The Great Unknowable End
Slater, Kansas is a small town where not much seems to happen.Stella dreams of being a space engineer. After Stella's mom dies by suicide and her brother runs off to Red Sun, the local hippie commune, Stella is forced to bring her dreams down to Earth to care for her sister Jill.Galliard has only ever known life inside Red Sun. There, people accept his tics, his Tourette's. But when he’s denied Red Sun's resident artist role he believed he was destined for, he starts to imagine a life beyond the gates of the compound...The day Stella and Galliard meet, there is something in the air in their small town. Literally. So begins weeks of pink lightning, blood red rain, unexplained storms... And a countdown clock appears mysteriously above the town hall. With time ticking down to some great, unknowable end they’ll each have to make a choice.If this is really the end of the world, who do they want to be when they face it?

The Great Unknowable End Details

TitleThe Great Unknowable End
Author
ReleaseFeb 19th, 2019
PublisherSimon & Schuster books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781534420502
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Historical, Historical Fiction

The Great Unknowable End Review

  • C.G. Drews
    January 1, 1970
    it's a bit early for a review, so a few things this book is about!→ it's set in 1977→ lots of music references→ there's a girl struggling to take her dead mother's place + a boy leaving the commune he's lived in his whole life to visit the outside world→ Galliard had Tourette's!→ kinda a Stranger Things mild sci-fi/magical realism vibe?→ the cover is prettyyy
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    after the beautiful masterpiece that was Tash Hearts Tolstoy I will read anything Kathryn Ormsbee writes!!! so uhhh cover?? release date???
  • Kales
    January 1, 1970
    I am so pleasantly surprised by this book. It was weird but in such an endearing and wonderful way. Kathryn Ormsbee is one of the most underrated YA authors and if you haven't read one of her books, you definitely should.The individual journeys that each Galliard and Stella take are commendable. They are dealing with realistic teenage issues of the time and yet, issues that people of many ages can relate to. The feeling of being split between love and duty is a universal theme but I adored how t I am so pleasantly surprised by this book. It was weird but in such an endearing and wonderful way. Kathryn Ormsbee is one of the most underrated YA authors and if you haven't read one of her books, you definitely should.The individual journeys that each Galliard and Stella take are commendable. They are dealing with realistic teenage issues of the time and yet, issues that people of many ages can relate to. The feeling of being split between love and duty is a universal theme but I adored how they were portrayed there. The "cult" life was an interesting aspect of this as well. I haven't read a lot of books with this aspect that weren't true crime. Most of them had negative connotations whereas this was rather positive or at least, multi-sided. It bordered on being negative and creepy but the redemption at the end was refreshing.Additionally, Stella's final lesson about letting go was awesome. I liked the conflict of liking vs loving people you love. And how, just because you are related to someone, you don't have to like them or get along with them or agree with their choices. Finally, the doomsday bit was interesting. I was a little dissatisfied with the fact that there wasn't an answer but at the end of it all, it was ultimately okay. Some of the elements of it all were interesting, rather unique and fascinating. And I liked the fact that it was set in the 70s. The importance of radio and nightly news is also wonderful because of the lack of social media and that is now news got around that time. It was education and really captured the time.I hope you all pick up this book in February. It found it immensely satisfying and a unique read. I find myself wanting to know more about these characters and hope they have good lives.Conclusion: To purchase
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  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Edelweiss for the chance to review this book.Wow. This book was weird and fun, and surprising. This story is set is the 70's in a town called Slater, Kansas and involves one girl and one boy whose lives could not be more different. Hey, let's throw in some mysterious phenomena and here we have The Great Unknowable End.Enter Stella. She lost her mother to suicide and works two jobs, one at an outdoor movie theater and another at a hair salon. She puts her dreams of becoming a space engi Thank you Edelweiss for the chance to review this book.Wow. This book was weird and fun, and surprising. This story is set is the 70's in a town called Slater, Kansas and involves one girl and one boy whose lives could not be more different. Hey, let's throw in some mysterious phenomena and here we have The Great Unknowable End.Enter Stella. She lost her mother to suicide and works two jobs, one at an outdoor movie theater and another at a hair salon. She puts her dreams of becoming a space engineer to the backburner to care for her father and little sister when her older brother suddenly leaves for a commune called The Red Sun without a word two years prior. Her family has distanced themselves from a town who associates evil with The Red Sun. They're loners, but they're loners together.Enter Galliard. He was born at The Red Sun and has little knowledge of the Outside. When he loses a spot as the resident artist within the commune, he seeks answers beyond the commune's gates. But will the world outside accept his Tourette Syndrome without judgment as The Red Sun?Strange things begin to happen in Slater. From red rain to eyeless snakes. The town puts the blame on the Red Sun. The Red Sun returns blame to the Outside. Meanwhile, Stella and Galliard meet and strike up an unlikely friendship. In the backdrop of all of these strange happenings, there's a girl with a weird face and a boy with tics who find each other amongst their secrets and pain.What this book reminded me of: The Twilight Zone, Donnie Darko, and Stranger Things.I absolutely loved this book. I loved it because the two main characters were so flawed and so real that I couldn't stop reading to see what would happen to them. I love magical realism, and I love it more when there's no explanation for it. For some reason, that mystery is better for me. But you can speculate, and I am sure there might have been something I missed that wrapped it all up together.What drew me into requesting this book was the magical realism aspect. What I got was the stories of two teenagers whose lives weaved with each other with that desire to be found and understood. It's about devotion to family, no matter blood-related or not or how blindly it is. There's a reminder in there about no matter what happens in life, be it a loss or the world coming to an end, that there are opportunities to follow your heart and to never give up on your dreams. This is the type of book that sticks in your brain long after you've read it. When I finish a book, I usually move on quickly, but this one has lingered. I've never read a character with Tourette's, and I'm grateful for the education about the disorder. And a girl who is in love with the stars? GIVE IT TO ME. In closing, add this to your reading list, preorders, whatever. I am certainly going to add it to my shelves.
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  • Claire (bookscoffeeandrepeat)
    January 1, 1970
    PRE-REVIEW Inspired by The Twilight Zone, you say?Well, sign me the hell up!(Note: These gifs are from the episode, Monsters are due on Maple Street. All I can say is... ALIENS!)I'm a huge fan of this series. I've only watched it the first time when I arrived to America (7 years ago). I was born in the Philippines, so give me a break! I've watched and re-watched the episodes of The Twilight Zone ever since I lived in the United States... My top 3 favorite episodes would be:1) The Eye of the Beh PRE-REVIEW Inspired by The Twilight Zone, you say?Well, sign me the hell up!(Note: These gifs are from the episode, Monsters are due on Maple Street. All I can say is... ALIENS!)I'm a huge fan of this series. I've only watched it the first time when I arrived to America (7 years ago). I was born in the Philippines, so give me a break! I've watched and re-watched the episodes of The Twilight Zone ever since I lived in the United States... My top 3 favorite episodes would be:1) The Eye of the Beholder or The Private World of Darkness (not really sure what the title was)2) Number 12 Looks Just Like You3) To Serve ManIf you've lived in America all your life and haven't watched a single episode of The Twilight Zone, WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH YOUR LIFE???Anyway, let's get back to the book - I CANNOT WAIT FOR THIS BOOK! The premise sounds like the Maple Street episode, which involves mass hysteria, conspiracy theories, and mistrust amongst other people. SPRING 2018 WHY?! GIVE IT TO ME!!!
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)The Great Unknowable End is about self-discovery. Whether it be Galliard and his questioning of his Red Sun life, or Stella's assumption of her motherly role towards her family, both of our main characters are at points in their life where they have figure out who they want to be. When you don't think you can be anything else than what you've known, what you've thought, how do we (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)The Great Unknowable End is about self-discovery. Whether it be Galliard and his questioning of his Red Sun life, or Stella's assumption of her motherly role towards her family, both of our main characters are at points in their life where they have figure out who they want to be. When you don't think you can be anything else than what you've known, what you've thought, how do we break free? How do we become something we never thought was possible?
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  • Stefani Sloma
    January 1, 1970
    Give me all the cult books!
  • Seoling :)
    January 1, 1970
    CAN I GET A HECK YES? I am so excited for this book. Why is summer 2018 not here yet?
  • Eden
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn’t expecting this book to be set in the 70’s, so first of all that threw me off. Second of all, I expected the weird phenomenons going on in town to be explained. I didn’t really care all that much about the characters or the resolutions of their personal storylines. I wanted to know WHY the weather was acting so crazy! I was disappointed with the end result.I didn’t mind Stella and Galliard. Kathryn Ormsbee created some well rounded characters, but I just didn’t care about their storyline I wasn’t expecting this book to be set in the 70’s, so first of all that threw me off. Second of all, I expected the weird phenomenons going on in town to be explained. I didn’t really care all that much about the characters or the resolutions of their personal storylines. I wanted to know WHY the weather was acting so crazy! I was disappointed with the end result.I didn’t mind Stella and Galliard. Kathryn Ormsbee created some well rounded characters, but I just didn’t care about their storylines. In the beginning I did, but after page 200 the issues in their lives became too repetitive. Yes, we get it. You have problems. You’re dealing with them. We got it. If the book would’ve been shorter and gotten to the point quicker, I probably would’ve liked it more.The writing I really enjoyed reading, I just couldn’t connect to this book and thought the romance was unnecessary. I’m definitely interested in reading more books by Kathryn Ormsbee in the future. This particular premise just didn’t mesh with me.
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  • Jill Muller
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 out of 5
  • Maraia
    January 1, 1970
    Sadly, this didn't live up the high expectations set by the other three books I've read by Kathryn Ormsbee.
  • Silanur
    January 1, 1970
    Gotta love the Cold War era!Excited to read about a time period I've never read from before.
  • Stevie
    January 1, 1970
    I love the premise of this book. A dark and twisty girl. A boy in a cult. The 70's and the end of the world. But, I found myself bored within 50 pages. The fact that this one was almost 400 pages didn't help. I thought the plot moved very slowly, and nothing really happened until three-quarters of the way through. I had high hopes for this one that were not fulfilled. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    There was nothing about this book that I did not like. I have not read anything so engaging, so intense, so heartfelt, so true all year long. Thank you, Edelweiss, for letting me have that experience.
  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    Not nearly as good as I was hoping, I'm afraid. A book that builds up a huge mystery should really deliver on it, not wimp out with 'sometimes weird stuff just happens, I guess'. If this had been just about Stella and Galliard, without any of the strange stuff, I probably would have liked it; as is, it's just disappointing. A real shame.
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  • Mai
    January 1, 1970
    This book is insides altering, mind bending, heart wrenching, heart filling, inspiring and beautiful. Meet two lifelong misfits, Stella and Galliard. Both struggling to find their own paths in life when it seems that the world around them has already laid their paths. Throw in some creepy occurrences, a mysterious countdown, gorgeous writing, insightfully flawed and inspiring characters and you get the amazing experience of “The Great Unknowable End.” This book so thoroughly sucks you into the 7 This book is insides altering, mind bending, heart wrenching, heart filling, inspiring and beautiful. Meet two lifelong misfits, Stella and Galliard. Both struggling to find their own paths in life when it seems that the world around them has already laid their paths. Throw in some creepy occurrences, a mysterious countdown, gorgeous writing, insightfully flawed and inspiring characters and you get the amazing experience of “The Great Unknowable End.” This book so thoroughly sucks you into the 70s and the unique lives of the characters that I felt like I’d grown up in the 70s by the end of it. I didn’t want the book to ever end and I already am imagining what Stella and Galliard are doing now and wondering what their futures hold.
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't finish The Great Unknowable End. I got about 1/3 of the way through and it was just too weird and moved too slowly to promise that we were going to get anywhere in the story soon. At 400 pages, that just doesn't hold my attention. I loved Ormsbee's Tash Hearts Tolstoy, which is why I was looking forward to The Great Unknowable End. Instead, I am disappointed by this newest work of hers.
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  • The Bookish Austin
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!
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