A Land of Permanent Goodbyes
Narrated by Destiny, this heartbreaking -- and timely -- story of refugees escaping from war-torn Syria is masterfully told by a foreign news correspondent who experienced the crisis firsthand.In a country ripped apart by war, Tareq lives with his big and loving family . . . until the bombs strike. His city is in ruins. His life is destroyed. And those who have survived are left to figure out their uncertain future.In the wake of destruction, he's threatened by Daesh fighters and witnesses a public beheading. Tareq'sfamily knows that to continue to stay alive, they must leave. As they travel as refugees from Syria to Turkey to Greece, facing danger at every turn, Tareq must find the resilience and courage to complete his harrowing journey.But while this is one family's story, it is also the timeless tale of all wars, of all tragedy, and of all strife. When you are a refugee, success is outliving your loss.Destiny narrates this heartbreaking story of the consequences of war, showing the Syrian conflict as part of a long chain of struggles spanning through time.An award-winning author and journalist--and a refugee herself--Atia Abawi captures the hope that spurs people forward against all odds and the love that makes that hope grow.

A Land of Permanent Goodbyes Details

TitleA Land of Permanent Goodbyes
Author
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherPhilomel Books
ISBN-139780399546839
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction

A Land of Permanent Goodbyes Review

  • Jaime Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely phenomenal! A beautifully written, yet heart wrenching story of the struggle for survival in the war torn Middle East. Narrated by Destiny personified, this novel depicts the tragic experiences of a Syrian youth, and his determination to find a safer world for his sister. Without a doubt.......a MUST READ!Thank you to Penguin First to Read for access to an advanced reader copy!
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  • Wendy Dopkin
    January 1, 1970
    This book is heavy, but SO worth it. It is so powerful and well-written...Highly recommended!
  • Lucy Booth
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. Beautifully written. It it truly inspiring. It tells not only of Syrian refugees, but refugees in the Middle East today, as well as throughout history. I also loved how it was narrated by destiny. This put an interesting twist to the book. I honestly can say this is one of the best, if not best books I have ever read. (This book was given to me by a local book store to read and review)
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  • Claire Draper
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me cry. At my desk. In public. It was every bit of a lovely book that I needed this year.
  • miss.mesmerized mesmerized
    January 1, 1970
    The family is at home, even if it is war outside, they still have themselves; Tareq, his younger brother Salim, the girls Farrah and Susan and the baby twins. He respected his mother Nour and his father Fayed and of course also his grand-mother. When a bomb hits their house, only Tareq and Susan can be saved, luckily their father was at work and is also alive. They decide it is time to leave the country, after such a loss, what is it that keeps them still there? But first, they need to go to Raq The family is at home, even if it is war outside, they still have themselves; Tareq, his younger brother Salim, the girls Farrah and Susan and the baby twins. He respected his mother Nour and his father Fayed and of course also his grand-mother. When a bomb hits their house, only Tareq and Susan can be saved, luckily their father was at work and is also alive. They decide it is time to leave the country, after such a loss, what is it that keeps them still there? But first, they need to go to Raqqa where Fayed’s brother lives who can lend them money. Yet, Raqqa is deep in the Daesh controlled area and going there is highly risky. But this is only the beginning of a journey which hopefully ends somewhere in Europe in peace and safety.Atia Abawi, an American journalist who spent many years in the middle east as a correspondent and is a daughter of Afghan refugees, has chosen the number one topic in the news of the last two years for her second novel. It is her background, both personal and professional, which can be found throughout the novel; you feel in every line that she knows what she is writing about and that neither the emotions she puts in her characters nor the experiences they make are just invented, but exactly what people undergo. At times, the style of the novel has some traces of journalistic work, leaves the pure fiction, but this does not reduce the quality of the novel at all.First of all, what I really appreciated was the fact that she does not victimize her characters. Already at the beginning of the novel, they are hit by a major loss, but they keep on fighting and do not rely on others. The risk a lot, see evil deeds committed by Daesh fighters, but still remain human themselves. The part I found especially interesting was Tareq’s time in Turkey. It is not only the large number of Syrians being stranded there and setting up a kind of community parallel to the Turkish, but first and foremost the way they are exploited, how people are trying to make profit from their fate which is annoying. Yet, I guess this is just reality.It is just the story of one family, however, it represents what many people all over the world go through. None of them wanted to leave their country, none of them wants to live in another country of which they neither know the language nor the culture, many of them believe that those who have died are blessed because they do not have to undergo this. Considering all the negative news about refugees, we should not forget their perspective. Atia Abawi has given them a beautiful and engrossing voice.
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    Tareq and his family are living in Syria, a country torn apart by war, when tragedy strikes his family. A horrific bombing claims the lives of many of his family members. Tareq and his surviving family members know the only way they can stay alive is if they leave the country they call home. But life as a refugee is no less dangerous as they make their journey from one country to the next. Told from the perspective of Destiny, this is a story about war, destruction, family, and love.I'll admit I Tareq and his family are living in Syria, a country torn apart by war, when tragedy strikes his family. A horrific bombing claims the lives of many of his family members. Tareq and his surviving family members know the only way they can stay alive is if they leave the country they call home. But life as a refugee is no less dangerous as they make their journey from one country to the next. Told from the perspective of Destiny, this is a story about war, destruction, family, and love.I'll admit I was a little iffy about reading a story told from Destiny's perspective but it ended up working in the story's favor and didn't overshadow the rest of the characters. Obviously, this is a timely story given the current events in Syria, but Destiny shows war has been destroying innocent lives for centuries. While Tareq and his family might be fictional characters, what they experience in the story is very accurate to the real life stories from refugees. I definitely recommend this book to anyone looking for a better understanding of the plight of the refugees.Thank you to First to Read for the opportunity to read an advance digital copy! I was under no obligation to review and all views expressed are my honest opinion.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I know this is an Important Book and I don’t know why I didn’t like it, but I didn’t.
  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy through First to Read and would highly recommend everyone read this book. It actually should be required reading. Narrated by Destiny, this book will open your eyes to the terrible, heartbreaking plight of the refugees from the worn torn countries in the middle east. A powerful book that I urge everyone to read.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusTareq lives a happy life with his mother, father, grandmother, and five siblings in Syria. Things are increasingly difficult, and when his apartment building is bombed, only he and his sister, Susan, survive. Their father Fayed was not there, so relocates with the children with relatives, including Tareq's slightly older cousin, Musa. When the Daesh crack down, Fayed is on therun once again, this time with Musa. Eventually, the group makes it legally into Turkey. Fayed a E ARC from Edelweiss PlusTareq lives a happy life with his mother, father, grandmother, and five siblings in Syria. Things are increasingly difficult, and when his apartment building is bombed, only he and his sister, Susan, survive. Their father Fayed was not there, so relocates with the children with relatives, including Tareq's slightly older cousin, Musa. When the Daesh crack down, Fayed is on therun once again, this time with Musa. Eventually, the group makes it legally into Turkey. Fayed and Susan stay in the border town, but Tareq and Musa head to Istanbul to see what their chances are there. There are many refugees, and things are difficult. There are bright spots, like a cafe run by other Syrian immigrants, but Tareq and his family believe firmly that in order to have a better life, they need to head to Europe. Tareq eventually is reunited with his father and sister, although Musa wants to remain in Turkey, and the family try to find smugglers to take them by boat to Greece. They don't have enough money, so Fayed sends his children ahead of him. The crossing is very difficult. We switch perspectives to Alexia, a US college student who has remained on the island of Lesvos to help refugees who are coming ashore. She helps Tareq and Susan, as well as the Afgan girl whom Tareq is trying to protect, who has been separated from her sister. Even though the children are now safe, there is still a lot of work to be done to get them settled and reunited with their father. Strengths: Along with Gratz's Refugee and Senzai's Escape from Aleppo, this is a much needed look at the crisis in Syria. The details of daily life before the bombing, as well as the details of survival afterwards, make this a riveting account. Because each experience is so different, it is helpful to have different accounts so that students understand that there isn't ONE Syrian refugee experience. The inclusion of the viewpoint of the volunteers also adds some depth.Weaknesses: At the beginning, this is narrated by Destiny, which was confusing and overly poetic. The shifts in perspective are a bit rocky. This is not a book for younger readers, as there is mention of rape, graphic beheadings, and other information that might be upsetting to readers below high school age.What I really think: I think I will pass on this for now, and stick with the other two titles, but may consider purchase if the 8th grade teachers proceed with a refugee unit.
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  • Sandy Harris
    January 1, 1970
    A LAND OF PERMANENT GOODBYES is a YA novel about a Syrian teen refugee forced to leave his war torn country and make his way to Greece and Germany. An interesting aspect is that Destiny is the narrator of the story that’s obviously been researched thoroughly. The novel will definitely stir compassion – for the plight of immigrants and refugees alike. A must read for adults as well as teens.My thanks to Penguin First to Read for the Advance Reader Copy.
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