The Sun Sister (The Seven Sisters, #6)
The Sun Sister is the sixth epic story in the Seven Sisters series by the number one international bestseller Lucinda Riley.To the outside world, Electra d'Apliese seems as though she is the woman who has everything: as one of the world's top models, she is beautiful, rich and famous. But beneath the veneer, and fuelled by the pressure of the life she leads, Electra's already tenuous control over her mental state has been rocked by the death of her father, Pa Salt, the elusive billionaire who adopted his six daughters as babies from around the globe. Struggling to cope, she turns to alcohol and drugs to ease the pain, and as those around her fear for her health, Electra receives a letter from a complete stranger who claims to be her grandmother . . .In 1939, Cecily Huntley-Morgan arrives in Kenya from New York to nurse a broken heart. Staying with her godmother, a member of the infamous Happy Valley set, on the shores of beautiful Lake Naivasha, she meets Bill Forsythe, a notorious bachelor and cattle farmer with close connections to the proud Maasai tribe. When disaster strikes and war is imminent, Cecily decides she has no choice but to accept Bill’s proposal. Moving up into the Wanjohi Valley, and with Bill away, Cecily finds herself isolated and alone. Until she discovers a new-born baby abandoned in the woods next to her farmhouse...Sweeping from the frenetic atmosphere of Manhattan to the magnificent wide-open plains of Africa, The Sun Sister is the sixth instalment in Lucinda Riley’s multi-million selling epic series, The Seven Sisters.

The Sun Sister (The Seven Sisters, #6) Details

TitleThe Sun Sister (The Seven Sisters, #6)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 31st, 2019
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Romance, Cultural, Africa, Mystery

The Sun Sister (The Seven Sisters, #6) Review

  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    I have really enjoyed reading the first five books in The Seven Sisters series by Lucinda Riley and was delighted to receive an Advanced copy of the sixth book The Sun Sister.Electra the youngest sister of the d'Aplises family is a successful model, rich and famous with a hedonistic lifestyle. Her hectic days are full of alcohol and drugs and after the death of her adopted father she loses control.All the d'Apliese sisters have been adopted and Electra has now received a letter from a woman I have really enjoyed reading the first five books in The Seven Sisters series by Lucinda Riley and was delighted to receive an Advanced copy of the sixth book The Sun Sister.Electra the youngest sister of the d'Aplises family is a successful model, rich and famous with a hedonistic lifestyle. Her hectic days are full of alcohol and drugs and after the death of her adopted father she loses control.All the d'Apliese sisters have been adopted and Electra has now received a letter from a woman claiming to be her material grandmother.Her grandmother tells her a story of Cecily who traveled to Africa just before the Second World War and the consequences of this has changed all their lives.I really enjoyed this book and honestly did not want to put it down. It's unusual for a story to bring me to tears but this one did. I particularly enjoyed Cecily's story and the descriptions of Africa and the 1930's lifestyle.I cannot wait for the next book in the series.Thank you to NetGalley and Pan Macmillan for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Claire Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    5 - "The worlds a big place you know…" Stars!I’ve known that The Sun Sister was going to be a challenge to read ever since we were first introduced to Electra D’Aplièse, back at the beginning of The Seven Sisters series, in that she did not come across as a very likeable person. The closing paragraph of the last book was in her POV, and as much as, as a reader you didn’t know much about her before that, I just had a feeling that her character, and the issues that are given voice at that point 5 - "The worlds a big place you know…" Stars!I’ve known that The Sun Sister was going to be a challenge to read ever since we were first introduced to Electra D’Aplièse, back at the beginning of The Seven Sisters series, in that she did not come across as a very likeable person. The closing paragraph of the last book was in her POV, and as much as, as a reader you didn’t know much about her before that, I just had a feeling that her character, and the issues that are given voice at that point would make her someone I would struggle to like.And that was 100% true, and in all honesty I can’t say I had really warmed to her by the end of the book. But I don’t think the author wrote her as a character that would want your sympathy anyway, but what she did do in the secondary story that began in New York, just before WW2 broke out, to the beauty of Kenya during and after the war, through the racial battes in the US, and the forming of the NAACP, and up to the rise of Barak Obama in the late two thousands was given a full explanation as to why this complicated and hard-to-love woman turned out the way she did.It was Cecily, and then Stella’s story that kept this book in the five star category for me, and if you haven’t read any of this series, it’s absolutely a book that you could read on its own merits. That said, the end of this one finally confirmed the fact that there is a seventh sister, and I cannot wait too see how Lucinda puts all the moving parts of the previous six books together to give her a story but to also tie up the mystery that is still Pa Salt.ARC generously provided via Netgalley, in exchange for the above honest review.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Informative, expressive, and engaging!The Sun Sister, the sixth instalment in The Seven Sisters series, is set during the 1930s through to 2008 and sweeps you back and forth between the bustling streets of NYC to the beautiful plains of Kenya as Electra, the youngest, most discontent D‘Apliese sets out on a journey with the help of some new friends to overcome her addictions and unravel her parentage.The prose is sincere and descriptive. The characters are multilayered, vulnerable, and lonely. Informative, expressive, and engaging!The Sun Sister, the sixth instalment in The Seven Sisters series, is set during the 1930s through to 2008 and sweeps you back and forth between the bustling streets of NYC to the beautiful plains of Kenya as Electra, the youngest, most discontent D‘Apliese sets out on a journey with the help of some new friends to overcome her addictions and unravel her parentage.The prose is sincere and descriptive. The characters are multilayered, vulnerable, and lonely. And the absorbing, heartfelt plot is an incredibly moving tale of fame, fortune, substance abuse, familial drama, self-discovery, love, loss, grief, friendship, racial segregation, courage, hope, as well as a little insight into life in Kenya during its colonialism by Great Britain.Overall, The Sun Sister is another epic saga by Riley at just over 800 pages, but with a timely, astute, present tale and a fascinating, immersive, past tale the pages seem to turn themselves. It is truly hard to believe that this series is close to its end, and I think for every reader whether they’ve been a die-hard fan and read them all or merely a part-time connoisseur whose been swept away by only one or two the fact that there is only one more left to come is truly bittersweet.Thank you to Pan Macmillan for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dana Al-Basha دانة الباشا
    January 1, 1970
    Electra's story!
  • Alisha
    January 1, 1970
    The Sun Sister! out October 2019!!
  • Kjersti Grandum
    January 1, 1970
    I can't wait to read this book! Lucinda Riley is my favorit author of all time!
  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    Discover the locations of The Sun SisterThis is perhaps the most serious and thought-provoking of the whole series so far. The author herself seems to think so given the author note at the end and the length and breadth of the bibliography. For reasons of spoilers, that's all I'm going to say, but this novel does and will make you think.Electra might seem exotic, dark-skinned and 'different' to those in New York where she lives and works, but as her African heritage comes to light, we learn more Discover the locations of The Sun SisterThis is perhaps the most serious and thought-provoking of the whole series so far. The author herself seems to think so given the author note at the end and the length and breadth of the bibliography. For reasons of spoilers, that's all I'm going to say, but this novel does and will make you think.Electra might seem exotic, dark-skinned and 'different' to those in New York where she lives and works, but as her African heritage comes to light, we learn more about her past. I was keen to know about her past given that her present doesn't seem all that happy. She feels lost, pressured to be famous all the time, she chases wealth and men who don't make her happy. She's got problems with substance abuse too. ( These sections and the ones when she goes to rehab are quite hard to read) Kudos to the author for reflecting the problem realstically though!The story then takes her to Kenya and her link to the past. As you might expect with Lucinda, the locations come to life from the page. The tribes, the animals the settings are all painted with a lush paint brush.and they shine off the page. You can feel the heat, hear the animals and feel the breeze on your face as you sit with the characters in the grand house where she stays.It's not all stunning however. The author does not shy away from depicting the reality of living in a country where civil war, apartheid and persecution depending on what tribe you belong to, goes on. There's political snippets, comments and discussions blended into the narrative which works well. And the Muthaiga club expats! Well that's another world entirely.I found the novel very thought-provoking and insightful but very sobering - and I use that word carefully. Electra has problems with addiction and this is explored in the novel. By the time she discovers a secret in New York, we've come to see that world a little clearer and it's heartwarming and heartbreaking. The novel ends slowly and quietly and I was left thinking about this novel for a while. It's full message if you like reaches you after you've fnished it and I felt I couldn't read much else until I'd really thought about this book.And one more thing? The ending hits at something about the missing sister...the seventh sister.... Can't wait for the last book! But then that means there's no more Seven Sisters! What a conundrum!
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  • Candy
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is probably the biggest book I’ve ever read ! But I thought it was fabulous, I loved it :) and what a ending ! I can’t wait to find out what happens next :)
  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite series
  • Heyland Whittle
    January 1, 1970
    I've just joined goodreads as a member, having used it from time to time as a non-member to get a range of opinions about various books. In the process, I have just realised that it is unhelpful if not ridiculous that members can comment on/rate books that are not even published. This book by Lucinda Riley is a case in point - it is not published until 31st Oct, the author herself posted on social media only two days ago that she had received advance copies. A few people in the goodreads I've just joined goodreads as a member, having used it from time to time as a non-member to get a range of opinions about various books. In the process, I have just realised that it is unhelpful if not ridiculous that members can comment on/rate books that are not even published. This book by Lucinda Riley is a case in point - it is not published until 31st Oct, the author herself posted on social media only two days ago that she had received advance copies. A few people in the goodreads community, eg trusted bloggers, might have been sent an advance copy for review by the publishers, but the current goodreads rating cannot possibly be an accurate picture. 80-plus people have given this book a 5-star rating when it is HIGHLY unlikely that they have even read it yet. People are clearly submitting ratings based on having enjoyed some of the author's previous books. The 'reviews' posted are only readers/fans saying that they are looking forward to reading the book. And part of that is goodread's fault- there are only two options for members for rating, either 'read the book' or 'planning to read'. Members should only be allowed to post reviews for books they have actually read, and perhaps goodreads needs to introduce a separate 'tick-box' category for unpublished books, where a member can express excitement about a forthcoming publication but isn't actually allowed to rate/review an unpublished book.Goodreads needs to sort out this ratings system if it wants to be a credible as a source of information for readers. I understand it's all about the sales at the end of the day, but really, a bit more integrity/transparency is needed.
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  • Raluca F.
    January 1, 1970
    What a wild ride this book is! And i don’t mean only the fact that it is massive (almost 900 pages!!), but the story is truly something else. I really like this series, the mix of past and present. I am always reluctant to get into the past story, but like always i end up loving it more than the present one. I must say that i loved the past story more than in the other books from the series. The setting in Africa is amazing, and the story of Cecily is so much more than a love story, but the What a wild ride this book is! And i don’t mean only the fact that it is massive (almost 900 pages!!), but the story is truly something else. I really like this series, the mix of past and present. I am always reluctant to get into the past story, but like always i end up loving it more than the present one. I must say that i loved the past story more than in the other books from the series. The setting in Africa is amazing, and the story of Cecily is so much more than a love story, but the history of a strong willed, accomplished woman. I really appreciate when authors give more nuance to female characters, than just their romantic side. The story of Electra though started off very annoying. This was one of the most unlikable character i have read in a while. A huge drama queen, egoistical, self absorbed woman, who asked such stupid questions at times that i wanted to hit myself with the book. She progresses eventually, but i can’t say i cared very much. Like i said about the previous books, one thing that annoys me about the series, is the need to find a romantic partner for each character. Which i find is absolutely not necessary. The character would survive if she wouldn’t find her other half at the end of the book. Is the same spiel in every book and i find it tiring and annoying. Seriously, some people thrive just fine by being single.But in the end, a good, engaging read. Just be warned: drug/alcohol triggers. And you might need to reserve a good chunk of time to read it
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved every single page of this 836 paged book, yes- I even enjoyed the Authors notes. Having read all the other sister books in order, I couldn’t wait for this book to be published. Now, I can’t wait for the next instalment. The historical story which lead to Electra life was just as addictive as Electra’s personality. The twists through wars and tough times kept me gripped and lead to many late nights up reading. The passion of the main characters, past and present, makes me proud I absolutely loved every single page of this 836 paged book, yes- I even enjoyed the Authors notes. Having read all the other sister books in order, I couldn’t wait for this book to be published. Now, I can’t wait for the next instalment. The historical story which lead to Electra life was just as addictive as Electra’s personality. The twists through wars and tough times kept me gripped and lead to many late nights up reading. The passion of the main characters, past and present, makes me proud to be a woman. There’s nothing we can’t achieve! Being a very long book, made the journey through the stories even better- I feel like I actually know the characters personally. As I’ve finished it in my sick bed, it’s been good to have something to look forward. I’m not sure what I’m going to do now I’ve finished it. Sleep, maybe.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved the first five books in the Seven Sisters series and have been waiting for this instalment to come out since I read the teaser chapter at the end of the Moon Sister.I was not disappointed, I was captivated by Electra and Cecily’s stories from the first few pages and had to force myself to slow down with the reading so as not to finish in one sitting.From the other sister’s stories I wasn’t sure what to expect from Electra’s story, however, this is one of the ones which held my I have loved the first five books in the Seven Sisters series and have been waiting for this instalment to come out since I read the teaser chapter at the end of the Moon Sister.I was not disappointed, I was captivated by Electra and Cecily’s stories from the first few pages and had to force myself to slow down with the reading so as not to finish in one sitting.From the other sister’s stories I wasn’t sure what to expect from Electra’s story, however, this is one of the ones which held my attention the most. Lucinda Riley does not shy away from dealing with some hard hitting topics here which are evidently well researched. The impact of addiction on those who suffer and those around them is described well, as is the power of perception and interpretation and the effect this has on internal monologue and feelings of worthlessness and loneliness.Alongside this the story of Cecily deals with themes such as prejudice and segregation from the 1930’s to 1960’s in both America and Kenya. Underneath the powerful themes though the focus is truly on the characters and their development as the stories unfold, oftentimes in unexpected ways.I can’t wait for the next book and more information on the mysterious missing sister.
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  • Louise Morris
    January 1, 1970
    Another great tale in The Seven Sisters series! At first, I disliked Electra because she was a spoiled, self-centered person who was only interested in herself. Her pity parties were definitely a cry for help. She grew on me once she started to realize that other people had feelings and genuinely cared for her. Cecily's part of the story showed how horrendous people were treated if they weren't rich and white. Unfortunately, there seems to be a back sliding to those days in the modern age. I Another great tale in The Seven Sisters series! At first, I disliked Electra because she was a spoiled, self-centered person who was only interested in herself. Her pity parties were definitely a cry for help. She grew on me once she started to realize that other people had feelings and genuinely cared for her. Cecily's part of the story showed how horrendous people were treated if they weren't rich and white. Unfortunately, there seems to be a back sliding to those days in the modern age. I absolutely am looking forward to the next book in the series and am kind of devistated that it will probably be the last book in the series. 😢
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  • Vivienne
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story of the 6th sister Electra D'Alpiese the youngest of them all. she also sets out to find where her origins are. I have loved everyone of these stories and feel this was the strongest in its storyline. now cannot wait for the next.....but know I am going to have to.
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  • Juliet Bookliterati
    January 1, 1970
    It is no secret Lucinda Riley is one of my favourite authors, and her Seven Sisters books are one of my favourite series. I have spent all year in anticipation for the sixth book in the series, The Sun Sister, and this epic read in both story and size, at eight hundred and forty eight pages long it is her biggest book, and I think the best do far. Electra is the youngest of the D’Aplièse sisters, all adopted by Pa Salt from different parts of the world and brought up on a beautiful Island, It is no secret Lucinda Riley is one of my favourite authors, and her Seven Sisters books are one of my favourite series. I have spent all year in anticipation for the sixth book in the series, The Sun Sister, and this epic read in both story and size, at eight hundred and forty eight pages long it is her biggest book, and I think the best do far. Electra is the youngest of the D’Aplièse sisters, all adopted by Pa Salt from different parts of the world and brought up on a beautiful Island, Atlantis in Switzerland. After their father’s death they are given clues to their true heritage to find out who they really are. Electra is twenty six and one of the worlds most famous models. At six foot, with her ebony skin and razor sharp cheek bones, she is instantly recognisable and lives a life of work, parties, drink and drugs. When she is contacted by someone claiming to be her grandmother, Electra’s life changes for the better as she learns her story and that of Cecily Huntley-Morgan. From the vast plains of Kenya to the society of Manhattan, this book will take you on a journey you will never forget.Electra has made an appearance in the earlier books and has come across as self centred and distant from her other sisters, but reading this book made me love her character and admire her strength. Electra is the party girl, always at glamorous events but the fame and her party lifestyle are fuelled by drink and drugs. The appearance of her grandmother in her life marks a changing point, a chance to change her life for the good and help others. From her grandmother she hears about Cecily who goes to stay with her godmother, Kiki Preston in Kenya to mend her broken heart in 1938. If you are a history buff like me Kiki Preston many ring a bell as she was part of the Happy Valley Set in Kenya, known for their hedonistic parties, affairs and champagne, there was even a murder. Cecily was a wonderful character, she overcame adversity and showed courage, belief and a huge heart whilst out in Kenya. It is not surprising that her love interest was the man who saved her from being killed by a lion. Lucinda Riley seamlessly mixes her fictitious characters with those historical characters from the Valley set whose lives seem far too fanciful and shocking to be real; Countess Alice de Janze shot her lover Joss, Earl of Errol in jealousy.Lucinda’s writing brings the vast plains of Kenya with the contrast of the hot dry months with the rainy periods, and the amazing wildlife to life with her realistic and vivid detail and descriptions. The same attention is given to her characters, who are complex, interesting and facing the challenges life puts in their path. Lucinda Riley doesn’t shy away from serious topics in her books, and through this book we see the characters deal with addiction, prejudice, racism, and suicide. The colonisation of Kenya by the English and the Civil Rights Movement are lived through by the characters and we are shown how these events were seen first hand by those involved. The historical detail combines seamlessly with the fiction to make this such an epic and breathtaking read. I have to admit that reading The Sun Sister was like a double edge sword in that I wanted to devour this book to learn more about Electra but then realising that this may well be the penultimate book, the last being about the missing seventh sister. I really didn’t want this book to end to the extent I slowed down my reading towards the end to savour it further.The Sun Sister is amazing, brilliant and wonderful to read. The Seven Sisters Series just gets better and better and more ambitious, and I can’t wait for the next book as I have a feeling there is going to be a twist in the tale for the sisters. For fans of this series you will love this book, and if you haven’t read any of this series you really need to, you don’t know what you are missing. So get out there and treat yourself to this amazing and stunning read; a sensational sixth novel from Lucinda Riley.
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  • Claire Mc Partlin
    January 1, 1970
    I've been waiting for this book for a year now, since I finished 'The Moon Sister' last October. I try to hold out on reading them as I know I'll have to wait another year for the next installment, but the minute I get it I can't help but start it! This series is amazing, one of my favourite ever, each story is so different and yet linked by the enigmatic Pa Salt who adopted the six (seven?) very different sisters. The amount of research that must go into each book is amazing!!This one is about I've been waiting for this book for a year now, since I finished 'The Moon Sister' last October. I try to hold out on reading them as I know I'll have to wait another year for the next installment, but the minute I get it I can't help but start it! This series is amazing, one of my favourite ever, each story is so different and yet linked by the enigmatic Pa Salt who adopted the six (seven?) very different sisters. The amount of research that must go into each book is amazing!!This one is about Electra, the beautiful super-model, and the youngest daughter adopted by Pa Salt. She was struggling with alcohol and drug addiction but in denial until she had a really bad night and needed help, which gave her a real wake-up call. She ended up checking into a rehab clinic, where she met a variety of other people who really helped her set off on a new path.Around this time she was contacted by her grandmother, who she had known nothing about, and had never met. When they finally meet her grandmother, Stella, started to tell her where she had originally come from, and Stella is the one who leads us through the side of the story centred in Kenya and the 'Happy Valley' set who were enjoying life to extreme excess before the outbreak of World War II, starting off with the wonderful Cecily who leaves the US to visit her outgoing and very social godmother, Kiki, in Kenya for a holiday, hoping to miss the wedding of her ex-fiancee in the meantime, and ends up marrying and staying there for a long time.From there we go back and forth between England, Kenya and New York, with various people, births and deaths over the years from the 1940s to the present day, with Cecily and Electra being the main characters.Absolutely riveting story, I really didn't want this one to end. Even when I wasn't reading it I was thinking about it and wondering where it would lead next. Sometimes I enjoy the past more than the present in a story, and sometimes vice-versa, but this time I was fascinated by both timelines and even managed to keep the relationships through time, and Electra's relatives, right in my mind, which usually takes a bit of concentration, but this one seemed easier somehow.As usual I can't wait for the next book and the 'missing' seventh sister mentioned right at the very end. Hopefully we'll also hear more about the enigmatic Pa Salt and quite why he was searching for the seventh sister, so there must be a reason each 'sister' was adopted... so many questions I need answering!! But..... then the series will have ended (I presume), so equally I don't want to read it either!
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  • Randi | randiloves2read
    January 1, 1970
    In #6 of the Seven Sisters Series, the youngest of the sisters we know so far, Electra, faces some serious issues. She deals with major challenges directly or indirectly affecting many, many people all over the world today. We get to follow her as she deals with consequences of lifestyle choices. I felt for her in the description of loneliness in her Park Avenue penthouse apartment and find it understandable that she feels vulnerable and tries to distance herself from everybody in her life. I In #6 of the Seven Sisters Series, the youngest of the sisters we know so far, Electra, faces some serious issues. She deals with major challenges directly or indirectly affecting many, many people all over the world today. We get to follow her as she deals with consequences of lifestyle choices. I felt for her in the description of loneliness in her Park Avenue penthouse apartment and find it understandable that she feels vulnerable and tries to distance herself from everybody in her life. I enjoyed following her in her journey throughout the book and found her to be a complex and well developed character even if she really is not the most likable in the beginning. Proud, sensitive and trying to not show weakness, I felt relieved when her biological grandmother showed up, even though it took some time before she was actually appreciated and welcome as family.Morphing from sad, recluse, to a person with a tribe of good people around her, she learns who she really is through her biological background and upbringing. Having good role-models and support, I fell glad and relieved that she develops into a force for good in the area she is passionate about.I have read all the sisters’ stories and they all face challenges in their own ways, but this is certainly next level challenges. I appreciated all the research that shines through in this work. I don’t feel I know much about African history, so I enjoyed the part of the story set in Kenya 1938-39. The vivid descriptions of the culture and lifestyle of The Happy Valley Set I found slightly off-putting from my own perspective, but probably a really realistic addition to the story. The part about Maasaian life and culture turned out to have a major effect on the development of the plot and I found it an interesting twist how the mindset of the tribe could have panned out like the plot describes. I think Electra’s story is a bit different from the other sisters’ stories. Being complex and dealing with serious issues, it adds something extra while still keeping the trademark feel we have come to love as readers of the Seven Sisters Series. You would have no problem reading this as a stand-alone work, but I think if I were to start out fresh, I would consider reading #1 to get a background to the story of the sisters.Readers who like dual-time novels would love this. Fans of Lucinda Riley’s work have probably waited for months (like I have) and will be thrilled to read this new release in the series.My rating 5/5 stars.(All opinions in this review are my own)
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    So, this is another weak 4 for me for the latest Seven Sisters novel.Don't get me wrong, I continue to be impressed with Lucinda Riley's work, the amount of research and thought that goes into each book, and am really curious to see all the stories come together. This volume also deals with some really serious issues like racism, addiction and war, and it's an important story to tell. And I definitely got sucked into the story (primarily the past story). It's a solid work and there were plenty So, this is another weak 4 for me for the latest Seven Sisters novel.Don't get me wrong, I continue to be impressed with Lucinda Riley's work, the amount of research and thought that goes into each book, and am really curious to see all the stories come together. This volume also deals with some really serious issues like racism, addiction and war, and it's an important story to tell. And I definitely got sucked into the story (primarily the past story). It's a solid work and there were plenty of bits I enjoyed. I just... So far I've said that I always find I have something in common with each sister regardless of how different we initially seem. CeCe kind of bugged me when I read Star's story, but when I started reading hers I found some common ground and I started to like her, though I still think she made some stupid decisions. I guess I just didn't find that common ground with Electra. I too have been bullied, I too have struggled a lot with insecurities, and I totally understand the urge to numb all the noise with booze and drugs - so I can empathise with her to some extent. I just didn't really connect with her. She didn't become as real to me as the other sisters. I kind of felt like something was missing. And as for the past story, though I found it quite fascinating it felt a little like the author had decided she wanted to write about Kenyan colonialism and afterwards needed to find a way to tie it in with Electra. I've felt before that the past stories get a bit rushed towards the end, and that was the case here too. But more than that I didn't really buy Stella's insistence that Electra needed to know all about Cecily when she was impatient to hear about her mum. Sure, without Cecily there would be no Electra, but I disagree that it was paramount for her to hear Cecily's story in such detail (and the rest of the story in comparatively little detail) in order to understand her past. There were also some bits I found plain weird, like "oh let me look up this guy who has randomly decided to station himself outside my apartment building to protect me - hey he has a wife and kid - who he must never see since he's here all the time - he must be OK". Also there didn't seem to be a real reason Bill and Cecily should have such.. Communication problems. All that being said, I did still really enjoy it, and it has an important message and a good ending. But this was definitely the one I've enjoyed the least so far (which is probably just because Lucinda Riley has set the bar so incredibly high with her earlier books).
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    When eccentric billionaire Pa Salt died, he left each of his six adopted daughters clues to find out about their birth families. The Sun Sister is the story of the youngest, Electra.On the outside, she is a rich supermodel and has the perfect life. But she has actually been spinning out of control since the loss of her father, a bad breakup combining with her hectic schedule to push her alcohol and drug addiction to the edge.When Electra's biological grandmother Stella, a well known civil rights When eccentric billionaire Pa Salt died, he left each of his six adopted daughters clues to find out about their birth families. The Sun Sister is the story of the youngest, Electra.On the outside, she is a rich supermodel and has the perfect life. But she has actually been spinning out of control since the loss of her father, a bad breakup combining with her hectic schedule to push her alcohol and drug addiction to the edge.When Electra's biological grandmother Stella, a well known civil rights campaigner, comes into her life, she shares the story of Cecily with Electra. At first Electra is impatient as she can't connect a privileged white woman to her own story but as she learns how she and Cecily are connected she begins to see that life can be both tragic and hopeful, and understand her own issues.All of the books in this series work in dual timelines, with a story about the particular sister running alongside a story about their ancestor (it's always like reading two books in one!). While both of the stories were interesting I always like one of the timelines better, and in this one I liked Electra's story more. At the beginning she is quite unlikable, but she does get better. She went through a lot in this book, and by the end I may have had a small tear. I do have a small niggle, and I honestly dont know if this happened in any of the other Lucinda Riley books I've read but there was this annoying thing where the characters would speak really abruptly.. like they would change subject within the same speaking part. It's really hard to describe but it really grated me in this book. This is the 6th book in the Seven Sisters series, and to be fair it's not my favourite of the series (that's still number 3, the Shadow Sister) but overall this was a solid addition to a great series. I highly recommend reading the Seven Sisters - they could technically function as standalone novels but it would be better to read them in order.
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  • Loves
    January 1, 1970
    I've previously read the first 3 books in the series, I received this copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I realise each book carries on from the previous sister's story in chronological order, not having read the 2 books in between in no way impacted my enjoyment of Electras story, The author fills in any relevant gaps for you so can easily be read as a standalone too. This is by far the most hard hitting and serious in the series that I've read. It deals with some hard issues I've previously read the first 3 books in the series, I received this copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I realise each book carries on from the previous sister's story in chronological order, not having read the 2 books in between in no way impacted my enjoyment of Electras story, The author fills in any relevant gaps for you so can easily be read as a standalone too. This is by far the most hard hitting and serious in the series that I've read. It deals with some hard issues and is so thought provoking , with some poignant moments. Electra is the face of the fashion industry and as a result of her high profile career has turned to hard drugs and alcohol as a coping mechanism to deal with her mad lifestyle. Her relationship with a man equally as famous as herself has been broken off in the public arena and her inability to deal with it has set off a chain of events which end up with her seeking professional help. In between all this she decides to open the letter Her adoptive father left her detailing how to find her origins. As a result she finds her grandmother , through her we learn of Electras African heritage and how her grandmother came to be living in America . I loved learning about Cecily and how she came to be living in Africa during the infamous Happy Valley Era in the 1930's. This was such an interesting retelling of events that unfolded during that time, I was riveted . This was a beautifully depicted book that captivates and it moved me to tears at certain points in the story. My only criticism at all is that the ending felt a little rushed compared to the vivid detail you get in rest of the book.I really enjoyed this book and would thoroughly recommend it . I can't wait to read the next one in the series now
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  • Tina Schrader
    January 1, 1970
    The sun sister is the 6th instalment in the seven sisters series.I loved all the previous books, and always look forward months in advance to the newest book.This one was no different, but I actually thought it would be the last one, so it came as a major surprise to me that some of the storyline I was waiting for didn’t happen and it also ended with a major cliffhanger - sigh. And one more year to wait.So, the sixth book is about the youngest sister, Electra. Like all books before, the book The sun sister is the 6th instalment in the seven sisters series.I loved all the previous books, and always look forward months in advance to the newest book.This one was no different, but I actually thought it would be the last one, so it came as a major surprise to me that some of the storyline I was waiting for didn’t happen and it also ended with a major cliffhanger - sigh. And one more year to wait.So, the sixth book is about the youngest sister, Electra. Like all books before, the book plays for half of the time in the current time, half in the past.Electras story is centred around colonial Kenya and the civil rights movement in the United States in the 50s.While I have some reservations in general towards the set up of the whole series (a stinky rich old men collecting orphan girls from different cultures around the globe and have them grow up in a fairy tale setting in Switzerland), I want to acknowledge that the author is at least trying to mention some of the problems that arise with cross-cultural adoption and also with colonisation and white supremacy, especially in this instalment of the series. It will probably only be able to judge the whole concept of the series after the final book. While this is for sure not pulitzer price material, it is well written, great to read and seriously addicting. I read this book ( 800+ pages) in five days and can’t wait for the next (last?) part. Also, I didn’t realise this because I was reading on my kindle, but this cover is hideous.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I've read all the other books in the series, and usually been frustrated by the hugely detailed "grandparent" story (the actual parents of these girls all get rushed over in about 2 sentences), when I'm more interested in the sisters. This book was different, I found Cecily's story way more interesting, at least until she returned to New York - the reasons for which just didn't seem compelling. Electra's complete change of character after a few weeks in rehab wasn't very convincing, especially I've read all the other books in the series, and usually been frustrated by the hugely detailed "grandparent" story (the actual parents of these girls all get rushed over in about 2 sentences), when I'm more interested in the sisters. This book was different, I found Cecily's story way more interesting, at least until she returned to New York - the reasons for which just didn't seem compelling. Electra's complete change of character after a few weeks in rehab wasn't very convincing, especially her sudden devotion to the young heroin addict she was sharing a room with (whose name I've forgotten 2 weeks after reading the book!).I keep reading these as I want to get the answer to their man-of-mystery father (another totally implausible plot device: how could all these girls not have found out his real name - should have been on their birth/adoption certificates; or how he made his obviously huge fortune?) The last chapter is a teaser for yet another book, which will presumably resolve all the mysteries. Is the seventh sister the baby Maia had which was adopted out? I couldn't remember what sex it was, but it would wrap things up neatly, and she did ask the lawyer to find her child in the first book.
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  • Jenks
    January 1, 1970
    Was I meant to like Electra ? Feel sorry for her ? Relate to her ? I don’t think the author aimed for a set response to this character ...I think the Electra is so unapologetically herself albeit through a haze of drugs and alcohol that she doesn’t want a reader provoked to feel empathy for her . I felt as though instead as we live in a totally materialistic world full of models and social media it was to learn how to listen to OTHERS stories and increase our empathy for them to pull us out of Was I meant to like Electra ? Feel sorry for her ? Relate to her ? I don’t think the author aimed for a set response to this character ...I think the Electra is so unapologetically herself albeit through a haze of drugs and alcohol that she doesn’t want a reader provoked to feel empathy for her . I felt as though instead as we live in a totally materialistic world full of models and social media it was to learn how to listen to OTHERS stories and increase our empathy for them to pull us out of the victim mentalities we create or the tunnel vision we create in our everyday lives .I loved the characters and I particularly loved how as Electras journey progressed we saw her become strong in a different sense and her relationship change with each of the people around her . This novel most definitely shows that with money you can make big changes ...and opens our eyes to the risks for those that don’t have privilege. I’m surprised by the final page ! 😮...I almost wanted it to be that pa salt was missing and brought the seventh sister but it appears he most defiantly is dead?? I’m also disappointed this news was delivered before Electra arrived and all the sisters were together to hear it .
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  • kim ellis
    January 1, 1970
    A Sun Sister Success.It's always with trepidation that you wait for a longed for book release, will it be as brilliant as you want/expect?, will it flow as easy as past books in a series?. Well Lucinda Riley has nailed it every time, the Seven Sisters books are a triumph, I wait eagerly to start the first page, to travel the story of the sisters, their discoveries, adventures, loves, losses, each book sits on its on but brings the whole family in, as a family should be, together, Electra's story A Sun Sister Success.It's always with trepidation that you wait for a longed for book release, will it be as brilliant as you want/expect?, will it flow as easy as past books in a series?. Well Lucinda Riley has nailed it every time, the Seven Sisters books are a triumph, I wait eagerly to start the first page, to travel the story of the sisters, their discoveries, adventures, loves, losses, each book sits on its on but brings the whole family in, as a family should be, together, Electra's story was I think the most sweeping and diverse of all the sisters so far, from the heady Colonial days of the white rich inhabitants,to the crack dens of Harlem. A great story, dealing with so many issues without being patronizing. With the Seventh Sister being found? We look forward, eagerly, to her story. Thank you Lucinda.
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  • sally whitfield
    January 1, 1970
    AmazingSo I've just finished this wonderful sixth book and I did have my doubts about Electra I didn't care much for her at the beginning but by the end of this story I was full of admiration for her. I've read every book that Lucinda has written and have loved every one of them. This book is fabulous I felt it was so descriptive and I could have been in Kenya reading it. I've read the seven sister's in order that they were written which I'm glad as I personally feel it makes more sense. Can't AmazingSo I've just finished this wonderful sixth book and I did have my doubts about Electra I didn't care much for her at the beginning but by the end of this story I was full of admiration for her. I've read every book that Lucinda has written and have loved every one of them. This book is fabulous I felt it was so descriptive and I could have been in Kenya reading it. I've read the seven sister's in order that they were written which I'm glad as I personally feel it makes more sense. Can't wait for the last one to tie it all up, I still believe that pa is still alive so will have to see if I'm right . If I had to pick a favourite from this series it would have to be Star's but I can honestly say they've all been so wonderful Electra's made me cry. And was very moving at the end, thanks again Lucinda and pleeeese write another book soon. .
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  • Jennyh
    January 1, 1970
    This is the sixth novel in a series of seven. They may be read in any order, but because of spoilers it is better to read them in sequence.Electra is the sixth adopted daughter of Pa Salt and I found her the hardest to connect to although as her story progresses her vulnerability is exposed. In hr quest to discover her roots, Electra finds a close relative and learns about her other family in Kenya. With her private life in turmoil, Electra must learn to trust others and discover her own self This is the sixth novel in a series of seven. They may be read in any order, but because of spoilers it is better to read them in sequence.Electra is the sixth adopted daughter of Pa Salt and I found her the hardest to connect to although as her story progresses her vulnerability is exposed. In hr quest to discover her roots, Electra finds a close relative and learns about her other family in Kenya. With her private life in turmoil, Electra must learn to trust others and discover her own self worth.The duel storyline tells of Electra,s struggles in the present and the story of how and why she was adopted in the past.In many ways I dread the publication of book 7; as then there will be no further stories. On the other hand I am looking forward to finding out about the missing sister and the story behind Pa SaltThank you Lucinda for another great read.
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  • Stuart
    January 1, 1970
    Did not enjoy this as much as the others for some reason. Even the Civil Rights issue did not come over as a powerful issue. Cecily's life in Kenya was interesting but not sure about Bill as a character. It also left me with some questions. Where did Kiki get all that champagne from in the middle of nowhere? How was Cecily able to run a fridge at Paradise Cottage (no-one mentioned electricity)? She also came up with odd phrases like 'holy moly' - do New Yorkers really speak like this? The other Did not enjoy this as much as the others for some reason. Even the Civil Rights issue did not come over as a powerful issue. Cecily's life in Kenya was interesting but not sure about Bill as a character. It also left me with some questions. Where did Kiki get all that champagne from in the middle of nowhere? How was Cecily able to run a fridge at Paradise Cottage (no-one mentioned electricity)? She also came up with odd phrases like 'holy moly' - do New Yorkers really speak like this? The other stories all had a main historical figure of interest but not sure who it was here - Stella? Joss Hay? Looking forward to meeting missing sister and finding out how the stories all come together. Just a year to wait now!
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    I think I maybe liked this one best. It’s about Electra who was the tearaway whilst going up, getting expelled from a host of schools, left education at 16, became a model and ended up in a cycle of drugs and Alcohol. Eventually her grandmother arrives and plays a part in encouraging her to go into rehab and so the twisting together of the story begins. Her background starts in Kenya and maybe that is why I enjoyed it so much because as I’ve been there and it brought back memories of our safari I think I maybe liked this one best. It’s about Electra who was the tearaway whilst going up, getting expelled from a host of schools, left education at 16, became a model and ended up in a cycle of drugs and Alcohol. Eventually her grandmother arrives and plays a part in encouraging her to go into rehab and so the twisting together of the story begins. Her background starts in Kenya and maybe that is why I enjoyed it so much because as I’ve been there and it brought back memories of our safari and visit. It’s slightly different from the rest which made it slightly more enjoyable as well. It ends that there will definitely be another book of the missing sister. Loved, loved, loved it.
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  • Annarella
    January 1, 1970
    Even if I didn't read the previous instalment in this series I loved this one and i think it can be read as a standalone.it's a fascinating, engrossing, poignant, and well written book that kept me hooked till the end turning pages as fast as I could.The cast of characters is fleshed and well thought, the plot is well crafted and I loved the descriptions of the settings.The writer is a very talented storyteller and she can write about serious topics giving you a lot of food for thought.I look Even if I didn't read the previous instalment in this series I loved this one and i think it can be read as a standalone.it's a fascinating, engrossing, poignant, and well written book that kept me hooked till the end turning pages as fast as I could.The cast of characters is fleshed and well thought, the plot is well crafted and I loved the descriptions of the settings.The writer is a very talented storyteller and she can write about serious topics giving you a lot of food for thought.I look forward to reading the next book by Ms Riley.It was an excellent read, highly recommended.Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.
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