The Lost Village (The Ghost Hunters, #2)
Some stories are never finished. Some voices insist on being heard, even after death . . . Many years ago, soldiers entered a remote English village called Imber and forced every inhabitant out. It remains abandoned . . .Each winter, on one night only, Imber's former residents return to visit loved ones buried in the overgrown churchyard. But this year, something has gone wrong. Secrets are surfacing, putting all who come near Imber in danger. And only one man can help.Notorious ghost hunter Harry Price has reluctantly reunited with his former assistant Sarah Grey. Once, she worshipped Harry, but their relationship has recently soured. Harry knows that Sarah could be the key to unlocking the mystery of Imber, but will her involvement in the case be the undoing of them both? Inspired by real historical events, this is the second novel by Neil Spring featuring the notorious real-life ghost hunter, Harry Price. The critically acclaimed ITV drama Harry Price: Ghost Hunter, starring Rafe Spall, was adapted from Spring's first novel, The Ghost Hunters.

The Lost Village (The Ghost Hunters, #2) Details

TitleThe Lost Village (The Ghost Hunters, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 19th, 2017
PublisherQuercus
Rating
GenreHorror, Mystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

The Lost Village (The Ghost Hunters, #2) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is historical fiction based on real events. This is a terrific read as the autumn days get shorter, for Halloween, and for whenever a spooky ghost read is what will fit the bill. An elderly Sarah Grey, once assistant to the famous ghost hunter, Harry Price, hears of the discovery of a spirit child's body in the lost village of Imber, on Salisbury Plain in 1978. This drives her to write about her experiences of Imber village, first in 1914 as a child, when it was taken over for the war effor This is historical fiction based on real events. This is a terrific read as the autumn days get shorter, for Halloween, and for whenever a spooky ghost read is what will fit the bill. An elderly Sarah Grey, once assistant to the famous ghost hunter, Harry Price, hears of the discovery of a spirit child's body in the lost village of Imber, on Salisbury Plain in 1978. This drives her to write about her experiences of Imber village, first in 1914 as a child, when it was taken over for the war effort by the army, and where her father was stationed, destined to never return home and later in 1932, when she and Harry investigate paranormal happenings, horrors, and ghosts. Promises made by the army and the government that the village would be returned fail to materialise making it a highly political and volatile issue.A significant visit to Brixton Picture Palace to explore the odd goings on there lead to Sarah and Harry meeting coincidentally. Sarah has left Harry's employ and their personal relationship led to consequences that have her feeling haunted and guilty. Vernon Wall, a journalist despised by Harry, is instrumental in getting Sarah and Harry into Imber to help the army in some confidential investigations. There has been the terrible burning of Sergeant Gregory Edwards, and the haunted sounds of the cries of children and women, and more on the site, heard by soldiers which has the army worried. They want nothing to impede the annual visit to Imber church service at St Giles by the grieving and resentful villagers, seen as a crucial PR exercise. There are the ghostly sightings of a young badly nourished boy, also summoned through seances led by a trusted army man, Sidewinder. The ghost boy is the dead son of Oscar Hartwell, a man who lost all 4 of his children. Hartwell used to be the local bigwig of Imber living in the large house, now used as kill house in army training. He is the central focus and leading light for the campaign to return Imber. As Sarah and Harry investigate, they uncover horrors and evidence that practically has arch sceptic Harry Price convinced that the paranormal and ghosts exist. For Sarah, Imber village takes her back to the past and a truer understanding of exactly who she is.The author does take some liberties but essentially this novel is based on fact. Neil Spring has written an atmospheric ghost story located in a lost village where feelings naturally run high amongst former locals. What I really loved was the character of Sarah Grey, a woman with a strong interest in the supernatural, visited by visions, or possibly hallucinations, in love with Harry Price but knows his marriage forbids a relationship between them. Through the course of the novel Sarah is on a journey that reveals so much about her complicated identity and she is instrumental in arriving at the truth. This is a wonderful and thrilling tale of the ruthless in humanity, ghosts and the paranormal. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.The perfect accompaniment to a chilly October evening, The Lost Village blends together fact and fiction to form a creepy tale filled with ghosts and long-forgotten memories.Most of the action is centered on the 'lost village' of Imber. Found on the Salisbury Plains, many years ago soldiers forced the inhabitants out to use it as a military base in the first World War. Once a year the inhabitants are allowed back to visit former lov I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.The perfect accompaniment to a chilly October evening, The Lost Village blends together fact and fiction to form a creepy tale filled with ghosts and long-forgotten memories.Most of the action is centered on the 'lost village' of Imber. Found on the Salisbury Plains, many years ago soldiers forced the inhabitants out to use it as a military base in the first World War. Once a year the inhabitants are allowed back to visit former loved ones buried in the churchyard. However, mysterious ghostly sightings that have driven the soldiers mad, and rumors of the church bells ringing on their own have started to occur in Imber, with many inhabitants claiming it's the former inhabitants rearing up to reclaim their forgotten village. Only Harry Price and his former assistant Sarah Grey can unravel the truth. Is this an elaborate hoax? Or the work of the undead?After a brief prologue involving an elderly Sarah and a ghostly visitation, we jump straight into the action with a younger Sarah investigating the Brixton picture house, which has a notorious reputation for ghost sightings. I found myself feeling as though I was there with Sarah as she explores the dark rows of seats, and there's an almost palpable tension created as she realises that the 'ghost light', usually left on by the last employee to leave on an evening, is switched off. This opening scene was a great introduction to the overall feel for the rest of the novel, which was deeply atmospheric, creepy and filled with paranormal activity.The plot itself, where we find Harry and Sarah in Imber, is fast paced, with plenty of twists and turns to keep me guessing until the end. Just when I thought I'd figured something out or solved a mystery, the author threw something unexpected in, which kept me on my toes and allowed me to really enjoy this. It's not often I'm taken by surprise by a story-line, and I was pleasantly surprised. I also liked how the plot all linked together - from the picture house to Imber and the elderly Sarah we see at the beginning. It was cleverly done, and showed that all aspects of the story had a purpose and were thoughtfully considered.I loved the relationship between Harry and Sarah, which was complex and almost love/hate. It's acutely apparent that Sarah is in love with Harry, but regrets from her past prevent her from acting on this. She also knows just how deeply under Harry's spell she is, and hates herself for it. I loved that aspect of her character. I also liked the fact that the author does not try to present Sarah as anything other than what she is - she feels like a 'proper' person from her time period. There's no 'modern' ideologies, which is great, and nothing about her feels forced. Harry is more complicated a character. As we only see things from Sarah's perspective, it's hard to get a grasp on who he really is and how he feels about Sarah. He often comes across as quite abrasive, and short with people who do not share is opinion. At one point in the story he's also appears to complete drop his own perspectives about the paranormal after one particular incident, which felt a bit out of place for him - especially as Sarah is convinced that it's a hoax. My main issue with Sarah and Harry was that I felt there wasn't any proper closure between the two characters at the end. I wanted the two of them to talk about their past together, which never happened - and so much was left unspoken that I was a little bit disappointed at the potential that was missed there.However, I found this an exceptionally well written tale with a great amount of atmospheric detail that kept me enthralled to the end.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    I found The Ghost Hunters to be pretty awesome, but this book was fabulous! I was thrilled to learn that the Ghost Hunters would get a sequel and I was even more thrilled when I got the book to read. And, what a book. From the first page was a hooked and the story kept its hold on my wall the way until the end. You don't have to read the first book, to read this one, but I would recommend you do that to get to know Sarah Grey and Harry Price from the start, how they met, how Sarah started to wor I found The Ghost Hunters to be pretty awesome, but this book was fabulous! I was thrilled to learn that the Ghost Hunters would get a sequel and I was even more thrilled when I got the book to read. And, what a book. From the first page was a hooked and the story kept its hold on my wall the way until the end. You don't have to read the first book, to read this one, but I would recommend you do that to get to know Sarah Grey and Harry Price from the start, how they met, how Sarah started to work for him and what went wrong.The Lost Village is a captivating tale. I was curious to learn what the connection between Sarah and the village. And, is Imber really haunted? And, what has the movie theater that is said to be haunted to do with everything? Is there some connection between the movie theater and the village? Sarah and Harry reunite to solve the mystery of Imber. But, their past is between them and the village is not a very peaceful place. This case could be the end of them...Neil Spring is a very talented writer and I sure hope that he will write at least one more book about Sarah and Harry. Although, to get this one was more than I hoped for and it was very bittersweet to turn the last page. It's an extraordinary tale and I recommend it warmly!I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I greatly enjoyed the first novel featuring Harry Price and his assistant, Sarah, as well as Neil Spring’s stand alone novel, ‘The Watchers,’ so I was delighted to read the sequel to ‘The Ghost Hunters.’ We meet up with Sarah as an elderly lady, when there is a news story relating to an investigation that she took part in, back in 1932. Reminded of those events, Sarah sets down her story on paper and confronts what happened to her as a young woman.The book revolves around the village of Imber, o I greatly enjoyed the first novel featuring Harry Price and his assistant, Sarah, as well as Neil Spring’s stand alone novel, ‘The Watchers,’ so I was delighted to read the sequel to ‘The Ghost Hunters.’ We meet up with Sarah as an elderly lady, when there is a news story relating to an investigation that she took part in, back in 1932. Reminded of those events, Sarah sets down her story on paper and confronts what happened to her as a young woman.The book revolves around the village of Imber, on Salisbury Plain, which, according to this novel (the author admits he has changed events a little) was requisitioned by the army during the first world war. Imber, previously a thriving, if isolated, community, was left a ghost village – the inhabitants only allowed to visit the village once a year to visit the graves of their dead. This has led to anger and resentment, as the villagers believed that, once the war was over, they would be allowed back.Sarah is recruited by journalist, Vernon Wall, to look into Imber for the army. Of course, it is not Sarah, but Harry Price they really want and that they hope Sarah can convince to help look into what lies behind the strange happenings at Imber, before the evacuated village is once again opened to the public. The soldiers based nearby are full of rumours of strange lights, murmured voices and ghostly sightings. With everyone spooked, can Price, the great sceptic, discover what is behind all the stories.This is an interesting and atmospheric novel, with an evocative setting. As readers of ‘The Ghost Hunters,’ will know, the relationship between Price and Sarah has been strained and this also helps make the novel interesting. There are also an excellent cast of characters; including the resentful Oscar Hartwell, whose family owned much of Imber before it was evacuated, the Commander of the army base and his assistant, Sidewinder, whose family hail from those parts, and, the journalist, Vernon Wall. Events in the village will cause everyone involved to reassess their thoughts on the supernatural and Sarah will have to confront her own past, as well as face danger to her own life. I hope to see more, both in this series, and from this very talented author.
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  • A Bald Mage** Steve
    January 1, 1970
    via GIPHY I would like to thank Quercus Books and Netgalley for giving me a free copy to review, the release date for this book is 19th October 2017.‘There are secrets in Imber that must be told. And very soon, you’re going to find out what they are’Here we are, it’s October, and it’s near Halloween so it’s time for me to indulge into some scary books, so I decided to start with The Lost Village. I can tell you that is a very intelligent novel that kept me thinking until the very end. The autho via GIPHY I would like to thank Quercus Books and Netgalley for giving me a free copy to review, the release date for this book is 19th October 2017.‘There are secrets in Imber that must be told. And very soon, you’re going to find out what they are’Here we are, it’s October, and it’s near Halloween so it’s time for me to indulge into some scary books, so I decided to start with The Lost Village. I can tell you that is a very intelligent novel that kept me thinking until the very end. The author caught me out on many occasions as to what was going on during the book, when I thought I was getting to grips with the story and tried to second guess the plot then the author threw in some key moments that got me re-thinking the outcome of the plot all over again. This story states that it’s based on real events which made it even more interesting to read.Full review on my Blog: Happy reading :)https://twobaldmages.wordpress.com/20...
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  • Kirsty White
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed 'Ghost Hunters' the first book in this series so was delighted that the author is doing more. This one is full of twists and turns and doesn't let up right from the beginning as Harry Price and Sarah Grey go off on yet another adventure to debunk spiritual happenings. One thing I do like is how nothing is 100% debunked though and while the majority of events in this story boil down to the dastardly do-ings of man there's still just a few things that can't be explained away by sc I really enjoyed 'Ghost Hunters' the first book in this series so was delighted that the author is doing more. This one is full of twists and turns and doesn't let up right from the beginning as Harry Price and Sarah Grey go off on yet another adventure to debunk spiritual happenings. One thing I do like is how nothing is 100% debunked though and while the majority of events in this story boil down to the dastardly do-ings of man there's still just a few things that can't be explained away by science. The story (based on real life events and a real village) of Imber is fascinating and makes me long for a bit of a road trip down to Wiltshire to see it myself. And for me, that's one of the signs of a good book setting. Do I want to go? Even with the scary ones. And I'm all for going to go scare myself in an abandoned village. Plot wise the relationship between Harry and Sarah is strained with mistrust. As per usual Price knows far more than he's letting on. I do wonder why she sticks around someone who is not really that likeable and very good at upsetting people but as she says herself 'he's famous worldwide' (a bit paraphrased). Or as is mentioned elsewhere in the book she's curious...and curious enough to put up with him.It's quite a pacy read, the main bulk of events take place over a very short space of time. The characters are really well drawn and for the most part likeable. I'm not entirely sure I'd get on with the real Harry Price but that's a personal thing and doesn't detract from the book. In fact I enjoy it when others take him down a peg or two. Overall another brilliant read. Free arc from netgalley
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  • Trev Twinem
    January 1, 1970
    Classic horror at its best Neil Spring is an elegant author of what I would term as classic horror. In his writing just like an artist he paints a picture and relies on the reader to look at that picture and use his imagination to envisage the story. In The Lost Village he again teams two of his favourite ghost hunters Harry Price and his assistant Sarah Grey. They have travelled to the former village of Imber on Salisbury Plain to help understand strange and ghostly sightings including the trag Classic horror at its best Neil Spring is an elegant author of what I would term as classic horror. In his writing just like an artist he paints a picture and relies on the reader to look at that picture and use his imagination to envisage the story. In The Lost Village he again teams two of his favourite ghost hunters Harry Price and his assistant Sarah Grey. They have travelled to the former village of Imber on Salisbury Plain to help understand strange and ghostly sightings including the tragic disfigurement of Sgt Gregory Edwards. I love Spring's writing style and his simple but effective use of language which is a joy to read yet somewhat disturbing and creepy...."The winter sun was sinking beneath the spires of Westminster and casting a pink hue across the London skyline".... "I froze. Around me, the trees seemed to shimmer, as if I were seeing them through a haze. At first, there was absolute silence. The air had become chillingly cold, freezing, and then I thought I heard, faintly.....low whispering"......"Price was standing in the centre of the wrecked mill, next to the battered table and chairs. A length of rope dangled from his right hand. Wearing his black frock coat that fell to his knees, he exuded the sinister presence of a Victorian Executioner"..... The Lost Village is really the story of displaced inhabitants attempting to reclaim what the army has stolen. Once a year they are invited back but this will be no ordinary visit as a chain of events sets in motion a terrible reckoning, and a sickening revelation ensuring that Imber will be remembered for all the wrong reasons. I particularly liked the cover of this novel with its dark angry skies and the picture of a man approaching wearing his trademark black coat, all which really adds to the atmospheric, macabre tale. Many thanks to the good people at Quercus publishing for a gratis copy in exchange for an honest review and that is what I have written.
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  • I read novels
    January 1, 1970
    I loved reading this book and the introduction to the authors notes. The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain is very real. A ghost town out of bounds, abandoned at the outbreak of the Second World War. For the novel to work it was necessary for the author to change the date of this abandonment to 1914, and although some characters are indeed based on historical figures, the author has taken liberties with places and names and historical events to transport readers to a place his characters were I loved reading this book and the introduction to the authors notes. The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain is very real. A ghost town out of bounds, abandoned at the outbreak of the Second World War. For the novel to work it was necessary for the author to change the date of this abandonment to 1914, and although some characters are indeed based on historical figures, the author has taken liberties with places and names and historical events to transport readers to a place his characters were able to explore. Imber truly is a creepy location remote, dangerous and eerily deserted. I loved reading about Harry Price a ghost hunter. Harry Price was a real psychical investigator a maverick who achieved infamy during the inter-war period for his other worldly investigations, and although this story is entirely imaginary, some of it was inspired by Price's own writings and experiences. A spooky psychological drama based on a true story.
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  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    The Lost Village is a welcome return for Harry Price and Sarah Grey, last seen in 2013's The Ghost Hunters. It's told in flashback, as an elderly Sarah sees a vision of the famous paranormal researcher and feels compelled to record the tale of one particular case they tackled together.Like The Ghost Hunters, this story is set in a real place: the 'ghost village' of Imber in Wiltshire. The background given in the novel is all true: during the Second World War, the residents of Imber were forcibly The Lost Village is a welcome return for Harry Price and Sarah Grey, last seen in 2013's The Ghost Hunters. It's told in flashback, as an elderly Sarah sees a vision of the famous paranormal researcher and feels compelled to record the tale of one particular case they tackled together.Like The Ghost Hunters, this story is set in a real place: the 'ghost village' of Imber in Wiltshire. The background given in the novel is all true: during the Second World War, the residents of Imber were forcibly evacuated so the village could be used as a training area for the army. When the war ended, the locals were not allowed to return, partly due to a proliferation of unexploded bombs and grenades – indeed, this is still the case today. In The Lost Village, these facts make Imber a breeding ground for anger, resentment, and possibly even vengeful spirits. Former residents claim the place is haunted by the Imber dead, angry at being separated from their families. Commander Williams of Westdown Camp, which controls Imber, appeals to Harry after a spate of eerie incidents unsettle his men. One encounter even seems to have driven a soldier insane.I thought this book, at almost 500 pages, would take a long time to get through, but I underestimated its readability. The combination of an intriguing supernatural conundrum and a real – undeniably creepy – location is dynamite. I loved these characters in the first book and was happy to have them back; Sarah and Harry have built-in chemistry as well as emotional appeal, keeping the narrative afloat as mystery is piled on mystery.The disadvantage of this amount of detail is that the plot becomes more convoluted than it needs to be, with a web of coincidences connecting Sarah to Imber. While suspension of disbelief is an obvious necessity for any story involving ghosts, some of the events in The Lost Village stretch credulity to its limits. (I adored the early sequence about Brixton Picture Palace, and wish this had been left to stand on its own.) But there's a confidence to the writing here that wasn't present in The Ghost Hunters.I hope there are more Harry Price and Sarah Grey adventures to come. If absorbing historical fiction with a spooky twist sounds like your thing, The Lost Village makes for a perfect Halloween read.I received an advance review copy of The Lost Village from the publisher through NetGalley.TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 *On the 1st November, 1943, the 150 residents of Imber, a village on the Salisbury Plain, were ordered by the Ministry of Defence to vacate their houses – Imber was needed for army training in view of the planned invasion of Continental Europe. Most villagers did not put up a protest – they felt they were doing their part for the war effort and, in any case, they were promised they would get back their homes once hostilities were over. Not that leaving Imber was easy – the village blacksmith 3.5 *On the 1st November, 1943, the 150 residents of Imber, a village on the Salisbury Plain, were ordered by the Ministry of Defence to vacate their houses – Imber was needed for army training in view of the planned invasion of Continental Europe. Most villagers did not put up a protest – they felt they were doing their part for the war effort and, in any case, they were promised they would get back their homes once hostilities were over. Not that leaving Imber was easy – the village blacksmith of forty years cried his eyes out. Ominously, he would be the first person to die after the evacuation and would return to the village only to be buried there. The war finished but the residents were never allowed to return to Imber which remains, to date, army property, its buildings crumbling due to decades of shelling and neglect.It is a poignant story and one which has inspired contemporary composer Giya Kancheli’s eerie choral work "Little Imber". Imber is also the setting of Neil Spring’s latest “ghost novel”, The Lost Village. As the author himself admits in the introduction, he has, for plot purposes, changed the date of the evacuation from 1943 to 1914, but he otherwise remains remarkably faithful to the background story, even managing to weave into his plot certain historical details and characters (weeping blacksmith included). “The Lost Village” is a sequel to “The Ghost Hunters” and, once again, features (a fictionalised version of) real-life ghosthunter Harry Price. When the Army requests Price to investigate some strange apparitions and supernatural goings-on at Imber, he is reluctantly joined by the narrator, Sarah Grey, previously his assistant, lover and, secretly, the mother of his child. They make a strange team – Harry consistently and almost irritatingly sceptical; Sarah, who is possibly psychic herself, more open to the possibility of the existence of a spirit world. But their new assignment will make Price rethink his certainties whilst bringing Sarah face to face with some personal demons. At around 500 pages, this novel is definitely a slow-burner and, at times, I found myself wishing that the book had gone through some more judicious editing. That said, its length gives the author enough space to build a ghostly atmosphere whilst developing the “human” stories behind the supernatural derring-do. In the last chapters, then, the plot really picks up and becomes decidedly Gothic – apart from the supernatural elements (including a chilling seance scene), there are every Goth’s favourite tropes: crumbling buildings, foggy graveyards, hidden family secrets, madness, and obsession. As well as a concluding action sequence which could grace a Hollywood blockbuster. This could make a fun club read for Halloween.
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  • WaterstonesBirmingham
    January 1, 1970
    A good, solid, creepy ghost story.The village of Imber, taken over by the army, is wonderfully described so that you can see it very clearly.The story is full of misdirection and surprises.Well worth a read for fans of atmospheric horror.Grace
  • Brightfeather
    January 1, 1970
    Oh i enjoyed this so much. I was lucky enough to receive this advanced copy from Neil via facebook, and i was absolutely delighted to meet up with Sarah and Harry again. I've been hoping for a follow up to The Ghost Hunters, and as this book is set in Imber which i've heard about since i was a child having grown up in the next county , i couldn't wait to get my hands on it.Neil's writing style is rite up my street, he has a way of drawing you into the story and making you care about the characte Oh i enjoyed this so much. I was lucky enough to receive this advanced copy from Neil via facebook, and i was absolutely delighted to meet up with Sarah and Harry again. I've been hoping for a follow up to The Ghost Hunters, and as this book is set in Imber which i've heard about since i was a child having grown up in the next county , i couldn't wait to get my hands on it.Neil's writing style is rite up my street, he has a way of drawing you into the story and making you care about the characters and its so interesting with twists and turns and things happening that you just wouldn't think of.Its creepy and unthinkable and dark and i want to read it again.A brilliant book worth every one of the 5 stars and i would highly recommend it to anyone .
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Very entertaining and spooky tale!A review: https://forwinternights.wordpress.com...
  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    A good, solid, creepy ghost story.The village of Imber, taken over by the army, is wonderfully described so that you can see it very clearly.The story is full of misdirection and surprises.There were some character traits i didn't particularly like and an occurrence towards the end of the book that seemed unceremoniously wedged in, but overall i enjoyed it.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Pure excellence. Neil Spring is filling the gap left by James Herbert and here is a book that has all the qualities of excellence, its a book to curl up with on a dark night, it is atmospheric, it's creepy, it is reading bliss. I found Neil Spring when I worked in my local library and I was converted to his genius immediately. This book follows up the Ghost Hunters, Sarah Grey reunites with Harry Price albeit reluctantly when asked to investigate the mysterious and spooky going on at a village c Pure excellence. Neil Spring is filling the gap left by James Herbert and here is a book that has all the qualities of excellence, its a book to curl up with on a dark night, it is atmospheric, it's creepy, it is reading bliss. I found Neil Spring when I worked in my local library and I was converted to his genius immediately. This book follows up the Ghost Hunters, Sarah Grey reunites with Harry Price albeit reluctantly when asked to investigate the mysterious and spooky going on at a village commandeered by the military, the place is called Imber and based on a real life village in England. The mystery is deep and Sarah and Harry are overwhelmed by what they uncover there. The narrative flows, no bad language just really inspired story telling, an authors who is true to his craft and this book is brilliant. I loved every moment of reading it. If you love infinite creepiness this is the book for you. No words can ever capture just how good it is
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  • Mitch
    January 1, 1970
    When I started reading this I didn't realise that this was the second book by Neil Spring about Harry Price and Sarah Grey, although I did remember the story as it was adapted for TV so it wasn't totally unknown. Harry and Sarah are ghost hunters who have been thrown back together after the army want them to look into strange and ghostly goings on in the real-life village of Imber on Salisbury Plain, this lost village was purchased by the Army during WWII to train soldiers, although in this book When I started reading this I didn't realise that this was the second book by Neil Spring about Harry Price and Sarah Grey, although I did remember the story as it was adapted for TV so it wasn't totally unknown. Harry and Sarah are ghost hunters who have been thrown back together after the army want them to look into strange and ghostly goings on in the real-life village of Imber on Salisbury Plain, this lost village was purchased by the Army during WWII to train soldiers, although in this book the writer has taken some fictional liberties and has set timeline at the time of world war one. This story though can be read as a standalone novel and I was intrigued enough to look up the history of Imber afterwards. The book does keep the reader guessing right up to the end but as good as it was I did find it was a bit repetitive in places.
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  • Louise Marley
    January 1, 1970
    I was attracted to this book by the deliciously creepy cover - I do love a traditional ghost story! At the time, I had not read the first book in the series (The Ghost Hunters) but I had seen the ITV adaptation. With hindsight, I should have read The Ghost Hunters first. I have now! There is quite a lot of past history between the main characters, Harry Price and Sarah Grey, explaining their unusual relationship - although the author does cover this in the early chapters.The Lost Village starts I was attracted to this book by the deliciously creepy cover - I do love a traditional ghost story! At the time, I had not read the first book in the series (The Ghost Hunters) but I had seen the ITV adaptation. With hindsight, I should have read The Ghost Hunters first. I have now! There is quite a lot of past history between the main characters, Harry Price and Sarah Grey, explaining their unusual relationship - although the author does cover this in the early chapters.The Lost Village starts in 1978 when Sarah hears a news story about the discovery of a child's remains in an uninhabited village on Salisbury Plain. It then cuts to 1932, when Sarah and Harry turn up at the same village - used as a training ground by the British Army - to investigate exactly what it is about the place that has got the soldiers so spooked.The story was far scarier than the first one in the series, quite dark in places, and there are some genuinely chilling moments. While I loved the character of Harry Price in the first novel, here he doesn't seem quite so likeable. And although I can relate to Sarah being fascinated by such a larger-than-life character, I couldn't quite see that there was any more to their relationship than that.Having said that, I did enjoy The Lost Village. While it didn't terrify me, it was scary enough to raise a few chills. I loved the setting of an abandoned village. There was also a spooky old house, church bells that rang themselves, séances, lots of double-crossing, and a few good twists I didn't see coming. I loved the scene at the end, when Imber's secret was revealed, although the final revelation was possibly a twist too far.If you're in the mood for a gothic ghost story, The Lost Village makes the perfect Halloween read - but I would definitely recommend reading the first book in the series before this one, to fully appreciate the three main characters and their relationships. Rating: 4.5 rounded up to 5 stars)I was lucky enough to read an advance copy. The Lost Village will be published on 19th October 2017.Thank you to Neil Spring, Quercus, and Netgalley for my copy of this book, which I received in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Leah Tonna
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not normally a reader influenced by ghost stories, but this book, (a freebie from Neil Spring & Goodreads,) had me sleepless for a few hours last night. It's based on a true story of an actual place, increasingly believable the further I got into the story. Starting as a paranormal investigation, it leads into horrid manipulations, cruelties & cover-ups, with the main character trying to remain unbiased although she has great sadness in her own life.Quite honestly it's put me off rea I'm not normally a reader influenced by ghost stories, but this book, (a freebie from Neil Spring & Goodreads,) had me sleepless for a few hours last night. It's based on a true story of an actual place, increasingly believable the further I got into the story. Starting as a paranormal investigation, it leads into horrid manipulations, cruelties & cover-ups, with the main character trying to remain unbiased although she has great sadness in her own life.Quite honestly it's put me off reading anything about the supernatural for a while, it's very moving!
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  • Sue Plant
    January 1, 1970
    would like to thank netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to read this amazing ghost storyand what a story it was...the best ghost/horror story i have read in ages its very much on par with the early james herbert books that i read long ago...no spoilers but its one that will keep you reading until you finish, so much happens that you want to know the whys and hows another author to keep an eye on
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  • Keith CARTER
    January 1, 1970
    Once again Neil Spring has produced a hit. He does what he does best, mixes A factual event with fiction and comes up with a spooky psychological thriller with twists and turns that keep you turning those pages. Perfect for Halloween or indeed any time as I would recommend all Neill's books unreservedly.
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  • Tarn Richardson
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written and mesmerising ghost story, which starts slowly but draws you in, page by page, chapter by chapter, to the revelations of the Lost Village of Imber and the secrets held there. Haunting in its imagery and suspense, it's a masterful modern ghost story, blending fact and fiction with prose that is effortless and entrancing.
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  • jess kirkby
    January 1, 1970
    Not a page TurnerI got this book because of everyone online raving about how good it is..I got to chapter 5 and couldn't read anymore I'm sorry but I found it boring couldn't get into it at all really did try but it's not for me maybe one day I shall finish it but I keep falling asleep
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  • Louise Morris
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting historical fiction involving the very real and controversial ghost hunter, Harry Price. It involves the mysterious village of Imber that the people were forced to abandoned for the armed forces use in the early 20th century. Hard to put down. Will definitely get the first book.
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  • Helen Carolan
    January 1, 1970
    Well this is a wasted day of my life I'll never get back. Total tripe!!! With each book Spring writes the premise gets sillier, but he's really excelled himself here. Harry Price investigates strange goings on in the abandoned village of Imber. Dreadful read.
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  • Olwyn Ducker
    January 1, 1970
    Full marks . Brilliant book as was the last one would highly recommend.
  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Quercus Books and netgalley for this ARC.Horror at its finest. It sneaks up on you of a sudden- chills, deja vu, and that paranoid feeling you don't want to be alone.
  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    The tag line said 'deliciously creepy' and it was. Perfect autumn reading.
  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect spooky read for this time of year.
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