The Boo-Boos That Changed the World

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World Details

TitleThe Boo-Boos That Changed the World
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherCharlesbridge Publishing
ISBN-139781632895578
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Nonfiction, History

The Boo-Boos That Changed the World Review

  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Barry Wittenstein clearly has a great sense of humor, because during the telling of this interesting story, he's made me laugh quite a lot. Certainly, I did not laugh when he began after Earle Dickson married his sweetheart, Josephine, and discovered that she had lots of small accidents, like tiny cuts when preparing dinner. And sad to say, all she had to stop the bleeding was a kitchen rag. Barry's father was a doctor so he knew all about infections, and Barry worked for a company that made ho Barry Wittenstein clearly has a great sense of humor, because during the telling of this interesting story, he's made me laugh quite a lot. Certainly, I did not laugh when he began after Earle Dickson married his sweetheart, Josephine, and discovered that she had lots of small accidents, like tiny cuts when preparing dinner. And sad to say, all she had to stop the bleeding was a kitchen rag. Barry's father was a doctor so he knew all about infections, and Barry worked for a company that made hospital supplies. You could say he knew a thing or two. He devised a long strip of tape with some gauze every so often. Josephine loved it, just needed to cut off a strip to wrap her finger. It was an invention full of love, but that long strip became a problem! Wittenstein might have ended the story then, but no, more than once he "almost" wrote, "The End", yet he knew more he wanted to tell! This new "bandage" that helped with "first aid" was eventually named "Band-Aid". That long, long strip was labor intensive to produce, a shorter one was invented, and the rest was almost history. But not yet. That's where the humor continues. Now they had to figure out how to produce them faster. Then, there was a bigger problem, no one would buy them! Digging deeper, the author has created a story that really has no end. After the Dicksons passed away in this 21st century, companies have created all kinds of shapes, sizes, and colors. Also, now they can be found 'latex-free'. This story has not ended yet. I don't want to give it all away. It's a great story, shown in delightful, full-of-expression illustrations by Chris Hsu, in his first picture book. One must look carefully and one can spot more than one person in the illustrations who is in need, of a BANDAID! He even put bandaids, lots of them, on the end papers! There is more to the story than I've shared, and Barry Wittenstein has also added an author's note, a timeline of Earle Dickson's invention, plus a timeline of other medical inventions from the 1920s and 1930s with the questions: "What can you find out about how these came to be?" Terrific book!
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I was really looking forward to reading this, and found the story interesting (the end). Not yet, actually, the illustrations really captured me, and I wanted to know more as I read more (the end). Almost. However, the author's constant use of breaking up the text really began to irritate me (the end). Just kidding, but do you see what I mean here? This constant "the end" stuff is vexing (the end). The End.
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Terrific narrative non-fiction for a product that nearly every child in the world has used--the band-aid! The book cover is clever, the inside illustrations brightly colored and engaging, and the text easy to follow with a hint of humor. Author Barry Wittenstein makes this book more versatile and useful with students of different abilities by adding several timelines and online extensions at the end. These additions are likely to encourage outside research on other medical inventions by many. Ta Terrific narrative non-fiction for a product that nearly every child in the world has used--the band-aid! The book cover is clever, the inside illustrations brightly colored and engaging, and the text easy to follow with a hint of humor. Author Barry Wittenstein makes this book more versatile and useful with students of different abilities by adding several timelines and online extensions at the end. These additions are likely to encourage outside research on other medical inventions by many. Target audience: grades 3-6 (Review of digital ARC from Edelweiss Above the Treeline)
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  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    #partner @charlesbridgepublishingThank you to Blue Slip Media for sharing this book. All opinions are my own.I’ve always been intrigued about the stories behind everyday objects. I’m always asking myself, “How long ago was this invented? What prompted it to be invented? How is it made? Who invented it?” I think these questions were prompted partially by my storytelling, and partially by my frequent conversations with my father who had an endless curiosity about the world.I can imagine just our c #partner @charlesbridgepublishingThank you to Blue Slip Media for sharing this book. All opinions are my own.I’ve always been intrigued about the stories behind everyday objects. I’m always asking myself, “How long ago was this invented? What prompted it to be invented? How is it made? Who invented it?” I think these questions were prompted partially by my storytelling, and partially by my frequent conversations with my father who had an endless curiosity about the world.I can imagine just our chat about band-aids! And since he loved to research the answers to all our questions in library books or in our set of The World Book Encyclopedia, he would have absolutely loved The Boo-Boos that Changed the World, as I did! This marvelous book answers all of our questions about band-aids and more and does it with a great sense of humor. It tells the charming story of Earle Dickson who was concerned about his new bride’s constant “boo-boos”. He was worried that they might become infected or lead to more accidents, so he decided to solve the problem. Happily, he did and it led to the invention of band-aids that we all take for granted today. But really, though, can you imagine life without band_aids?!Chris Hsu’s sweet illustrations are a perfect accompaniment to the story that takes us from Earle and Josephine’s marriage through the actual invention and finally through Earle’s struggle to make band-aids a household item. He captures Earle’s expressions perfectly from the time when Earle first ponders the problem, to when Earle has his eureka moment and lastly when Earle joyfully tells Josephine that he has convinced his boss James Johnson (of Johnson & Johnson fame) to mass produce band-aids. Finally, be sure and notice Mr. Hsu’s playful endpapers - so much fun!Another aspect of the book that I really like is the author’s note. In a very entertaining way, it tells us more of the story behind the invention of band-aids and how many aspects of Earle’s life came together perfectly to contribute to his invention. There’s also a great timeline of Earle Dickson’s life, as well as a timeline of medical inventions from the 1920’s and 1930’s, which gives us a better perspective about the world at that time.This picture book biography is a great choice for anyone looking for a biography; especially if they are hoping to learn about a lesser known figure in history. In addition, it would also be of great interest to a child who is wanting to read more about the steps which lead to a successful invention. Lastly, it would also be a perfect read aloud to introduce a lesson about biographies or inventions. The Boo-Boos that Changed the World needs to be on every elementary library shelf!
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  • Laura Mossa
    January 1, 1970
    Special thanks to Barbara Fisch of Blue Slip Media for providing our #bookexcursion group with a copy of The Boo Boos That Changed the World. All opinions are my own.Did you ever wonder how Band-Aids were invented? If so, you are in luck. Author Barry Wittenstein humorously tells the story of Earle Dickson and how Band-Aids came to be.It seems Earle’s wife, Josephine was accident prone especially in the kitchen. When preparing meals, it was common for Josephine to cut or burn herself. To make ma Special thanks to Barbara Fisch of Blue Slip Media for providing our #bookexcursion group with a copy of The Boo Boos That Changed the World. All opinions are my own.Did you ever wonder how Band-Aids were invented? If so, you are in luck. Author Barry Wittenstein humorously tells the story of Earle Dickson and how Band-Aids came to be.It seems Earle’s wife, Josephine was accident prone especially in the kitchen. When preparing meals, it was common for Josephine to cut or burn herself. To make matters worst, bandaging herself with bulky towels caused her to injure herself even more. Earle took pity on his young wife fearing her cuts would become infected. Fortunately, for Josephine, Earle was not only the son of a doctor but also worked for a hospital supply company. Ever hear of Johnson & Johnson?After some thoughtful pondering, Earle designed the first “band aid” which consisted of adhesive tape, sterile gauze, and crinoline. Josephine’s boo boos were now covered, and they lives happily ever after, right? But..wait! Earle realized that Josephine was not the only person who could benefit from his invention. He shared his bandage with his boss, James Johnson, who agreed to produce and sell them as Band-Aids.To the readers’ surprise, Band-Aids were not an overnight success. It was not until they were mass produced by a machine and given away to the Boy Scouts and the army during World War II that Band-Aids became a hit not just in the United States but all over the world!Told in a playful narrative, Wittenstein’s account of Earle’s invention is highly engaging and entertaining. In my district, our third graders just finished a unit, Inventions and Innovations so I cannot wait to share this book with students. In the author’s note, Wittenstein admits he invented Earle and Josephine’s dialogue and shares additional information about Earle. Chris Hsu’s illustrations transport the reader back to that time period and make the story come alive. Also included at the end of the book is a timeline, a list of other medical inventions from the 1920s and 1930s, and websites for further research. The next time I use a Band-Aid, I will think fondly of Earle and and thank him for his ingenuity.
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  • Baby Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is The Boo-Boos That Changed The World: A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!), written by Barry Wittenstein and illustrated by Chris Hsu, a story of how Band-Aids came to be.Once upon a time, there was a couple named Earle Dickson and his beloved Josephine. Earle worked for the medical supply company Johnson & Johnson, and Josephine was a homema This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is The Boo-Boos That Changed The World: A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!), written by Barry Wittenstein and illustrated by Chris Hsu, a story of how Band-Aids came to be.Once upon a time, there was a couple named Earle Dickson and his beloved Josephine. Earle worked for the medical supply company Johnson & Johnson, and Josephine was a homemaker – a particularly accident-prone one. Earle would often come home to his wife and be sad to see that she had cuts or burns on her hands from cooking, and he worried about the non-sterile rags she used to wrap her injuries. After brainstorming for a while, Earl come up with a solution: a piece of gauze adhered to medical tape, and treated with crinoline to keep infection away. Josephine liked his invention so much that she, along with one of Earle’s friends, encouraged him to pitch the invention to his company. Band-Aids were born… but to a rocky start! But some savvy marketing and generosity would ensure that Band-Aid would eventually become a household name.Very interesting! Band-Aids are such a staple of everyday life that it’s definitely worth knowing where the idea came from! And this book tells a fun tale, using a sense of humor and enthusiastic text to engage readers in the story. The illustrations are very cute, bringing the 1920’s to life with cheerful-looking characters and lovely backgrounds. The length was good, and JJ enjoyed it. There was one slight issue: a few times, the world “bloody” is used as a humorous double-meaning adjective. For American readers, this is not an issue, but many other English-speaking countries still consider this to be a curse word! In every other sense, this is an interesting tale with a great energy, and we liked it. Baby Bookworm approved!(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!
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  • storymamas
    January 1, 1970
    This informative & fun non fiction picture book answers the question, how and why bandaids were invented. Thank you @charlesbridgepublishing for sending us a review copy. All opinions are our own. ..The Boo-Boos That Changed The World - A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!) by Barry Wittenstein & Illustrated by Chris Hsu is a true winner! ..Maybe I am in a minority, having collected bandaids as a kid, but I had wondered about the first bandaids. Even if you have never wond This informative & fun non fiction picture book answers the question, how and why bandaids were invented. Thank you @charlesbridgepublishing for sending us a review copy. All opinions are our own. ..The Boo-Boos That Changed The World - A True Story About An Accidental Invention (Really!) by Barry Wittenstein & Illustrated by Chris Hsu is a true winner! ..Maybe I am in a minority, having collected bandaids as a kid, but I had wondered about the first bandaids. Even if you have never wondered about the invention, the written style Barry takes on is fun and grabs reader’s attention. He weaves in the history with a sweet love story of how Earle Dickson created the first bandaid to help his accident prone wife. (Isn’t that adorable??) It’s not just a love story, but we find out that Earle is determined, hard-working and doesn’t give up. All character traits the kids will want to hear about! Chris’ illustrations are warm and his characters are inviting that you feel like you know them...If you are looking to teach your kids some history, share a unique and fun writing style technique, read about characters you will route for, and finish reading and want to thank Earle because you realize your life would be different without his hard work, well this is the book for you!!!
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  • Kristi Bernard
    January 1, 1970
    Could you live without band-aids? If the answer is no, then you are not alone. The idea of a band-aid didn’t come about until 1924. The idea wasn’t created when a man by the name of Earle Dickson discovered that his wife never could go a day without a cut, scratch, scrape or some other boo-boo. So, to make life a little easier for her he came up with the idea to put sterilized gauze on small sticky pieces of tape to help heal small cuts and scrapes. During this timeline this was not the easiest Could you live without band-aids? If the answer is no, then you are not alone. The idea of a band-aid didn’t come about until 1924. The idea wasn’t created when a man by the name of Earle Dickson discovered that his wife never could go a day without a cut, scratch, scrape or some other boo-boo. So, to make life a little easier for her he came up with the idea to put sterilized gauze on small sticky pieces of tape to help heal small cuts and scrapes. During this timeline this was not the easiest task or invention, but with a little help from Johnson & Johnson it seemed to work itself out.Readers are introduced to Earle and his wife Josephine in this story. Colorful illustrations mimic the 1920s with grays and muted colors. The back of the book shares the authors note, the inventor’s timeline, other medical inventions from that era and resources to learn more. There are even links to YouTube, so kids can watch some of the old Band-Aid commercials. Parents and teachers can use this tool to teach kids about history, inventions and how the simplest things can change our lives.
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks so much to Blue Slip Media for the review copy of this title!!As an elementary librarian, I usually know within 3 pages whether a book will be a hit as a read aloud or not. And this one will be a complete hit!While this title is undoubtably a high quality nonfiction title about a fascinating topic, it is also written in SUCH a fun style! The author keeps ending the story by saying "The End", and then on the next page correcting it and going on to continue the story. It will add such a dyn Thanks so much to Blue Slip Media for the review copy of this title!!As an elementary librarian, I usually know within 3 pages whether a book will be a hit as a read aloud or not. And this one will be a complete hit!While this title is undoubtably a high quality nonfiction title about a fascinating topic, it is also written in SUCH a fun style! The author keeps ending the story by saying "The End", and then on the next page correcting it and going on to continue the story. It will add such a dynamic feel to a story time - I can't wait to read this aloud to my middle grade students! Due to the longer text, I would recommend for grades 2 and up, or in a small group setting for younger children. The illustrations are vivid and their is font size differentiation for emphasis throughout the book. Having a box of band-aids on hand for this story time would probably be a good idea!Highly recommended for all elementary libraries.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I always find it interesting to find out the stories behind inventions that I take for granted every day. The Band-Aid is one such invention. Wittenstein does a nice job of explaining where the idea for the product came from and I can relate, I'm a bit of a klutz too. It's nice to know where a product that I use on an almost daily basis came from. I also appreciated the fact that the product wasn't really popular at first. It took a while for society to get used to the product and the product we I always find it interesting to find out the stories behind inventions that I take for granted every day. The Band-Aid is one such invention. Wittenstein does a nice job of explaining where the idea for the product came from and I can relate, I'm a bit of a klutz too. It's nice to know where a product that I use on an almost daily basis came from. I also appreciated the fact that the product wasn't really popular at first. It took a while for society to get used to the product and the product went through several versions before what we now know as the Band-Aid took it's present form. The brilliant idea of giving some away free to the Boy Scouts was an interesting tidbit as well. This is the sort of book that can help children understand that the things we use come from somewhere. The book could also be a great inspiration in helping children develop their own inventions.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Blue Slip Media for the review copy of this book — all opinions are my own.This book is cleverly told in sections that show how each piece of the story could have been the end of Earle Dickson’s idea for the adhesive bandage. He could have created a bandage for his wife and never mentioned it to his boss. The end. But wait, there’s more! Each time Earle pushes on, a page turn reveals the next phase of his story.There is ample back matter that shows a timeline of the events described in Thanks to Blue Slip Media for the review copy of this book — all opinions are my own.This book is cleverly told in sections that show how each piece of the story could have been the end of Earle Dickson’s idea for the adhesive bandage. He could have created a bandage for his wife and never mentioned it to his boss. The end. But wait, there’s more! Each time Earle pushes on, a page turn reveals the next phase of his story.There is ample back matter that shows a timeline of the events described in the story from 1892 through 1969–that’s persistence! Readers can also learn about other medical inventions of the era. The BOO BOOS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD would be a great addition to school libraries looking for interesting nonfiction for young readers.
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  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com
    January 1, 1970
    This book is FANTASTIC. I love that it highlight show an accident can be an amazing and positive thing. I have always just took band-aids for granted and now I will never be able to look at them the same. They have rich history and it is worth knowing. The illustrations are just adorable and add so much to the story because as a new or young reader can follow the story through the images in the book. I, as a teacher and mother, love that there is a timeline in the back. It is such a cool way to This book is FANTASTIC. I love that it highlight show an accident can be an amazing and positive thing. I have always just took band-aids for granted and now I will never be able to look at them the same. They have rich history and it is worth knowing. The illustrations are just adorable and add so much to the story because as a new or young reader can follow the story through the images in the book. I, as a teacher and mother, love that there is a timeline in the back. It is such a cool way to show children how things progress and lead us to present day. A great book for the classroom!
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  • smgK8
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, LOVED this book. Adorable picture book about the history of the band-aid. Written with humor and did a great job of addressing the timeline, biography, etc. (all the features of a non-fiction story) all wrapped up in a wonderful little picture book. Would work great as a read-aloud and great for an invention unit (Reading Street has one). Great little story.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    In the list of things I never knew, was how the band-aid was invented. I can now say, I learned something new! What an incredible story of problem solving, perseverance and excellent marketing. I really enjoyed learning about the background, why and how of the invention of the band-aid. This will be a great story to share with children.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting! I love history. We often don't think about where things come from that we use every day.
  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    This peppy, humorous account of the inspiration behind the invention of the bandaid sure was fun! Review soon on my blog!
  • Lisa Newman
    January 1, 1970
    Informative and interesting.Wittenstein delivers info in a fun way too. (Really!)
  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Information text about the band-aid's creation. Takes younger readers through the history of its invention and manufacture to modern use.
  • Tracie
    January 1, 1970
    The story of how and why Band-Aids were invented.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Too many fake "The End"s. But a decent story. Nonfiction-ish. The story is true but the quotes and how the pair interacted is made up. But the important parts are there.
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