Cadaver & Queen (Cadaver & Queen, #1)
When Lizzie Lavenza enrolled at Ingold as its first female medical student, she knew she wouldn't have an easy time. From class demands to being an outsider among her male cohorts, she'll have to go above and beyond to prove herself. So when she stumbles across what appears to be a faulty Bio-mechanical--one of the mechanized cadavers created to service the school--she jumps at the chance to fix it and get ahead in the program.Only this Bio-mechanical isn't like the others. Where they are usually empty-minded and perfectly obedient, this one seems to have thoughts, feelings...and self-awareness.Soon Lizzie realizes that it is Victor Frankenstein--a former student who died under mysterious circumstances. Victor, it seems, still has a spark of human intelligence inside him, along with memories of things he discovered before his untimely death...and a suspicion that he was murdered to keep that information from getting out.Suddenly Lizzie finds herself intertwined in dark secrets and sabotage that put her life, and the lives of Victor and their friends, in danger. But Lizzie's determined to succeed--even if that means fighting an enemy who threatens the entire British Empire.

Cadaver & Queen (Cadaver & Queen, #1) Details

TitleCadaver & Queen (Cadaver & Queen, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 27th, 2018
PublisherHarlequin Teen
ISBN-139781335470461
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Historical, Historical Fiction, Retellings, Fantasy, Science Fiction

Cadaver & Queen (Cadaver & Queen, #1) Review

  • Kristen Burns
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsReview:I reread Frankenstein recently and am on a quest to read all the retellings! And this one proved to be a thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist.While not a retelling, per se, this story took characters and ideas from the original novel as a springboard and twisted them in really interesting ways to form something new and really highlight some of the thought-provoking aspects of the original. Our main character was Elizabeth, our love interest Victor, 3.5 StarsReview:I reread Frankenstein recently and am on a quest to read all the retellings! And this one proved to be a thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist.While not a retelling, per se, this story took characters and ideas from the original novel as a springboard and twisted them in really interesting ways to form something new and really highlight some of the thought-provoking aspects of the original. Our main character was Elizabeth, our love interest Victor, except, in this story, Victor was the monster. He was a bio-mechanical---a reanimated corpse, usually made of stitched-together parts from various different bodies, although Victor was mostly intact with just the arm of a stranger to replace his mangled one.The characters were well-written with flaws but also good qualities. My favorite was Byram because of his dry humor and support of Lizzie. I liked Jack too, despite his small role. Lizzie was the protagonist though, and I loved that she was intelligent, strong-willed, and determined. She didn't let the sexism and all the obstacles in her way stop her from chasing after her goals, which made this a fantastically feminist book. Buuuuuut she could also be so self-assured and focused on trying to succeed that she was uncaring toward patients and didn't listen to them, and she butted her head into things that's weren't her business which put not only herself but also others in danger. So she could be frustrating, but she was realistically flawed (which I like), and she did get called out on a lot of her behaviors by other characters.Although the pace of the plot was slow, I found myself engrossed by the story. There was so much great stuff going on---mystery, friendship, bio-mechanicals, sinister plans. Oddly enough, I wasn't all that into the romance (though it was plenty believable)---I was more interested in what was going on with the school and the professors, what exactly had happened to Victor, how it would all impact Lizzie, etc.I had one main issue though. There were a some threads left hanging, things I didn't quite understand, and things I wanted to know more about. It was like so many of those mysterious/sinister parts of the plot about the school just got dropped. According to the author, there's going to be another book that continues the story (albeit with the focus on different characters), so hopefully these will still get addressed. Maybe someone who's finished the book can help me in case I just missed some things? *SPOILER* (view spoiler)[Will didn't believe Victor was still in there at first, but what was their relationship like by the end of the book? Did Victor ever speak to Henry? Makepeace's heart attack was oddly perfectly timed---was it really a heart attack? (I was rooting for Igor to save the day, to be honest.) Were the professors murdering people for their parts? Why was Lizzie ok with all the shady stuff and totally trusting of Grimbauld and Moulsdale at the end? Why were Grimbauld and Moulsdale ok with Lizzie and her friends knowing their secrets? What exactly was the story behind Victor's murder? (I was confused by Henry's explanation.) How did Lizzie end up with a white streak in her hair if Makepeace didn't actually do anything to her? How did Justine end up with telepathy? (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER*One other thing I wanted to mention is that Lizzie thought about how Byram was so attractive that he wouldn't even be friends with her if it weren't for his bad foot bringing him down to her level. She mentioned something similar about some boy she had a crush on and got to know while he was ill. I didn't like the implication that having a disability brings a person's value down. I chocked it up to just being Lizzie's beliefs as a product of the time she lived in, but I wanted to point it out so readers could be aware of this kind of thing not just in this book but in life in general.Last but not least, I wanted to talk about the thought-provoking aspect of this book. I mentioned that Victor was entirely intact except for having someone else's arm. That one little arm, however, had a big impact. *SPOILER* (view spoiler)[Victor's arm kind of had a mind of its own at first, and Victor had some memories of the person the arm belonged to. Later in the story, that other person ended up taking over the body for a short while, and eventually they kind of learned to coincide together, Victor remaining in charge but borrowing on Jack's traits when he needed them. (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER* I loved that the author used that to explore the concept of souls and memories and whether our body parts retain a bit of ourselves if they're kept alive after the rest of our body has died. I've heard stories, for example, about people who got heart transplants and then started acting like the person the heart originally belonged to, and things like that make me wonder. When we die, if some part of our body remains alive, does part of our soul, or maybe some imprint of it, remain with it? Or in cases like the heart transplants, is there a scientific explanation? (I did read something about cell memory.) But in the case of fictional Frankenstein stories, if someone is reanimated, do they get their soul back? What if they're composed from the parts of a whole bunch of people, do they even get a soul? A whole bunch of souls? Maybe that's why the other bio-mechanicals were mindless---they were confused by having too many souls in one body. This book doesn't go in-depth into any of this, nor does it force any belief on the reader, but it's definitely an interesting part of the story.As for the audio, I struggle with audiobooks in general, but I thought Saskia Maarleveld did a wonderful job. She read in a way that sounded normal rather than overdramatic, and she did men's voices well and made them sound natural with proper inflection and emotion (those are the two things I usually have the biggest issue with).Overall, this book gripped me with its mysteriousness and its feminism and its unique twist on the Frankenstein story, and hopefully those loose threads will be wrapped up in the next book!Recommended For:Readers who like Frankenstein retellings, feminist characters, mysterious plots, and thought-provoking reads. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight --------------------Initial Thoughts:A thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist! Full review soon.
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  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    January 1, 1970
    A YA reimagining of Frankenstein.I just received a free copy of the hardback book from Harper Collins for review. Thanks!!
  • Jay G
    January 1, 1970
    Want to see more from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy for honest review Lizzie Lavenza is the first female medical student to be enrolled at the prestigious Ingold School in England during the 1800s. She faces a lot of prejudice and quickly realizes she will need to work twice as hard as her male counterparts. Upon arriving, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein who was murdered a few month Want to see more from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy for honest review Lizzie Lavenza is the first female medical student to be enrolled at the prestigious Ingold School in England during the 1800s. She faces a lot of prejudice and quickly realizes she will need to work twice as hard as her male counterparts. Upon arriving, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein who was murdered a few months earlier. Victor is now a Bio-mechanical - part human, part machine. As time goes on, she discovers a sinister plan that the head professors of Ingold are planning that involves the Queen of England and these new Bio-mechanical soldiers. I absolutely love retellings, so I was very excited for this Frankenstein retelling! The book was very quick to read and enjoyable. At times, I did find it to be a bit slow, but I enjoyed it none the less. I liked the banter between characters, especially Lizzie and the three boys. The romance was really well done in my opinion and I really enjoyed the slow burn of it. The idea of the bio-mechanicals was also a really cool concept. One major downfall I found was that the ending felt a bit too rushed, but overall it was an enjoyable read!
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  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this historical sci-fi take on the classic story of Frankenstein more than I expected to like it. Bio-mechanicals (reanimated corpses who perform menial tasks and follow orders), a top of the line British medical school, a female American student, and Victor Frankenstein - a once great student who has since died a been transformed into a bio-mechanical who still seems to be himself - doesn't that sound like a cool story? It totally was and I loved getting to know our cast of cha I really enjoyed this historical sci-fi take on the classic story of Frankenstein more than I expected to like it. Bio-mechanicals (reanimated corpses who perform menial tasks and follow orders), a top of the line British medical school, a female American student, and Victor Frankenstein - a once great student who has since died a been transformed into a bio-mechanical who still seems to be himself - doesn't that sound like a cool story? It totally was and I loved getting to know our cast of characters and discover this alternate history world set in 1903. I'm really looking forward to the companion sequel Corpse & Crown which retells Oliver Twist.
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  • Heather (Curious Fox Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    This book was one of my most anticipated reads for the year. I mean look at that Cover! Intriguing right? And a Frankenstein retelling! Psh.. Heck Yes!!However, it fell a little short for me. The idea of the story was definitely there and intriguing, but as I got reading, I felt the story start to get a little choppy, Jumping from here to there, or having conversations with characters that were unnecessary. Then by the ending, I had all these things come up... that were never answered or explain This book was one of my most anticipated reads for the year. I mean look at that Cover! Intriguing right? And a Frankenstein retelling! Psh.. Heck Yes!!However, it fell a little short for me. The idea of the story was definitely there and intriguing, but as I got reading, I felt the story start to get a little choppy, Jumping from here to there, or having conversations with characters that were unnecessary. Then by the ending, I had all these things come up... that were never answered or explained. The ending literally felt like a well... I need to end this, so this is going to happen. It didn't leave me satisfied, left too many things unanswered, and was extremely rushed. There was easily about 50 pages more that could have been written to tie everything up nicely.The idea was there, it was good, but I felt it wasn't executed as well as it could have been. So I'm giving it 3 🌟 🌟 🌟 Stars.Photo taken by me! Visit my Instagram for more!
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I've heard this called a Feminist Frankenstein Retelling? I am so here for that!
  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    Update: wait...there's a sequel now?!Ohhhh this was actually fun and not what I was expecting! It kinda reminded me of Stalking Jack the Ripper and some Frankenstein. Victorian era sexism really does piss me off. The romance was kinda cheesy but I actually didn't mind it. Lots of mystery and science which I'm always a sucker for. Pretty decent for a sci-fi/fantasy stand alone.
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  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    Not sure how I feel about this cover... ---This sounds amazing! I love Frankenstein, so I am excited to see where this goes.
  • Kayleigh
    January 1, 1970
    3 stars.“It is dangerous to be right on matters in which the established authorities are wrong.”Cadaver & Queen follows Elizabeth Lavenza, who has enrolled at Ingold as its first female medical student. From class demands to being an outsider among her male peers, she will have to go above and beyond to prove herself. So when she stumbles across what appears to be a faulty Bio-Mechanical—one of the mechanized cadavers created to service the school—she jumps at the chance to fix it and get ah 3 stars.“It is dangerous to be right on matters in which the established authorities are wrong.”Cadaver & Queen follows Elizabeth Lavenza, who has enrolled at Ingold as its first female medical student. From class demands to being an outsider among her male peers, she will have to go above and beyond to prove herself. So when she stumbles across what appears to be a faulty Bio-Mechanical—one of the mechanized cadavers created to service the school—she jumps at the chance to fix it and get ahead in the program. However, this Bio-Mechanical isn't like the rest: while all the others are usually empty-minded and perfectly obedient, this one seems to have thoughts, feelings, and self-awareness. Elizabeth soon finds out it's Victor Frankenstein—a former student who died under mysterious circumstances. Victor still has a spark of human intelligence inside him, along with memories of things he discovered before his untimely death, and a suspicion that he was murdered to keep that information from getting out. Now, Elizabeth finds herself caught up in dark secrets and sabotage that put her life, and the lives of Victor and their friends, in serious danger. But Elizabeth's determined to succeed—even if that means fighting an enemy who threatens the entire British Empire.Well, this book was quite fun to read. A feminist, Frankenstein retelling? Sign me up. It wasn't as great as I was hoping it would be—it was a bit slow at times and, for such a short book, some parts of the story kind of dragged. That being said, I still enjoyed it. Lizzie was a great main character, and Alisa Kwitney did a great job at making her feel very real—flaws and all. I loved watching her excell in a man's world and taking no shit for being a woman in the medical field, and she's clearly very good at it. My main complaint, besides the pacing, was that there was a lot of things left unanswered. I won't go into spoilers, but I had more questions than answers by the end of the novel, so I do hope Kwitney answers them in the companion novel (which I do plan on reading once it comes out, because this one was really interesting). Even so, it didn't bring down my enjoyment of the novel all that much—it's just a bit annoying, is all.All in all, I would definitely recommend Cadaver & Queen. It was a lot of fun, and I'm excited to see where the author goes with the companion novel.
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  • Katherine Paschal
    January 1, 1970
    I have no idea why this book has not gotten the hype that it should! I had not even heard of Cadaver & Queen until I was rummaging at the library and I stumbled across the book, with it's eye catching cover and intriguing synopsis. This was a Frankenstein retelling with steampunk elements, a strong female main character, and the best kind of romance! I listened to the audiobook and the narrator was great, giving personality and voice to each character, and between the narrator and the writte I have no idea why this book has not gotten the hype that it should! I had not even heard of Cadaver & Queen until I was rummaging at the library and I stumbled across the book, with it's eye catching cover and intriguing synopsis. This was a Frankenstein retelling with steampunk elements, a strong female main character, and the best kind of romance! I listened to the audiobook and the narrator was great, giving personality and voice to each character, and between the narrator and the written words I felt like I was watching the book unfold instead of just listening.I loved everything about the book and really, really hope there will be more. Keep in mind that this could be a standalone since it was wrapped up nicely, but I would love more. I will keep my eyes peeled for more by Alisa.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    There wasn't anything particularly bad with this book, but it just didn't enthrall me at all. I would sit there, looking at the page and being bored. I will say that I was quite confused at first. I kind of went into this book, forgetting that it was a Frankenstein retelling of sorts. I was very confused on the world. I couldn't tell if this was supposed to be straight up Historical Fiction or if it was supposed to have fantasy elements, so I got a bit lost on what exactly Bio-Mechanicals were. There wasn't anything particularly bad with this book, but it just didn't enthrall me at all. I would sit there, looking at the page and being bored. I will say that I was quite confused at first. I kind of went into this book, forgetting that it was a Frankenstein retelling of sorts. I was very confused on the world. I couldn't tell if this was supposed to be straight up Historical Fiction or if it was supposed to have fantasy elements, so I got a bit lost on what exactly Bio-Mechanicals were. It took me a while, but once I got it, I was pretty impressed. The author showed a lot of creativity with the world and taking on the retelling aspects of it, and I really was interested in the details she came up with. Also, Frankenstein retellings are so super cool, and the world needs more of them.I also thought the world was realistic. Elizabeth, our main character, was constantly being put down by other men for her desire to be a doctor, and I have to say that despite it being disgusting and enraging, it was what would have happened if she walked into a school wanting to learn to become a doctor. I thought Kwitney did a great job of showing this but still showcasing Elizabeth's strength and empowerment. Elizabeth kicked some major butt, which was so great to see. The other aspects felt cool as well when it came to realism. I liked how she really made it feel very Victorian and very London and very HF. I liked the vibes, and Kwitney did a great job with the medical descriptions.The characters were okay. The issues is that I never really connected with any of them. I thought all of them were just okay. Elizabeth was okay. Byram was okay. Victor was okay. All of them were just okay, and that disconnect really stuck around for me for the entire novel.The ship was just okay as well. I thought it was a bit too fast for me, and I think I might have checked out very quickly on. I wasn't invested in the two characters that it was involving, and therefore, I wasn't invested in the romance either.The plot was...omg, okay again. I thought there was intrigue in it, but about halfway through, I just got bored. I felt like we were going to slowly to get anywhere and we were just doing the same things like going to class. I just wanted more excitement and intrigue, and I was left just feeling really bored and wanting the novel to do something faster.Overall, as I said, there was really nothing wrong with it. It just couldn't keep my attention or make me connected with it at all. I just needed something more of it that it didn't give me. But there were some good things in it like the atmosphere and world that was created! 2 crowns and a Cinderella rating!
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    Listen I could literally sit around and read Frankenstein retellings all day every day. I'm not exactly sure why because the original novel is really very so-so for me, but I just love all the retellings so much! And somehow they still all manage to be different enough to be interesting. This one features all the familiar faces [plus a guy with a club foot named 'Byram', one guess who he's supposed to be lol] and is set in a steampunk-ish world where the process of bringing bodies back to life i Listen I could literally sit around and read Frankenstein retellings all day every day. I'm not exactly sure why because the original novel is really very so-so for me, but I just love all the retellings so much! And somehow they still all manage to be different enough to be interesting. This one features all the familiar faces [plus a guy with a club foot named 'Byram', one guess who he's supposed to be lol] and is set in a steampunk-ish world where the process of bringing bodies back to life is a well-known thing and not something Victor managed on his own. I guess some people will think that is too much of a deviation but personally I liked the transformation of Victor from creator to creature just because it's something different than what we are used to and made for a good story in my opinion. I will admit that it's kind of weird to have Victor not be his dramatic mopey bastard self all the time but there's still enough of him in there to recognize I think. I even liked the typical YA romance that would usually drive me up the wall. Incredible ;)
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Cadaver & Queen is the story of Lizzie and Victor while they are attending medical school in Britain. Lizzie is the first females to be allowed to study medicine at Ingold while Victor was a previous student but met with some not so great circumstances but they somehow meet during this book and a huge ordeal takes place.Lizzie is our main character. We start the book out on her first day at Ingold, a medical school in Britain. She is the first female student they have allowed to attend actua Cadaver & Queen is the story of Lizzie and Victor while they are attending medical school in Britain. Lizzie is the first females to be allowed to study medicine at Ingold while Victor was a previous student but met with some not so great circumstances but they somehow meet during this book and a huge ordeal takes place.Lizzie is our main character. We start the book out on her first day at Ingold, a medical school in Britain. She is the first female student they have allowed to attend actual medical school there. She receives a lot of hate and anger from the male students AND teachers who don't think she should be there. She does end up making 2 really good friends and one of those friends happens to be the brother of Victor Frankenstein.Victor was a student at Ingold. He was the brightest and most focused student in his class. Then he ends up dead. Everyone thinks it was just a medical emergency that killed Victor. Then Lizzie starts working with one of the professors and she meets Victor. Only she doesn't know who he really is. Victor was killed to keep a secret. A secret that involves the queen and some very questionable medical advances. But if Victor was killed, how is he still 'alive'?Now... Ingold isn't your average medical school. In this world automatons are invented. They were invented as a way to build a better army but some people have been using them for other purposes. Ingold happens to be one of those places. But what kind of purposes? I guess you will just have to read this awesome book to find out!The plot of the story is pretty straightforward but also has some twists and turns. I didn't know who I could trust at all in this book. It seemed like everyone had their own agenda and those agendas weren't exactly wholesome. I just really enjoyed the medical and romance aspects of this book. I didn't think I would enjoy a romance like the one in this book but I found myself rooting for them both so much! In the end, I was extremely satisfied with this book. If you loved the Stalking Jack the Ripper books and are looking for something to help tide you over then I HIGHLY suggest checking this book out. If you like YA in general then I suggest this book. I never used to like historical fiction but books like this definitely have changed my mind. I cannot wait for the next book in the series, I hear its about another character from the book but we still get to see Lizzie and Victor!Overall, I gave the book 4.5/5 stars.
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  • Ella Schantz
    January 1, 1970
    I won this uncorrected proof from a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you for allowing me the chance to read this book prior to its release! Elizabeth (Lizzie) Lavenza is the first female medical student at Ingold, a school in 1800's England. While she struggles to fit in and work around the sexism of a male-dominated school setting, there is a worldwide movement to create a whole army of Bio-Mechanicals. Their purpose is to serve as a soldier in the wars the countries keep waging against each other - I won this uncorrected proof from a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you for allowing me the chance to read this book prior to its release! Elizabeth (Lizzie) Lavenza is the first female medical student at Ingold, a school in 1800's England. While she struggles to fit in and work around the sexism of a male-dominated school setting, there is a worldwide movement to create a whole army of Bio-Mechanicals. Their purpose is to serve as a soldier in the wars the countries keep waging against each other - thus drastically reducing the number of human casualties. They are portrayed to be dumb, simple creatures. However, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein (I got a chuckle out of the name), who was purportedly murdered by the head professors at Ingold for discovering a dangerous secret that could threaten the stability of the British Empire. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It was a very easy, but engrossing read. The blossoming romance between Lizzie and Victor was no secret from the very beginning, but the author does a good job at drawing out the interactions between the two of them, so they are not thrust into any sort of romantic encounter too soon. Each character is individually different, although there are a few stereotypical cliches attached to each one (i.e. the very wealthy, and very snobby British boy who despises Lizzie on contact, and tries to make her life miserable). The latter half of the book held some subtle plot twists that (in retrospect) I could see coming, but I didn't notice them as I sped through it. However, just because some parts of the plot may be predictable, that doesn't stop this book from being very written and enjoyable. The author interspersed occasional historical facts throughout the novel, which as a historical fiction fan, I appreciated. It can become so easy to let a book exist in a vacuum, rather than blended into actual history. This is the perfect young adult novel for anyone who likes history and the creativeness of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a big fan of retellings and anything that offers up a bit of a twist with a female lead tackling the mystery and horror along with a male dominated society but overall this book as just okay. “Cadaver and Queen” begins with first year medical student Lizzie who wants nothing more than to prove herself amongst the men in her class but quickly finds that it will be an uphill battle with few allies. Meanwhile, Victor, another medical student, wakes up to find that he has become a regenerated co I’m a big fan of retellings and anything that offers up a bit of a twist with a female lead tackling the mystery and horror along with a male dominated society but overall this book as just okay. “Cadaver and Queen” begins with first year medical student Lizzie who wants nothing more than to prove herself amongst the men in her class but quickly finds that it will be an uphill battle with few allies. Meanwhile, Victor, another medical student, wakes up to find that he has become a regenerated corpse with few memories of how he came to be this way and on his quest to uncover the secrets surrounding his death he crosses path with Lizzie and the two find that there is more to their school and its professors than meets the eye. This book doesn’t hold back when describing the prejudice between Lizzie and her classmates as she deals with their taunts and sexist comments while trying to navigate this field but where it succeeds in that regard it falters when dealing with class struggles and in some cases the treatment of other women outside the college. While there’s a direct confrontation between Lizzie and her roommate discussing the roles and attitudes between doctors and nurses the other women and sex workers in the book, along with those both men and women in the lower class become caricatures or lean into stereotypes and are portrayed that way throughout the remaining course of the novel with no real nod to a resolution to their concerns as the other plot elements wrap up. I enjoyed the romance side of this even though there’s some rush to it I think it’s handled nicely up until then end with the introduction of another character that sort of comes out of left field that I didn’t care for and was brought up too late almost as an afterthought when someone realized it was needed as a plot element but even then that was left sort of ambiguous and wrapped up rather quickly making the real threat being that of the people outside rising up against their oppressors instead of those using science for their own means. I feel like if you’re looking for a book that deals with this kind of theme of a women looking to make a name for herself in the medical field laced with classic horror stories you should look at Stalking Jack the Ripper and save this for a slow day.
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  • Cocktails and Books
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this twist on the story of Frankenstein. It's one of those books you just have to experience for yourself. Victor was perfect as the tortured hero and strong-willed Lizzie was immediately likable and you couldn't help but want this couple to figure out how to get their HEA.
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  • Caitlyn
    January 1, 1970
    [email protected] pg 118.Unsalvageable. An unusual premise, abominably executed—and a romance which, while true to the period, offended my modern sensibilities.
  • katie
    January 1, 1970
    I really really really liked the beginning of this book. Elizabeth was a girl against the world. She was smart and she knew it and she wasn't about to let some egotistical male teachers keep her from becoming a doctor. I enjoyed her friendship with the other misfits, and even her strange relationship with her roomate, because they felt like real relationships. The romance wasn't too quick, and it was nice to watch them develop feelings for each other.HOWEVER, the last half of the book felt rushe I really really really liked the beginning of this book. Elizabeth was a girl against the world. She was smart and she knew it and she wasn't about to let some egotistical male teachers keep her from becoming a doctor. I enjoyed her friendship with the other misfits, and even her strange relationship with her roomate, because they felt like real relationships. The romance wasn't too quick, and it was nice to watch them develop feelings for each other.HOWEVER, the last half of the book felt rushed and many things were left unexplained.Like: -How do biomechanics work? -Why was Victor's situation different?-Why did (view spoiler)[ Jerko teacher person break her device when it ended up being vital to Operation Zombie Queen? Surely he could have surmised that it may end up being useful. He IS a professor at the top medical school in the country. I feel like towards the end we spent more time watching her try to hook up with her zombie boyfriend (and his alternate ego) than we did facing the issues at hand.Issues like:-The Queen is in fact a biomechanical. We know this because we JUST SAW HER WITH OUR OWN EYES IN THE LAB.-Homegirl was right and they WERE killing perfectly healthy people just to have fresh cadavers. Did we ever discover that to be truth? I feel like this wasn't explained enough despite the fact that it is important enough to be the reason behind the riots that eventually destory the school.-Doc Strange just randomly dies of a heart attack at the most opportune moment? Come on...-Justine can speak into people's MINDS?! And Elizabeth has an unexplained white streak in her hair? Is there going to be a sequel? Because I feel like this is setting up for a sequel...-William freaking SHOT his friend, was reunited with his zombie brother, and then he's just like "Gotta go to the principals office to get in trouble for being out after dark, peace!"-Where were Byrum and Auggie this whole time? They just made this huge discovery, ran for their lives, and then went back to their rooms as if everything was okey dokey. "Where are our roommates? Oh I'm sure they're fine and haven't been captured by the mad evil scientists we were just running from."-Speaking of mad scientists, the one was so certain that the others would want to use Elizabeth's body to save the queen, but then they acted like that was a ludicrous idea and suddenly did a 180 in terms of how they treat their one female student. What changed their opinions? -Of all of the demands she could have made, Elizabeth asked them to reinstate her zombie beau as a student. She knew they had turned the queen into a walking corpse and yet her list of requests was painfully short.-Oh, so Victor "was in a coma this whole time" and just miraculously woke up, restored to full strength and physical condition, because of the fire? Is anyone really buying this? Show me yo neck, boy! (hide spoiler)]I really enjoyed the concept, a feminist Frankenstein rewrite, but the rushed ending left it as more of a zombie love story with some cool side plots that never fully played out. I really thought this was going to be a 4 - 5 star read for me, but the end bothered me enough to bump it down to a 3 - 3.5. I'd still recommend it, but just know that you're going to get frustrated towards the end.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC. Lizzie Lavenza is a medical student, the first female in fact, at a school in England during the 1800’s. In spite of her male classmates and professors, she is determined to make a name for herself and become a doctor. In addition to serving as a medical school, the professors are also experimenting on creating Bio-Mechanicals, a new class of soldiers for England who are modified and put together using the parts of the newly deceased. One day, while trying to figu I received this book as an ARC. Lizzie Lavenza is a medical student, the first female in fact, at a school in England during the 1800’s. In spite of her male classmates and professors, she is determined to make a name for herself and become a doctor. In addition to serving as a medical school, the professors are also experimenting on creating Bio-Mechanicals, a new class of soldiers for England who are modified and put together using the parts of the newly deceased. One day, while trying to figure out how to be treated equally among her classmates, Lizzie meets a Bio-Mechanical named Victor Frankenstein. At first, she views him as such another experiment, but it isn’t long before sparks start to fly between the two and it develops into more. With the help of Victor, Lizzie soon learns that there is something more sinister brewing at her school, something that includes how Victor actually died and became a Bio-Mechanical and how this may be a threat to the very nation of England. When I first heard about this book, I was so stoked. I love a good re-telling, especially ones which dabble with some steampunk elements, Gothic literature and the macabre in general. The book was fast paced, easy to read and keeps the story engaging. While Lizzie and Victor are the main characters, I thoroughly enjoyed how fleshed out some of the secondary ones where; Auggie in particular. Towards the end, I felt like the plot was becoming a bit muddled and there were one too many things that wrapped up all around the same time, it was an enjoyable book; one I would recommend to my teen patrons and other readers who like retellings of classic literature.
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  • Jovy
    January 1, 1970
    Cadaver & Queen had potential but I felt like the story was executed poorly. The book dove into a promising start as it was rather creepy and intriguing. Halfway through the book, the story was flooded with irrelevant dialogue between characters. There also wasn't very much character development to make the reader relate or actually develop a liking to the main characters.
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  • Christina (Ensconced in Lit)
    January 1, 1970
    There was nothing really wrong with this book, but after it started off strong with an interesting female protagonist in a room full of boys at medical school, it dragged. I liked some of the twists, but it wasn't enough to keep me engaged throughout the book.
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  • Sionna
    January 1, 1970
    ended up not really liking this one... :/ A huge shame since this was one of my most anticipated reads this year. I loved the concept and started out being really interested in what was going on, yet the middle became a bit stale-- or more like a book without direction. Which makes sense considering the ending was confusing to me and left many loose ends. In fact, many things which I considered problems are just looked over, gone along with, or forgotten about. Pretty much nothing is explained. ended up not really liking this one... :/ A huge shame since this was one of my most anticipated reads this year. I loved the concept and started out being really interested in what was going on, yet the middle became a bit stale-- or more like a book without direction. Which makes sense considering the ending was confusing to me and left many loose ends. In fact, many things which I considered problems are just looked over, gone along with, or forgotten about. Pretty much nothing is explained. In the same vein I'd say the ending was a bit rushed and just pulled together.But I liked the concept and I really liked Victor. Seriously, Victor is the best character here. I felt like he is the only one who experiences character development, even though many others needed it, including our lead Lizzie. Well, Lizzie has a moment where she could be developing, but they never went further showing she understood and changed for the better. Which made that moment and the accompanying dialogue seem unneeded in the story. I'm going to end my review here because the more I think about the book, the more I want to lower my rating. I might recommend this to people, but at this time I'm just not sure who too...
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  • Mary Ditmer
    January 1, 1970
    I must admit that when I first picked up this book I was wary as to whether or not I would like it. The cover was eye catching, but I was unsure of the story itself, I am presently surprised at how much I loved this book. A retelling of Frankenstein as a steampunk alternate history book??? Kwitney had the perfect blend of gothic horror, with a dash of steampunk. Lizzie was smart, savvy, and fearless a perfect heroin to balance out the biomechanical, studious Victor. I look forward to Keitneys ne I must admit that when I first picked up this book I was wary as to whether or not I would like it. The cover was eye catching, but I was unsure of the story itself, I am presently surprised at how much I loved this book. A retelling of Frankenstein as a steampunk alternate history book??? Kwitney had the perfect blend of gothic horror, with a dash of steampunk. Lizzie was smart, savvy, and fearless a perfect heroin to balance out the biomechanical, studious Victor. I look forward to Keitneys next book.
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  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)
    January 1, 1970
    MEH.There was nothing remotely scary, terrifying, or gasping about this story. I found it rather uneventful and dull. :( Disappointment is the only word I can really think to properly describe my thoughts on this one.
  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting story
  • Tina ( As Told By Tina )
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe a 3.5 but this was pretty interesting for the most part.
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    We have a bit of a love/hate relationship. I think it was an interesting premise, although not very well justified or explained. The characters all started off pretty intriguing and interesting, although there wasn't a lot of growth or development. The plot became all kinds of interesting, but then it was wrapped up really weakly and left a lot of loose ends.First, characters. I like how strong-willed and determined Lizzie is, even (especially) in a world where women are looked down on. She coul We have a bit of a love/hate relationship. I think it was an interesting premise, although not very well justified or explained. The characters all started off pretty intriguing and interesting, although there wasn't a lot of growth or development. The plot became all kinds of interesting, but then it was wrapped up really weakly and left a lot of loose ends.First, characters. I like how strong-willed and determined Lizzie is, even (especially) in a world where women are looked down on. She could be rather frustrating at times, as with most headstrong characters, and wasn't always very empathetic towards others, but overall I liked her. I'd say the main problem with her was that she didn't develop very much from beginning to end. A little, but not really enough.Victor was the most interesting character and also the one with the most depth and growth. I enjoyed watching how he slowly rebuilt his identity and abilities to become more human again. The whole arm thing was a little overdramatic to me (that particular idea has been way overdone in popular fiction and, I think, would have greatly benefited from a more subtle, realistic, and thoughtful approach rather than the more ham-fisted one we got here), but the theme made sense in context of this whole exploring what humanity means in a world where we're sort of resurrecting people to be shells of their former selves. But anyway, he had some great parts (no pun intended).Most of the other characters fell flat. Will, Byram, and Aggie had a lot of potential, but pretty much disappeared for huge chunks of the story and stayed pretty one-note after their original interesting introduction. I liked Will's insecurities, Byram's witty dialogue, and Aggie's alternate view on the doctors and prickly but down-to-earth and empathetic personality.The rest of the supporting cast had very little personality at all.The relationships were a bit of a letdown too. I was especially interested to see the development of Lizzie's friendships with Byram and Aggie, and also how Victor and Will rebuilt their relationship and what the whole bio-mech thing would do to it and what would change. That last one really kills me. It's never addressed after that first reveal, and it had so much potential to be a fascinating reunion. Maybe I'm just a sucker for rebuilding those brotherly bonds, but I was extremely disappointed that was totally brushed off in favor of just Lizzie.Also, I wasn't a huge fan of how the romance started. It wasn't that horrible insta-love, at least, but it seemed too sudden and shallow in the beginning. It grew on me over time, but I still don't like how it started out.Aaand, the plot. All the mystery and intrigue with Victor's murder and the queen and what the professors are plotting was super interesting and suspenseful and then...not a whole lot. (view spoiler)[The whole ending was rushed and tons of stuff was left unexplained, and, as far as I can tell, nothing came of the whole plot with the queen. Random telepathy, perfectly timed heart attack ("heart attack"?), perfectly timed rebellion and fire... And Lizzie was just totally okay with the professors after everything. And then cut to random boat scene epilogue. (hide spoiler)]It was just so...disappointing. The setup was really good, but then the plot started to peter out halfway through and totally fell apart at the end. It's too bad, because I was actually really interested.So, I give it 4 stars for potential and 3 for execution. I did still like the main characters and even some of the side ones, even if there was a failure to develop any relationship besides the romance. And the cat was awesome! XD Interesting premise, lackluster execution, but I think it's at least worth reading for the premise and characters. There's also some interesting philosophical musings in here about life and what it means to be human, and it's definitely an out-of-the-box Frankenstein retelling.
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  • Teenreadsdotcom
    January 1, 1970
    Alisa Kwitney’s latest novel, CADAVER AND QUEEN, is a romantic-thriller that reinvents Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN. Kwitney is a prolific writer who is well known for her romantic appeal, such as in her novel, DOES SHE OR DOESN'T SHE. Kwitney’s familiar tones of romance remain in CADAVER AND QUEEN and are interwoven with strands of mystery, science fiction, and political turmoil.Elizabeth Lavenza is determined to prove herself. As the first female to enter as a medical student at the prestigious Alisa Kwitney’s latest novel, CADAVER AND QUEEN, is a romantic-thriller that reinvents Mary Shelley’s FRANKENSTEIN. Kwitney is a prolific writer who is well known for her romantic appeal, such as in her novel, DOES SHE OR DOESN'T SHE. Kwitney’s familiar tones of romance remain in CADAVER AND QUEEN and are interwoven with strands of mystery, science fiction, and political turmoil.Elizabeth Lavenza is determined to prove herself. As the first female to enter as a medical student at the prestigious Ingold University, Elizabeth, nicknamed Lizzy, finds that learning how to fit in proves harder than she expected. However, her greatest challenge may not be tests, the uniform or even the sexism she faces from her peers and teachers. In another part of the castle, Victor Frankenstein awakes, his last memories burning in his mind --- he was murdered. But why he was killed, and what secrets he may have been killed to protect, Victor cannot find out by himself. The strangely prophetic phrase, “dare to know,” at first only whispered in a ghost story, foretells the imminent danger Lizzy finds herself in for her curiosity. Like the Greek mythological Pandora, or maybe as a doctor, Lizzy cannot resist dissecting the mystery of Victor Frankenstein’s death. Meanwhile, tension is brewing outside of Ingold; the superstitious local town becomes tense and rash as Ingold fails to come up with answers for their missing patients; as the health of Queen Victoria is failing, the empire prepares for a new kind of war, a war that involves an army of undead. In the remote, cold landscape of Ingold, Lizzy and her band of misfits decide to, “dare to know,” digging deeper into the mystery the school and it’s faculty are desperately trying to hide. If Lizzy, Victor and their friends are not careful, they could reveal ambitious secrets that threaten to unravel everything they know.CADAVER AND QUEEN is fraught with a complex plot; Kwitney builds an alternative reality where technology and biology have combined to create Bio-Mechanicals, dead bodies that are reanimated to become warriors. Instead of leaving it at that, Kwitney explores the political and social strains this new discovery has on both the British Empire and the community of Ingold itself. However, near the end of the novel, Kwitney focuses more on the development of the relationship between Victor and Lizzy. Though some details remain unexplained and a few questions unanswered, CADAVER AND QUEEN was certainly a captivating novel, keeping up the tension by revealing just enough information to keep the reader on their toes. By sharing the points of view with Victor and Lizzy, the dramatic irony escalates as Lizzy searches to find the pieces of the puzzle that Victor has.All the characters in CADAVER AND QUEEN are fully fleshed-out humans, with weaknesses and strengths. Lizzy’s character in particular evolves throughout the novel because of the people who she interacts with. While every character is developed, some of the characters tend to drop off by the end of the novel and the plot escalates. Motives may not be fully explained, but the obvious conflicting emotions in every character provide insight to the character’s true goals.The castle of Ingold is chilling and spooky, complete with candlelit hallways and secret tunnels that set the eerie mood right from the beginning. Kwitney has a wonderfully developed writing style that allows the reader to picture the beautiful landscape, to feel the freezing winter air and get goosebumps as the plot unfolds. With mystery, science fiction and romance, I would recommend this book to anyone who is looking for an equally thrilling and emotionally gripping read.Reviewed by Lauren C., Teen Board Member
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  • Sarah Pedersen
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, I'm not sure what to do with this. I'm just... It's a story. Frankenstein-style, taking place in a world where it's morally okay to turn dead bodies into mindless half-living creatures to serve others, though because they're mindless it's really unclear how that works well in general. However, I love a good YA school story in a supernatural setting, so I bit. We are promised a smart and nerdy heroine from the description of the book, and I think that's why I'm so mad. She invents crazy thing Oh, I'm not sure what to do with this. I'm just... It's a story. Frankenstein-style, taking place in a world where it's morally okay to turn dead bodies into mindless half-living creatures to serve others, though because they're mindless it's really unclear how that works well in general. However, I love a good YA school story in a supernatural setting, so I bit. We are promised a smart and nerdy heroine from the description of the book, and I think that's why I'm so mad. She invents crazy things that other people can't think of, and has miserable social skills. Cool, right? Except she's not actually smart. She's YA heroine dumb in the worst possible moments, needs to be saved from herself constantly, and lets people walk all over her OR says obnoxious things, no mature in-between or real character growth. Fine, start your character there if you want, but show us she's learning and growing SOMEHOW. Plus, she apparently really hates all these people looking down on her for being female, while simultaneously falling into every cringey old timey stereotype possible. (Like, I can't count the number of times she gives herself away in times she's trying to hide because of gasping or something. Really? No self preservation at all? I can't think of one time in my life I've made noise on accident while trying to hide, no matter what I heard. She's not five.)The other characters are just... Hm. Victor, the main male lead, kind of gives me the heebie jeebies more than being attractive. I mean, he's pretty (bulky muscled and handsome, as we are often told) but he's dead. At least, we think he's dead. A reanimated dead guy, and none of us quite know what that means. Isn't his body constantly trying to decay? Wouldn't he smell? And his personality, rather than being smart scientist that he was, has somehow turned into stubborn "hide everything for your own good", "hot then cold", too-perfect YA romance man. But he knows science too! ... Sometimes. His head's a little weird, you know, with being technically dead and all. And having an arm that has a mind of its own entirely.The other side characters have personality, but their relationships and connections to each other seem sparce, despite being told there are connections. It just doesn't feel like anything.There is some great imagination and fun going on here, and I know I'm probably coming off harsher than I should in my disappointment. I did actually finish the story (I was listening to the audiobook) and what compelled me the most was the interesting world and dilemmas introduced in the beginning. However, the real kicker that killed the story for me is that most of the "secret" they were trying to figure out in the story was revealed entirely at the very beginning. Then all I had to look forward to was waiting for the characters to figure it out... Again, and again. Sheesh.
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  • Kacey
    January 1, 1970
    I love Frankenstein and love re-imaginings of classic stories, so I was down for this when I saw it. It has a really cool concept and definitely plays in some of the haunting and creepy feelings one should expect from this kind of stories. As well as the questions of morality in scientific exploration, and just how far people would go.I'm going to get my critiques out of the way first. Sometimes Elizabeth could be so stupid. Yeah, I know it was explained she was a little socially inept because s I love Frankenstein and love re-imaginings of classic stories, so I was down for this when I saw it. It has a really cool concept and definitely plays in some of the haunting and creepy feelings one should expect from this kind of stories. As well as the questions of morality in scientific exploration, and just how far people would go.I'm going to get my critiques out of the way first. Sometimes Elizabeth could be so stupid. Yeah, I know it was explained she was a little socially inept because she was home-schooled by her father, but she completely ignored very obvious cues. She also made some pretty dumb and reckless decisions and seemed surprised when the consequences slapped her in the face. It just comes off as jarring character inconsistencies. There were also a few things that didn't really add up or make any sense. This is about reanimated corpses, but some parts just didn't seem to have an explanation that I could believe.Also, I'm going to put it out there that this love story reminded me very strongly of the one in the Kane Chronicles. Thank god it didn't go to the levels of a love triangle, but it felt like it was leaning that way and just came off as really weird. Then again, this is the love story between a woman and a reanimated corpse, so that's going to be weird from the very start. The ending is very rushed. I feel like the author could've spared a few more pages to wrap things up nicely, but also given it the proper amount of time and focus.All that said, I still really enjoyed it. Like I said, it played into a lot of elements that are important in the Frankenstein story. The characters were all interesting and of course me being the champion of the minor character, really wanted to see more from Byram, Aggie and others. But Elizabeth and Victor were good leads and I liked reading from both of their perspectives. Jack was an extremely interesting character too, and I really wish more could've been done with him.If this is a stand-alone, that's great. It told its story well and I was very entertained. If there is a sequel, that's also great. I like these characters and wouldn't mind seeing more of them. Maybe have the next one from the perspective of Will and Byram with more from Aggie and the other nurses? I'd read it. For now, this was good, and I would recommend to people who like the original story and want to see a decent re-imagining.
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