Bluff
"Driven by the heart-pounding suspense of a high-stakes poker game, Bluff is a vivid, compelling novel about deceit, seduction, and delicious revenge that will keep you spellbound and cheering as you turn the last page." -Susan Cheever, New York Times bestselling authorOne-time socialite Maud Warner polishes up the rags of her once glittering existence and bluffs her way into a signature New York restaurant on a sunny October day. When she shoots Sun Sunderland, the "Pope of Finance," as he lunches with "accountant to the stars" Burt Sklar - the man that she's accused for years of stealing her mother's fortune and leaving her family in ruins - she deals the first card in her high-stakes plan for revenge.Maud has grown accustomed to being underestimated and invisible and uses it. Her fervent passion for poker has taught her that she can turn a weakness into the strength to take advantage of people who think they are taking advantage of her. It's uncanny how she reads them.Her intimates in New York high society believe that "Mad Maud" accidentally missed Sklar, her real target. But nothing is as it first appears as she weathers the unexpected while following her script. And while Maud is on the run, the dark secrets of men who believe their money and power place them above the law will be exposed. Betrayal, larceny, greed, sexual battery, and murder lurk beneath the surface of their glittering lives.One unexpected twist after another follows as we watch a fierce, unapologetic Maud play the most important poker hand of her life. The stakes? To take down her enemies and get justice for their victims. Her success depends on her continuing ability to bluff. And on who will fold.Can she win?

Bluff Details

TitleBluff
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 9th, 2019
PublisherAlibi
Rating
GenreFiction, Mystery

Bluff Review

  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    This book has one of the more memorable opening scenes I've read this year. Maud Warner, a 50+ year old socialite walks into the Four Seasons restaurant in NYC and shoots a man named Sun Sutherland. She then proceeds to walk out calmly and ends up boarding a train headed to Washington D.C. But why did she shoot Sun instead of the man he was lunching with, Burt Sklar, the person she blames for losing her family's fortune?I think the real strength of the book is the writing style. It's quirky and This book has one of the more memorable opening scenes I've read this year. Maud Warner, a 50+ year old socialite walks into the Four Seasons restaurant in NYC and shoots a man named Sun Sutherland. She then proceeds to walk out calmly and ends up boarding a train headed to Washington D.C. But why did she shoot Sun instead of the man he was lunching with, Burt Sklar, the person she blames for losing her family's fortune?I think the real strength of the book is the writing style. It's quirky and had a bit of an old school vibe to it where nothing is as it seems and even though a crime is committed you aren't expected to take it too seriously. I feel like the style was a breath of fresh air and not something you really get to see much in today's books. I did think the first half of the book was stronger than the second. I probably would have enjoyed this one a tad more if it was written as a novella rather than a full length novel. Overall, a decent read and I recommend checking this one out if you are in the mood for something a bit different.Thank you to the publisher and BookishFirst for sending me a free advance digital copy! I was under no obligation to post a review and all views expressed are my honest opinion.
    more
  • Julie Parks
    January 1, 1970
    This totally reads like badass women's fiction at its best. This time about an ex-socialite gone poor and on revenge. Fantastic book!I just read this second paragraph in the book and knew I will absolutely love her:I whisk a comb through my bobbed graying hair and apply a little lip gloss to my lightly made-up face. It's not an unattractive face, just an older one, silted with apprehension. I'm satisfied I look like what I'm supposed to be: a middle-aged lady of means with a conservative sense o This totally reads like badass women's fiction at its best. This time about an ex-socialite gone poor and on revenge. Fantastic book!I just read this second paragraph in the book and knew I will absolutely love her:I whisk a comb through my bobbed graying hair and apply a little lip gloss to my lightly made-up face. It's not an unattractive face, just an older one, silted with apprehension. I'm satisfied I look like what I'm supposed to be: a middle-aged lady of means with a conservative sense of style. I re-check the contents in my faux Birkin bag to make sure I have everything I need. It's all there: wallet, glasses, compact, lipstick, comb, cell phone, gun.Know what I mean? Does it get any better when it comes to a heroine's description?I'm not giving away any spoilers, but I will say this. I was so intrigued by this writer, and especially, of course, her last name, that after reading it I Googled her and, well, most of her Wikipedia page sounds much like the synopsis of this book. A possible half-true story here? I'm just saying...Loved it!Thank you NetGelly for the chance to read this in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    I liked Bluff. It's a fun read. The heroine is a fifty something woman, which I find refreshing as characters go. She's likeable. The plot is complex and unpredictable. A great ending and entertaining throughout. I recommend this one.
  • Susan Beamon
    January 1, 1970
    Seldom do we get a murder mystery where we know exactly who done it, but we aren't sure about anything else. The intended victim may not have been the actual victim, but maybe it was. The three principal characters couldn't know each other, could they. It is all so simple, open and shut, but maybe it isn't. When the leader of the plat plays professional poker, we can't be sure of much.I enjoyed the twists in this little tale of multiple revenges. The ultimate villain gets his just rewards and s Seldom do we get a murder mystery where we know exactly who done it, but we aren't sure about anything else. The intended victim may not have been the actual victim, but maybe it was. The three principal characters couldn't know each other, could they. It is all so simple, open and shut, but maybe it isn't. When the leader of the plat plays professional poker, we can't be sure of much.I enjoyed the twists in this little tale of multiple revenges. The ultimate villain gets his just rewards and survives to not enjoy them. Money is not the solution, but the game is so much fun. I recommend this book for when life doesn't go your way.I received the copy of Bluff I read for this review from BookishFirst.
    more
  • Sarah Perchikoff
    January 1, 1970
    Omg this book is so FUN! Gossip, socialites, poker, long-held grudges, murder, appearances for appearance's sake, and long cons, OH MY! This book was everything I love. Badass ladies killing assholes and people talking shit about other people. What more could you want? Let's get to the review.Synopsis (from Goodreads):One-time socialite Maud Warner polishes up the rags of her once glittering existence and bluffs her way into a signature New York restaurant on a sunny October day. When she shoots Omg this book is so FUN! Gossip, socialites, poker, long-held grudges, murder, appearances for appearance's sake, and long cons, OH MY! This book was everything I love. Badass ladies killing assholes and people talking shit about other people. What more could you want? Let's get to the review.Synopsis (from Goodreads):One-time socialite Maud Warner polishes up the rags of her once glittering existence and bluffs her way into a signature New York restaurant on a sunny October day. When she shoots Sun Sunderland, the "Pope of Finance," as he lunches with "accountant to the stars" Burt Sklar - the man she's accused for years of stealing her mother's fortune and leaving her family in ruins - she deals the first card in her high-stakes plan for revenge.Maud has grown accustomed to being underestimated and invisible, and uses it. Her fervent passion for poker has taught her that she can turn weakness into strength to take advantage of people who think they are taking advantage of her. It's uncanny how she reads them.Her intimates in New York high society believe that "Mad Maud" accidentally missed Sklar, her real target. But nothing is as it first appears as she weathers the unexpected while following her script. And while Maud is on the run, the dark secrets of men who believe their money and power place them above the law will be exposed. Betrayal, larceny, greed, sexual battery, and murder lurk beneath the surface of their glittering lives.One unexpected twist after another follows as we watch a fierce, unapologetic Maud play the most important poker hand of her life. The stakes? To take down her enemies and get justice for their victims. Her success depends on her continuing ability to bluff. And on who will fold.Can she win?Maud Warner has been planning to kill Burt Sklar since the day she accused him of taking all her mother's money and no one believed her. But when she goes to the Four Seasons with a gun in her handbag, she doesn't shoot him, she shoots his friend, Sun Sunderland. Why? That is what the society woman Maud used to be friends with, the cops, and the tabloids would love to know. But this isn't just Maud's story.If you've read any of my past reviews, you know how much I love a book that changes perspectives per chapter. While I would say Maud is definitely the main character in this story, so is Sun Sunderland's widow, Jean, Greta, Jean's best friend, and Danye (I can't say who she is because it is THE MOST UNEXPECTED SURPRISE). They are all affected by the death of Sun Sunderland in one way or another and let me just tell you...be ready to be the most surprised and delighted that you've ever been!There are not that many things I can talk about with this book because it is filled with shocking twists and turns and I had such a good time learning about the surprises that I cannot take that fun away from you. But I will say that Maud is a genius! When her family lost all their money, she turned to poker as her "drug" of choice and it teaches her everything she needs to know to lie, bluff, and maybe even shoot someone and get away with it.The only critique I have is that it wrapped up way too quickly for me. The trial could have been AMAZING and suspenseful and thrilling, but it was pretty much glossed over which was incredibly disappointing, especially when this book was a total winner up until that point. But, other than the too quick ending, this was a brilliantly thought out and well-written book.If you like mysteries, misconceptions being questioned and thrown out the window (no one suspects Maud to be a killer because of her age), and just some amazing characters and dialogue, Bluff should definitely be added to your TBR. I am giving Bluff by Jane Stanton Hitchcock 4 out of 5 stars. Check it out!Bluff comes out April 2, 2019 (I know it's a long time to wait!!)Thank you to NetGalley and Poisoned Pen Press for the free ARC in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it!."Driven by the heart-pounding suspense of a high-stakes poker game, Bluff is a vivid, compelling novel about deceit, seduction, and delicious revenge that will keep you spellbound and cheering as you turn the last page." -Susan Cheever, New York Times bestselling authorOne-time so 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it!."Driven by the heart-pounding suspense of a high-stakes poker game, Bluff is a vivid, compelling novel about deceit, seduction, and delicious revenge that will keep you spellbound and cheering as you turn the last page." -Susan Cheever, New York Times bestselling authorOne-time socialite Maud Warner polishes up the rags of her once glittering existence and bluffs her way into a signature New York restaurant on a sunny October day. When she shoots Sun Sunderland, the "Pope of Finance," as he lunches with "accountant to the stars" Burt Sklar - the man that she's accused for years of stealing her mother's fortune and leaving her family in ruins - she deals the first card in her high-stakes plan for revenge.Maud has grown accustomed to being underestimated and invisible and uses it. Her fervent passion for poker has taught her that she can turn a weakness into the strength to take advantage of people who think they are taking advantage of her. It's uncanny how she reads them.Her intimates in New York high society believe that "Mad Maud" accidentally missed Sklar, her real target. But nothing is as it first appears as she weathers the unexpected while following her script. And while Maud is on the run, the dark secrets of men who believe their money and power place them above the law will be exposed. Betrayal, larceny, greed, sexual battery, and murder lurk beneath the surface of their glittering lives.One unexpected twist after another follows as we watch a fierce, unapologetic Maud play the most important poker hand of her life. The stakes? To take down her enemies and get justice for their victims. Her success depends on her continuing ability to bluff. And on who will fold.Can she win?Oh Maud, Maud, Maud - I love you, you crazy woman!!! I started to read this book after breakfast and my parents will attest that I did not come up for air until I finished just before I went to cook their dinner. (I was parent-sitting and get I do get a lot of reading done that way!) Maud is a delight to know and follow around her adventures from shooting on to the VERY surprising twists and turns that led to the ending. The cover is also perfect as it is almost a (non-Lady-Gaga) poker face showing beneath that hat...it makes you wonder what Maud is hiding and smiling about in that Red Door worthy lipstick!)I know nothing, zero, zilch, nada about poker but that didn't take away from my *****LOVE***** of this book. It is a wonderfully twisty adventure that was (in the words of my nephew) AMAZEBALLS!) There is some movement about on the site about the actual release date but when it does come out. I am going to thrust this book upon the eight book clubs I bought to: Miss Stanton Hitchcock deserves the sales of the 80+ members I chose books for who pay retail for said books. Five, glittery sparkly, shiny 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 !!!
    more
  • Patricia Doyle
    January 1, 1970
    Thankfully, I was on a bus trip and I could read all day. That’s good, because I could keep reading to the end and didn’t have to put this page turner down to let life get in the way. I was pulled in from the very beginning and was happily engrossed through to the last paragraph. It’s about Maud who shot a man. We know she did it. Sounds simple, right. Not so much. There are twists and turns, cleverly written back stories, interesting characters, unlikable Burt and Sun, high society matrons, pok Thankfully, I was on a bus trip and I could read all day. That’s good, because I could keep reading to the end and didn’t have to put this page turner down to let life get in the way. I was pulled in from the very beginning and was happily engrossed through to the last paragraph. It’s about Maud who shot a man. We know she did it. Sounds simple, right. Not so much. There are twists and turns, cleverly written back stories, interesting characters, unlikable Burt and Sun, high society matrons, poker, fortunes lost or swindled, and, of course, bluffing. I enjoyed the writing style. Bluff is very effectively written both in first person and third person; first person when Maud is talking about herself, third person when anyone else and other situations are central. Regarding the story itself: the author’s imagination is extraordinary. Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I loved everything about this unique creation and recommend it to my reading friends. Well done, Ms. Hitchcock. I hated to see this one end.
    more
  • Brooke Banks
    January 1, 1970
    I did not think I could be won over for a story following the privileged rich. While I realized the writing was great from the get-go, the name dropping name brand fashion blah blah in the beginning had me thinking I was right - this wasn't going to work for me. And then the one line right before the shooting...And then the wife...The run...The dinner. Once I got a little farther than the Bookish First Impression preview, I couldn't put it down. When I had to put it down, I kept thinking about i I did not think I could be won over for a story following the privileged rich. While I realized the writing was great from the get-go, the name dropping name brand fashion blah blah in the beginning had me thinking I was right - this wasn't going to work for me. And then the one line right before the shooting...And then the wife...The run...The dinner. Once I got a little farther than the Bookish First Impression preview, I couldn't put it down. When I had to put it down, I kept thinking about it. II was itching to get back to it. I flew through the last half of the book in one sitting staying up late to finish it. Loved it. All the characters, the descriptions, the plot, just all of it. Besides the name dropping beginning that does lay the foundation but comes off pretentious and blasé. It may take a little while to get into, but when it starts poppin, it doesn't stop. Now I can easily recommend Bluff to anyone, especially if you want a twisty revenge tale. Bluff is First Wives Club meets Ocean's 8.
    more
  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read! Bigotry, murder and larceny, oh my!Maud Warner, middle-aged former socialite and poker savant, walks into the Four Seasons and shoots, the “Pope of Finance”, Sun Sunderland. And so begins a high-stakes game of poker - not with cards but with Maud’s life. Will she be able to pull off the biggest bluff of her poker career?So many colorful characters in this story - just skating the edge of caricature-ish. Slimy Burt Sklar, the slippery “accountant to the Stars” - I felt the ne This was a fun read! Bigotry, murder and larceny, oh my!Maud Warner, middle-aged former socialite and poker savant, walks into the Four Seasons and shoots, the “Pope of Finance”, Sun Sunderland. And so begins a high-stakes game of poker - not with cards but with Maud’s life. Will she be able to pull off the biggest bluff of her poker career?So many colorful characters in this story - just skating the edge of caricature-ish. Slimy Burt Sklar, the slippery “accountant to the Stars” - I felt the need for a shower after every chapter in which he appeared. I don’t know anything about poker but I enjoyed the parallels between poker and life throughout the story.There were some cheesy lines throughout and a few plot points were a little far-fetched but none of this took away from the entertainment value of this book (not for me at least).Overall this a very fun and enormously clever novel. Highly recommend! I want to thank NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this novel.
    more
  • Robin Blankenship
    January 1, 1970
    "Mad" Maude is an ex-socialite whose family was scammed out of a fortune by a slick, icky financial wizard and her whole life revolves around hating him. The story of Maude is woven intricately with other people from her world. The writing on this one is interesting. You do not see this style often but it is done well. She writes characters well. At first it was a bit slow but I loved the originality and the twists and turns to get there. It was funny, clever, fun, twisty and very entertaining. "Mad" Maude is an ex-socialite whose family was scammed out of a fortune by a slick, icky financial wizard and her whole life revolves around hating him. The story of Maude is woven intricately with other people from her world. The writing on this one is interesting. You do not see this style often but it is done well. She writes characters well. At first it was a bit slow but I loved the originality and the twists and turns to get there. It was funny, clever, fun, twisty and very entertaining. This is not usually my kind of book but I would love to read more by this author. Her style is catchy. It drags you in and keeps you going. Well written and I genuinely loved every minute with Maude.
    more
  • Olga Fry
    January 1, 1970
    I thought "Bluff" by Jane Stanton Hitchcock was a fun, comedic read, one that I enjoyed very much. The book focuses on Maud Warner, a 65-year-old woman, set to exact her revenge on what she perceives as wrongdoing against her mother. Her intended victim? Burt Sklar. However, she misses and ends up shooting Sun Sunderland. Was it by accident? On purpose?I thought the characters were well-written and genuine people, people I would want to be friends with. That and the writing style is a real stren I thought "Bluff" by Jane Stanton Hitchcock was a fun, comedic read, one that I enjoyed very much. The book focuses on Maud Warner, a 65-year-old woman, set to exact her revenge on what she perceives as wrongdoing against her mother. Her intended victim? Burt Sklar. However, she misses and ends up shooting Sun Sunderland. Was it by accident? On purpose?I thought the characters were well-written and genuine people, people I would want to be friends with. That and the writing style is a real strength of the novel. I found myself flipping through the pages to see what was going to happen next. The beginning had one of the more memorable scenes I've read lately and while I found the middle slightly lagging, I enjoyed the book overall.
    more
  • Lana
    January 1, 1970
    Bluff is such a unique mystery-thriller, that is very appropriately named! I enjoyed every minute of this poker themed story! Maud Warner is an old poker player, but she’s still a good one! After being swindled out of her family’s money, Maud uncovers the truth and she takes matters into her own hands. I loved this novel! And I loved Maud! I also happen to enjoy playing poker and will be looking for more from this author.Thank you to Poisoned Pen Press and NetGalley for this advanced copy, my op Bluff is such a unique mystery-thriller, that is very appropriately named! I enjoyed every minute of this poker themed story! Maud Warner is an old poker player, but she’s still a good one! After being swindled out of her family’s money, Maud uncovers the truth and she takes matters into her own hands. I loved this novel! And I loved Maud! I also happen to enjoy playing poker and will be looking for more from this author.Thank you to Poisoned Pen Press and NetGalley for this advanced copy, my opinions are my own.This will be featured on my blog on Saturday, December 22, [email protected]
    more
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I have read a few of Jane Stanton Hitchcock's frothy "society" novels and thoroughly enjoyed the "snark" and humor. But, this novel was in a class of its own in the way it used success at poker as an analogy for success in life. The "take" may not be unique, but the book itself was fresh and clever and very entertaining.Perhaps because I am "a lady of a certain age," I immediately bonded with the heroine (or is she technically an anti-heroine?) . She used her perceived invisibility as both a shi I have read a few of Jane Stanton Hitchcock's frothy "society" novels and thoroughly enjoyed the "snark" and humor. But, this novel was in a class of its own in the way it used success at poker as an analogy for success in life. The "take" may not be unique, but the book itself was fresh and clever and very entertaining.Perhaps because I am "a lady of a certain age," I immediately bonded with the heroine (or is she technically an anti-heroine?) . She used her perceived invisibility as both a shield and a weapon-- and proved far from defenseless.The characters are so perfectly drawn that I could cast the mini-series without any effort and I assure you that I would tune in (even though I know what the outcome is). The book is not so much a mystery, as a caper. And a wonderful character study. Yes, it is light reading, but that doesn't preclude it being well-written and well-done. I loved every minute of BLUFF.
    more
  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it!."Driven by the heart-pounding suspense of a high-stakes poker game, Bluff is a vivid, compelling novel about deceit, seduction, and delicious revenge that will keep you spellbound and cheering as you turn the last page." -Susan Cheever, New York Times bestselling authorOne-time so 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it!."Driven by the heart-pounding suspense of a high-stakes poker game, Bluff is a vivid, compelling novel about deceit, seduction, and delicious revenge that will keep you spellbound and cheering as you turn the last page." -Susan Cheever, New York Times bestselling authorOne-time socialite Maud Warner polishes up the rags of her once glittering existence and bluffs her way into a signature New York restaurant on a sunny October day. When she shoots Sun Sunderland, the "Pope of Finance," as he lunches with "accountant to the stars" Burt Sklar - the man that she's accused for years of stealing her mother's fortune and leaving her family in ruins - she deals the first card in her high-stakes plan for revenge.Maud has grown accustomed to being underestimated and invisible and uses it. Her fervent passion for poker has taught her that she can turn a weakness into the strength to take advantage of people who think they are taking advantage of her. It's uncanny how she reads them.Her intimates in New York high society believe that "Mad Maud" accidentally missed Sklar, her real target. But nothing is as it first appears as she weathers the unexpected while following her script. And while Maud is on the run, the dark secrets of men who believe their money and power place them above the law will be exposed. Betrayal, larceny, greed, sexual battery, and murder lurk beneath the surface of their glittering lives.One unexpected twist after another follows as we watch a fierce, unapologetic Maud play the most important poker hand of her life. The stakes? To take down her enemies and get justice for their victims. Her success depends on her continuing ability to bluff. And on who will fold.Can she win?Oh Maud, Maud, Maud - I love you, you crazy woman!!! I started to read this book after breakfast and my parents will attest that I did not come up for air until I finished just before I went to cook their dinner. (I was parent-sitting and get I do get a lot of reading done that way!) Maud is a delight to know and follow around her adventures from shooting on to the VERY surprising twists and turns that led to the ending. The cover is also perfect as it is almost a (non-Lady-Gaga) poker face showing beneath that hat...it makes you wonder what Maud is hiding and smiling about in that Red Door worthy lipstick!)I know nothing, zero, zilch, nada about poker but that didn't take away from my *****LOVE***** of this book. It is a wonderfully twisty adventure that was (in the words of my nephew) AMAZEBALLS!) There is some movement about on the site about the actual release date but when it does come out. I am going to thrust this book upon the eight book clubs I bought to: Miss Stanton Hitchcock deserves the sales of the 80+ members I chose books for who pay retail for said books. Five, glittery sparkly, shiny 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 !!!
    more
  • Donna172
    January 1, 1970
    The opening scene of this book totally drew me in from the get go. Maud, an ex-socialite, walks into the upscale Four Seasons and shoots a man then calmly turns around and walks out the door. Unbelievably, she is able to do this and get on a train to another city without being caught. It is the use of what some might believe to be her weakness that allows her to get away with as much as she does. She is underestimated by those around her and she uses her knowledge of this weakness to help her g The opening scene of this book totally drew me in from the get go. Maud, an ex-socialite, walks into the upscale Four Seasons and shoots a man then calmly turns around and walks out the door. Unbelievably, she is able to do this and get on a train to another city without being caught. It is the use of what some might believe to be her weakness that allows her to get away with as much as she does. She is underestimated by those around her and she uses her knowledge of this weakness to help her get what she wants - REVENGE! It is not secret that she has a dislike for Sklar and has been trying to convince people that he is a bad seed for years. The only thing that her claims get her is the nickname "Mad Maud." After the opening scene people are convinced more than ever that she is "mad." Little do they know that she has the ability to take what people think of her and turn it to work for her advantage. As a poker player she has the ability to use weaknesses to her advantage. Who would think that an innocent looking aging ex-socialite would have the power to bluff her way through almost anything. I loved the style of writing of this book. It is straight forward and cuts right to the chase. No fluff is needed to get the plot of this story across. The characters were introduced with no frills and the reader knew exactly what they were dealing with 90% of the time. The 10% that were the shocking portions were well played and timed exactly right. I think a second read of this book might help me to appreciate it even more as I would be able to concentrate on the characters more since I already have the plot line figured out. I received this ARC from #Bookish First. Thanks for a great read!
    more
  • Energy
    January 1, 1970
    Bluff starts off with a bang, literally. Because Maud, or Mad Maud as they call her, has shot Sun Sutherland while he was dining at The Four Seasons. What continues is an unfolding of the people connected to Sun and subsequently, his best friend Burt Sklar, who was Maud's intended target. Bluff is told through various pieces of information, not just Maud's point of view, by Sun's wife Jean, and Sklar and the stripper he's chasing after. Maud is a very strong character, she's smart, so much smart Bluff starts off with a bang, literally. Because Maud, or Mad Maud as they call her, has shot Sun Sutherland while he was dining at The Four Seasons. What continues is an unfolding of the people connected to Sun and subsequently, his best friend Burt Sklar, who was Maud's intended target. Bluff is told through various pieces of information, not just Maud's point of view, by Sun's wife Jean, and Sklar and the stripper he's chasing after. Maud is a very strong character, she's smart, so much smarter than people give her credit for. I found myself cheering her on. Sklar was such a sleazy character and I felt he was written so well. From scamming Maud's mother out of money to cozying up to Sun, everything he does is with an ulterior motive, he's a social climber who is always looking for the next easy paycheck. I loved that the book centered around poker and the various aspects of playing it, hence the title, Bluff. Anyone who plays knows the cunning and skill involved is impressive. I think it will make a fan of non-players. As I'm writing this review, I find myself coming back to Maud again. She was such a fun character and I found myself surprised by her. I think because she lived so long as the outcast in society, people seriously underestimated her, and that label of Mad Maud allowed her to focus on getting what she wants. The writing style is very unique and engaging because you find yourself racing through each chapter, anxious to piece it all together. Just when you think you've figured it out, the author throws you a twist. It's a fun and witty read, the characters are so well-written and you find yourself cheering Maud on. I loved the camaraderie among the woman, as it's nice to see strong women in a book. Jane Stanton Hitchcock has a new fan!
    more
  • Jean Kolinofsky
    January 1, 1970
    When Maud Warner entered the New York restaurant and shot financier Sun Sunderland as he lunched with his friend Burt Sklar was he the actual target or was she really aiming for Sklar? Maud was raised as a member of New York society, but when her step-father died her mother turned over control of their finances to Sklar. After the death of her mother, Maud and her brother were informed that there was no money left from the millions that he initially controlled. Now Maud has carefully plotted her When Maud Warner entered the New York restaurant and shot financier Sun Sunderland as he lunched with his friend Burt Sklar was he the actual target or was she really aiming for Sklar? Maud was raised as a member of New York society, but when her step-father died her mother turned over control of their finances to Sklar. After the death of her mother, Maud and her brother were informed that there was no money left from the millions that he initially controlled. Now Maud has carefully plotted her revenge. Having become a frequent poker player, she knows the importance of a good bluff and she uses this to her advantage. She was referred to as “Mad Maud” when she first start d making accusations against Sklar, but time has passed and she was forgotten by most of her old friends. Now Sunderland is dead. News of his infidelity and financial manipulations ar flying through society and his best friend Sklar played a part in all of it. It seems “Mad Maud” was right and now she has to find a way to use these accusations to her advantage.Jane Stanton Hitchcock has written a story that is full of unexpected twists. From Maud’s opening shot to her final surprising testimony in court, her actions are calculated and she never shows her hand until the game is over. From the New York society dinners to the illegal poker dens, this story was pure fun to read and I would highly recommend it. I would like to thank Bookish First for providing a copy of this book for my review.
    more
  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Bluff is Jane Stanton Hitchcock's sixth novel and pays homage to her newfound love of poker. The story is a quirky whodunit in which we already know whodunit, we just don't know why. Mad Maud Warner, former New York City socialite is convinced that shady Burt Sklar robbed her mother Lois of her fortune and had a hand in the death of Maud's beloved brother, Alan. She's taken every opportunity to let all of New York's elite know what a crook Sklar is but instead of gaining sympathy, all Maud has d Bluff is Jane Stanton Hitchcock's sixth novel and pays homage to her newfound love of poker. The story is a quirky whodunit in which we already know whodunit, we just don't know why. Mad Maud Warner, former New York City socialite is convinced that shady Burt Sklar robbed her mother Lois of her fortune and had a hand in the death of Maud's beloved brother, Alan. She's taken every opportunity to let all of New York's elite know what a crook Sklar is but instead of gaining sympathy, all Maud has done is reinforce Sklar's claim that she's bonkers. And bonkers she seems to be when she walks into the dining room of the Four Seasons and takes a shot at Sklar in broad daylight. The only problem is, she misses Sklar completely and instead mortally wounds Sklar's best friend Sun, one of the most powerful men in the city-- then walks right out the front door.Maud's story is intertwined with Sun's wife Jean, Sklar and his inexplicable crush on a stripper, and a debt that goes far beyond mere money. With more twists and turns than the New York Thruway, Bluff is an entertaining read that keeps you guessing until the moment Maud finally puts all her cards on the table. And even then you'll be left wondering whether or not she's bluffing.
    more
  • Quirkybookworm
    January 1, 1970
    Maud, Maud, 'Mad' Maud....how I love you! You are just simply brilliant!The cover is unique and awesome.This was an ingenious, well thought out, intelligent novel which deserves many praises!So, so, so, so GOOD!The title Bluff is... well pretty much what the title says. The book is pretty well thought out, well executed to the end and gets major points for its originality of the story.,I absolutely adore Maud, the ex-socialite who was scammed out of her inheritance by greedy climbers. She is als Maud, Maud, 'Mad' Maud....how I love you! You are just simply brilliant!The cover is unique and awesome.This was an ingenious, well thought out, intelligent novel which deserves many praises!So, so, so, so GOOD!The title Bluff is... well pretty much what the title says. The book is pretty well thought out, well executed to the end and gets major points for its originality of the story.,I absolutely adore Maud, the ex-socialite who was scammed out of her inheritance by greedy climbers. She is also a poker player. Her love for poker knows no bound. She integrates the themes and concepts of poker rules into her life. She uses them to her advantages.I just love the snarky humors on upper class society.The novel started out with a bang and ended with the most satisfying bang. I cannot wait to see what the author has to bring to the table. I'd give this book a high 4 stars!I received this highly entertaining ARC from Poisen Pen Press from Net Galley and BookishFirst in exchange for my unbiased and honest review. Thank you!
    more
  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    Maud Warner is part of the "overlooked and invisible" generation, the older women who move through society ignored by most. Until, that is, she walks into a restaurant and shoots someone. Her guilt is known from the very first pages. What sets this mystery aside is the labyrinth readers navigate while answering a number of questions. Was "the Pope of Finance" her intended target? Why is she unapologetic and unconcerned about her guilt? Maud is a poker player and fans will enjoy her tips on play Maud Warner is part of the "overlooked and invisible" generation, the older women who move through society ignored by most. Until, that is, she walks into a restaurant and shoots someone. Her guilt is known from the very first pages. What sets this mystery aside is the labyrinth readers navigate while answering a number of questions. Was "the Pope of Finance" her intended target? Why is she unapologetic and unconcerned about her guilt? Maud is a poker player and fans will enjoy her tips on playing and learning about the importance of bluffing. She certainly knows how to bluff! The book is chatty and whimsical, flitting between the mean streets of DC and the high society cafes and homes of New York City. It's a bit too gritty to be called a cozy but readers who don't want a lot of violence will be pleased. I had read another of Hitchock's books and then kind of forgot about her. I'll be going back to fill in the missing titles. Lots of fun!
    more
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so much fun, and made me wonder why I hadn't read any previous titles written by this author. It's almost like Jackie Collins Lite. A fun, fast-paced read during which the reader does not need to expend extra brain power to figure things out, Bluff begins with the high-society murder of the century, and takes you on a rollicking ride with Maud Warner, Jean Sunderland and Danya, and various other quirky characters who help to flesh out the story. I thoroughly enjoyed the author's wr This book was so much fun, and made me wonder why I hadn't read any previous titles written by this author. It's almost like Jackie Collins Lite. A fun, fast-paced read during which the reader does not need to expend extra brain power to figure things out, Bluff begins with the high-society murder of the century, and takes you on a rollicking ride with Maud Warner, Jean Sunderland and Danya, and various other quirky characters who help to flesh out the story. I thoroughly enjoyed the author's writing style. The story came together pretty seamlessly. There were several small reveals throughout the story, delivered in such a way that they didn't seem like reveals. One of them had me practically cheering out loud - hell yes, ladies! While I do wish there had been more poker involved, the poker scenes that are included are well done and interesting. Thank you to Bookish First and Poisoned Pen Press for the digital ARE!
    more
  • Aimee (Book It Forward)
    January 1, 1970
    A murder mystery at its finest with an unlikely murderess at its core! Bluff doesn't make you wait to find out who murdered a man in cold blood. This bit is told right in the beginning and we are left to unravel the mystery as to WHY it happened. I loved the twisted plot and the pacing of the story. The characters and their back stories were fascinating, and I LOVED that the main character was an older woman named Maude. Mad Maude for the win! She was a character I loved rooting for. The revelat A murder mystery at its finest with an unlikely murderess at its core! Bluff doesn't make you wait to find out who murdered a man in cold blood. This bit is told right in the beginning and we are left to unravel the mystery as to WHY it happened. I loved the twisted plot and the pacing of the story. The characters and their back stories were fascinating, and I LOVED that the main character was an older woman named Maude. Mad Maude for the win! She was a character I loved rooting for. The revelations as to who she was working with, and their end game was jaw dropping. It was nice to have her as our main character. She was extremely intelligent and very humble. She knew that she would fly under radar as she fled the murder scene because she was an older woman. People don't see older women, and especially don't suspect them of being capable of waltzing into the Four Season's Restaurant and shooting someone at point blank range. Mad Maude's love of poker meant she always had an ace up her sleeve and her bluff game was impeccable. Hence the name of the book. The slimy men she went after deserved every bit of what she had planned for them. I felt like I needed a shower after reading their parts of the book. I am so happy to have had the chance to read this. I haven't read anything by Jane Stanton Hitchcock before, but you can count on me picking up her books the next time I venture out to the bookstore.Thank you to NetGalley and the Publisher for giving me an advanced readers copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.See this and other book reviews at www.BookItForward.blogFollow me on Instagram and Twitter! @BookItBlog
    more
  • Nannette
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Stanton Hitchcock's Bluff is a wonderful book. For me, it is reminiscent of the many Dominick Dunne books I read. It gives the reader a wonderful look at the lives of the 1% and how miserable they can be. Maud Warner is a wonderful character. She is a lady of what my mother's generation called, "a certain age." She lets us into her story when she walks into the Four Seasons restaurant in Manhattan, shots a man, and walks back out unaccosted. Hitchcock writes this wonderful line, "Older wome Jane Stanton Hitchcock's Bluff is a wonderful book. For me, it is reminiscent of the many Dominick Dunne books I read. It gives the reader a wonderful look at the lives of the 1% and how miserable they can be. Maud Warner is a wonderful character. She is a lady of what my mother's generation called, "a certain age." She lets us into her story when she walks into the Four Seasons restaurant in Manhattan, shots a man, and walks back out unaccosted. Hitchcock writes this wonderful line, "Older women are invisible and we don't even have to disappear." The characters are well fleshed out, not just the main protagonist. The action is believable. Bluff is a very enjoyable read. I am looking forward to reading more of her work.I won an e-book copy of Bluff from BookishFirst.com. I have written an honest review.
    more
  • Sophia
    January 1, 1970
    At first this read like a short story right out of the New Yorker. Each chapter was short and succinct, a little dry. I wasn't sure where it was going but continued along for the ride. Then, the author dealt an array of such charismatic characters I found myself fully enjoying each one for whatever they were meant to contribute to the story. The "bluff" theme was consistently brought up throughout the story but not ad nauseam. And the feminist vibe was there but not overpoweringly so, enough to At first this read like a short story right out of the New Yorker. Each chapter was short and succinct, a little dry. I wasn't sure where it was going but continued along for the ride. Then, the author dealt an array of such charismatic characters I found myself fully enjoying each one for whatever they were meant to contribute to the story. The "bluff" theme was consistently brought up throughout the story but not ad nauseam. And the feminist vibe was there but not overpoweringly so, enough to appreciate but not shoved down the readers throat. All in all this was great fun, a quick read, with some surprise twist and turns. When you start reading early in the night and suddenly you realize it's well past midnight but you won't stop until you've finished- I'd say that's the sign of a great read!
    more
  • Judgie
    January 1, 1970
    Bluff is a twisty, fun murder mystery. We know early on who the murderer is but the events that lead up to it are for the reader to unravel. Fallen socialite, Maud Warner walks int the Four Seasons and shoots Sun Sunderland during a busy lunch. It seems she was aiming for Burt Sklar, the man she accused of stealing her family's fortune, and Sun's best friend. When Maud walks out of the restaurant and disappears everyone begins to wonder where she is and why she did what she did. As the story unf Bluff is a twisty, fun murder mystery. We know early on who the murderer is but the events that lead up to it are for the reader to unravel. Fallen socialite, Maud Warner walks int the Four Seasons and shoots Sun Sunderland during a busy lunch. It seems she was aiming for Burt Sklar, the man she accused of stealing her family's fortune, and Sun's best friend. When Maud walks out of the restaurant and disappears everyone begins to wonder where she is and why she did what she did. As the story unfolds we learn about many juicy secrets Maud, Burt, and Sun are keeping.The author structures the story after a poker game, as Maud is an avid poker player. She repeats how important the bluff is when playing the game and carries this over into trying to get away with murder.Bluff is fast-paced and will keep the reader wondering, "What is going to happen next?"
    more
  • Susan B
    January 1, 1970
    Whoa! Why hasn't anybody told me about Jane Stanton Hitchcock? Bluff is the first book by her that I've read and I'm hooked.I don't usually like first person, present tense in books, but Hitchcock makes it work beautifully. "Mad" Maude is an ex-socialite whose family was scammed out of a fortune by a slick, icky financial wizard and her whole life revolves around hating him. The story of Maude is woven intricately with other socialites, with a nod to their shallow, vapid money-oriented lives. Ma Whoa! Why hasn't anybody told me about Jane Stanton Hitchcock? Bluff is the first book by her that I've read and I'm hooked.I don't usually like first person, present tense in books, but Hitchcock makes it work beautifully. "Mad" Maude is an ex-socialite whose family was scammed out of a fortune by a slick, icky financial wizard and her whole life revolves around hating him. The story of Maude is woven intricately with other socialites, with a nod to their shallow, vapid money-oriented lives. Maude's a poker player and a good one. Her life is permeated by the methods and magic of poker and she uses them to her advantage. I love the way the story connects and interconnects and comes to a final, satisfying conclusion. It was hard to put this book down and now I start my search for more Jane Stanton Hitchcock books. One of the best books I've read in awhile!
    more
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    “Bluff” is my first Jean Stanton Hitchcock novel that I have read. It won’t be my last, and I am not bluffing. Our novel starts with our main character Maud walking into a restaurant and shooting Sun Sunderland who Burt Skylar pulls in front of himself to avoid being shot. Maud is able to escape the restaurant but can she escape the crime she has just committed and she did not get the intended target. We know that this is a revenge killing for having her inheritance taken away by these two men w “Bluff” is my first Jean Stanton Hitchcock novel that I have read. It won’t be my last, and I am not bluffing. Our novel starts with our main character Maud walking into a restaurant and shooting Sun Sunderland who Burt Skylar pulls in front of himself to avoid being shot. Maud is able to escape the restaurant but can she escape the crime she has just committed and she did not get the intended target. We know that this is a revenge killing for having her inheritance taken away by these two men when her rich mother dies. So many twists and turns throughout the story kept this reader guessing up to the last few pages. Maud, an excellent Poker player played the BLUFF ADMIRABLY and proved she is the Queen of Poker, I received an ARC e- copy from Bookish First and Poisoned Pen Press in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    Maud Warner, past her prime and spending her days at the poker table, is out to get her revenge and it isn't going to be pretty. Now that she is the center of a murder at the famous Four Seasons, she must figure out a way to make sure that the person responsible for her and her family's misery is brought to justice. Bluff is a novel that is full of questions and answers that seem to change with every turn of the page. Although the main players of the book all belong to the privileged class, they Maud Warner, past her prime and spending her days at the poker table, is out to get her revenge and it isn't going to be pretty. Now that she is the center of a murder at the famous Four Seasons, she must figure out a way to make sure that the person responsible for her and her family's misery is brought to justice. Bluff is a novel that is full of questions and answers that seem to change with every turn of the page. Although the main players of the book all belong to the privileged class, they show themselves as no better than anyone else when it comes to family, sex, jealousy, and most importantly, money. I thought that the book did a decent job of showing different sides of the crime, and I do like how it had a bit of a big twist just past the halfway point. Light crime fans will want to pick up a copy of this book. *Book provided by Bookish First
    more
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a book that will make you laugh at silliness, Bluff will do it for you. Do not expect to have to use your brain, but relax, sit back and be entertained. Maud, aka Mad Maud, walks into the Four Seasons and shoots a man, walks out and becomes invisible as only an older woman can, so says Maud. As a really good poker player, Maud is an expert at bluffing at cards, but can she pull this one off? Meet the cast: Sun Sunderland and Jean, his wife (soon to be widow) along with his If you are looking for a book that will make you laugh at silliness, Bluff will do it for you. Do not expect to have to use your brain, but relax, sit back and be entertained. Maud, aka Mad Maud, walks into the Four Seasons and shoots a man, walks out and becomes invisible as only an older woman can, so says Maud. As a really good poker player, Maud is an expert at bluffing at cards, but can she pull this one off? Meet the cast: Sun Sunderland and Jean, his wife (soon to be widow) along with his partner Burt who is as slimy as can be. Then there are the lawyers, the reporters, the friends and the gossips along with a mistress or is she a wife? Implausible? Of course, but suspend reality and just enjoy. Very cute story! Thanks for the laughs.
    more
  • Gabriela Zago
    January 1, 1970
    I actually had fun ready Bluff. The book is about a female poker player that kills a man, and the story alternates between her point of view (told in first person), and other character's points of view. So you can see that their perceptions are slightly different of what happened and how it happened. I like that, just like bluffing in poker, you can only understand what really happened in the end of the book, when all "cards" are revealed. It's a very cleverly constructed story, like a murder in I actually had fun ready Bluff. The book is about a female poker player that kills a man, and the story alternates between her point of view (told in first person), and other character's points of view. So you can see that their perceptions are slightly different of what happened and how it happened. I like that, just like bluffing in poker, you can only understand what really happened in the end of the book, when all "cards" are revealed. It's a very cleverly constructed story, like a murder investigation in reverse (because since the beginning we already know that she did kill the guy, and she was definitely not trying to hide it, considering where the murder took place - at a restaurant full of people and witnesses). Overall, a nice and fun read.
    more
Write a review