture book-sized. Certainly that would have taken much longer to create (lotta cross-hatching would ensue) but in an era when the walls between formats is a lot more fluid than in the past (thanks in large part to the aforementioned Hugo Cabret) it certainly could have been done. And yet, the creators clearly wanted this to be an early chapter book. Selznick actually got his start back in the day with The Houdini Box, which was early chapter fare of a different sort. And reading this book with my 3-year-old and 6-year-old (who both loved it equally) this book may indeed be one of those pan-age level titles that transcend audience. Doggone it.Why do both of my small children love this book so much? Because it’s a gut-buster, frankly. Funny? Sister, you don’t know the half of it. The very opening of the book sets the stage for hilarity. You open it up and are accosted by an oversized call to “WAIT!” It then challenges you with the question “Who is Baby Monkey?” The answer? “He is a baby.” Page turn. “He is a monkey”. Page turn. “He has a job to do.” That’s when you see his detective agency. Now as any good children’s book author knows, when writing a funny book for children, ideally you should direct some humor at the kids and some at the adult readers. Go too far in the children’s direction and you get Walter the Farting Dog. Go too far in the adult direction and you get some crappy Dreamworks movie that’s more of a prolonged wink than a film. In this, Serlin and Selznick find the perfect sweet spot. For the adults there’s a kind of seek-and-find element to Baby Monkey’s ever changing office. For kids, there’s the fact that baby monkey cannot easily put on his own pants. Pants are, by their nature, hilarious. I think it has something to do with the word itself. Pants. And while most jokes work best when you’re operating under the Rule of Threes, the choice to give this book five chapters (which involves four pant-struggling sequences) is bold. Surely there was a temptation somewhere in the process to limit the chapters to three. I respect the fact that it’s an unwieldy five instead. Gives the jokes more time to percolate.Monkeys should, by all rights, be classic picture book staples. With that in mind, I ask you this: Who is the most famous monkey in the whole of children’s literature. If you said Curious George I’m gonna whip out the old “Curious George is actually an ape” line and we’ll have at it. But beyond George there are shockingly few famous kidlit monkeys to choose between. This is particularly strange because monkeys should potentially fill all the requirements of children’s book illustration. They are small, like human children, and cute, like human children. They are, in fact, the perfect stand-ins. Selznick, for his part, has gone and gotten cute on us. His baby monkey is remarkably tiny. Do you remember that old Disney-drawn explanation of “The Cute Character” where the ratio of the head to body, ears to head, legs to feet, etc. are explained? Well, Selznick clearly knows his stuff. Baby monkey’s proportions are carefully calibrated for maximum cuteness, as are his facial expressions, and body language. This is part of the reason the book works as well as it does with the youngest of readers. Who wouldn’t love that guy?The art is indicative of Selznick’s trademark graphite, with one notable difference. Color! That’s right, baby, there’s at least one singular jolt of color making itself known in each chapter. I had just assumed that the red of the missing jewels / pizza / clown nose / etc. was the same as the red on the cover of the book, but this does not appear to be the case. While the red of the letters on the cover are deep, the jewels / pizza / nose have this extraordinary tint to them. Maybe just a hint of orange? I couldn’t say, but whatever it is it just pops off the page. I think longingly of what this book could have been had the author written it in a picture book format. Then I get ahold of myself again and appreciate it for what it is.I mentioned earlier that in writing a book for children that’s funny, an author has to walk a fine line between humor for kid readers and humor for adult readers. In the case of Baby Monkey, though, this applies to far more than the jokes. In his art, Selznick takes care to hide in plain site multiple references to whatever case it is that Baby Monkey is about to solve. His office before the opera singer comes in is outfitted with portraits of Maria Callas and Marian Anderson. A bust of Mozart overseas Baby Monkey’s note taking. There’s even a reference to that old Marx Brother classic (my personal favorite) A Night at the Opera. With each case the décor changes. Don’t think for a moment that I’m good at spotting all these references, though. While I got the poster for the 1980 production of Barnum and recognized the image from A Trip to the Moon (a bit of an homage to Hugo Cabret in its way) I had to rely heavily on Selznick’s “Key to Baby Monkey’s Office” at the back of the book. There you will find all the hidden references laid out before you. It’s really nice, actually. Few artists take the time to let their readers in on their jokes. But the book’s most subtle jokes for adults are also the most superfluous (and, consequently, the most charming). After the aforementioned “Key” you’ll find an Index and Bibliography that honestly have no reason at all to be there. The Index may be worth it entirely for the entry on “Wainscoting” (Warning: it’s intense). The Bibliography, however, is a carefully crafted labor of lovable nonsense. It is filled from guggle to zatch with nonsense books. From a 1997 edition of Animals Who Look Like They Have No Noses (2nd edition, if we’re going to be specific) to Moshe Moshi’s Famous Babies I Have Known the faux titles, authors, and presses abound. Honestly, just read it for the authors’ names. Barbara Bathtowel. Luis Gergle. Herbert Hobbypocket. I could go on all day.I wonder if there’s a moment where a children’s book creator peaks and then crosses over to a whole new level. Sendak sort of did it, the consequence being that he traded his mortality for some truly obtuse works for kids. Selznick is traveling on a Sendakian course, but along the way he’s never lost his penchant for kid-friendly fare. Credit collaborator David Serlin (who’s getting the short end of the stick in this review) or credit is unequivocal love for the audience (a weapon Sendak never had in his own back pocket). For all its seeming simplicity, Baby Monkey packs a wallop. It challenges what an early chapter book can be, it’s the funniest fare you might read this year, it’s beautiful to look at, and there’s plenty to please small children and grown adults alike. Taken as a whole, the Serlin/Selznick duo is a force to be reckoned with. Will we see more Baby Monkey in the future? I cannot know the answer. All I can hope is that these guys pair up frequently. I like where all this is headed.For ages 3 and up.
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    As an elementary school librarian, reading teacher, and a parent of a 6-year-old (and several older kids who were once 6), I'll tell you why this book is fabulous: because ALL kindergarten and first graders want in the whole entire world is to be able to check out and read a BIG BOOK. They want one just like the big kids get. The thick ones. With chapters. That's why Selznick's other books are so hot - BIG THICK BOOKS that all kids can experience.BUT. We keep talking Good Fit Books this and Good As an elementary school librarian, reading teacher, and a parent of a 6-year-old (and several older kids who were once 6), I'll tell you why this book is fabulous: because ALL kindergarten and first graders want in the whole entire world is to be able to check out and read a BIG BOOK. They want one just like the big kids get. The thick ones. With chapters. That's why Selznick's other books are so hot - BIG THICK BOOKS that all kids can experience.BUT. We keep talking Good Fit Books this and Good Fit Books that. Blah blah blah. WELL, this is it. It's big. It's thick. It has tons of pages. BUT. THEY CAN READ IT! I field tested it with my 6 yo daughter last night and she LOVED it. She figured out all the picture clues and was able to read multiple sections to me. And as an adult, it's just plain adorable. The majority of "early readers" are either 1) incredibly little/skinny or 2) not actually for the earliest readers. So many of the new early chapter books are actually written at an upper 2nd/3rd grade reading level.......fine for them, but not for actual beginning readers!I will be buying multiple copies of this book for my library and anticipate it never being on the shelf. Thanks to the Kid Lit Exchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.
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  • Ashlee Null
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of adorable! I liked it but didn't love it. As a bookseller I'm not sure who I'll give this book to but I'll know them when I see them.
  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    The simple, repetitive language is perfect for kids who are just starting to read on their own. As with any Selznick book, though, at least half of the story unfolds in the illustrations. At the start of each of Baby Monkey's investigations, the decorations in his office change to feature people, things, and events related to the missing item. The index in the back can be used to create a game of seek-and-find within the illustrations and, paired with the bibliography, provides a great starting The simple, repetitive language is perfect for kids who are just starting to read on their own. As with any Selznick book, though, at least half of the story unfolds in the illustrations. At the start of each of Baby Monkey's investigations, the decorations in his office change to feature people, things, and events related to the missing item. The index in the back can be used to create a game of seek-and-find within the illustrations and, paired with the bibliography, provides a great starting place for further discussion and exploration of topics such as circuses and space flight.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful new book from Brian Selznick that combines the visual beauty of a picture book with the ease and repetition of text of an early reader and the length of a chapter book. Not to mention an adorable gumshoe on the case of stolen jewels, pizza, clown noses, and spaceships.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    GENIUS!
  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Selznik is amazing.(And Baby Monkey is pretty dang cute, especially when he's trying to get his pants on!)
  • Scott Robins
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting to see Selznick's unique style of storytelling in book for younger readers. Simple, repetitive text and adorable illustrations make this a great book for beginning readers but a lot of the concepts and the appeal make it fine for older readers as well. Be sure to check out the back matter. As always, Selznick peppers the narrative/illustrations with cultural references. This book will provide a bit of a conundrum for collection development professionals - where does one put this? I'v Interesting to see Selznick's unique style of storytelling in book for younger readers. Simple, repetitive text and adorable illustrations make this a great book for beginning readers but a lot of the concepts and the appeal make it fine for older readers as well. Be sure to check out the back matter. As always, Selznick peppers the narrative/illustrations with cultural references. This book will provide a bit of a conundrum for collection development professionals - where does one put this? I've advocated at my library system to put it in the juvenile graphic novel collection. I think it's the best place for it.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love love this!!
  • SundayAtDusk
    January 1, 1970
    This is a bit of an odd duck of a children's book, or maybe odd monkey would be a better term. It's intended for children, ages 4-8, yet has almost 200 pages. It's obvious, too, many of the illustrations, such as the office ones, are intended for adults, not children. There are five different office scenes that all have different movie posters, paintings, busts of famous people, etc., which relate to the five cases Baby Monkey is hired to solve. There's even two pages at the end of the story pic This is a bit of an odd duck of a children's book, or maybe odd monkey would be a better term. It's intended for children, ages 4-8, yet has almost 200 pages. It's obvious, too, many of the illustrations, such as the office ones, are intended for adults, not children. There are five different office scenes that all have different movie posters, paintings, busts of famous people, etc., which relate to the five cases Baby Monkey is hired to solve. There's even two pages at the end of the story picturing the five office scenes and identifying all the items in the pictures. In addition, those who seek Baby Monkey's help all look like individuals from old movies, such as the "Fat Lady" opera singer with the horned helmet.It's a bit doubtful little children are going to be interested in all of that; but, of course, it gives adult readers something to focus on, instead of the repetitious storyline that only a young child would truly appreciate.(Note: I received a free ARC of this book from Amazon Vine.)
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  • Jeana
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway. When I first won I thought it was a novel or chapter book but when I received it yesterday I was quickly surprised that it takes on a completely different look than I expected. My first thought of this book is not only is the feel and details amazing, it is a perfect book for someone like my nephew who is in kindergarten and starting to read now. I could see how a young child would find this "big kid" book attractive and help get them I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads giveaway. When I first won I thought it was a novel or chapter book but when I received it yesterday I was quickly surprised that it takes on a completely different look than I expected. My first thought of this book is not only is the feel and details amazing, it is a perfect book for someone like my nephew who is in kindergarten and starting to read now. I could see how a young child would find this "big kid" book attractive and help get them even more interested in reading. However when they open it up they would find an appropriate level of reading and wouldn't be disheartened by something they aren't ready for. Then to go into the details. The pictures are beautiful and they make the monkey so cute and realistic you want to take him right out of the book and tickle his belly. I read through it fairly quickly the first time but go back again and you will find each case sets a new tone and details to history. I absolutely loved it.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.Interest Level: K-3What do you do if your jewelry has been stolen? Pizza? Nose? Or even your Spaceship? Why of course you call Baby Monkey, Private Eye. Baby Monkey will look for clues, make notes, eat a snack and put on his pants, then he is ready!! But can Baby Monkey solve the case? Read this precious, easy-reader, predictable text to find out. Follow me:Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https:/ Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.Interest Level: K-3What do you do if your jewelry has been stolen? Pizza? Nose? Or even your Spaceship? Why of course you call Baby Monkey, Private Eye. Baby Monkey will look for clues, make notes, eat a snack and put on his pants, then he is ready!! But can Baby Monkey solve the case? Read this precious, easy-reader, predictable text to find out. Follow me:Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - https://twitter.com/lauriepurser27Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.weebly.com/
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  • Ireadkidsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    With a film noir vibe, minimal text, appealing plot repetition, and a few snack breaks along the way, this brilliant blend of early reader and picture book introduces one seriously adorable, wardrobe-challenged detective, Baby Monkey, who is quite the accomplished crime solver. The pants! The snacks! The scene shifts! The criminals! Kids will appreciate the easy font and gorgeous, classically Selznick pencil sketches. Astute parents will chuckle at the clues hidden in each office scene (and thos With a film noir vibe, minimal text, appealing plot repetition, and a few snack breaks along the way, this brilliant blend of early reader and picture book introduces one seriously adorable, wardrobe-challenged detective, Baby Monkey, who is quite the accomplished crime solver. The pants! The snacks! The scene shifts! The criminals! Kids will appreciate the easy font and gorgeous, classically Selznick pencil sketches. Astute parents will chuckle at the clues hidden in each office scene (and those that don’t catch them will appreciate the thorough Bibliography and Index). Hard to categorize--is it a 200-page picture book? A graphic novel?--but a laugh-out-loud total win, regardless.
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  • Lauren- The Smile Lines
    January 1, 1970
    Baby Monkey, Private Eye attracted my kids immediately with the giant text! The story is broken into chapters with each case he tries to solve. Baby Monkey always starts with the same steps which helps in repetitive text for my beginning reader. My children thought the private eye monkey was so silly every time he tried to put his pants on and had some issues with the situation! The ending is sweet and made us want to hug Baby Monkey! I definitely recommend this book to kids who like silly books Baby Monkey, Private Eye attracted my kids immediately with the giant text! The story is broken into chapters with each case he tries to solve. Baby Monkey always starts with the same steps which helps in repetitive text for my beginning reader. My children thought the private eye monkey was so silly every time he tried to put his pants on and had some issues with the situation! The ending is sweet and made us want to hug Baby Monkey! I definitely recommend this book to kids who like silly books and solving cases! I really enjoyed the sketch like illustrations with very little color. Thank you to the kidlitexchange for a copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • P.J. Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book as an ARC in a Goodreads giveaway, my winning in no way influenced my review. •I give this book a 4/5. It’s definitely humorous and the illustrations make it even better. The black and white goes well with the detective theme. Baby Monkey really made my daughter laugh. I personally loved how put together it was. Now I give it 4 because it was really hard for her to go through it herself. She would lose interest really quickly, one of the reasons being because of how many pages th I won this book as an ARC in a Goodreads giveaway, my winning in no way influenced my review. •I give this book a 4/5. It’s definitely humorous and the illustrations make it even better. The black and white goes well with the detective theme. Baby Monkey really made my daughter laugh. I personally loved how put together it was. Now I give it 4 because it was really hard for her to go through it herself. She would lose interest really quickly, one of the reasons being because of how many pages there were. It influenced my review given it’s a children’s book. But it was definitely a nice book for me to read TO her, especially with the pictures.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Before even opening the cover readers are presented with an illustration of a cute and capable monkey, setting the scene for young readers to dive eagerly at this book with expressions of, "Aw!" or "Cool!" Once again Brian Selznick, with the help of David Serlin, combines text and sketch in a seamless manner, this time leaving catalogers to scratch their heads and kids giggling on the floor.The relatively simple vocabulary as well as the repetition opens up this book to a very wide audience givi Before even opening the cover readers are presented with an illustration of a cute and capable monkey, setting the scene for young readers to dive eagerly at this book with expressions of, "Aw!" or "Cool!" Once again Brian Selznick, with the help of David Serlin, combines text and sketch in a seamless manner, this time leaving catalogers to scratch their heads and kids giggling on the floor.The relatively simple vocabulary as well as the repetition opens up this book to a very wide audience giving early readers plenty of support to decode Baby Monkey's cases while older readers can still enjoy the humor in each story. Now, where to shelve it?!
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Baby Monkey is a private eye. When clients knock on his door, he solves their crimes. The plot of the book will delight the very young reader. But what really steals the heart of the reader is the charming drawings. There are two reasons for this. First of all, Baby Monkey is utterly adorable. Second, within the well-crafted pictures are some well-placed and interesting clues that adults will enjoy. This book is very, very simply written and is appropriate for the very beginning reader.I receive Baby Monkey is a private eye. When clients knock on his door, he solves their crimes. The plot of the book will delight the very young reader. But what really steals the heart of the reader is the charming drawings. There are two reasons for this. First of all, Baby Monkey is utterly adorable. Second, within the well-crafted pictures are some well-placed and interesting clues that adults will enjoy. This book is very, very simply written and is appropriate for the very beginning reader.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Carolyn Moul
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, love Brian Selznick and love this easy reader for beginning readers! Baby Monkey comes to life with the multiple facial expressions Selznick draws into Baby Monkey’s face. Large text, plot repetition and simple words are perfect for the target audience. I think this will become many kid’s favorite book. I only wish there was a little bit more plot development around the revealing of the clues, even if the number of cases had to be reduced. Selznick has such a gift and this addition d Love, love, love Brian Selznick and love this easy reader for beginning readers! Baby Monkey comes to life with the multiple facial expressions Selznick draws into Baby Monkey’s face. Large text, plot repetition and simple words are perfect for the target audience. I think this will become many kid’s favorite book. I only wish there was a little bit more plot development around the revealing of the clues, even if the number of cases had to be reduced. Selznick has such a gift and this addition does not disappoint.
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this ARC through a Goodreads giveaway. I like that the text is simple and repetitive. It could be enjoyed by any age reader. What I LOVE about the book are the illustrations, particularly how in each chapter the detective office decorations change and are connected to the mystery. A curious reader will recognize and enjoy these details. I liked that Selznick and Serlin included a list of things to notice at the end of the book.I will share with a younger student who is lovin I received a copy of this ARC through a Goodreads giveaway. I like that the text is simple and repetitive. It could be enjoyed by any age reader. What I LOVE about the book are the illustrations, particularly how in each chapter the detective office decorations change and are connected to the mystery. A curious reader will recognize and enjoy these details. I liked that Selznick and Serlin included a list of things to notice at the end of the book.I will share with a younger student who is loving graphic novels and then pass on to my #BookVoyage friends.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    This is the perfect book! My kindergartener and I started to read the ARC together and once we got through the first chapter he felt confident to take it over himself and read it to me. I love how the exquisite pictures guide the reader to unlock the text. I love how the text is repetitive and therefore trustworthy for the reader. It really will always have a special place in my heart as it was the book I was able to witness my son truly read to me for the first time. I just pre-ordered it for u This is the perfect book! My kindergartener and I started to read the ARC together and once we got through the first chapter he felt confident to take it over himself and read it to me. I love how the exquisite pictures guide the reader to unlock the text. I love how the text is repetitive and therefore trustworthy for the reader. It really will always have a special place in my heart as it was the book I was able to witness my son truly read to me for the first time. I just pre-ordered it for us and will plan to give it as a gift to all his friends!
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful! It is like a super long leveled reader or picture book? Except with chapters which is fun. Baby Monkey has to solve mysteries and it won't take you (or your young reader) long to figure out the patterns in these mysteries. I think it is definitely going to be a fun one to read again and again. Recommended for young readers and their parents.
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  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    Sweetly humorous early chapter book featuring an adorable baby monkey and plenty of sight gags and illustrator self-references for the very observant. This is the author's debut. The font is huge, there's plenty of repetition making it a great choice for emerging readers who will be so happy to carry such a "big" book!
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  • Patricia Bergman
    January 1, 1970
    I just won this one through Goodreads. The illustrations are adorable and the readability level is perfect for a first grade reader. This is a gift for a 5 year old who can read above her age level. I am sure she will love it.
  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant!On constant rotation with the 5 year-old. Great for fans of Elephant & Piggie, young readers building confidence and anyone who likes laugh. Plenty of content "hidden" in the illustrations for those of us required to read this one several times a week.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Once he puts on his pants, Baby Monkey is on the case. Lost something? Need it found? Baby Monkey is first choice. Beautifully illustrated, this multi-story novel will entertain soon to be or early readers. Mystery and graphic novel combined, I enjoyed every page, illustrated or written.
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  • Erin Buhr
    January 1, 1970
    A truly brilliant easy reader book. Simple predictable, repetitive text and story that boosts the confidence of new readers with a cute, humorous, layered story that you will want to read again and again. And again.
  • Jonathan
    January 1, 1970
    This seems to Be a chapter book but inside, there is a lot of pictures and the text is big, short sentences and easy to Read. This can boost the self esteem of your young reader and be his first "chapter book" he can read all by himself! Very cute, well done!!
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing art! Loved the thematic office settings for each chapter.
  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Funny children's book, has chapters and an intro prior to the "contents" page. As a reading resource teacher, I recommend this book to other school staff including librarians for primary grades.
  • Patti
    January 1, 1970
    My six year old loved reading a "big book". We kept looking for clues in the pictures, and loved the ending!
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