Trumpocracy
Bestselling author, former White House speechwriter, and Atlantic columnist and media commentator David Frum explains why President Trump has undermined our most important institutions in ways even the most critical media has missed, in this thoughtful and hard-hitting book that is a warning for democracy and America’s future."From Russia to South Africa, from Turkey to the Philippines, from Venezuela to Hungary, authoritarian leaders have smashed restraints on their power. Media freedom and judicial independence have eroded. The right to vote remains, but the right to have one’s vote counted fairly may not. Until the US presidential election of 2016, the global decline of democracy seemed a concern for other peoples in other lands. . . . That complacent optimism has been upended by the political rise of Donald Trump. The crisis is upon Americans, here and now."Quietly, steadily, Trump and his administration are damaging the tenets and accepted practices of American democracy, perhaps irrevocably. As he and his family enrich themselves, the presidency itself falls into the hands of the generals and financiers who surround him.While much of the country has been focused on Russia, David Frum has been collecting the lies, obfuscations, and flagrant disregard for the traditional limits placed on the office of the presidency. In Trumpocracy, he documents how Trump and his administration are steadily damaging the tenets and accepted practices of American democracy. During his own White House tenure as George W. Bush’s speechwriter, Frum witnessed the ways the presidency is limited not by law but by tradition, propriety, and public outcry, all now weakened. Whether the Trump presidency lasts two, four, or eight more years, he has changed the nature of the office for the worse, and likely for decades.In this powerful and eye-opening book, Frum makes clear that the hard work of recovery starts at home. Trumpocracy outlines how Trump could push America toward illiberalism, what the consequences could be for our nation and our everyday lives, and what we can do to prevent it.

Trumpocracy Details

TitleTrumpocracy
Author
ReleaseJan 16th, 2018
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062796752
Rating
GenrePolitics, Nonfiction, History

Trumpocracy Review

  • Ted Lehmann
    January 1, 1970
    Trumpocracy by David Frum – Book ReviewDavid Frum has written an erudite, scholarly, entertaining, coruscating, and, ultimately, both deeply scary and hopeful book called Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic (HarperCollins, 2018, 320 pages, $25.99/12.99). Using elegant, nuanced writing and thoughtful analysis based on deep, and wide research, fully thirty percent of the text is taken up by footnotes, Frum carefully builds his argument using well-recognized sources from across the Trumpocracy by David Frum – Book ReviewDavid Frum has written an erudite, scholarly, entertaining, coruscating, and, ultimately, both deeply scary and hopeful book called Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic (HarperCollins, 2018, 320 pages, $25.99/12.99). Using elegant, nuanced writing and thoughtful analysis based on deep, and wide research, fully thirty percent of the text is taken up by footnotes, Frum carefully builds his argument using well-recognized sources from across the political, historical, and media spectrum. He presents a clear-eyed vision of Trump world from a Republican intellectual who wants him to do well and achieve the conservative goals his party has long felt powerless to achieve. Frum carefully uses what Trump says about his goals both as a candidate and as President, as well as a wide array of his allies, the media from Fox & Friends to Meet the Press, from Hugh Hewitt to Mark Levin. He’s careful, judicious, and, ultimately... damning. David Frum, born in Canada, has degrees from the University of Toronto, Yale University, and Harvard Law School. As he said in Newsweek, “I'm a conservative Republican, have been all my adult life. I volunteered for the Reagan campaign in 1980. I've attended every Republican convention since 1988. I was president of the Federalist Society chapter at my law school, worked on the editorial page of The Wall Street Journal and wrote speeches for President Bush—not the "Read My Lips" Bush, the "Axis of Evil" Bush. I served on the Giuliani campaign in 2008 and voted for John McCain in November. I supported the Iraq War and (although I feel kind of silly about it in retrospect) the impeachment of Bill Clinton. I could go on, but you get the idea.” He has been an American citizen since 2007, while having been active in American politics for most of his adult life. Frum, who appears to be no admirer of Trump, nevertheless paints what seems to me to be an accurate and un-frenzied picture of how Trump uses real and imagined power along with blunt bullying and lying to force people not his natural allies to line up with him and do his bidding, while many of them have taken positions in the government which will allow them to create no end of un-doing a generations long pattern of increasing governmental oversight of their enterprises. Meanwhile, useful regulations and protections are thrown out with the bureaucratic overburden and there’s so much self-dealing the public becomes inured to it. He demonstrates how the use of language in the Trump administration masks the goals of those he’s appointed to make America a more dangerous, dirty, and divided country. The structure of Trumpocracy lays out the ways in which Donald Trump behaves to bring maximum attention to himself while having limited interest in the history, laws, traditions, and structure of our country. He consistently acts in such a way as to increase his own power while not seeking advice or counsel from those who truly understand how the government works, especially with reference to our hallowed separation of powers and reliance upon them to come to reasonable governance for all. Frum writes that under Trump, “The government of the United States seems to have made common cause with the planet’s thugs, crooks, and dictators against its own ideals—and in fact to have imported the spirit of thuggery, crookedness, and dictatorship into the very core of the American state, into the most solemn symbolic oval center of its law and liberty.” He continues, “Trump’s hope was that an unconstrained America could grab more power for itself (and thereby for him). He never understood that America’s power arose not only from its own wealth and its own military force, but from its centrality to a network of friends and allies.” For Trump there is no win-win, he can only win if someone else loses, and he will never share his wins with anyone. The author treats extensively the web of associations, betrayals, and the apparent idea that America itself must not only be first, but alone at the top. “Trump throws everyone under the bus in his eager embrace of...Himself! He seems totally unaware of the intensely interwoven mutual dependency that exists between the President and members of Congress in seeking to enact his agenda. As a man with no knowledge of how government works or the place of the Presidency in it, he continues to show no interest in policy, the rule of law, or political realities. Frum emphasizes his treatment of Carmen Yulin Cruz, the mayor of San Juan, and Senator Jeff Flake, from Arizona, as examples of people whose support he needed who he gleefully destroyed in his own interest. His cruel decision not to allow Sean Spicer to meet the Pope stands as a testimony to his willful nastiness. Trump’s insistence on flattery and abject adherence to his neediness is stomach turning. Frum details a televised cabinet meeting during which a round-table of cabinet secretaries vomited out flattering lies about the fine job Trump was doing. He contrasts that to George W. Bush’s deep skepticism to anything that smacked of flattery. A major advantage of a book from a person like David Frum is that it steps back a little way from the day-to-day cascade of cable news, or even from the weekend talk shows to take a wider and more comprehensive portrait of Trump and the Trump administration. As such, it can be both nuanced and comprehensive. By battling against everything the press says that could be mildly seen as critical, Trump actively works to reduce the influence of the press at home and abroad. His and his surrogates, particularly at Fox News, encourage discrediting even the most reliable and honest reporters. Furthermore, he actively supported authoritarian leaders in other countries when abroad in their efforts to muzzle their own press. Frum argues that Trump’s negligence and laziness actually strengthens him through eliminating all normal checks and balances. He shows how Trump relience on outmoded and failed Republican ideology has replaced conservative thinking. However, Frum despairs at the ability of the incumbent to see or understand what that might be. Nevertheless, he concludes his very fine book on a note of hope generated from reactions to the negative affects of the Trump administration. David Frum’s Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic (HarperCollins, 2018, 320 pages, $25.99/12.99) stands as a sober, yet often frightening, at least to me, assessment of the Trump campaign and most of his first year. The book has earned the highest of recommendations I can give it. I received a free copy of Trumpocracy from the publisher as an electronic pre-publication through Edelweiss and read it on my Kindle App.
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  • Jason Aglietti
    January 1, 1970
    I found Trumpocary to be a thought provoking commentary on the current chaotic status of US politics centered around the presidency of Donald J. Trump. Frum explains how US politics arrived to this point, rehashes the current status of the Trump presidency of the last year, and then focuses on the short-term future of US politics. Frum, a long-time conservative and former speech writer for George W. Bush makes a compelling case against the Trump presidency and the need for Republicans to recant I found Trumpocary to be a thought provoking commentary on the current chaotic status of US politics centered around the presidency of Donald J. Trump. Frum explains how US politics arrived to this point, rehashes the current status of the Trump presidency of the last year, and then focuses on the short-term future of US politics. Frum, a long-time conservative and former speech writer for George W. Bush makes a compelling case against the Trump presidency and the need for Republicans to recant on their unwavering loyalty to Trump. The book is engaging and should be insightful to anyone looking to gain a critical conservative perspective on Mr. Trump. While I overwhelmingly liked the book and found it to be a great read, my one critique is that it rehashed many of the events of the last two years that most politically aware people already know. Still, it was a great book that I would recommend to anyone who wants to gain a deeper, conservative perspective on Trump's troubling presidency.[Continue for in-depth review that discusses specific parts of the book]I found one of the most important points that Frum makes is that the Donald Trump campaign and presidency did not happen out of no where. Frum argues that ‘democracy dies in degrees’, and shows how the chipping away at American democracy is due to politicians breaking their own rules in order to gain instant gratification of a pressing matter. He also argues that with the Republican legislature take-over in 2010, Republicans adopted a ‘all or nothing’ political platform, that had ripple effects for the next seven years.Frum also makes the compelling case that over the last few decades, the political scene in America reached a high toxicity level, thus causing many vulnerabilities within America’s democracy and paving the way for Trump to exploit them. This ‘all or nothing’ political platform paved the way for Trump since Republicans backed themselves into a corner, leaving them with the options of looking disloyal to the Republican brand, or simply becoming an enabler of Mr. Trump. While the first half of Frum's book offers little new perspectives on many events that journalists and political commentators have been saying over the last few years, the second half of Frum's book is much more compelling. Frum shares a conservative perspective on the future for Mr. Trump, the Republican Party, and America as a whole. Frum ultimately makes the case that the Republican party’s fate is headed for “electoral trouble – or worse,” where he also thinks that as 2020 draws closer, loyalty from politicians to Trump will “devour his party from within.”(206)The book ultimately ends with glimmers of hope by talking about how he’s seen people become more politically educated and socially aware that may not had happened if the election had swung the other way. He cites polls where Americans overwhelmingly condemn many of Trump’s controversial policies. Frum says that Trump reminded Americans “of the old schoolyard lesson: the bully is a coward.”(227) He ends by saying that as soon as Republicans are willing to accept and fix themselves from aligning themselves with trump, that they may be able to charge forward and redeem themselves.
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  • Mal Warwick
    January 1, 1970
    "Trumpocracy has left Americans less safe against foreign dangers, has diverted their money from its proper purposes to improper pockets, has worked to bias law enforcement in favor of the powerful, and has sought to intimidate media lest they report things the public most needs to know." Thus David Frum sets the stage to explain how Donald Trump undermines democracy in his new book, Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic.If there is any surprise in this line of argument, it lies i "Trumpocracy has left Americans less safe against foreign dangers, has diverted their money from its proper purposes to improper pockets, has worked to bias law enforcement in favor of the powerful, and has sought to intimidate media lest they report things the public most needs to know." Thus David Frum sets the stage to explain how Donald Trump undermines democracy in his new book, Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic.If there is any surprise in this line of argument, it lies in the identity of its author. David Frum is a card-carrying conservative, or neoconservative, if you prefer the current jargon. He wrote speeches for George W. Bush and served as a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. (He is now a senior editor at The Atlantic and a CNN commentator.) What sets Frum apart from today's kneejerk "conservatives" is that he has been in the Never Trump camp since the New York developer turned reality TV star declared his campaign for the White House.In Trumpocracy, Frum methodically surveys the damage Donald Trump and his minions have been inflicting on the American people ever since November 6, 2016. For example, in a chapter entitled "Plunder," he details the blatant corruption that is enriching Trump and his family. (Frum notes that "the United States ranked a not exactly reassuring eighteenth on Transparency International's corruption index, behind Hong Kong and Belgium.") But the author doesn't place all the blame on Donald Trump personally. "The man inside the oval center did not act alone. He held his power with the connivance of others. They executed his orders and empowered his whims for crass and cowardly reasons of their own: partisanship, ambition, greed for gain, eagerness for attention, ideological zeal, careerist conformity, or—in the worst cases—malicious glee in the wreck of things they could never have built themselves."Frum is clearly convinced (as am I) that Donald Trump is in the White House "in some considerable part by clandestine help from Russia." Like Guardian reporter Luke Harding in another recent book, Collusion, Frum believes the evidence clearly shows that the Trump campaign collaborated with Russian officials operating on behalf of President Vladimir Putin. And he deplores the shameless efforts by Right-Wing media as well as the White House to discredit those who are attempting to uncover the truth about the collusion. For instance, he quotes a pro-Trump author speaking on CNN: "'There's no violation of law if, in fact, the campaign colluded with Russia, whatever that means.'" Come again? How is collusion in this context not treasonous?Curiously (for a conservative), Frum appears to be troubled by the near-total dominance of the Republican Party in today's political scene—and the underhanded tactics used to achieve it. "Republicans entered the 2016 cycle controlling all elected branches of government in half the states in the country, their best showing since the 1920s. Democrats controlled only seven states, their worst showing since Reconstruction." Frum notes with concern that voter suppression has played a major role in this trend. However, he doesn't mention gerrymandering, which has doubtless been an equally important factor.Frum also examines the damage to US foreign policy and our country's reputation around the world. He writes, "[Trump] never understood that America's power arose not only from its own wealth and its own military force, but from its centrality to a network of friends and allies." The author is also deeply concerned about the multiple attacks from Trump and his staff on the national security agencies. He fears the possibility that the FBI, the CIA, and the other intelligence agencies—as well as the Pentagon—may drift into the habit of keeping future Presidents isolated and acting essentially on their own.As other commentators have done, Frum explores the rise in support for violent white-nationalist groups as a result of Donald Trump's campaign and his time in the White House. But of even greater concern is the much broader trend toward the politics of resentment. "The phrase 'white privilege' transitioned from the academy into common speech in the Obama years—at exactly the moment that millions of white Americans were experiencing the worst social trauma since the Great Depression." Not only did Trump capitalize on that development; as well all know, he is driving the wedge even deeper between whites and people of color.There is little in Trumpocracy that is truly new. We've learned most of these lessons from others over the past two years. Frum's contribution is to compile the facts and the analysis into one thin volume—and carefully document every assertion. By contrast with other recent books about the Trump Era, one-quarter of Frum's book consists of notes. The result is a case against Donald Trump that is difficult to refute.
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  • Owlseyes
    January 1, 1970
    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/...
  • Eric Wojciechowski
    January 1, 1970
    If I were to write a book about the Donald J Trump presidency and the campaign before it, it would read very much like David Frum’s TRUMPOCRACY. I found myself time and again nodding in recognition of my own thoughts and recollections, noting that I’d written similar warnings and complaints in essays featured on my own blog, to Twitter threads and other social media posts. And in conversations with numerous people, I presented many of the same concerns Frum discusses in this book. However, Frum If I were to write a book about the Donald J Trump presidency and the campaign before it, it would read very much like David Frum’s TRUMPOCRACY. I found myself time and again nodding in recognition of my own thoughts and recollections, noting that I’d written similar warnings and complaints in essays featured on my own blog, to Twitter threads and other social media posts. And in conversations with numerous people, I presented many of the same concerns Frum discusses in this book. However, Frum has a much better grasp on the material. He has more and better resources so it was a delight to see some gaps filled in and information added.The first chapter of this book discusses how Trump was able to seize the presidency. Titled, “Pre-existing Conditions”, it discusses some things that went wrong eventually allowing a person like Trump to sit in the Whitehouse. Barack Obama isn’t given any leniency here. His presidency was one in a long line of executive power grabbers, increasing the Imperial Presidency and Frum makes it clear that Trump is more a symptom of degradation than the start of one. However, if we can’t turn this around, the United States of America could become less of what the Founding Fathers envisioned,and more a country of future politicians and presidents demanding loyalty to themselves and his/her family and business dealings instead of good policy for all.From Trump’s pathological lying to his insistence that any media that disagrees with him is “Fake News”, to the Conservative movement moving more to Trumpism instead of an actual conservative platform. To the Republican Party, once working against him during the 2016 campaign to suddenly supporting him, apologizing for him and shrugging shoulders at his bad behavior. To his appeasers who irritate the situation and to those who cross him, Trump snubs and crushes when they don’t play along. To his ability to destroy in a single tweet. To his nepotism, instituting Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump to positions of “advisor”. And to the entire goal of the Trump’s presidency: To enrich himself, his family and massage his own ego. The Donald J Trump presidency is a disaster, far from what America is supposed to be. TRUMPOCRACY is a must read for details on all these points.As stated above, much of the information in this book wasn’t entirely new to me. If you paid attention to this topic since at least 2015, you’ll already know much of this. But as also stated above, Frum has better sources than myself and I suspect, most others on the outside looking in. The two biggest take-aways I got from this book are the following:The first take away involves American allies and Russia. Trump has encouraged the break up of the European Union, doesn’t think much of NATO (never mentioning Article 5 during a speech to NATO suggesting no interest in supporting it should it be needed). He belittles leaders in many of those countries and is creating an atmosphere distancing America from the rest of the world. Closer to home, he showed no indication of caring for Puerto Rico after the hurricane and instead, somewhat blaming them for their hardship in a series of tweets. And let’s not forget he wants a great wall along the southern border due to his ignorance and bigotry about who’s coming over the border from Mexico. In summary, he’s shattering long lasted alliances. No one will want to play with the USA anymore if this keeps up. Except one person.There’s one world leader he doesn’t do this too. Trump goes out of his way to flatter Vladamir Putin and appears to be compromised in some fashion by Russian agents. In other words, the American president, for the first time since the end of World War II, favors Russia over European countries and neighbors. He flatters Putin and belittles the leaders in Europe who are the front line, geographically, against Russia. Does this signal to Putin he may do a little more of whatever he pleases?And while good relations with Russia would be a positive thing, it’s clear Russia/Putin isn’t interested in a give and take. He’s interested in dominance. But that might be why Trump likes him. There’s ample evidence Russian agents tampered in many elections in Europe and the 2016 of the USA. The cold war will continue while this behavior persists. There’s going to have to be better leadership on both sides before things change.This leads to the second take away. With Trump praising Vladimir Putin and showing zero interest in Russia’s interference with the 2016 election, AND, with it all too clear Trump was assisted into the presidency by Russian agents (to what extent, we’re still not sure), what is the intelligence community and American military to think of him? What if they begin operations off the books; that is, without notifying the Whitehouse due to lack of trust to where his allegiances lie? What if they work around this president for what they perceive is the good of the country, keeping both an eye on outside dangers and a possible one sitting right in the Whitehouse? With a president who shrugs off bad news about Russia but creates bad relations with Europe, what do you think they’re going to do? The history books regarding these matters may be missing a lot of chapters on the Trump years due to lack of documentation and more black budgeting in order to avoid involving the Whitehouse.The last chapter, simply titled HOPE, gives...well, hope. It presents several “gifts” that Trump has given us. One of which is that much of America is showing a dislike for bullying behaviors as they turn on Trump when he demonstrates this. Americans are also spending more time bettering themselves, putting energy into learning the history of this country if only for the sake of trying to preserve the better parts. And also directing energies into pro-active and random acts of kindness. In the end, it’s possible that without even trying, Trump will end up creating better people who inhabit these United States.
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  • Sassan
    January 1, 1970
    David Frum’s timely and prescient book “Trumpocracy” is a vital read in not solely understanding the baseness that is Donald Trump – but most importantly those who have enabled him to come to this point in risking the security, reputation, and long term stability of our country in great risk. It is vital that we learn from the lessons of history and the implications that they can mean to our present situation. Donald Trump is a unique threat and we truly are living in a perilous time in our nati David Frum’s timely and prescient book “Trumpocracy” is a vital read in not solely understanding the baseness that is Donald Trump – but most importantly those who have enabled him to come to this point in risking the security, reputation, and long term stability of our country in great risk. It is vital that we learn from the lessons of history and the implications that they can mean to our present situation. Donald Trump is a unique threat and we truly are living in a perilous time in our nation’s history. I truly believe that history will judge this time as to where people stood and the causes they advocated once history is recorded. The most amazing thing is to see the number of people who simply seem to accept the fact (or in denial) that Donald Trump and his campaign were involved in nefarious activities with a foreign adversary who tried to tilt our election in his favor. I believe that history will record Donald Trump as the *Asterisk President – one that history records as illegitimate. Before that time comes, we are faced with a unique threat in terms of both the debasing of our cherished institutions and democratic process; as well as this reckless malignant narcissist increasing the chances of a nuclear war in which millions of people can perish in the blink of an eye. David Frum is a principled conservative who never sold out his soul, character, integrity and morals to support a demagogue. As David Frum excerpts from an op-ed he wrote toward the end of the election cycle on why he voted for Hillary Clinton, “Previous generations accepted infinitely heavier sacrifices and more dangerous duties to defend democracy. I am voting to defend Americans’ profoundest shared commitment: a commitment to norms and rules that today protect my rights under a president I don’t favor, and that will tomorrow do the same service for you.” As we have come to see in just the past year how true these words were then and resonate even more now. Putting America first is not about using demagogic tactics of the authoritarians, totalitarians and fascists of the first half of the 20th Century. It is not about being a liar and telling your core supporters that all news against the Dear Leader is “fake news”. It is not lying about lying and lying as a normal practice. We cannot allow Donald Trump to represent a new normal. Donald Trump is an aberration and a stain on both the office of the Presidency and to the history and ideals of our country. I look forward to Bob Mueller releasing his final report. And if warranted, treasonous/traitorous actions should have consequences. We will soon see whether Republicans in Congress have the slightest modicum of integrity and humility in putting country and humanity over the parochial whims of being members of Congress.By the way, the tone and voice of the author was very much alive in this reading. Very good writer full of expression and wit.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Given the choice between Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury" and David Frum's "Trumpocracy," read "Trumpocracy." Both books were rushed to press to meet near term demand on a topic of current interest, and both books suffer somewhat from that limitation, but that's about all they have in common. Compared to F&F, "Trumpocracy" is:* Well researched and documented with 44 pages of footnotes.* Devoid of innuendo and "wink, wink, read between the lines" gossip.* Composed entirely of publicly verifiab Given the choice between Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury" and David Frum's "Trumpocracy," read "Trumpocracy." Both books were rushed to press to meet near term demand on a topic of current interest, and both books suffer somewhat from that limitation, but that's about all they have in common. Compared to F&F, "Trumpocracy" is:* Well researched and documented with 44 pages of footnotes.* Devoid of innuendo and "wink, wink, read between the lines" gossip.* Composed entirely of publicly verifiable facts.* Written by a conservative about conservatives.* Focused on ongoing damage to American political institutions rather than stories about individuals, feelings, or policies. Frum is clearly angry about how American political institutions are being subverted, and his anger periodically comes through in his choice of words, but he is careful not to assert anything that cannot be documented through public sources and he successfully eschews emotional conclusions and hyperbole. Bob Woodward is the political reporter of the last 40 years who consistently got inside then current administrations to reveal their inner workings to the public. The Trump Administration, however, through its use of social media and its manipulation of mainstream media, is already public. Frum simply organizes the information available and draws conclusions, some of which have long term implications, about what made President Trump's election victory possible and how American political systems have changed and continue to change.
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  • Fay
    January 1, 1970
    David Frum has written an excellent book dealing with the election of Donald Trump and his first year in office. Mr. Frum brings a background of political experience with the GOP over 3 decades which, at least for me, gives more credibility to the criticisms he directs at the Trump campaign and his first year in office. The book lacks the bombast and hyperbole that can be found in many discussions of the same material and again, contributes to its legitimacy. The subtitle of the book (The Corrup David Frum has written an excellent book dealing with the election of Donald Trump and his first year in office. Mr. Frum brings a background of political experience with the GOP over 3 decades which, at least for me, gives more credibility to the criticisms he directs at the Trump campaign and his first year in office. The book lacks the bombast and hyperbole that can be found in many discussions of the same material and again, contributes to its legitimacy. The subtitle of the book (The Corruption of the American Republic) and some chapter titles (Enablers, Appeasers, Plunder, Betrayals, Rigged System, Resentments, Believers and the last one, Hope) all signify the areas of major concern contained within and that contribute to Mr. Frum's belief that Mr. Trump and his direction are a threat to our democracy. This book would be a wise selection for anyone who wonders how we got here as a nation and where we might be headed.
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  • Geoffrey Kelley
    January 1, 1970
    It is amazing to what point Donald J. Trump sucks all the oxygen out of the room. News channels, late night talk shows, and now the book bestseller lists are singularly focussed (obsessed?) with the 45th President of the United States. Having read both Edward Luce's "The Retreat of Western Liberalism" and David Frum's new book, you'd think that our democracies are on life-support. Yes, era of Trump is cause for concern. Yes the toxic partisanship is cause for concern. Yes the attacks on the medi It is amazing to what point Donald J. Trump sucks all the oxygen out of the room. News channels, late night talk shows, and now the book bestseller lists are singularly focussed (obsessed?) with the 45th President of the United States. Having read both Edward Luce's "The Retreat of Western Liberalism" and David Frum's new book, you'd think that our democracies are on life-support. Yes, era of Trump is cause for concern. Yes the toxic partisanship is cause for concern. Yes the attacks on the media, and the accusations of " fake news" are causes for concern. So there is lots of material for our modern day Cassandras to work with. But I am convinced that our institutions are a hardy breed, and we will survive this presidency.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    A thoughtful, multi-faceted analysis of the trends, forces, actions, and personalities of the Trump presidency, and their corrosive effect on American democracy. Well written, and well argued, ending with a stirring call to become better citizens. The book leaves you wishing for more chapters. If you only read one book about Trump's presidency thus far, make it this one.
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  • Donald Schopflocher
    January 1, 1970
    A detailed, well documented review of the absurdities of the Donald Trump presidency, organized by prominent themes. Avoids the salacious gossipy tone of Fire and Fury in favor of a focus on the characteristics and principles of liberal democracy, how they have been undermined, and how they can be rescued. Frum is that rarest of political observers, a conservative intellectual.
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  • Jane Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Trump StoryThis is a good book, one that focuses on the corruption that is Donald Trump's method. The author suggests that we become better citizens, realizing that we must return to our governments that had civility and honor.
  • Gregory Vince
    January 1, 1970
    While "Fire and Fury" is the talk of the town, Frum's book is a much more mature and intellectually stimulating read. I think it serves as the ultimate written critique of this Presidency and also as a guide for citizens who are troubled by it.
  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    The threat to the democracy is not the man, but that the man will leave the republican party in a hole that will take a generation to dig out of if they are able to recover from losing their beliefs at all.
  • Jon Schwarz
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe the most terrifying book I’ve read in years.
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