That's What She Said
First things first: There will be no man shaming in That’s What She Said. A recent Harvard study found that corporate “diversity training” has actually made the gender gap worse—in part because it makes men feel demonized. Women, meanwhile, have been told closing the gender gap is up to them: they need to speak up, to be more confident, to demand to be paid what they’re worth. They discuss these issues amongst themselves all the time.  What they don’t do is talk to men about it. It’s time to end that disconnect. More people in leadership roles are genuinely trying to transform the way we work together, because there's abundant evidence that companies with more women in senior leadership perform better by virtually every measure. Yet despite good intentions, men often lack the tools they need, leading to fumbles, missteps, frustration and misunderstanding that continue to inflict real and lasting damage on women's careers.That's What She Said solves for that dilemma.  Filled with illuminating anecdotes, data from the most recent studies, and stories from Joanne Lipman’s own journey to the top of a male-dominated industry, it shows how we can win by reaching across the gender divide. What can the Enron scandal teach us about the way men and women communicate professionally? How does brain chemistry help explain men’s fear of women’s emotions at work? Why did Kimberly Clark have an all-male team of executives in charge of their Kotex tampon line? What can we learn from Iceland’s campaign to “feminize” an entire nation? That’s What She Said shows why empowering women as true equals is an essential goal for women and men—and offers a roadmap for getting there. That’s What She Said solves for:·         The respect gap·         Unconscious bias·         Interruptions·         The pay and promotion gap·         Being heard·         The motherhood penalty·         “Bropropriation” and “mansplaining”·         And more….   

That's What She Said Details

TitleThat's What She Said
Author
ReleaseJan 30th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062437211
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Business, Feminism, Leadership

That's What She Said Review

  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    great. everybody read. I found the advice valuable and not vilifying or preachy.
  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    I like this book. I would probably recommend it as a primer on the research and perspective on the topic of women and work, though I have some quibbles, it's generally a good recap of the studies and approaches. I was hoping to get more about "what men need to know" and how to engage men in ways that don't make them feel "guilty" or "beaten by a 2X4". I didn't feel there was much explicit advice on that front, besides 'the goals of diversity align with the goals of existing metrics of profit and I like this book. I would probably recommend it as a primer on the research and perspective on the topic of women and work, though I have some quibbles, it's generally a good recap of the studies and approaches. I was hoping to get more about "what men need to know" and how to engage men in ways that don't make them feel "guilty" or "beaten by a 2X4". I didn't feel there was much explicit advice on that front, besides 'the goals of diversity align with the goals of existing metrics of profit and success'. It did discuss how we've seen backlash on trainings and sometimes diversity training can be counterproductive. But, we don't really know the answer.All in all, an easy read, comprehensive on a number of topics, largely based on research. The interpretation of the research is generally good and in line with the data. The major issue I have is with the chapter on crying. That chapter just really didn't seem helpful and I'm not sure those studies are very good.I listened to the audiobook during my commute. It was a good alternative, since I'm not trying to look up the references. I've already read most of them.... except that one study at Carnegie Mellon on job ads. I know job ads are profiling people based on age, but sex too seemed crazy. But, so it is.
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  • Cavak
    January 1, 1970
    Compared to the previous and older book I read about feminism and gender equality (Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate), Lipman is respectful to both genders without playing the blame game. It's comforting for me to know that we've made some progress since then in addressing gender in modern society. Most examples she cites are from a North American perspective, but a mix of other countries are included too. Hope you like the section about Iceland as much as I did. Lipman talks abo Compared to the previous and older book I read about feminism and gender equality (Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate), Lipman is respectful to both genders without playing the blame game. It's comforting for me to know that we've made some progress since then in addressing gender in modern society. Most examples she cites are from a North American perspective, but a mix of other countries are included too. Hope you like the section about Iceland as much as I did. Lipman talks about the staggering observations about how society views gender. How we all carry unconscious biases, how transgender people are treated after transitions to whatever gender they choose, and how we're all prone to interrupting more women than men. Even how diversity training from the '90s has drawn a greater line between the sexes. No side is exempt from it, even the ones who proclaim to be for women's rights and equal pay. But Lipman's episodes of biting irony makes the blows sink in without pessimism. There is a message of hope under it all.What is helpful to me is that she includes some practical tips that can be used in identifying these cues without resorting to antagonizing attitudes. The simple "cheat sheet" of proposed solutions included at the end of the book is directed towards business leaders, but I think it'd be helpful for anyone who wants to bridge the gender divide in a potentially productive and cooperative way.While Lipman and the people she has interviewed don't offer all of the answers, it did answer some of my questions regarding the gender gap. Keep a curious mind and a heart willing to absorb and listen; you may enjoy this book more.I received the book for free through Goodreads Giveaways.
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  • DK Simoneau
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm. Well the information is fascinating, I felt like most of the book was see......peppered with stats and information explaining just how big the gender gap is in the USA. As far as info for what men can do about it, I'm not so sure. Little info about it at the end. And it would probably not be read by a man unless they are already women equality champions. Nothing about it would convince a man of what to do. In fact it might just turn them off.
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  • Susanne Cutler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book. I not only enjoyed it but it brought a lot of insight into the dynamics of working in the business world. I would love if HR personnel made this book required reading before people started their jobs. With so much emphasis on the "me too" movement this book could not have come at a better time.
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  • Tina Panik
    January 1, 1970
    Prepare yourself for anger, and epiphanies: Lipman’s straightforward, well-researched work will enlighten you on why meetings are where women’s careers go to die, why a lack of support and mentorship prohibits their advancement, and why working against men—instead of including them—is crippling equality for everyone.
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  • Elisa
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book. It makes you angry at the beginning, but, tehre more you read it, the more you realise that, even by not being eye opening, it depicts in a clear and catching manner the female perception in the business world.
  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    A timely book.
  • Brad
    January 1, 1970
    Wish there were more clear cut solutions. This is a great read and I’d encourage everyone, but particularly fellow males, to read it deeply and become an ally.
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Honest and earnest. Lots and lots of different kinds of studies.
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book from Goodreads Giveaways. Thank you.
  • Care
    January 1, 1970
    Just read a review of this from Jan 30, 2018 NYT by ROBBIE MYERS and I wanted to share this quote from the article:"And when Lipman quizzed male executives on what it was about working with women that flummoxed them most, the resounding consensus was a crying woman. When women cry, a man’s testosterone drops, which makes him depressed. If he only knew that women typically don’t cry at work because they’re sad. According to the research Lipman cites, women cry in the office because they’re angry. Just read a review of this from Jan 30, 2018 NYT by ROBBIE MYERS and I wanted to share this quote from the article:"And when Lipman quizzed male executives on what it was about working with women that flummoxed them most, the resounding consensus was a crying woman. When women cry, a man’s testosterone drops, which makes him depressed. If he only knew that women typically don’t cry at work because they’re sad. According to the research Lipman cites, women cry in the office because they’re angry."
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