Down the River unto the Sea
From trailblazing novelist Walter Mosley: a former NYPD cop once imprisoned for a crime he did not commit must solve two cases: that of a man wrongly condemned to die, and his own. Joe King Oliver was one of the NYPD's finest investigators, until, dispatched to arrest a well-heeled car thief, he is framed for assault by his enemies within the NYPD, a charge which lands him in solitary at Rikers Island.A decade later, King is a private detective, running his agency with the help of his teenage daughter, Aja-Denise. Broken by the brutality he suffered and committed in equal measure while behind bars, his work and his daughter are the only light in his solitary life. When he receives a card in the mail from the woman who admits she was paid to frame him those years ago, King realizes that he has no choice but to take his own case: figuring out who on the force wanted him disposed of--and why.Running in parallel with King's own quest for justice is the case of a Black radical journalist accused of killing two on-duty police officers who had been abusing their badges to traffic in drugs and women within the city's poorest neighborhoods.Joined by Melquarth Frost, a brilliant sociopath, our hero must beat dirty cops and dirtier bankers, craven lawyers, and above all keep his daughter far from the underworld in which he works. All the while, two lives hang in the balance: King's client's, and King's own.

Down the River unto the Sea Details

TitleDown the River unto the Sea
Author
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2018
PublisherMulholland Books
ISBN-139780316509640
Rating
GenreFiction, Mystery, Thriller

Down the River unto the Sea Review

  • Patrice Hoffman
    January 1, 1970
    Since this is not my first roll in the hay with Mr. Walter Mosley's writing I expected exactly what I got. What I got was a gritty, police procedural of an ex-detective, Joe King Oliver, making his way in life as a Private Investigator on the mean streets of Brooklyn. Let's refer to him as King from now on.King narrates as he investigates two cases that may or may not be connected, yet are still extremely personal. His investigation into the frame-up that essentially took the life he had as a co Since this is not my first roll in the hay with Mr. Walter Mosley's writing I expected exactly what I got. What I got was a gritty, police procedural of an ex-detective, Joe King Oliver, making his way in life as a Private Investigator on the mean streets of Brooklyn. Let's refer to him as King from now on.King narrates as he investigates two cases that may or may not be connected, yet are still extremely personal. His investigation into the frame-up that essentially took the life he had as a cop is deeply personal. Someone orchestrated bringing him down and it appears that plan is still in play. What he wants to know is the why and who. Simultaneously, but seemingly peripherally, King agrees to work on helping to free Man, who's currently on death row. What entices him about the case is that word on the streets is that there may have been corrupt police officers who set this guy up as well. The nightmares or solitary confinement still haunt King, along with the disappearance of a key witness for Man urge King to poke around despite the caution not to.What Mosley does best here is introduce us to a complex character in so little pages. Because this novel is less that 300 pages, Mosley doesn't spend time with any unnecessary words, yet, there's so much detail and intrigue that totally captivates the reader. Yes, Down the River Unto the Sea moves at an alarming pace, still it does not leave the reader feeling deprived. Mosley allows King the space to change and develop as a character. We see King dive deeper and deeper into a world he really doesn't want any parts of. He's tried to maintain being an honorable and respectable police officer, even without the badge, up until these cases beg him to choose a side. Ultimately, Down the River Unto the Sea is my favorite read yet of 2017. It's only my second read, but I know what I like. I've only read a few Walter Mosley novels but I'm a fan. There's grit. There's grime. There will even be pages you want to turn away from. No this novel is not for the faint of heart. No I won't be sending Walter Mosley up the river. He's too worth reading to do that.Copy provided by Mulholland Books via Netgalley
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  • DP Lyle
    January 1, 1970
    Joe Oliver had once been a respected NYPD homicide detective. He had also been a convicted felon. Framed by his enemies, beaten and broken in prison, he is suddenly and unexpectedly released. None of it makes sense but Joe accepts his fate and moves on, becoming a private investigator. But, a note comes his way, from a woman who says she had been paid to help frame him. What follows is vintage Walter Mosley. A twisted and dark story that runs through the underbelly of NY and is populated with ch Joe Oliver had once been a respected NYPD homicide detective. He had also been a convicted felon. Framed by his enemies, beaten and broken in prison, he is suddenly and unexpectedly released. None of it makes sense but Joe accepts his fate and moves on, becoming a private investigator. But, a note comes his way, from a woman who says she had been paid to help frame him. What follows is vintage Walter Mosley. A twisted and dark story that runs through the underbelly of NY and is populated with characters of all types—evil and treacherous, heroic and compassionate. To ferret out the truth, Joe hooks up with his smart and sociopathic friend Melquarth Frost. But, nothing is as it seems. Neither friend nor foe is easily discernible and Joe quickly finds himself in a world he barely understands. And one that could end his life in a NY minute. Love this story.DP Lyle, award-winning author, lecturer, and story consultant
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  • James Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Walter Mosley has long been one of my favorite authors, especially in regards to his mystery novels. The first several Easy Rawlins novels, as well as the Socrates Fortlow and the Fearless Jones series', are among my most beloved books. Unfortunately, his more recent works, while solid, haven't lived up to this legacy.That is as true here as it is with the Leonid MacGill series. While there are several interesting support characters and a nice father-daughter dynamic, the main character just did Walter Mosley has long been one of my favorite authors, especially in regards to his mystery novels. The first several Easy Rawlins novels, as well as the Socrates Fortlow and the Fearless Jones series', are among my most beloved books. Unfortunately, his more recent works, while solid, haven't lived up to this legacy.That is as true here as it is with the Leonid MacGill series. While there are several interesting support characters and a nice father-daughter dynamic, the main character just didn't connect with me. It didn't help that his voice was indistinguishable from Leonid's. This despite an intriguing, and tragic, backstory.The same holds true for the story itself. There are two main plots, thematically linked rather than literally. Both are topical, as well as politically charged, yet neither had any sense of urgency.Still, this is a Mosley novel, so it's well- written and has crackling dialogue. He's always worth a read, and this is no different. Still, one hopes for a return to his earlier form.I thank Netgalley, the author, and the publisher for an e-arc of this book. All opinions are my own and are honest.
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  • Columbus
    January 1, 1970
    Walter Mosley is one of the very few writers writing in any genre that I would read without knowing anything about the book. He’s normally pretty consistent in his writing and though he typically writes similar-type mystery potboilers he uses different P.I.’s in a number of different series and they’re all well written.This one just didn’t work for me.The private investigator in this procedural is Joe King Oliver and he’s investigating duo cases simultaneously: one where he was personally framed Walter Mosley is one of the very few writers writing in any genre that I would read without knowing anything about the book. He’s normally pretty consistent in his writing and though he typically writes similar-type mystery potboilers he uses different P.I.’s in a number of different series and they’re all well written.This one just didn’t work for me.The private investigator in this procedural is Joe King Oliver and he’s investigating duo cases simultaneously: one where he was personally framed for a sexual assault as a long time NYC police officer and another where a radical journalist, A Free Man, as he’s known, is on death row and is accused of killing 2 police officers .This book is only 336 pages long but it feels much longer. It’s rather bloated with an excessive list of characters that seemed to just grow, and grow and grow. It was rather difficult for me to keep up with this motley crew.The writing is pure Mosley though and the action is fast and swift. There are quite a few hilarious moments and King Oliver is an interesting enough character albeit no Easy Rawlins. I also loved the fact that he’s a fan of literature and jazz/classical music (referenced Monk,Yardbird and Debussy). Suffice to say, not at all one of my favorite Mosley books but might work better for someone more patient in reading a fast-paced potboiler with a ridiculously large list of characters.Thanks to the publisher Mulholland Books and Netgalley for the ebook ARC.3 stars
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  • James Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Walter Mosley has long been one of my favorite authors, especially in regards to his mystery novels. The first several Easy Rawlins novels, as well as the Socrates Fortlow and the Fearless Jones series', are among my most beloved books. Unfortunately, his more recent works, while solid, haven't lived up to this legacy.That is as true here as it is with the Leonid MacGill series. While there are several interesting support characters and a nice father-daughter dynamic, the main character just did Walter Mosley has long been one of my favorite authors, especially in regards to his mystery novels. The first several Easy Rawlins novels, as well as the Socrates Fortlow and the Fearless Jones series', are among my most beloved books. Unfortunately, his more recent works, while solid, haven't lived up to this legacy.That is as true here as it is with the Leonid MacGill series. While there are several interesting support characters and a nice father-daughter dynamic, the main character just didn't connect with me. It didn't help that his voice was indistinguishable from Leonid's. This despite an intriguing, and tragic, backstory.The same holds true for the story itself. There are two main plots, thematically linked rather than literally. Both are topical, as well as politically charged, yet neither had any sense of urgency.Still, this is a Mosley novel, so it's well- written and has crackling dialogue. He's always worth a read, and this is no different. Still, one hopes for a return to his earlier form
    more
  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    Though this isn’t the best of Mosley’s books is still darn enjoyable. His writing style is more reminiscent of Chandler in Down the River unto the Sea and though the characters lead live distant from most of us common mortals they’re relatable with an emphasis on the gray area between right and wrong. As a new character The former New York cop turned PI aka survivor Joe Oliver leads a lonely life in the shadows. He’s still recovering and trying to make sense of who set him up to take a fall land Though this isn’t the best of Mosley’s books is still darn enjoyable. His writing style is more reminiscent of Chandler in Down the River unto the Sea and though the characters lead live distant from most of us common mortals they’re relatable with an emphasis on the gray area between right and wrong. As a new character The former New York cop turned PI aka survivor Joe Oliver leads a lonely life in the shadows. He’s still recovering and trying to make sense of who set him up to take a fall landing him in jail.He loves his seventeen year old daughter and lives for her as well as to vindicate his arrest and to help others who have or might in the near future suffer because of a corrupt penal system. The plot is hard to follow at times which helps make opaque enough to keep the reader guessing and though Joe and some of his associates operate in moral shadows it’s hard not to root for them.Thank you to the publisher for providing an advance reader’s copy.
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  • Adrain Dudley
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the best books I have ever read. I read an Advanced Reading Copy as it will be release in February. Some of Mr. Mosley's best work.
  • Abby Slater- Fairbrother
    January 1, 1970
    review to follow closer to release date 💖📚🤓
  • Jamie Canaves
    January 1, 1970
    (TW: sexual assault) I’m still making my way through Mosley’s catalog but you better believe I dropped everything to read the ARC for his upcoming novel the day it arrived. We’re introduced to a new detective, Joe King Oliver, a former cop turned PI. He’s a former cop because of a rape charge he denies and the book focuses on him trying to find out who set him up while also taking on a case to find justice for a convicted cop killer. A good read that pits law vs justice, and I loved his relation (TW: sexual assault) I’m still making my way through Mosley’s catalog but you better believe I dropped everything to read the ARC for his upcoming novel the day it arrived. We’re introduced to a new detective, Joe King Oliver, a former cop turned PI. He’s a former cop because of a rape charge he denies and the book focuses on him trying to find out who set him up while also taking on a case to find justice for a convicted cop killer. A good read that pits law vs justice, and I loved his relationship with his assistant, his teenage daughter.From 2018 Mystery & Thrillers to Be Excited For!
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  • Damien
    January 1, 1970
    Solid, if unremarkable given Mosley's oeuvre. A bit darker than his usual work, though I loved the father/daughter relationship in the story. Mosley never disappoints, and as prolific as he is, I am still feverish by the time a new book is ready.(Unbiased review provided in exchange for advance copy by NetGalley)
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    My first Mosley! I like how much of a New York story this is.
  • Jamele (BookswithJams)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for an electronic ARC of this book. I have never read Walter Mosley before, but what a great book! Joe King Oliver is a former NYPD cop that was at Rivers for a crime he did not commit, and is now out ten years later working as a private investigator, running his agency with assistance from his teenage daughter. One day he receives a letter from the woman who set him up, and he has no choice but to investigate his own case from the past. He is also investigating a case to Thank you to NetGalley for an electronic ARC of this book. I have never read Walter Mosley before, but what a great book! Joe King Oliver is a former NYPD cop that was at Rivers for a crime he did not commit, and is now out ten years later working as a private investigator, running his agency with assistance from his teenage daughter. One day he receives a letter from the woman who set him up, and he has no choice but to investigate his own case from the past. He is also investigating a case to free a man on death row that was also set up, and the two intertwine throughout the book. The author keeps a good pace going throughout and the final scene was quite suspenseful. I enjoyed the interactions between the characters, mostly Joe and his daughter, but also between Joe and Mel, a sociopath he must team up with to solve these cases. Joe also struggles throughout the book with what he really wants by investigating what happened to him, is it to be reinstated, to be exonerated, or just the satisfaction of knowing who it was that set him up? Watching him work through this is very interesting, as he enlists help from people you would not expect.I love the crime / cop thriller genre and this one did not disappoint. The ending was not expected but very satisfying. I do recommend this one when it is released in late Feb 2018.
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