The Clever Guts Diet
From #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fast Diet and The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet comes a life-changing look at your gut—home to your “second brain”—and the crucial role it plays in your health and your weight.Your gut is astonishingly clever. It contains millions of neurons—as many as you would find in the brain of a cat—and is home to the microbiome, an army of tiny organisms that influence your mood, your immune system, and even your appetite.In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Mosley takes us on a revelatory journey through the gut, showing how junk food and overuse of antibiotics have wiped out many “good” gut bacteria leading to a modern plague of allergies, food intolerances, and obesity. Drawing from the latest cutting-edge research, Dr. Mosley provides scientifically proven ways to control your cravings, boost your mood, and lose weight by feeding the “good” bacteria that keep you healthy and lean, while staving off “bad” bacteria that contribute to weight gain and disease.Dr. Mosley also shares a simple two-phase healing program, an effective way to repair and replenish the microbiome and to ease intestinal distress. Discover how foods like chocolate, red wine, and cheese can be part of a gut-healthy diet; how fasting can strengthen the gut and boost “good” bacteria; how changing your microbiome can undo the damage of yo-yo dieting; and how opening a window (and other simple acts) can improve gut health.Packed with delicious, healing recipes, meal plans, checklists, and tips, The Clever Gut Diet includes all the tools you need to transform your gut and your health for the rest of your life.

The Clever Guts Diet Details

TitleThe Clever Guts Diet
Author
ReleaseJun 1st, 2017
PublisherSimon & Schuster Australia
Rating
GenreHealth, Nonfiction, Food and Drink, Food, Self Help, Science, Reference

The Clever Guts Diet Review

  • Fraser
    January 1, 1970
    A good summary of what we know about gut health and a great collection of simple recipes. I was surprised to learn that the microbes in our gut don't just help regulate weight, they influence how much food is extracted from what we eat, control hunger signals, regulates our immune system, influence our cravings and even influence our mood. A few notes:- avoid drinking your calories (juice, beers etc)- cut back on readily absorbed carbs to avoid insulin spikes (bread, potatoes, rice)- eat slowly A good summary of what we know about gut health and a great collection of simple recipes. I was surprised to learn that the microbes in our gut don't just help regulate weight, they influence how much food is extracted from what we eat, control hunger signals, regulates our immune system, influence our cravings and even influence our mood. A few notes:- avoid drinking your calories (juice, beers etc)- cut back on readily absorbed carbs to avoid insulin spikes (bread, potatoes, rice)- eat slowly at a table and pause after the main course to allow hunger hormones (PPY the appetite suppressant) to kick in - branch out and get as much diversity in your diet as possible. 75% of the world's food comes from just 12 plants and 5 animal species! The more different plants you eat the more diverse your microbiome. - avoid antibiotics where possible and avoid eating animals raised with antibiotics. It can take months to years for your microbial community to bounce back.- open a window to increase the diversity of microbes in your house- Great foods for your gut: olive oil, oily fish, seaweed, cocoa, turmeric, garlic, shallots, leeks, white onions, eggplant, Jerusalem artichoke, asparagus, barley, flax seeds, yogurt, kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut, apple cider vinegar. - Foods to avoid: sugar and anything processed with emulsifiers, trans fats, artificial sweeteners- get better sleep and meditate
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  • Asho
    January 1, 1970
    If it weren't for the two small children that dictate my life, I'd have never put this book down. It's an entertaining, as well as informative, read written in language that is easy to understand but still thought-provoking. It is such a fascinating subject-matter that we are still only on the cusp of fully understanding. Dr Mosley navigates the facts, fiction and educated supposition of the field quite well. At times the anecdotal evidence is overwhelming, but in a field yet so devoid of explor If it weren't for the two small children that dictate my life, I'd have never put this book down. It's an entertaining, as well as informative, read written in language that is easy to understand but still thought-provoking. It is such a fascinating subject-matter that we are still only on the cusp of fully understanding. Dr Mosley navigates the facts, fiction and educated supposition of the field quite well. At times the anecdotal evidence is overwhelming, but in a field yet so devoid of exploration, it's largely all we have and I find this book informed and reasoned as opposed to the quackery a lot of books in this genre can be. It is for this reason that I put a lot of prior research into which book on the subject to purchase and read, as my time and money need to be used well these days. There are general guidelines provided for those who just want to tweak their lifestyle and/or do it in their own way, and there is total handholding with a meal plan and recipes for those who like that approach. I'm not going to lie, as someone who needs a major dietary and lifestyle overhaul, some of the recipes are a little alien-sounding, but not all, I'm glad to say. This book personally speaks volumes to me as my family battles complicated autoimmune conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, and reading the book is like finding the final piece of the puzzle of self-management. But I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. I think it speaks to a lot of the modern problems that plague us and seems a real answer as opposed to a lot of the theories out there with regards to society's health decline. This book is far from a conspiracy-reinforcer that often puts me off a lot of books and blogs out there on nutrition and health. The reason I haven't afforded it 5 stars is largely due to editing issues which are something I detest of published books at the best of times but particularly in non-fiction. There is also some strange formatting with regards to the pictures of the recipes in the Australian Kindle version I read, but that's nothing major. I also sometimes find the examples used a bit thin/superficial even for an "entertaining" non-fiction book, such as references to Rebel Wilson's diet. I also wasn't a fan of the politicised comment regarding ISIS. It just didn't need to be used in a diet book. Finally, a word of caution to mothers; this book talks about the benefits of vaginal birth and breastfeeding and the evils of c-sections and antibiotic use in labour and infancy. It's not worded in a heavy way, but it is pretty emphatic that vaginal and breast are best. It's backed-up with studies and isn't incorrect, but I would have preferred a stronger caveat that sometimes intervention is best. I know first-hand that there's already a lot of judgement and guilt placed on mother's, most of all by ourselves, and that many desperate women out there are all too quick to blame themselves for anything that causes our children to be less than perfect. If you are looking for answers for illness in your children, read this book but be aware that many of the interventions experienced in birth/child-raising, are beyond our control and usually used because they minimise risk of negative outcomes. For instance, better our child is safe from life-threatening infection than not, even if that means they have eczema/asthma/ASD. This book may just help us in better managing our family's health, but don't use it to beat yourself up (and certainly the book isn't written in that tone, I just wish to forewarn).All-in-all, this is a fantastic book that I would recommend everyone read. I'm genuinely excited about this new field and can't wait to see what unfolds from the research. I hope Dr Mosley updates this book as new discoveries are made.
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  • Lisa - (Aussie Girl)
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting and informative read but nothing really earth shattering. Eat more fruit and vegetables and exercise is the key to good health. The end, LOL.
  • Val Robson
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting and informative read. There's a lot to take in and I feel I need to go back and read some of it again. I would like confirmation from professionals in the field as to whether they agree with the contents of not as I felt that some of the advice was based on anecdotal evidence or studies that did not involved enough subjects to be scientifically representative. I was quite irritated with the section on babies born by Caesarean being proclaimed inferior health-wise to those born v Very interesting and informative read. There's a lot to take in and I feel I need to go back and read some of it again. I would like confirmation from professionals in the field as to whether they agree with the contents of not as I felt that some of the advice was based on anecdotal evidence or studies that did not involved enough subjects to be scientifically representative. I was quite irritated with the section on babies born by Caesarean being proclaimed inferior health-wise to those born vaginally - more likely to be obese and develop allergies in later life. The media seems to enjoy placing guilt trips on mothers who did not give birth 'naturally' while overlooking that many of these mothers would have died in the not too dim distance past if Caesareans were not an option.
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  • Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling
    January 1, 1970
    My View:I am a big fan of Dr Michael Mosley. I like him, I like his style of reporting and documenting science based health information which is presented in clear, easy to read language and is backed by Dr Mosley’s personal scientific experimentation, research and the research of others. Gut based health is something that I (and my immediate family) are very aware of and very interested in. There is still so much to learn about the gut and its microbiome – this book is an excellent starting poi My View:I am a big fan of Dr Michael Mosley. I like him, I like his style of reporting and documenting science based health information which is presented in clear, easy to read language and is backed by Dr Mosley’s personal scientific experimentation, research and the research of others. Gut based health is something that I (and my immediate family) are very aware of and very interested in. There is still so much to learn about the gut and its microbiome – this book is an excellent starting point, a useful reference and the recipes are easy to follow and taste delicious. Learn about resistant starches (not all starches are created equal), probiotics, prebiotics, fermented foods and how to re boot your biome and so much more. Gut health is so important to your overall health. Change your gut biome – one delicious meal at a time, change your health.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it! Really informative :)
  • Vashti
    January 1, 1970
    An insightful book on gut health, with some handy recipes at the back. For me, it's nothing groundbreaking as I've read quite a bit on this topic already, but I enjoyed trying some of the recipes like pumpkin porridge, and its encouraged me to bring fermented foods like kefir into my diet.
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  • Domhnall
    January 1, 1970
    Not a diet book or a fad book but a really useful and interesting account of the complex eco-system that is our gut, supported by decent science. So much of our mental life revolves around our alimentary canal in all its features, yet we understand it no better than we understand the depths of the oceons and in our ignorance, we not only fail to act in ways that help that hidden ecosystem but also fail to appreciate why this is a matter of our survival. At the moment when we hear that over 50% o Not a diet book or a fad book but a really useful and interesting account of the complex eco-system that is our gut, supported by decent science. So much of our mental life revolves around our alimentary canal in all its features, yet we understand it no better than we understand the depths of the oceons and in our ignorance, we not only fail to act in ways that help that hidden ecosystem but also fail to appreciate why this is a matter of our survival. At the moment when we hear that over 50% of food eaten in Britain is manufactured and processed by the food industry, it is sobering to be told that that industry is actively wrecking our guts in ways that are deeply harmful. When the adverts proclaim a new health food, the evidence is that it is usually not healthy. The book explains what is happening in sensible, well reasoned and easily readable terms and how we can recover our health by eating differently and intelligently.
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  • Toby
    January 1, 1970
    An unexpectedly Lovecraftian body horror, including descriptions of "vaginal seeding," swallowing tapeworm cysts cut from the tongue of a dead cow, and a menagerie of "old friends," the numerous species of microbe that have evolved to live inside us. Beyond these fun bits, the book amounts to a selection of sensible advice and recipes to sort your stomach aches.
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  • Lizzie
    January 1, 1970
    Not comprehensive, but not designed to be. A very interesting overview of gut health - likely to be huge in medical advances in the next decade
  • Katrina B
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Mosley is a British television journalist, producer and presenter, working with the BBC. He's famous for all sorts of health-related shows including 'Trust me, I'm a doctor' and 'Eat, fast, and live longer'. In 2017 Michael Mosley released 'The Clever Guts Diet' book about gut health. In this book, Michael Mosley describes the gut system and the inter-related part of the enteric nervous system, and the make up of the biome of the intestines. The explanation given is that certain foods ha Michael Mosley is a British television journalist, producer and presenter, working with the BBC. He's famous for all sorts of health-related shows including 'Trust me, I'm a doctor' and 'Eat, fast, and live longer'. In 2017 Michael Mosley released 'The Clever Guts Diet' book about gut health. In this book, Michael Mosley describes the gut system and the inter-related part of the enteric nervous system, and the make up of the biome of the intestines. The explanation given is that certain foods have certain effects on the the gut biome, which can and does have feedback loops. That each person can and does have different responses to different foods. What is good for one person, isn't necessarily for the next person, and that there is an Israeli team setting up testing so that advice can be specialised for the individual. His end conclusion is that we are better off eating the Mediterranean diet with lots of carotenoids, flavonoids, resistant starches, and fibres, and having intermittent hunger periods to promote the population of Akkermansia species in our guts.It is a relatively small book read fairly fast. How much of the data in this book is cherry picked? A good question I am unable to answer.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Some very interesting information, some would say shocking. I didn't know that inside of your digestive track little terrorist bacteria wait until they have the numbers and then hold you to ransom; forcing you to indulge in sugars and carbs!? Hell no, I certainly do not negotiate with terrorists - good bye sugar and starchy/carby foods.Worth reading - even if just to add to your research in maintaining a healthy mind and body.
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  • Lisa Randall
    January 1, 1970
    Great book Really good and very informative. Great recipes and there are meal plans to follow. The reason I haven't given 5 stars is in one part of the book it says to cut out veg like broccoli in phase 1 and then the meal plans in Phase 1 are full of broccoli?? I don't know whether to include them or not?
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  • Mehmet Kutup
    January 1, 1970
    Harika bir kitap. Gerci BBC Earth kanalinda belgeselini izlemistim. Kitabi okuduktan sonra yemek yeme istahim kapandi.
  • Sherry Monger
    January 1, 1970
    We have several people in the family with digestive issues - from IBS to reflux problems -so I am always interested in the latest research that will help me to understand. The Clever Gut Diet focuses on the complex world of the intestines and the bacteria needed there for healthy living. Called the biome, this environment is strongly influenced by what you eat and by the amount of sleep and exercise you get.Mosley has written an interesting and informative book on the various gut flora and how t We have several people in the family with digestive issues - from IBS to reflux problems -so I am always interested in the latest research that will help me to understand. The Clever Gut Diet focuses on the complex world of the intestines and the bacteria needed there for healthy living. Called the biome, this environment is strongly influenced by what you eat and by the amount of sleep and exercise you get.Mosley has written an interesting and informative book on the various gut flora and how to bring your body into a balance that allows you to profit from the food you eat. Also included are many recipes designed to bring your system into better harmony.The short course? Restrict refined sugar as much as possible, and abandon processed foods. Try fasting (600-800 calories of healthy food) 2 days a week to encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria.Yes, Scott, you could have written this book!😊
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  • Michelle Keill
    January 1, 1970
    Hugely informative and highly accessible book, which provides a detailed account of how our digestive systems work and a guide to our 'Old Friends' who are living inside us. Packed with really useful and practical advice (the book, not our guts) and after reading it you will probably want to go rush out and get your poo tested to find out who's helping you out down there. Guts are the new brains.
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  • Els Deveuster
    January 1, 1970
    Interessant boek. Alle feiten die de auteur/arts aanhaalt zijn wetenschappelijk onderzocht. Wat nieuws geleerd maar meestal nog eens bevestiging van wat de laatste jaren wordt gemeld rond gezonde voeding. Wel nieuwe inzichten dat onze darmen toch een belangrijke invloed hebben op onze gezondheid, op bepaalde ziekte en op zwaarlijvigheid. Door wat je eet kan je invloed uitoefenen op de darmflora en deze veel gezonder maken .
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  • Susan Dunn
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot about what not to eat! Really helpful for those dealing with gut issues.
  • Em
    January 1, 1970
    Easy to read, yet satisfyingly scientific. Thankfully this is not a fad diet book, but one that explains the digestive system, then links a lot of different research through its impact on the gut 'biome'. I haven't tried any of the recipes yet, but some of them sound worth a try.
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  • Thor Olafsson
    January 1, 1970
    A fascinating topic.....and a true eye opener. The authors humor and simple writing style make it a totally entertaining read :) A fascinating topic.....and a true eye opener. The author´s humor and simple writing style make it a totally entertaining read :)
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Slightly embarrassed to have read this, but a newly developed middle aged waist line has driven me here.
  • Gabi
    January 1, 1970
    I've chosen this book just to see different point of view. I've read similar books in the past and was wondering if I'll find anything new in here. I didn't but overall it was a good enjoyable read.
  • Peter O'Brien
    January 1, 1970
    "The Clever Guts Diet is a 'diet' in the same way that you might talk about being on a vegetarian diet or Mediterranean diet. It's not about calories or restriction; it's about the sort of food and lifestyle changes you should make if you have gut problems, or simply want to keep yours in good condition." - page 9Optimum health comes first, it's that simple. Your health is the foundation upon which everything else in your life is built, if you have a low level of health then everything and every "The Clever Guts Diet is a 'diet' in the same way that you might talk about being on a vegetarian diet or Mediterranean diet. It's not about calories or restriction; it's about the sort of food and lifestyle changes you should make if you have gut problems, or simply want to keep yours in good condition." - page 9Optimum health comes first, it's that simple. Your health is the foundation upon which everything else in your life is built, if you have a low level of health then everything and everyone else in your life will suffer as a result. More and more research is showing that your gut and the many species of good and bad bacteria that can thrive there are key to your health. Therefore, understanding how to look after your guts and cultivate the right bacteria in them is one of the best places to start taking control of your health and, building on decades of research, The Clever Guts Diet provides an easily digestible place to start for the health conscious person to start taking charge of their guts. High recommend to everyone!
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  • Astrid
    January 1, 1970
    I love Michael Mosley. I think he's an absolute credit to his profession, and I love the way he goes above and beyond to prove/disprove theories just to help others, as well as himself.This book didn't disappoint. It's a journey into your microbiome which is in your gut. It contains information on how to 'change' it, or make it more diverse. We are learning all the time in the science field that the gut could be the route of a lot of problems - including such things as depression and anxiety. It I love Michael Mosley. I think he's an absolute credit to his profession, and I love the way he goes above and beyond to prove/disprove theories just to help others, as well as himself.This book didn't disappoint. It's a journey into your microbiome which is in your gut. It contains information on how to 'change' it, or make it more diverse. We are learning all the time in the science field that the gut could be the route of a lot of problems - including such things as depression and anxiety. It's a fascinating area and Dr. Mosley does a fantastic job at explaining it. He's not patronising, but at the same time he doesn't shy away from medical/scientific language. He explains everything very well and in the right amount of details. I also really liked that he says he can't shy away from chocolate no matter how much he tries - chocolate is my downfall too, made me feel a bit better about myself!Who would I recommend this book to? Anyone that's interested in their microbiome or altering their diet to make their gut healthier, and possibly losing weight and making yourself more 'happy' in the process. Anyone that's interested in different diets as well - there's a good few recipes at the back of the book that are gut-friendly. I'd also recommend it to anyone that's enjoyed any of Michael Mosley's programmes on television - he's very much the same in the book. Very enjoyable and enlightening to read.
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  • Lou Griffiths
    January 1, 1970
    As always, enjoyable, approachable and informative....healthier gut here I come.
  • Kate Littlejohn
    January 1, 1970
    The new findings and research about the gut ‘world’ is fascinating. Dr Michael Mosley presents it in his infectiously enthusiastic way, that is easy to read and understand. The edition I read had Australian references for more information and there were recipes in the back to help you on your way.
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  • Abhinav Talwar
    January 1, 1970
    The Clever Guts Diet is chiefly about the microbiota which colonises a humans large intestine and how the variety and density of each species present here is increasingly being shown to have significant effects on the health of an individual.Many scientists and health care practitioners are aware of the significance of the link between gut health to overall health and over the last few decades increasing research, testing and hence evidence is accumulating to support the tie that gut health has The Clever Guts Diet is chiefly about the microbiota which colonises a humans large intestine and how the variety and density of each species present here is increasingly being shown to have significant effects on the health of an individual.Many scientists and health care practitioners are aware of the significance of the link between gut health to overall health and over the last few decades increasing research, testing and hence evidence is accumulating to support the tie that gut health has with a number of conditions. To rattle off a few: Diabetes type 2, obesity, glucose intolerance, coeliac disease, Irritable bowel syndrome to anxiety and depression.Michael Mosley's repeatedly emphasises to the reader that through his and other scientist’s research and experiments that a marked difference in the microbiota in the large intestine results in very different responses in the way in which individuals digest and assimilate nutrients in the same food.The range of experiments he enlists include: contaminating mice with the faeces from people with a good proportion of good bacteria and in another with large proportions of the mischievous ones and observing how they respond to the same food, swallowing a pill sized camera in front of a live audience and viewing the digestion of his food from the inside, a vast number of nutrition studies done in the Wiezmann Institute to FMT.He further goes on to outline how some companies have exploited the prospects of this gut information through the promotion and mass-selling of a number of redundant products. He gives the low down on which pre and pro bacteria rich foods, supplements as well as yogurts to go for on his website.You can check out his website here: https://cleverguts.com/ FYI, Pre-biotics feed good bacteria present within your body and Pro-biotics provide bacteria.He ends the book with an assortment of recipes which he, his wife and a leading nutritionist have put together which empower the reader to immediately put into action the knowledge acquired through reading this book. There are a number of takeaways from this book which is why I rated it so. I would encourage the health conscious individual to pick this up since they will get value from it. Nonetheless, if you do not want to or are short of time for this kind of stuff, below is my list of a take-aways to promote gut-health, courtesy of ‘The clever guts diet’:- Eat oily fish-Consume Garlic, Turmeric and various Fibre one example being Inulin.-Eat a variety of colourful vegetables very regularly-Intermittent fast-Eat apples, seaweed, barley, oats -Eat fermented food wherever you get the chance. Some examples include: Kefir, Kimchi, Sauerkraut.-Eat yogurts with live active bacteria- Eat certain cheeses- Feta, Gouda, Mozzarella, Cottage- read the labels and they will let you know what is in there.- Avoid anti-biotics unless inexorably necessary.-Avoid dairy and gluten for 1-2 weeks and then re-introduce back into your diet and see if there are significant differences in your activity level, mood and overall wellbeing. Use a food diary to monitor this. He has a reboot gut biome programme with guideline meals in the recipe section of his book.-Anyone can get their poo sampled through the a biome society for just under 3 figures. This will tell you what proportion of what species is currently inhabiting your gut and allow you to monitor results diet and lifestyle changes have had on your inner population so that you can personalise your diet accordingly or continues as you are.-Exercise regularly but not excessively. HIIT is theform he promotes. -Sleep at a regular times at least 4 times a week and wake up at the same time.- Avoid situations which are stressful for you.- Eat a Mediterranean like diet.- Practice mindfulness.- Research bacteria present in the gut and try to eat foods and create a lifestyle which produce proportions of good and bad bacteria that make you feel fit and healthy most of the time. To name drop some good bacteria mentioned, he talks about:AkkermansiaBifidobacteriaLactobacillus.Although not a traditional diet book (good marketing mate), I am really looking forward to making his suggested Chocolate and Aubergine brownies tomorrow. Hmmmm...nom,nom,nom.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    What happens in our bodies when we eat a meal or swallow a drink?Many people would rather not know the answer and yet the last few years have seen more and more evidence about the importance of our digestive system to overall health and well-being. Three separate specialists from different branches of medicine  and health have all told me in the last year that the gut is now considered as a second brain: a highly integrated system that manages a set of processes as complex as all those neural pa What happens in our bodies when we eat a meal or swallow a drink?Many people would rather not know the answer and yet the last few years have seen more and more evidence about the importance of our digestive system to overall health and well-being. Three separate specialists from different branches of medicine  and health have all told me in the last year that the gut is now considered as a second brain: a highly integrated system that manages a set of processes as complex as all those neural pathways. When a surgeon, a physiotherapist and a mindfullness teacher all sang the same song  I began to sit up and pay attention.Which is how I came to be reading Michael Mosely's book: The Clever Guts Diet: How to Revolutionise Your Body From The Inside Out.I’ve seen Michael Mosely multiple times on British television through his Trust Me I’m A Doctor series and he always struck me as the kind of man who isn’t swayed by fads or pseudo science of the kind  trotted by many a clean eating celebrity.  He has a deeply inquiring mind  that often leads him to take extreme actions in a search for answers. In this case, his desire to know how the digestive system really works, what foods might trigger problems like allergies or IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and cancer, led him to an experiment with a live audience at the British Museum.After a meal of steak, chips and kale washed down with apple juice he then swallowed a microscopic camera called a “pillcam”, which captured digital images of  his gastrointestinal tract . The idea was to watch in real-time what happened to his meal once the microbes got to work.Mosely loves those microbes.  He can name the different species of the 50 million microbes (mainly bacteria)  that live in the gut and make up the microbiome.The bad news? A diet limited in variety and heavy in processed food – along with antibiotic overuse – has ravaged the modern microbiome. This helps explain dramatic increases in health conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases, allergies, food intolerances, asthma and eczema.But there is good news in the book too. It's possible, says Mosely, to halt the damage and reboot the system back to health with a gut-friendly eating regime. Avoiding fruit juice is an early piece of advice. It moves through the body so quickly there’s little time for its nutrients to be absorbed. Worse still: it creates a spike in blood sugar levels.  Sugar encourages the growth of the microbes that love sugar,. They crave even more of it - telling your brain (and you) to eat more ... and more....  In the meantime, the good microbes get destroyed.So message number one: cut down (or even better, out) uncessary sugar.Message number two:  encourage the growth and variety of “good” gut microbes, by eating probiotics (fermented foods that contain live bacteria and yeast) and prebiotics (certain vegetables and pulses containing indigestible plant fibre).The Clever Guts Diet is based on research Mosely conducted for more than a year during which he interviewed multiple experts and read scores of research papers. The result is a  treasure house of insights and factual information.   It's often amusing. Often provokes a reaction of Yuck when you read it. But it's also thought provoking. This is not a book for anyone who feels in the slightest bit queasy when confronted by information about bodily functions but it is definitely a book for anyone who wants to take back control of their health.
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  • Kerry Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is basically a summary of the documentary series that Dr Mosley produced, along with some recipes. Not that I'm complaining - there was a lot of info to get through and I appreciate the notes.I came away impressed but a bit disappointed - it's wonderful to know so much about my gut "biome" - but as everyone is different, it seems to me that unless I know what exactly my deficiencies are and what eating pattern works for me, the advice falls a bit short.There is a lab you can send your This book is basically a summary of the documentary series that Dr Mosley produced, along with some recipes. Not that I'm complaining - there was a lot of info to get through and I appreciate the notes.I came away impressed but a bit disappointed - it's wonderful to know so much about my gut "biome" - but as everyone is different, it seems to me that unless I know what exactly my deficiencies are and what eating pattern works for me, the advice falls a bit short.There is a lab you can send your poo off to that will give you an idea of your deficiencies, but the other lab is still only trialing the diet advice (admittedly with good results, but not yet widely available). So I'm left a bit flummoxed by what I should do exactly with all this new found knowledge about my rich inner world. Will the first poo test be enough to help me change or improve my eating habits? I'm going to do more research and I feel this book has given me a good jumping off point. Some of the recipe ingredients - like coconut oil - raised my eyebrows a bit as it seems to be being debunked as good for us. One glaring omission in the recipe sections was a basic kimchi recipe. He'd extolled its virtues quite a lot.Glad I read it and I will keep it on hand, but if you saw the series and were on the fence, this book isn't going to sway you - there's not much new in it. But if, like me, you saw the series and were intrigued - this is like the study guide to it.
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  • Ron W.
    January 1, 1970
    The book completely flipped my previous thinking on how our intestines function. I knew bacteria were important, I just didn't know how important. At school, I was one of the senior high biology "nerds," yet Mosley's book really opened my eyes as to how what we eat really affects everything from mood to longer term health. Mosley seems to emphasize as well that we need to treat antibiotics as a last rather than a first resort, and only take them when an infection is really stubborn. The problem The book completely flipped my previous thinking on how our intestines function. I knew bacteria were important, I just didn't know how important. At school, I was one of the senior high biology "nerds," yet Mosley's book really opened my eyes as to how what we eat really affects everything from mood to longer term health. Mosley seems to emphasize as well that we need to treat antibiotics as a last rather than a first resort, and only take them when an infection is really stubborn. The problem is that antibiotics are the 'carpet bombing' of medicine so it really affects our gut 'biome' (bacterial ecosystem). Factoids and advice are also given, such as don't drink your calories, chew slowly so your receptors have time to tell you you're full, cut down on dense carbs to avoid sugar spikes, and when possible do some HIT (high intensity training) for short bursts.There are also some great recipes at the end of the book to try and get you to put as much bacteria into your body as possible, apparently the more the merrier. In short - I had no idea how simple the whole thing is. Just love your guts!!! There are so many fad diets out there, but Mosley really puts it all back into a simpler perspective allowing any reader to save his / her gut, health, and sanity. A must read for all individuals and families - tell this stuff to your kids (start early)!!!
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