Be the Parent, Please
Toddlers on tablets. Pre-teens on Tumblr. Thanks to a variety of factors—from tech companies hungry for new audiences, to school administrations bent on making education digital, to a culture that promotes everyone as the star of their own reality shows—technology is irrevocably a part of childhood, and parents are struggling to keep up. What should be allowed? What should be denied? And, given the ubiquity of technology and its inherent usefulness, what do sensible boundaries even look like? A noted columnist and mother of three, Naomi Schaefer Riley fully understands the seductive nature of screens. For example, an after­noon of finger painting equals enormous cleanup of both house and hands. But an afternoon of iPad games? Just a swipe and a charger. Or what about car rides around town? Always having toys and books on hand isn’t a given, but your game-loaded smart phone is. Riley draws us into her story and then walks us through the research on technology’s encroachment into each stage of childhood. She then offers “tough mommy tips”: realistic, practical, applicable advice for parents who recognize that unlimited technology access is a problem, but who don’t know where to start in taking back control. These tips cover everything from placating an antsy toddler at your local favorite restaurant to best practices for keeping your teens safe from unsavory sites. Any parent knows the effects of screens on their distracted, cranky, sedentary, and incessantly anxious-about-what-might-be-going-on-without-them kids. Naomi Schaefer Riley brings her experience, research, and no-nonsense candor to help parents prevent the children from falling under the destructive spell of technology.    

Be the Parent, Please Details

TitleBe the Parent, Please
Author
ReleaseJan 8th, 2018
PublisherTempleton Press
ISBN-139781599474823
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Social Issues, Parenting

Be the Parent, Please Review

  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    Be the Parent, Please: Stop Banning Seesaws and Start Banning Snapchat: Strategies for Solving the Real Parenting Problems, is an informative book written in an engaging style with a common sense approach. The book is neither preachy nor does it take on an anti-technology attitude. The author simply aims to open up a discussion by laying relevant research, anecdotes, and experiences on the table for parent’s consideration. I personally believe this is a must-read for most parents in the twenty-f Be the Parent, Please: Stop Banning Seesaws and Start Banning Snapchat: Strategies for Solving the Real Parenting Problems, is an informative book written in an engaging style with a common sense approach. The book is neither preachy nor does it take on an anti-technology attitude. The author simply aims to open up a discussion by laying relevant research, anecdotes, and experiences on the table for parent’s consideration. I personally believe this is a must-read for most parents in the twenty-first century. Certainly not everyone will agree with everything written in the book, but very few people will not glean something useful from it. “There are so many forces pushing us to give our kids technology, including the technology companies themselves, our schools, our friends, and the culture at large. It’s all happening so fast. One day we are wondering about whether an hour of Sesame Street is a good habit for a two-year old, and the next minute it seems we have adolescents who won’t look up from their phones long enough to have a conversation with us.” As a mother of a nearly nine-year old boy, I can relate to the premise that there are many forces pushing us to give our kids too much screen time. In the last year, my son has suddenly insisted that life without a considerable amount of screen time is unfair. I have often found myself wondering how this happened. He went from being happy with 30 minutes on pbs.kids.org games just two years ago, to a kid who whines to have more time than he can or should handle. The arguments that arise with my husband and I and our son over his screen time requests have become exhausting at times. I appreciated the author’s tips peppered throughout the book, as well as the amount of relevant data and anecdotal evidence provided to help me, as a parent, make informed decisions on how to best incorporate technology into my family’s daily life. In fact, some of the information provided in this book might just surprise you. I find this is a good thing, because personally, I feel every parent should have relevant facts at their disposal and Naomi Schaefer Riley does an outstanding job of compiling a great deal of information into one comprehensive and useful book.I would like to mention that I received a copy of this book in a Good Reads giveway, but this did not affect my rating. I have provided an unbiased and honest review.
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  • Miriam Downey
    January 1, 1970
    Read my full review here: https://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot....Out today is a book that has been on my to-be-read list. This is a timely book, and very much a necessary read for every parent who has kids on devices. How do we handle this smart phone generation—or generations, I presume. How do parents gain control. In some ways, I am as guilty as my 5-year-old grandson. I gave him the Leap Pad he spends so much time on!Here is the PR piece on the book.Toddlers on tablets. Pre-teens on Tumblr. Read my full review here: https://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot....Out today is a book that has been on my to-be-read list. This is a timely book, and very much a necessary read for every parent who has kids on devices. How do we handle this smart phone generation—or generations, I presume. How do parents gain control. In some ways, I am as guilty as my 5-year-old grandson. I gave him the Leap Pad he spends so much time on!Here is the PR piece on the book.Toddlers on tablets. Pre-teens on Tumblr. Thanks to a variety of factors—from tech companies hungry for new audiences, to school administrations bent on making education digital, to a culture that promotes everyone as the star of their own reality shows—technology is irrevocably a part of childhood, and parents are struggling to keep up. A noted columnist and mother of three, Riley fully understands the seductive nature of screens. She draws us into her story and then walks us through the research on technology’s encroachment into each stage of childhood. Throughout, Riley offers “tough mommy tips”: realistic, practical, applicable advice for parents who recognize that unlimited technology access is a problem, but who don’t know where to start in taking back control. Any parent knows the effects of screens on their distracted, cranky, sedentary, and incessantly anxious-about-what-might-be-going-on-without-them kids. Riley brings her experience, research, and no-nonsense candor to help parents retake control over technology’s influence over their kids. In an editorial in the LA Times, Riley equates screen time to snack time. Parents seldom go anywhere with their small children without snacks, and lately they seldom go anywhere without screens. A couple of personal examples. Last week, a 10-year-old grandson spent the night. He has not been in our family long, so he was understandably anxious. I let him watch a video on his tablet until he fell asleep. The next morning, two other grandchildren came to spend the day. We did a craft project and then went sledding on a nearby hill. Everyone was delighted with the morning. I was tired out. So after lunch, I put on a video for the kids to watch, but the 5-year-old wanted to watch You Tube videos of children playing with dinosaur toys. (These, by the way, are just insidious commercials.) So, I let him do that. Bad grandma, or just tired-out grandma. Proves the author’s point.Naomi Schaefer Riley is a prolific author and journalist. She believes that it is important to expose children to a wide environment of exploration and challenges. “It‘s a matter of exposing them to all the other things in the world besides technology that they might enjoy and that might make them more thoughtful and even happier people.”It is interesting to note that as I was reading Be the Parent, Please last evening, a public service announcement came on the television. Will Farrell as the father in a family that has a cell phone basket for the dinner table (a bright idea). Produced by Common Sense.org, Will can’t let go of his phone. Very pointed but delightfully funny at the same time.Watch the video; read the book. Let’s use some common sense to help our children and grandchildren find value in a life away from the screen. But if you are a really tired-out babysitting grandma, we’ll give you some latitude.
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  • Michelle Malsbury
    January 1, 1970
    Naomi Schafer Riley, AuthorBe The Parent, Please Templeton Press, ISBN 978-1-59947-482Non-Fiction-self help, personal development, emotional intelligence, emotional education, parenting, technology 240 pagesDecember 2017 Review for BookpleasuresReviewer-Michelle Kaye Malsbury, BSBM, MMReviewAre your children addicted to their phones, tablets, computers, or television? In today’s world that appears to be a common dilemma. As parents, is there anything you can do to change those dynamics? Let me s Naomi Schafer Riley, AuthorBe The Parent, Please Templeton Press, ISBN 978-1-59947-482Non-Fiction-self help, personal development, emotional intelligence, emotional education, parenting, technology 240 pagesDecember 2017 Review for BookpleasuresReviewer-Michelle Kaye Malsbury, BSBM, MMReviewAre your children addicted to their phones, tablets, computers, or television? In today’s world that appears to be a common dilemma. As parents, is there anything you can do to change those dynamics? Let me show you what author, Naomi Schafer Riley, has to say about that in her books titled Be The Parent, Please. Schafer Riley opens chapter one with a conversation she was having with a friend over screen time and their children. She makes reference to a study conducted in 2015 by Common Sense Media where it was found that tweens, according to their study those are children aged 8 to 12, were spending as much as twelve hours each day on their computers, phones, or tablets and those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen spent eight hours and twenty minutes per day doing the same on average. (2017, paraphrase, p.7) Naomi states that many parents find these statistics uncomfortable and perhaps misconstrued. However, another study conducted in 2010 by the Kaiser Family Foundation stated findings that were extremely close to these. So what does this mean?The single upside to this excessive time spent on digital media is that infants and toddlers who swiped screens had better motor coordination that those that did not. (2017, p.17) In over 217 studies on this topic conducted by Northwestern University and Temple University “people of all ages can improve all types of spatial skills through training, period,”. However, notes Schafer Riley those skills did not translate into anything meaningful in the real world. And according to Tim Smith, in the Tablet Project, “Students who got the console decreased academic performance and had more behavioral problems”.Schafer Riley cites a 2015 article that states “…even educational electronic toys may hinder children’s interactions with real people.” (2017, p.37) This was a comparative study that found that traditional toys paved the way for better quality conversations with more vocabulary and descriptive content. “…educational programs are positively associated with overall measures of achievement and potentially long lasting effects, while purely entertainment content, particularly violent content is negatively associated with academic achievement.” (p,42) Can the uptick in school shootings and violence have anything to do with the vast amount of violence that is depicted on television, in music videos, and in video games? Schafer Riley says that “When we hand over phones and tablets to children we are likely changing not only the information they can access but also their habits, personalities and their tastes.” (2017, p.91) Never before has information been so readily accessible. Smart phones and tablets have changed the way that children are educated and how they interact with others. Technology is truly a double edged sword and one that all parents ought to vigilant about dolling out to their children in proper doses. Naomi Schafer Riley makes a compelling argument in this book about excessive use of digital media for children. Can you as parents afford to look the other way? And if you do, at what peril?
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  • Valerie (He Said Books Or Me)
    January 1, 1970
    In full disclosure, I am not a parent. When I was offered this book I picked it up because I am an Aunt. I have family members who are trying to make sense of what is too much screen time and what does that mean for their kids. I thought maybe their would be some insights in this book that helped to enlighten that.This book was certainly full of information. It talked about the challenge of dealing with kids sometimes and the desire to passify them (of sorts) with technology. I cannot speak to t In full disclosure, I am not a parent. When I was offered this book I picked it up because I am an Aunt. I have family members who are trying to make sense of what is too much screen time and what does that mean for their kids. I thought maybe their would be some insights in this book that helped to enlighten that.This book was certainly full of information. It talked about the challenge of dealing with kids sometimes and the desire to passify them (of sorts) with technology. I cannot speak to that experience directly, but I can see where that can be the case.I found the book informative. Thank you for the opportunity. Disclaimer: I was awarded this book. Though I did not pay for the book, the opinions are strictly my own.
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