Mythos
The Greek myths are the greatest stories ever told, passed down through millennia and inspiring writers and artists as varied as Shakespeare, Michelangelo, James Joyce and Walt Disney.They are embedded deeply in the traditions, tales and cultural DNA of the West. In Stephen Fry's hands the stories of the titans and gods become a brilliantly entertaining account of ribaldry and revelry, warfare and worship, debauchery, love affairs and life lessons, slayings and suicides, triumphs and tragedies.You'll fall in love with Zeus, marvel at the birth of Athena, wince at Cronus and Gaia's revenge on Ouranos, weep with King Midas and hunt with the beautiful and ferocious Artemis.Thoroughly spellbinding, informative and moving, Stephen Fry's Mythos perfectly captures these stories for the modern age - in all their rich and deeply human relevance.

Mythos Details

TitleMythos
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 2nd, 2017
PublisherMichael Joseph
ISBN-139780718188726
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Fantasy, Mythology, History, Audiobook, Classics, Historical, Short Stories, Retellings, Religion, European Literature, British Literature

Mythos Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know about any of you, but this one's a winner. Far from feeling like another dry recounting of a number of our favorite Greek myths, Fry's down-to-earth humor and traditional (modern) storytelling have turned these gods into something most relatable.I've read Edith Hamilton and Bullfinch's recountings and I've had the pleasure of countless other sources, but here's where Fry shines: he cherry-picks the very best stories and tells them so charmingly and naturally that I wouldn't be surpr I don't know about any of you, but this one's a winner. Far from feeling like another dry recounting of a number of our favorite Greek myths, Fry's down-to-earth humor and traditional (modern) storytelling have turned these gods into something most relatable.I've read Edith Hamilton and Bullfinch's recountings and I've had the pleasure of countless other sources, but here's where Fry shines: he cherry-picks the very best stories and tells them so charmingly and naturally that I wouldn't be surprised if most people would go out of their way to start their friends and family out with this, first.He does sacrifice breadth in favor of depth, but of course, that's a fine thing. These are some of the most amazing stories of the bunch. They're all told with intelligence, heart, and humor.Do I have a man-crush? Maybe. A little. But Fry has always been charming as hell. A must-read!
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    I first heard of Stephen Fry many years ago, have since watched him debate with the Church and wander through dense jungles trying to find nearly extinct animals, listened to him bring one of my favourite magical worlds to life, and learned a great deal from him on what must be one of the best quiz shows on (British) television. Not to mention his influence on LGBTQ rights and the acceptance of mental health issues (he himself is suffering from at least one). He's been on radio programs, televis I first heard of Stephen Fry many years ago, have since watched him debate with the Church and wander through dense jungles trying to find nearly extinct animals, listened to him bring one of my favourite magical worlds to life, and learned a great deal from him on what must be one of the best quiz shows on (British) television. Not to mention his influence on LGBTQ rights and the acceptance of mental health issues (he himself is suffering from at least one). He's been on radio programs, television shows, and in movies. He knows so much about almost everything, out of a natural curiosity, and had a very ... interesting ... childhood/life so far. In short: the man is a national and international treasure and I'm a total fangirl. *swoons* Naturally, he is not without fault, but that - in a very ironic twist of fate - makes him so PERFECT a man to retell the Ancient Greek Myths.After all, if one looks at all the groups of gods from around the world and all kinds of eras, they are all flawed - but none more so than the Greeks with all their debaucheries (and, by extent, the Roman ones but they are mostly a copy of the Greek pantheon anyway).Funnily enough, the publication of Mythos this year coincides (and I'm told it really was a coincidence albeit a fortunate one) with the publication of Gaiman's retelling of the Norse myths. Thus, I now have TWO wonderful tomes detailing the essentials of two cultural influences on what is nowadays Europe (the name itself was taken from Greek mythology).The Greek culture (city states, first democracy, the victory over the Persians and thus Islam, their type of warfare, ...) is the root of almost all the European countries today and one can see it in many instances. Moreover, the Greek pantheon is probably the most well-known one. Many artists have immortalized the birth of Aphrodite (Venus) or the love between Amor and Psyche or Apollo driving his sun chariot across the sky or Zeus imprisoning the Titans.As is also typical for mythology, the myths explained seemingly unexplainable happenings back in the day while the gods showed the characteristics one could observe in any human.Fry cannot retell ALL the myths that have survived, of course, but he managed the almost Herculean task (see what I did there? :P) of selecting the ones for his book perfectly and not only bringing the myths to life with his incomparable voice (I listened to the audio because I can never resist the man), but to also retell the stories in a way that is simultaneously modern and tasteful - which makes this book so appealing. He seamlessly weaves in references to pop culture, literature and music (modern and classic) and modern politics, explains linguistic roots as well as the naming of many a constellation and elements and therefore gives a detailed but never boring lesson about why the Greek myths matter so much, even to this day. In doing so, he gives us a history of ourselves, where we come from, what shaped us.We start at the beginning, the creation myth (from Chaos to order) and then move on to the Titans.From there, it's only a small step to Zeus and his siblings overthrowing their parental generation and establishing/ruling Olympus and Hades, after which we humans are created. After that, the fun really begins! We are being introduced to the muses (after one of which - Thalia - I was named),monsters, heroes, gods, demi-gods, nymphs, centaurs, satyrs and all the rest that make up this colorful and vivid world.We learn about family relations, rewards and punishments (often it isn't even clear what is what). We learn about the comical stuff as much as about the drama, the wonderful stories as much as the horrible ones. Naturally, it will come as no surprise to anyone who has ever heard a Greek myth that most catastrophes are started by the Olympians getting up to no good (often in form of raping an immortal of some kind or a man or a women - female and male gods alike were quite indifferent to whether or not you wanted to be their consorts). The message clearly being that as a mortal you could only lose (even rape victims were the blamed parties and got punished by other, jealous, gods). What is the most interesting and satisfying aspect about this, however, is how timeless these stories are and how much they still translate to modern problems (believe it or not, the rape or seduction was often only the beginning, setting the stage to a whole world of other plots). I guess we haven't evolved all that much after all.Neil Gaiman was asked, after the publication of his book about Norse myths, if he would do another one about a different pantheon and he declined, saying that the Norse mythology was where his heart lay and any work about any other would therefore not be adequate. I firmly believe it's the same with Stephen Fry and Greek mythology (although greedy little bookworm as I am, I do want moremoremore).I cannot recommend this book enough as it is as vibrant as the Greek pantheon itself and Fry is not only very knowledgeable in the myths themselves but also in languages (that were greatly influenced by these myths) and history in general and you can feel the author's passion for these myths, his enthusiasm therefore being infectious. Moreover, he has a unique way of knowing just when and how to make you laugh, giving the overall retelling a lightness despite the heaviness of some stories.I am both enchanted and delighted and would even recommend this book before one of the classic sources like Bullfinch (in fact, I hope very much that THIS will also become one such classic over time).
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  • Alice Lippart
    January 1, 1970
    The most fun and entertaining book I've read in a very long time. Loved it.
  • ☘Misericordia☘ ✺❂❤❣
    January 1, 1970
    This is good enough to eat! Loooooooooooooooooooove it! Gosh!!! I'll try to savour it for as long as possible!Q:What misery can be so great that it causes you to go about half drowning honest ants? (c)Q:‘You should ask yourself what brought you here,’ said Pan. ‘If it’s love, thenyou must pray to Aphrodite and Eros for guidance and relief. If your ownwickedness caused your downfall then you must live to repent. If it was causedby others then you must live to revenge.’ (c)Q:What a business. The g This is good enough to eat! Loooooooooooooooooooove it! Gosh!!! I'll try to savour it for as long as possible!Q:What misery can be so great that it causes you to go about half drowning honest ants? (c)Q:‘You should ask yourself what brought you here,’ said Pan. ‘If it’s love, thenyou must pray to Aphrodite and Eros for guidance and relief. If your ownwickedness caused your downfall then you must live to repent. If it was causedby others then you must live to revenge.’ (c)Q:What a business. The god of love himself lovestruck. (c)Q:Her so-called beauty had always been a source of irritationto her. She hated the fuss and stir it caused, how oddly it made people behave inher presence and how freakish and set apart it made her feel. She had plannednever to marry, but if she had to then a rapacious beast would be no worse than atedious fawning prince with mooncalf eyes. The agony of its attentions would atleast be over quickly. (c)Q:Her mother Damaris howled, shrieked and sobbed. KingAristides patted her hand and wished himself elsewhere. (с)Q:The sun shone down upon her. Larks called in the bluesky. She had pictured boiling clouds, shrieking winds, lashing rain and dreadfulthunder as accompaniments to her violation and death, not this glorious idyll oflate-spring sunshine and rippling birdsong. (c)Q:He is taking me to mydoom. Well, at least it’s a comfortable way to travel.’ (c)Q:‘Why, you are here, your highness.’‘And where is here?’‘Far from there but close to nearby.’‘Who is the master of this palace.’‘You are the mistress.’ (c)Q:All was laughter and delight at the wedding of Eros and Psyche. Apollo sangand played on his lyre, Pan joined in with his syrinx. Hera danced with Zeus,Aphrodite danced with Ares and Eros danced with Psyche. And they dancetogether still to this very day. (c) Uhhhh. My kind of ending!Q:Io may have been a cow, but she was a very influential and important one. (c)Q:Erechtheus had Athena as a proxy parent, Gaia as a mother and Hephaestus as afather. Three immortal parents could be regarded as overdoing it (and asboastfulness about their founder on the part of Athenians), but it was notuncommon for mortals to claim one such progenitor. (c)Q:‘You are joking?’‘I sort of promised.’‘Well, sort of unpromise then.’ ...‘I have spoken and so I have … er, spoken.’ (c)Q:In honour of Cygnus the young of all swans are called ‘cygnets’. (c)Q:No lesson, no matter how grim, ever seems to deter us. (c)
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    This was the perfect book to read over a very sunny and hot Bank Holiday. Covering the dawn of the Gods, through the golden and silver ages, this discusses a wide range of stories told in the usual Fry wit. It’s incredibly informative and well planned out, told in a more structured chronological order than I’m normally use to with these stories. And I’ve read a lot of these stories. There’s nothing new here if you’ve delved into Greek mythology, but I enjoyed Fry's take on them - and I really li This was the perfect book to read over a very sunny and hot Bank Holiday. Covering the dawn of the Gods, through the golden and silver ages, this discusses a wide range of stories told in the usual Fry wit. It’s incredibly informative and well planned out, told in a more structured chronological order than I’m normally use to with these stories. And I’ve read a lot of these stories. There’s nothing new here if you’ve delved into Greek mythology, but I enjoyed Fry's take on them - and I really liked the little addendums of information littered throughout that enhanced my knowledge of the Greeks and their language and lore. My favourite stories have always been those about hubris, or pride, and here we get a whole chapter dedicated to the various ways the Gods have punished those mere mortals who dare to challenge them, such as Arachne the great weaver and Marsyas the ill fated satyr. The stories are told in such a laid back way, that it’s easy for those familiar, and those who are new to the stories, to equally enjoy them. The Gods are described in such a colourful, fun way, that their distinct personalities leap from the pages and allowed me to fall in love with them all over again. If anything, this lacked the luscious tales of the later period dedicated to the great heroes of Odysseus, Perseus, Jason etc. I hope that Fry writes another volume to include these at some point because they for me really embody the overall epic feel of the Greek stories. However, this certainly has its place amongst other retellings.
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  • Lucy Langford
    January 1, 1970
    4.5**So lucky to have found this book in the local library. Stephen Fry does a brilliant job of recounting the Greek myths- through describing the tales of gods, goddesses and creatures alike. This was a very informational read and I was able to build my knowledge on Greek myths and uncover more tales. Stephen Fry writes the book in such a way that it is not dry or boring (unlike some other informational books) and you can easily follow the myths and use your imagination. His writing can be rath 4.5**So lucky to have found this book in the local library. Stephen Fry does a brilliant job of recounting the Greek myths- through describing the tales of gods, goddesses and creatures alike. This was a very informational read and I was able to build my knowledge on Greek myths and uncover more tales. Stephen Fry writes the book in such a way that it is not dry or boring (unlike some other informational books) and you can easily follow the myths and use your imagination. His writing can be rather comical with his commentaries running throughout the book, and this just makes the book more captivating! He talks about most of the gods and their stories, as well as metamorphoses (which I loved!). His book contains all the Gods in their selfish and arrogant ways and the consequences this has on the people they meet. This book included some of my favourite myths, for example, I have always been intrigued by the story of Hades and Persephone. It was great to also be introduced to the Furies (I love the underworld and was especially curious of them). It was also great to learn more about the story of Arachne. Not only does he write about the myths but he also includes footnotes which provide extra information. For example, how some words are still used today, or how they were derived from Greek myth. Overall this was a very comprehensive read and fulfilled my curiosity of learning more about the Greek myths. I loved learning about the Greek myths when I was a child, and now as an adult, it is fantastic to read a book which reinforces this curiosity!
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  • Ana
    January 1, 1970
    The lesson that repeats and repeats throughout the story of man. Don’t mess with the gods. Don’t trust the gods. Don’t anger the gods. Don’t barter with the gods. Don’t compete with the gods. Leave the gods well alone. Treat all blessings as a curse and all promises as a trap. Above all, never insult a god. Ever.Stephen Fry’s dry, sardonic wit and wicked humour shines through every page, particularly the pseudo-archaic banter between the Gods and Goddesses, which is perhaps what someone already The lesson that repeats and repeats throughout the story of man. Don’t mess with the gods. Don’t trust the gods. Don’t anger the gods. Don’t barter with the gods. Don’t compete with the gods. Leave the gods well alone. Treat all blessings as a curse and all promises as a trap. Above all, never insult a god. Ever.Stephen Fry’s dry, sardonic wit and wicked humour shines through every page, particularly the pseudo-archaic banter between the Gods and Goddesses, which is perhaps what someone already familiar with the origins and the many misdeeds of the Mount Olympus dwellers, as well as with Fry’s personal love for the subject, looks for in this book. If you read the afterword, you will know - before making any such comments - that his aim was not to interpret or explain the myths, only to tell them, breathing new life into these well-known characters and making the stories downright funny. I think it is this is an absolute treasure of a book and I hope Stephen Fry will delight us more in the future with his unequalled gift for storytelling!
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    As always, Stephen Fry proves to be a wonderful narrator, bringing life, humour, and modernity into these age old stories. Certainly, Jeremy Kyle's show has nothing on the incessant sexual escapades, jealousy, deceit, love, and revenge that fuel the tales, which are essentially one long list of who had sex with who and what children were born of it. Sometimes listening to it in big chunks was almost too much, it is perhaps a book best dipped into so that each mini story has a greater impact- oth As always, Stephen Fry proves to be a wonderful narrator, bringing life, humour, and modernity into these age old stories. Certainly, Jeremy Kyle's show has nothing on the incessant sexual escapades, jealousy, deceit, love, and revenge that fuel the tales, which are essentially one long list of who had sex with who and what children were born of it. Sometimes listening to it in big chunks was almost too much, it is perhaps a book best dipped into so that each mini story has a greater impact- otherwise there are moments when you think to yourself: oh, another young girl tricked/stolen/turned into an animal/taken against her will? Looking at you particularly Zeus. Hera, are you still bitter, hun? Perhaps you should spend more time dealing with your husband than the poor women who can't escape him. And if you're the kind of young man who can stop traffic, best believe you'll end up dead. Or a flower. Anyway, it's a great resource, accessible and amusing. It's not exhaustive, there are plenty of big names who didn't make it into this cut, but Fry does well with the stories he includes, making everyone from Gods to nymphs that bit more understandable. Apart from Zeus, seriously, that guy...
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  • Claudia
    January 1, 1970
    I must have been around 8 when I first read The Legends of the Olympus and fell in love with Greek mythology. I reread it at least 3 times afterwards and remains one of my favorite books to this very day.Stephen Fry’s retelling of these myths is just as good as the original, if not better. It is limited to the gods (heroes’ tales are not included) but much more detailed than the version I read. I never really thought about how many of today’s vocabulary are derived from the names in these myths I must have been around 8 when I first read The Legends of the Olympus and fell in love with Greek mythology. I reread it at least 3 times afterwards and remains one of my favorite books to this very day.Stephen Fry’s retelling of these myths is just as good as the original, if not better. It is limited to the gods (heroes’ tales are not included) but much more detailed than the version I read. I never really thought about how many of today’s vocabulary are derived from the names in these myths – I always took them for granted, even if it's obvious. But Fry does an amazing job explaining them – either in the stories or in the footnotes. However, without his hilarious approach it would have been just another book about the Greek myths, even if more complex than others. But the way he chose to tell the stories is just brilliant. Whatever the truth, science today agrees that everything is destined to return to Chaos. It calls this inevitable fate entropy: part of the great cycle from Chaos to order and back again to Chaos. Your trousers began as chaotic atoms that somehow coalesced into matter that ordered itself over aeons into a living substance that slowly evolved into a cotton plant that was woven into the handsome stuff that sheathes your lovely legs. In time you will abandon your trousers – not now, I hope – and they will rot down in a landfill or be burned. In either case their matter will at length be set free to become part of the atmosphere of the planet. And when the sun explodes and takes every particle of this world with it, including the ingredients of your trousers, all the constituent atoms will return to cold Chaos. And what is true for your trousers is of course true for you.The seeding of Gaia gave us meaning, a germination of thought into shape. Seminal semantic semiology from the semen of the sky.Remember Tartarus was a primordial being too, who was born out of Chaos at the same time as Gaia. So when she approached him, they greeted each other as family members will.‘Gaia, you’ve put on weight.’‘You look a mess, Tartarus.’ ‘What the hell do you want down here?’ ‘Shut up for once and I’ll tell you …’‘Suppose,’ said Zeus, ‘suppose I were to start a new race.’[…] They should be shaped in our image, anatomically correct in every detail, but on a smaller scale. Then we could animate them, give them life, replicate them and release them into nature to see what happens.’ Prometheus pondered this idea. ‘Would we engage with them, speak to them, move about with them?’ ‘That would be exactly the point. To have an intelligent – well, semi-intelligent – species to praise and worship us, to play with us and amuse us. A subservient, adoring race of little miniatures.’ ‘Male and female?’ ‘Oh, good heavens no, just male. You can imagine what Hera would say otherwise …’Zeus stroked his beard, thought hard and came up with what he believed was a masterstroke. He transformed Io into a cow, a beautiful plump young heifer with shivering flanks and large, gentle eyes. If he hid her in a field Hera would never spot her and he could visit her whenever he liked. Or so he imagined. When lust descends, discretion, common sense and wisdom fly off and what may seem cunning concealment to one in the grip of passion looks like transparently clumsy idiocy to everyone else.Hera knew her husband all too well. Once his libidinous propensities were aroused there would be no taming them.I can’t recommend this book enough – you’ll have a lovely time reading it.PS: when I first read the legends, in my edition there is a picture of François Gérard’s painting Psyché et l'Amour, exhibited at Louvre. It became my goal to see that painting with my own eyes. And here it is my childhood dream come true when I was 15:
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  • Sonja Arlow
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI love fantasy and mythical tales and I adore Stephen Fry (who's audio narration was pitch perfect). I have also always wanted to read / understand the different Greek myths, and this seemed the perfect opportunity.I found it very interesting to learn the relationship between these myths and the English language, and just how much of an influence these stories still have on us today.There were a few tales that stood out, and these were the longer stories that actually felt like proper s 3.5 starsI love fantasy and mythical tales and I adore Stephen Fry (who's audio narration was pitch perfect). I have also always wanted to read / understand the different Greek myths, and this seemed the perfect opportunity.I found it very interesting to learn the relationship between these myths and the English language, and just how much of an influence these stories still have on us today.There were a few tales that stood out, and these were the longer stories that actually felt like proper stories, not just anecdotes.Eros and Psyche – I am not one for love stories but this was such an enchanting tale. A mix between Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast.Sisyphus and Thanatos – how could l not love the story of Sisyphus fooling Death not once but TWICE and for his clever tricks he got punished for all eternity pushing up a boulder that will never reach the top.And my word Zeus just could not keep his junk in his pants, could he? No wonder his wife Hera was so grumpy all the time. There are so many gods, demi-gods, nymphs, furies, and humans to keep track of. It felt a little overwhelming.The end note explaining that the author did by no means include ALL the Greek myths had me wondering just how many there actually are?So although my rating is not extremely high, this is a book that I will probably listen to again so I can absorb a little more the 2nd time around.
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  • Netta
    January 1, 1970
    It is regrettable that Stephen Fry's talent to be effortlessly snobbish in a very appealing, charmingly British way, does absolutely no good to the subject of his book. The main problem with this book is that Fry's retelling of the myths of Ancient Greece is exactly what the title promises – it is the retelling of the myths of Ancient Greece with some supposedly witty (but more often irrelevant) remarks which can be easily omitted. The question is: Do we actually need one more retelling of Greek It is regrettable that Stephen Fry's talent to be effortlessly snobbish in a very appealing, charmingly British way, does absolutely no good to the subject of his book. The main problem with this book is that Fry's retelling of the myths of Ancient Greece is exactly what the title promises – it is the retelling of the myths of Ancient Greece with some supposedly witty (but more often irrelevant) remarks which can be easily omitted. The question is: Do we actually need one more retelling of Greek myths? No. Are we in desperate need of Fry's comments on well-known, beloved stories? The answer is, I'm afraid, no. While Neil Gaiman, writing his Norse Mythology tried to make it look like a comforting fairy tale, Fry simply retold what, I daresay, has already been told rather nicely.
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  • Cheese
    January 1, 1970
    The history of greek mythology told in a long long story.This is the audio book and it was a challenge to finish, but interesting nonetheless.Stephen Fry is faultless in his narration.
  • Katerina
    January 1, 1970
    Хорошо, но мало.Узнала, что Оксфорд и Босфор означают совершенно одно и то же (cow's crossing), и прозрела, в числе прочего, что гермафродит - это сын Гермеса и Афродиты; вот уж воистину blissful ignorance of the stupid.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    At a time when other children had their mothers reading "Sleeping Beauty" and "Little Red Riding Hood" to them, my father was telling me the story of the abduction of Persephone with his own adornments (I particularly liked the squirrels wondering why she was picking flowers instead of nuts).I bring this up so you understand that I was exposed to the Greek myths at a young age. Once I was able to read I got my hands on Bullfinch's Mythology and Robert Graves rather interesting two volume offerin At a time when other children had their mothers reading "Sleeping Beauty" and "Little Red Riding Hood" to them, my father was telling me the story of the abduction of Persephone with his own adornments (I particularly liked the squirrels wondering why she was picking flowers instead of nuts).I bring this up so you understand that I was exposed to the Greek myths at a young age. Once I was able to read I got my hands on Bullfinch's Mythology and Robert Graves rather interesting two volume offering.Stephen Fry now sits, in my mind, with these giants of Greek mythology. His retelling of many of the stories, especially the origins of the gods, is simply delightful. His love for the subject just shines through, and he has a deft hand with gentle sarcastic observances and natty oneliners.If I have to pick a favourite story it would have to be the birth of Hermes. And not just because Hermes has always been my favourite.I now have a question for Stephen. When is he going to retell the Iliad?
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  • Jake
    January 1, 1970
    This was by far the easiest 5 stars I have had the pleasure to give in quite a while. It is one of the very few books I would read again.Mythos is fascinating from start to finish. I have attempted to get into numerous mythology books before (yes even Edith Hamilton) and struggled. Stephen Fry has made these captivating stories into a very readable and even hilarious style. He has made each God not only memorable, but also much easier to obtain a deeper insight into what each God stands for. He This was by far the easiest 5 stars I have had the pleasure to give in quite a while. It is one of the very few books I would read again.Mythos is fascinating from start to finish. I have attempted to get into numerous mythology books before (yes even Edith Hamilton) and struggled. Stephen Fry has made these captivating stories into a very readable and even hilarious style. He has made each God not only memorable, but also much easier to obtain a deeper insight into what each God stands for. He does not pull any punches or wrap any stories in bubble-wrap, the vengeful wrath of each God is explained in full detail, yet he still manages to put the typical Fry charisma into each one.One thing I was not prepared for when starting this book is the vast amount I would learn from it. Not just the stories but where words linking with different stories originate. I found myself constantly telling people the stories of where certain words came from, or even just how certain words relate to the stories, even if they were words before the myths. This included little interesting stories over time that have been lost in translation to this day such as Pandora's jar. These are the type of facts I thrive off and I believe anyone reading them would love them too.Due to the amount of Greek myths there are, Fry could not put all of them in this book. I only see that as a glimmer of hope that there will be a second. Stephen Fry, take a bow, then write the second book! Brilliant.
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  • R
    January 1, 1970
    I love Greek Mythology or any mythology at that. This is a great collection of retellings but in Frys perfect storytelling mixed with his intellect and wit. If you enjoyed Gaimans Norse novel this will be 100% your thing. Has a little more depth to it than Gaimans and some personal touches which maked this a perfect read from start to finish.
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  • Liawèn
    January 1, 1970
    Can Stephen Fry write more books about myths? Like every myth? Heracles, Illyad, Odyssee, Oedipus? Please? I love listening to his voice and his new take on the dialogue between the gods and mortals is the best. So, please, please, please: Write another one :-D
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  • Karina Read
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Mythos, and Fry’s narration was superb. What makes it different from all the other Greek/Roman mythology books that I have collected over the years is the coherent chronology that Fry has achieved. By placing all the stories in context and in a timeline, the personalities and actions of the gods suddenly made sense to me. I’d often struggled to remember who was who’s relation previously but I found Mythos wonderfully easy to follow and lose myself in. I immensely enjoyed all of his aside I loved Mythos, and Fry’s narration was superb. What makes it different from all the other Greek/Roman mythology books that I have collected over the years is the coherent chronology that Fry has achieved. By placing all the stories in context and in a timeline, the personalities and actions of the gods suddenly made sense to me. I’d often struggled to remember who was who’s relation previously but I found Mythos wonderfully easy to follow and lose myself in. I immensely enjoyed all of his asides that link a certain story or name to contemporary society and the personal touches he adds. I’ve learned so much in an unpatronising and fun way. What a great way to keep the myths alive. This will definitely be a book I read again and again. An extremely enjoyable reading experience all round. The only reason I can’t give this the full 5 stars is that I cannot call this my definitive Greek mythology collection as it is missing some key stories that I was looking forward to learning more about (Icarus, Theseus, Jason, Heracles, The Iliad, The Oddessey etc..). Fry does explain at the end that had he included *all* the stories, the book would be so large that it would be unreadable. Which I totally understand, but I shall keep my fingers crossed for a part 2...
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  • Max Nemtsov
    January 1, 1970
    Прелестная и полезная книжка, сам не ожидал. Потому что казалось бы — ну, мы и с классикой худо-бедно знакомы, и Куна своего в детстве читали. Но, во-первых, Фрай излагает мифосюжеты не по матрице Куна (сами убедитесь), где-то он это делает подробнее, что-то вообще оставляет за кадром, поэтому Куна не заменит, конечно, но освежит и заставит взглянуть под другим углом, а во-вторых, Кун вполне ванилен (например, он не сообщает нам, за что _именно_ боги наказывали классических грешников (и какие он Прелестная и полезная книжка, сам не ожидал. Потому что казалось бы — ну, мы и с классикой худо-бедно знакомы, и Куна своего в детстве читали. Но, во-первых, Фрай излагает мифосюжеты не по матрице Куна (сами убедитесь), где-то он это делает подробнее, что-то вообще оставляет за кадром, поэтому Куна не заменит, конечно, но освежит и заставит взглянуть под другим углом, а во-вторых, Кун вполне ванилен (например, он не сообщает нам, за что _именно_ боги наказывали классических грешников (и какие они были, вообще говоря, мудаки); Фрай же от нас не скрывает ничего, так что буквально — шок! разоблачения! видео! И шутки шутками. У него там прекрасные диалоги персонажей (все они очень человечны, прости, Стивен) — эдакая помесь Криса Мура и Гордона Хотона. Звонко и смешно.
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  • Suanne Laqueur
    January 1, 1970
    Not everyone's into mythology but I am and I freakin' loved this. Fry's fantastic retellings unpeeled layers of stories I already knew, and his humor made them super readable, approachable and hilarious. One million Olympic stars, and "Arch Psychopomp" is now my preferred title.
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this! I loved how Fry narrated the story and how he explained it all. It was also fascinating to learn how much influence the greek myths had on the English language ! I did miss the legend of Hercules though and sometimes wish the stories were longer
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  • Sumit Singla
    January 1, 1970
    What an absolute cracker of a book!I love mythology. Especially Greek. AND I love Stephen Fry. This is a great combination as an audiobook. Narrated in Stephen Fry's crisp British accent (my favourite accent in the whole world) and with typical British humour and asides thrown in, this book made peak hour commutes extremely pleasant.If one can think of the gelding of Ouranos or the opening of Pandora's box, instead of vehicles coming right at oneself, what better can one ask for?The myths are de What an absolute cracker of a book!I love mythology. Especially Greek. AND I love Stephen Fry. This is a great combination as an audiobook. Narrated in Stephen Fry's crisp British accent (my favourite accent in the whole world) and with typical British humour and asides thrown in, this book made peak hour commutes extremely pleasant.If one can think of the gelding of Ouranos or the opening of Pandora's box, instead of vehicles coming right at oneself, what better can one ask for?The myths are deep, rich and sonorous. And Stephen Fry's masterful retelling makes them absolutely come alive. Greek Gods are mean, vindictive and cruel. All their external beauty and internal ugliness comes to the fore in this wonderfully narrated book. Some of the stories are relatively well-known, whereas others are a bit obscure. However, Fry does supreme justice to all of these, by spending just enough time on each story and sub-plot and making every single character come vividly alive in this book.If there's ONE audiobook you ought to hear, let it be this one!However, the Greek gods were the horniest bunch of folks ever. Gay sex, incest, infidelity & adultery - name it, and it's there. Therefore, it may not be to everyone's taste to read/hear this one.
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  • Gaby
    January 1, 1970
    Such a brilliant book in every way. Was very disappointed when I got to the end, I wanted there to be more!
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, a BIG FAT THANK YOU to my awesome friend Bubu who send me this book via audible. THANK YOU!!! <3 Anyways. From the foreword:Mythos begins at the beginning, but it does not end at the end. Had I included heroes like Oedipus, Perseus, Theseus, Jason and Herakles and the details of the Trojan War this book would have been to heavy even for a Titan to pick up. Moreover, I am only concerned with telling the stories, not explaining them or investigating the human truths and psychologica Once again, a BIG FAT THANK YOU to my awesome friend Bubu who send me this book via audible. THANK YOU!!! <3 Anyways. From the foreword:Mythos begins at the beginning, but it does not end at the end. Had I included heroes like Oedipus, Perseus, Theseus, Jason and Herakles and the details of the Trojan War this book would have been to heavy even for a Titan to pick up. Moreover, I am only concerned with telling the stories, not explaining them or investigating the human truths and psychological insights that may lie behind them. The myths are fascinating enough in all their disturbing, surprising, romantic, tragic, violent and enchanting detail to stand on their own as stories. If, as you read, you cannot help wondering what inspired the Greeks to invent a world so rich and elaborate in character in incident, and you find yourself pondering the deep truths that the myths embody- well, that is certainly part of the pleasure. And pleasure is what immersing yourself in the world of Greek myth is all about.I guess you have to love this approach to enjoy this book. I certainly know enough people who want their myth with a heavy dose of judgement and "and the lesson we learn from this...", but I happen to be the exact opposite. I absolutely adored the way Fry spun stories from (sometimes) familiar stories, the way he makes them come alive without beating you about the head with a deeper meaning that you have to find. That being said, I absolutely LOVED immersing myself in Fry's version of (way too few, if you ask me) Greek myths. Some I knew, some where new to me. But they all fascinated me. And the way he wrote it really did make me wonder about the people who came up with these myths to begin with! That's the thing I love most about his way with words.He had me glued to the page/phone, chuckling, crying, sighing, and rolling my eyes at the follies of mortals and gods alike. I had the immense pleasure of both reading it AND listening to Fry read it himself. I couldn't possible say which I loved more though :)
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  • *Thea 'WookieMama' Wilson*
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a fun read, a little tough on the brain with all the notes and appendixes (all nicely hyperlinked up so you never lose your place in the ebook edition, the physical version may end up being a little more difficult!) but you can tell a mile off that the wonderful Stephen Fry had a hand in this work. I read the whole book with his voice in my head, only Fry would use some of those big words in places where little ones would do just as well but that's him all over of course and the wh This was such a fun read, a little tough on the brain with all the notes and appendixes (all nicely hyperlinked up so you never lose your place in the ebook edition, the physical version may end up being a little more difficult!) but you can tell a mile off that the wonderful Stephen Fry had a hand in this work. I read the whole book with his voice in my head, only Fry would use some of those big words in places where little ones would do just as well but that's him all over of course and the whole thing is nearly threaded through with his excellent sense of humour which only adds a lovely quirk to all the myths and legends inside. You can see the love he has for the myths he retells and it easily rubs off onto the reader like Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology did.If you're a fan of mythology and/or Stephen Fry then this is a MUST read and that goes for those that loved Gaiman's mythology book too as it's in the same kind of vein and I completely adore both books!
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  • Lo
    January 1, 1970
    This is so exciting! Greek mythology AND Stephen Fry?!? If only it were possible to pre-order, but it looks like the release is coming in early November. Woohoo!Edit: It's available to pre-order in the UK from a few sources, for Nov 2 release, but still nothing in the US. If anyone finds it from a US seller, please drop me a comment.Edit2: It's out now on Amazon.co.uk, but still not available from Amazon in the US. UK reviews are mixed, not great. The audiobook (read by Stephen Fry!) is on Audib This is so exciting! Greek mythology AND Stephen Fry?!? If only it were possible to pre-order, but it looks like the release is coming in early November. Woohoo!Edit: It's available to pre-order in the UK from a few sources, for Nov 2 release, but still nothing in the US. If anyone finds it from a US seller, please drop me a comment.Edit2: It's out now on Amazon.co.uk, but still not available from Amazon in the US. UK reviews are mixed, not great. The audiobook (read by Stephen Fry!) is on Audible, but I'm not allowed to download it in the US. Alas! My local library has never heard of it. I'll continue to update if I find any new information!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This audiobook was amazing! Stephen Fry is a brilliant narrator! As someone who has little knowledge on Greek Myths, I absolutely loved every second of this book! I would recommend to everyone! 5 stars
  • Thomas Edmund
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a little while to sink into Stephen Fry's Mythos, but before I knew it I was craving my mythological hit every day. Fry is able to pull together wit, sympathy, commentary along with a flourish of academic perspective on Greek Mythology creating an all round enjoyable experience. It's like he somehow knew at every junction whether to provide some light-hearted dialogue between Greek Gods OR a brief lingual summary. The tome is quite thorough, and (obviously through no fault of Fry's) t It took me a little while to sink into Stephen Fry's Mythos, but before I knew it I was craving my mythological hit every day. Fry is able to pull together wit, sympathy, commentary along with a flourish of academic perspective on Greek Mythology creating an all round enjoyable experience. It's like he somehow knew at every junction whether to provide some light-hearted dialogue between Greek Gods OR a brief lingual summary. The tome is quite thorough, and (obviously through no fault of Fry's) the Mythology is somewhat dense with names so its a piece worth reading section by section over a longer period than trying to devour the lot. My only beef is that I want more - I really really hope Stephen F is going to dive into the latter ages especially the age of heroes (as least I think that's the correct term if he doesn't write it how will I learn up about Greek Myths properly!!) He does allude to events not covered in Mythos which I hope like hell is a promise.
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  • Steffi ~mereadingbooks~
    January 1, 1970
    This was incredibly entertaining and informative.You simply can't go wrong with Stephen Fry!- full review to come -
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Ποτέ άσκοπα επιφανειακές οι τροποποιήσεις που κάνει ο Fry στο μύθο, τονίζουν, με το ιδιαίτερό του χιούμορ, το γελοίο και το εξωφρενικό των ιστοριών, διατηρώντας ταυτόχρονα την παθολογία και το συναισθηματικό περιεχόμενο του δράματος.Η κλασική ανάγνωση των μύθων από τον Robert Graves και τους λοιπούς συγγραφείς του είδους του συνεχίζουν να είναι κομβικής σημασίας, ωστόσο ο Fry καταδεικνύει με τον καλύτερο τρόπο πόσο οι μυθολογικές διηγήσεις αφορούν άκρως ανθρώπινες θεότητες.
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