All-American Murder
The world's most popular thriller writer presents the definitive, never before told account of the Aaron Hernandez case. Everyone thought they knew Aaron Hernandez. He was an NFL star who made the game of football look easy. Until he became the prime suspect in a gruesome murder. But who was Aaron Hernandez, really?Rich with in-depth, on-the-ground investigative reporting that gives readers a front row seat to Hernandez's tumultuous downward spiral, THE PATRIOT will reveal the unvarnished truth behind the troubled star, with first-person accounts and untold stories--from his hometown of Bristol, CT to his college days in Gainesville, FL to the Patriots' NFL locker room where he ascended to stardom, to the prison where Hernandez spent his final days. Packed with the shocking details of a true crime masterpiece and the pacing of a suspenseful thriller, THE PATRIOT answers the questions that everyone is asking about Aaron Hernandez.

All-American Murder Details

TitleAll-American Murder
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 22nd, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316412650
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Crime, True Crime, Sports and Games, Sports, History, Biography

All-American Murder Review

  • Tabby
    January 1, 1970
    I could not put this book down. I bought it a few hours ago and stayed up until 4am reading it. It was written so well and had so much information I never knew about. I was a fan of Hernandez, until it came to light that he was involved in Lloyd’s murder. The story fascinated me and still does. Patterson did an amazing job writing about it and the details he used. Truly a great read!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting read for a Bostonian, knowing the streets and alleys where some of the murders took place and knowing a lot of the players involved (no pun intended). I found it to be pretty engrossing and read it in one day. And it left me feeling sorry for Aaron Hernandez, which is something since he was a murderer when it came right down to it.
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  • Frances L Dobbs
    January 1, 1970
    Guilty? I think not. Maybe I'm one of the few who enjoys facts about a case. While many have boycotted this book I could not. I am a Florida girl, born and raised right here in Alachua County. Home of the Fighting Gators! I remember Aaron playing for UF. I remember the issues he faced here and I always asked the same question... Can they prove it was him? You can put him anywhere you want in the picture but can you prove it was him? Some may call me crazy, some will disagree with me, but hear me Guilty? I think not. Maybe I'm one of the few who enjoys facts about a case. While many have boycotted this book I could not. I am a Florida girl, born and raised right here in Alachua County. Home of the Fighting Gators! I remember Aaron playing for UF. I remember the issues he faced here and I always asked the same question... Can they prove it was him? You can put him anywhere you want in the picture but can you prove it was him? Some may call me crazy, some will disagree with me, but hear me out.. During the Gainesville case you have one (1) man saying "Yeah yeah it was him!!" But you have several others saying " Naw it was a black man, tall, skinny with cornrows. " Can you prove it was him? No, there is no physical evidence showing he pulled the gun or shot anyone. Moving forward....You have evidence showing yes Aaron had a gun at him home, picture shows it. You have texts that Odin went with Aaron and two (2) other men the night of his death. You have video showing them driving and their location. This can all be proven. Now you have four (4) men in the car and one man is shot and killed. Leaves you three (3) men, all have been in trouble with the law in some shape or form. All have a reason for not wanting to go to prison for murder. But you only have (1) who is making millions and a name for himself. Yes Aaron was in trouble before and a bit of a hot head but you can't physically put that gun in his hand at the time of Odin's death can you? One man is on the stand saying "Yeah yeah he did it..." That man is a well known drug dealer and addict. And you're supposed to believe his word to save his own behind? I think not.. This book brought to light a lot of things I didn't know to begin with. It opened my eyes and I will admit at one time I believed him guilty as the rest. But no where can you put the gun in his hand at the time of that murder. Notice i said Time of that murder.. I would recommend this book for anyone looking to find the truth and understanding of Aaron Hernandez.
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  • Donna Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book because I was curious about how a man with seemingly everything going for him could be convicted of murder and subsequently commit suicide. (You can tell this is a Patterson book because of the short chapters...and writing credit is shared with two other authors.). But as to Mr. Hernandez. He lost his father, he lost his focus, he was a very talented athlete, he believed in his invincibility, he abused many drugs, he hung with and was totally loyal to his gang/criminal friends, I read this book because I was curious about how a man with seemingly everything going for him could be convicted of murder and subsequently commit suicide. (You can tell this is a Patterson book because of the short chapters...and writing credit is shared with two other authors.). But as to Mr. Hernandez. He lost his father, he lost his focus, he was a very talented athlete, he believed in his invincibility, he abused many drugs, he hung with and was totally loyal to his gang/criminal friends, and he was damaged. The fact that professional football enabled him - excused his failings, gave him HUGE sums of money and fed into his massive ego - and helped to contribute to his downfall. Hernandez was not the only professional athlete to run afoul of the law. And CTE is not enough to explain his actions. The book is sad in that this could happen again to another talented player. I am not a proponent of football, but I understand that it is a highly popular sport in this country. I just am not sure how this problem should be addressed in the future.
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  • Kathleen Perkins
    January 1, 1970
    It is a true puzzle; a young man raised up by a loving father, lost too soon, with intelligence and athletic gifts consistently makes terrible decisions that remove him from the path of success and onto the path of self-destruction. He did not have an ideal relationship with his mother, but it was certainly not one of abuse or rejection. He had the advantage of good role models with his coaches and managers and colleagues and he turned his back on all of them - for what - that is the mystery. A It is a true puzzle; a young man raised up by a loving father, lost too soon, with intelligence and athletic gifts consistently makes terrible decisions that remove him from the path of success and onto the path of self-destruction. He did not have an ideal relationship with his mother, but it was certainly not one of abuse or rejection. He had the advantage of good role models with his coaches and managers and colleagues and he turned his back on all of them - for what - that is the mystery. A well written book describing the destruction, I read it in just about one sitting. It was not until almost the end of the book that I believe the real answer was discussed; the damage done by CTE, stage III. Aaron had been a star athlete since childhood and the most recent research indicates that the damage to brains is greater in childhood and can exhibit far into adulthood. Aaron Hernandez was banged around throughout his life. It would be hard to conclude that CTE had no affect on his personality or influenced his reckless actions.In my opinion, that is the answer to this mystery.
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  • Michele A.
    January 1, 1970
    At the end of this book I was still as confused by Aaron Henandez's actions as I was in the beginning. For a man with such potential, he rarely used it in the right way. To say he had a habit of making poor decisions is an understatement. He ran with a bad crowd, his dad died unexpectedly and it made a huge impact on his life. His mentor was gone and his decision making was not the best, and he was volatile and erratic. He seemed to have poor social skills, followed the wrong people and allowed At the end of this book I was still as confused by Aaron Henandez's actions as I was in the beginning. For a man with such potential, he rarely used it in the right way. To say he had a habit of making poor decisions is an understatement. He ran with a bad crowd, his dad died unexpectedly and it made a huge impact on his life. His mentor was gone and his decision making was not the best, and he was volatile and erratic. He seemed to have poor social skills, followed the wrong people and allowed loyalty to skew his actions. His coaches seemed to shelter him and playing for the Gators did not help his belief that he was above the law. He seemed to think he could do what he wanted, when he wanted and there would be no penalty for it. The book was interesting in that I didn't know about the whole trial, the subsequent trial and his friend accusing him of trying to kill him. I found it to be in-depth and as unbiased as it could be. It was a shame that a person so young, with so much potential, ended up the way he did.
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  • Marie-Elena Mahoney
    January 1, 1970
    The Rise & Fall of Aaron HernandezI love James Patterson so I read many of his books so I decided to try this. I’m from the Boston area so I knew a lot about the subject! I just didn’t know how bad he really was! I would recommend it because it held my interest from being to end! He was one sick puppy!!
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  • Angela Williamson
    January 1, 1970
    This book did not let up once I started reading it. I had not kept up with this case as it was happening so a lot of this was new to me. The authors tried to present a balanced, unbiased story. Because I question so many things, I wonder how much of Hernandez's behavior was due to repeated tackles and hits to the head. Or was it the drugs and the people he ran around with? Would things have been different if his father had lived? Were there too many excuses made based on his football abilities a This book did not let up once I started reading it. I had not kept up with this case as it was happening so a lot of this was new to me. The authors tried to present a balanced, unbiased story. Because I question so many things, I wonder how much of Hernandez's behavior was due to repeated tackles and hits to the head. Or was it the drugs and the people he ran around with? Would things have been different if his father had lived? Were there too many excuses made based on his football abilities and his fame? Unfortunately, these questions will never be answered. But, the book was a wonderful read and I enjoyed it.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    What a thug, and tremendous waste of real athletic ability. This story also reflects poorly on the business of football in general, collegiate and NFL. Avid fans may enjoy this but I'm not in that camp. My husband bought this book and it was sitting on the coffee table.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    A truly fascinating book. I’m no fan of American football and some of its terminology might as well be written in Swahili, but was vaguely familiar with the Aaron Hernandez and decided the book was worth a try.However, it had me in thrall from page one and held on tightly throughout the 380 odd pages (some reviewers have said they consumed it in one sitting, to which I dips me lid – took me three days).Won’t got into too much detail for those as unfamiliar with the outcome as I was, but don’t th A truly fascinating book. I’m no fan of American football and some of its terminology might as well be written in Swahili, but was vaguely familiar with the Aaron Hernandez and decided the book was worth a try.However, it had me in thrall from page one and held on tightly throughout the 380 odd pages (some reviewers have said they consumed it in one sitting, to which I dips me lid – took me three days).Won’t got into too much detail for those as unfamiliar with the outcome as I was, but don’t think it’s a spoiler to say that the last line in the book is – to me – the most intriguing … “in the end, he escaped understanding”.I despise the sense of privilege that appears to affect (infect?) many of our sporting stars but this one just went beyond the pale.There obviously was a lot of faulty wiring in the bloke’s head and he clearly believed he could get away with … yes, murder, but equally so, a lot of it simply doesn’t add up. Maybe a lot more will come out in the future, but much of it will remain a mystery.
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  • Counsel182
    January 1, 1970
    a rush to publish? a very interesting topic. I have no doubt of herandez's guilt but was very disappointed in the haphazard approach this book took. there were no great revelations and the well known ending didn't really add anything to the story. it is a real disgrace in terms of how we coddle athletes and put such a primacy at winning at all costs. in my view it helped create the monster Hernandez was...nevermind the excuses or CTE findings...he was a thug even before that was an issue...maybe a rush to publish? a very interesting topic. I have no doubt of herandez's guilt but was very disappointed in the haphazard approach this book took. there were no great revelations and the well known ending didn't really add anything to the story. it is a real disgrace in terms of how we coddle athletes and put such a primacy at winning at all costs. in my view it helped create the monster Hernandez was...nevermind the excuses or CTE findings...he was a thug even before that was an issue...maybe we can blame that on his "horrible mother" or untimely death of his father but there are people who grow up in far worse circumstances who don't go off shooting guns in murdering people while they have 40 million dollar contracts waiting for them in the wings. a pathetic story that should have been better told...perhaps Patterson should stick to fiction.
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  • Olga Fry
    January 1, 1970
    I remember following the Aaron Hernandez case closely when it first broke, so I was pretty excited to read this. However, I was a little disappointed with the information divulged in the book because I didn't feel like I'd learned anything new. I think that was partially because I'm a Patriots fan so I was aware of his background and time in Florida before everything else came out. Then when the case broke, I followed it and read the Sports Illustrated profile. The chapters were short, so typica I remember following the Aaron Hernandez case closely when it first broke, so I was pretty excited to read this. However, I was a little disappointed with the information divulged in the book because I didn't feel like I'd learned anything new. I think that was partially because I'm a Patriots fan so I was aware of his background and time in Florida before everything else came out. Then when the case broke, I followed it and read the Sports Illustrated profile. The chapters were short, so typical of a James Patterson book, so it felt like the book moved fast. Some things were glossed over, like hiring Jose Baez, Aaron's suicide, the rumors that circled around him, and the CTE results. It felt like information was just tossed in.
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    After reading this book, I am even more disgusted with football. The coaches, college and professional, cover up for bad behavior. Many of the players are thugs, violent and mean, and they believe themselves to be above the law. Sadly, many people revere them and their behavior. Add drugs and money into the mix and it is a recipe for disaster. The authors do a good job of laying out all the issues and the problems of the life of Aaron Hernandez. Sadly, this was a young man with a great deal of a After reading this book, I am even more disgusted with football. The coaches, college and professional, cover up for bad behavior. Many of the players are thugs, violent and mean, and they believe themselves to be above the law. Sadly, many people revere them and their behavior. Add drugs and money into the mix and it is a recipe for disaster. The authors do a good job of laying out all the issues and the problems of the life of Aaron Hernandez. Sadly, this was a young man with a great deal of athletic ability that got involved with drugs and gangs, and liked to go everywhere with guns.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    This so called "definitive untold story " is no such thing. Any one who followed the cases and the trials, will find nothing here that they don't already know. There are no documented facts, no references of any sort pertinent to interviews or other conversations with involved parties. What we have, are the author's presumptions and opinions written into a narrative of trial transcripts, newspaper articles and perhaps police reports. There is again, no documentation proving that he even saw thos This so called "definitive untold story " is no such thing. Any one who followed the cases and the trials, will find nothing here that they don't already know. There are no documented facts, no references of any sort pertinent to interviews or other conversations with involved parties. What we have, are the author's presumptions and opinions written into a narrative of trial transcripts, newspaper articles and perhaps police reports. There is again, no documentation proving that he even saw those. Over all a very disappointing work. All fact, or fact and fiction? You be the judge if you want to waste your money!
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  • Sonia
    January 1, 1970
    As a New Englander and a big James Patterson fan, I was curious to read this one. After following the news coverage through the years and then reading the book, a lot of light was shed on this case. However, I am still left with some conflicting feelings and will never know for sure the answers to some of my questions. With any good murder story, many clues surface but in the end it's proof and evidence that convicts. Yet there are still many doubts and gaps amongst those left behind. Overall a As a New Englander and a big James Patterson fan, I was curious to read this one. After following the news coverage through the years and then reading the book, a lot of light was shed on this case. However, I am still left with some conflicting feelings and will never know for sure the answers to some of my questions. With any good murder story, many clues surface but in the end it's proof and evidence that convicts. Yet there are still many doubts and gaps amongst those left behind. Overall a good read, gives you a glimpse into who Hernandez once was and makes you wonder what he could've truly been had circumstances in his life been different. Give it a read.
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  • Eileen Granfors
    January 1, 1970
    This is not great literature, but it is a compelling story. The rise and fall of Aaron Hernandez once seemed like a typical dumb athlete falling into drugs and crime to me. After reading Patterson's book, I am deeply moved and saddened by Hernandez's loss of self in the course of his lifetime. He was a gifted athlete, a good brother, a good friend. He lost it all. Patterson finds a good balance of football and life experiences to focus on the victims of Hernandez's penchant for violence and crim This is not great literature, but it is a compelling story. The rise and fall of Aaron Hernandez once seemed like a typical dumb athlete falling into drugs and crime to me. After reading Patterson's book, I am deeply moved and saddened by Hernandez's loss of self in the course of his lifetime. He was a gifted athlete, a good brother, a good friend. He lost it all. Patterson finds a good balance of football and life experiences to focus on the victims of Hernandez's penchant for violence and crime. It is a tragedy amplified by fame, drugs, money, and access to guns. I am not a Patterson fan in most circumstances, but he told this story well.
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  • Cindy Wood
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting and CompellingThe tragic story of Aaron Hernandez is one that is compelling and heartbreaking. The seemingly senseless murders of the men he killed is the biggest tragedy. My heart breaks for their families and for Hernandez's brother and daughter. How much Aaron's drug use, CTE and bad influences played into his demise will always remain a mystery. Patterson's novel does a good job of describing the events of Aaron's life that led up to the murders and to Aaron's final act of violen Interesting and CompellingThe tragic story of Aaron Hernandez is one that is compelling and heartbreaking. The seemingly senseless murders of the men he killed is the biggest tragedy. My heart breaks for their families and for Hernandez's brother and daughter. How much Aaron's drug use, CTE and bad influences played into his demise will always remain a mystery. Patterson's novel does a good job of describing the events of Aaron's life that led up to the murders and to Aaron's final act of violence. What a waste of talent.
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  • Clare
    January 1, 1970
    A really frustrating read. A lot of info that was in news reports at the time and the failure to nab Hernandez's brother as a source (he chose to tell his story to Sports Illustrated) leaves a massive gap in the story. There's a brief mention of CTE towards the end which smacked of 'He had huge brain damage but the deadline is coming up, so you know, whatever' and sums up how frustrating this book is as there was more details of Hernandez's reading habits in prison than this vital facet of the s A really frustrating read. A lot of info that was in news reports at the time and the failure to nab Hernandez's brother as a source (he chose to tell his story to Sports Illustrated) leaves a massive gap in the story. There's a brief mention of CTE towards the end which smacked of 'He had huge brain damage but the deadline is coming up, so you know, whatever' and sums up how frustrating this book is as there was more details of Hernandez's reading habits in prison than this vital facet of the story. This case needs a really thorough in depth book, but unfortunately this isn't it.
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  • T.L. Fullerton
    January 1, 1970
    The book is listed as both The Patriot and All American Murder. The book follows former football star Aaron Hernandez for childhood to death. James Patterson and his co-writers did a great job of compiling information and witness accounts. As someone who lives in the area of the murders Hernandez was accused and/or convicted of, I found the name novel disturbing. If even half of the information is true, I’m glad our paths never crossed. The book stands as a testament why we should not put these The book is listed as both The Patriot and All American Murder. The book follows former football star Aaron Hernandez for childhood to death. James Patterson and his co-writers did a great job of compiling information and witness accounts. As someone who lives in the area of the murders Hernandez was accused and/or convicted of, I found the name novel disturbing. If even half of the information is true, I’m glad our paths never crossed. The book stands as a testament why we should not put these sports stars on a pedestal just because they can play ball.
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  • Jack
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story of the tortured life of a top NFL football player from his teen years to his untimely death when he was still a young adult. He suffered from paranoia which could have been due to his heavy use of alcohol & drugs as well as the death of his father when he was only 13 years old. After his deaths it was discovered he had CTE (or very severe brain damage) which undoubtedly was due to playing football. This book is a recitation of facts based on interviews & public records. I This is a story of the tortured life of a top NFL football player from his teen years to his untimely death when he was still a young adult. He suffered from paranoia which could have been due to his heavy use of alcohol & drugs as well as the death of his father when he was only 13 years old. After his deaths it was discovered he had CTE (or very severe brain damage) which undoubtedly was due to playing football. This book is a recitation of facts based on interviews & public records. Interesting but not a great book — a stretch to rate it to 2.5.
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  • Paul Miller
    January 1, 1970
    Don't waste your time - nothing really new here. Aaron Hernandez was a low-life gang-banger in high school, at Florida, and with the Patriots. He also happened to be a freakishly good athlete so Urban Meyer and Bill Belichick took the very bad with the good b/c hey, they get paid to win and have staff to manage the occasional wild animal on the team. I had forgotten that Hernandez had killed a few other folks before he finally got caught, but that's just a detail.
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  • Harry Trumfio
    January 1, 1970
    Provided insight into the make-up of a very troubled, professional football player. Hernandez became rutterless after his father died. The influence of unsavory friends contributed to his undoing. However, his own bad habits and choices also were key in his disturbing behavior. This is a sad tale regarding the manner in which sport organizations at all levels will excuse players misbehavior and cover up for them. Allowing the guilty to escape consequences does them or society any favors.
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  • Lisa Wiebeld Coburn
    January 1, 1970
    I really like James Patterson books and was looking forward to this one. I have to admit that this book just didn’t do it for me. I hate to speak about the deceased but let’s face it Aaron doesn’t deserve the pity people are giving him. He had so much talent and it could have taken him so far but he wanted to be a thug and look where it got him. The one to suffer in all this is his daughter who will never know her father just others peoples perspectives about him.
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  • Gerri
    January 1, 1970
    Had a difficult time rating this one. How can this be a “true” crime novel with no documentation such as foot notes or mention of how the book was researched by Patterson? I watched the TV Documentary (think it was 48 Hours) and honestly the book shed no new light on the matter other than raising questions about how author knew this, that or many things. Far too many incidents glossed over or eliminated completely from the book and the “filler” gibber-jabber added nothing to the story.
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  • Lisa Stethem
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating how truly stupid some people are. I’m a football fan but it’s sad that the NFL collects players who think they are above the law and don’t know right from wrong. CTE cannot be used as the excuse for everything. Hernandez obviously had problems but was catered to throughout his career. That did not help him in life. Consequences for actions should hold a bigger spot than talent for a game..
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  • Melissa Loucks
    January 1, 1970
    I would have finished this book in one day if work had not gotten in the way (lol) I really enjoyed this book. Being a Patriots fan I was really interested in this subject. Having a criminal justice degree makes me questions so of the court stuff. It seemed like a lot of circumstantial evidence. Either way it was a great book.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    I was actually very happy with this book. There was a lot of new information that I hadn't seen/heard before. It was a super quick read that I was unable to put down.I am a life long UF fan and loved Aaron Hernandez. It was sad to see his demise, but it was his own doing. It would have been interesting to see how things turned out had his father not died at such a pivotal age for Aaron.
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  • Tina Choy
    January 1, 1970
    I am not a fan of football and never knew who Aaron Hernandez was until the news came out. I am a fan of James Patterson's books and thought he did a great job writing about Aaron.It is so sad that this guy had so much going for him and due to all kinds of bad decisions his life ended the way it did.
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  • Shirley York
    January 1, 1970
    Murder by any name is MurderI have chosen 5 rating because it deserved it!!!! Mr. Paterson is a master of story telling. I followed Aaron's story because it intrigued me and because I grew up not far from Bristol. What a waste of this young man's life and talent. I recommend this read very highly.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    Boy did this suck. Typical Patterson, super short chapters. Pretty much a recap with him throwing in a very iffy connection to a murder Hernandez wasn't tried for. Spends all of 10 pages on CTE. Money grab, little effort, little investigative work. Pretty much a recap of events, not a lot of sources interviewed.
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