The Fox Hunt
“Nail-bitingly suspenseful. ... Inspiring. ... Essential reading.” — Booklist, starred reviewThe Fox Hunt tells one young man’s unforgettable story of war, unlikely friendship, and his harrowing escape from Yemen's brutal civil war with the help of a daring plan engineered on social media by a small group of interfaith activists in the West.Born in the Old City of Sana’a, Yemen, to a pair of middle-class doctors, Mohammed Al Samawi was a devout Muslim raised to think of Christians and Jews as his enemy. But when Mohammed was twenty-three, he secretly received a copy of the Bible, and what he read cast doubt on everything he’d previously believed. After connecting with Jews and Christians on social media, and at various international interfaith conferences, Mohammed became an activist, making it his mission to promote dialogue and cooperation in Yemen.Then came the death threats: first on Facebook, then through terrifying anonymous phone calls. To protect himself and his family, Mohammed fled to the southern port city of Aden. He had no way of knowing that Aden was about to become the heart of a north-south civil war, and the battleground for a well-funded proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia. As gunfire and grenades exploded throughout the city, Mohammed hid in the bathroom of his apartment and desperately appealed to his contacts on Facebook.Miraculously, a handful of people he barely knew responded. Over thirteen days, four ordinary young people with zero experience in diplomacy or military exfiltration worked across six technology platforms and ten time zones to save this innocent young man trapped between deadly forces— rebel fighters from the north and Al Qaeda operatives from the south.The story of an improbable escape as riveting as the best page-turning thrillers, The Fox Hunt reminds us that goodness and decency can triumph in the darkest circumstances.

The Fox Hunt Details

TitleThe Fox Hunt
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062678218
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography, War

The Fox Hunt Review

  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    If anyone deserves to get the life he has prepared for and does by example strive toward with work/goals continually forward, it is this author. He is also a born capitalist in his soul, IMHO. Not to mention that his intellect is coupled with a personality born whole and then honed by his family for "fellow well met" associations supreme. His background and physical state could have made him bitter and vengeful. Instead, he is kind. Also holding continual voice with action example to get the exp If anyone deserves to get the life he has prepared for and does by example strive toward with work/goals continually forward, it is this author. He is also a born capitalist in his soul, IMHO. Not to mention that his intellect is coupled with a personality born whole and then honed by his family for "fellow well met" associations supreme. His background and physical state could have made him bitter and vengeful. Instead, he is kind. Also holding continual voice with action example to get the explosive ends around to meet somewhere and somehow. He also sees humor and positive minutia with strong recognition of some joy in just being alive. (Although lack of electricity is sure to take the smile off his face.) People with disability from a very young age who find a route they like often have that quality, I've found. Or else they get bitter introverted/ closed in to recluse and rather mean. He definitely took the top route.His story of Yemen is complex and often confusing. As is their civil war of, IMHO, far more than just 2 sides. And this is his tale of getting out alive from Yemen when he was and is a mark for the absolute worst consequences. Not only because of who he is ethnically, but also because of how he talks and thinks regarding his own religious lines of dictates. He became "known".Mohammed is exactly the kind of immigrant that is welcome and has more than just victim /refugee justifications to be welcomed. With all of this trouble and anguish, I have the feeling that Al Samawi is certainly worried about his birth family but that he is also one of those people who you know from some font of his own joy, also has a positive smile for the next possible associate. His name could be Horatio Alger too, in a broad sense, it could. Success is possible. All levels of success are possible. Social networks have their downsides but they also have their advantages. This is a fabulous story of connection through tech too. 3 star for the writing ability and 5 star for the personal story/ example. So 4 star rating for a tale of today which explains so much about the Middle East's endless troubles. UN, UNICEF, Saudi Arabia in particular could do SO MUCH more to help those caught in the horrific and constant cracks.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the most amazing stories I have ever read – and it is a true story! Across the top of the front cover of the book is a very powerful description – “Four Strangers, Three Faiths, and One Extraordinary Escape to Freedom”.Mohammed Al Samawi grew up in Yemen being taught to hate Christians and Jews. But then he met Luke, a Christian professor, and they struck up a friendship. With sincere concern for Luke, Mohammed presented him with a copy of the Quran. Luke agreed to read the Quran This is one of the most amazing stories I have ever read – and it is a true story! Across the top of the front cover of the book is a very powerful description – “Four Strangers, Three Faiths, and One Extraordinary Escape to Freedom”.Mohammed Al Samawi grew up in Yemen being taught to hate Christians and Jews. But then he met Luke, a Christian professor, and they struck up a friendship. With sincere concern for Luke, Mohammed presented him with a copy of the Quran. Luke agreed to read the Quran if Mohammed would read the Bible. This challenge would ultimately totally change Mohammed’s life.The more he read, the more he came to realize that Jews, Christians, and Muslims are more similar than they are different. This realization resulted in so many questions he knew he had to get answers. He began on-line interactions with Jews and Christians and attended conferences in Sarajevo and Jordan. It was in Jordan that he met a young lady who would later help save his life. But his interactions with Jews and Christians soon got the attention of the extremist groups. He began receiving death threats and soon knew his life was truly in danger. How could he get out of Yemen? Fearing for the safety of his family he left his home of Sana’a and fled to Aden.In Aden, he reached out on social media asking for help. He was trapped, all alone, in the bathroom of his apartment while outside the gunfire and grenades exploded. His social media friends became his family, there with him 24 hours a day. It was four young interfaith activists – two in the US and two in Tel Aviv - with no experience in foreign affairs, international relations, or foreign diplomacy who, through social media, carried out a miracle. They reached out to everyone they knew and got them to also reach out to their networks. And people responded! They connected with various militaries, governments, and organizations where they found some who were willing to help. The way they got him out of Yemen is just mind-boggling. Not only did they get him out of Yemen but they then got him to the US. This is a miraculous story. It restores faith that there really are good people out there who will go to great measures for people they do not know. Why? It is just the right thing to do I guess. It really should be no surprise too that his story has already been picked up to be made into a movie. This is absolutely a MUST READ.
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    This is an autobiography of a man's escape from his war torn country of Yemen. In the beginning, as he goes through his childhood, this felt like it was going to be a chore to get through. I was ready to toss 2 stars at it. It felt overly dramatic and I think it was because of the narration. But the second half picked up considerably. It still felt dramatic but for good reason. The suspense was well written. His escape has an incredible feat and it was made possible by friends and of course, fri This is an autobiography of a man's escape from his war torn country of Yemen. In the beginning, as he goes through his childhood, this felt like it was going to be a chore to get through. I was ready to toss 2 stars at it. It felt overly dramatic and I think it was because of the narration. But the second half picked up considerably. It still felt dramatic but for good reason. The suspense was well written. His escape has an incredible feat and it was made possible by friends and of course, friends with money. The second half was 4 stars....so I'll go with 3.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy in a giveaway -- and I'm so glad I did! This was a very well put together story of a refugee's experience in faith, friendship, and international affairs. There was a lot of explanation of the war in Yemen, which was a little slow at times, but helped me (as someone who was not fully aware of the tensions in the country) understand what was happening on the ground. An important read to learn more about what refugees go through!
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  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    Mohammad grew up in Yemen and was taught that Westerners and Jews were evil and an enemy to all Muslims. A college level course provided him a fateful interaction with a Western man that led to his continued education in other religions, cultures and nationalities. This is a moving memoir that not only details his scary situation as Yemen disintegrated into civil war but also the importance of making connections. A group of the connections and friendships that Mohammad forged during his NGO peac Mohammad grew up in Yemen and was taught that Westerners and Jews were evil and an enemy to all Muslims. A college level course provided him a fateful interaction with a Western man that led to his continued education in other religions, cultures and nationalities. This is a moving memoir that not only details his scary situation as Yemen disintegrated into civil war but also the importance of making connections. A group of the connections and friendships that Mohammad forged during his NGO peace work went to drastic lengths to help get him out Yemen. He is very honest about his experiences and the mistakes that he makes, which is at times frustrating, but at the same time very engaging. I received a digital ARC of this book through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know much about the causes of the war in Yemen until I read this book.  It still doesn't make much sense to me because it boils down to "Those people look different than us and think differently than us."  It is that kind of mindset that Mohammed Al Samawi was working against prior to the war.  The stars of this story of the activists around the world who play a high stakes game of Six Degrees of Separation.  Who do you know?  Who do they know?  Can you get one man from Aden to Africa? I didn't know much about the causes of the war in Yemen until I read this book.  It still doesn't make much sense to me because it boils down to "Those people look different than us and think differently than us."  It is that kind of mindset that Mohammed Al Samawi was working against prior to the war.  The stars of this story of the activists around the world who play a high stakes game of Six Degrees of Separation.  Who do you know?  Who do they know?  Can you get one man from Aden to Africa?What struck me while reading this is the problems that are caused by Yemen's patriarchy/toxic combination of masculinity and religion: The whole conflict could be put down to this He was unable to shelter with his uncle's family because his uncle wouldn't let him in the house where his unmarried female cousins lived.  How messed up is that?  Your nephew is alone in an apartment in a war zone but you won't take him in because you assume he wouldn't be able to sexually control himself around his female relatives? Because he was male he was completely unprepared to live on his own without women to care for him.  He moved to Aden and was living alone.  He ate out daily since he didn't cook so he had minimal food and supplies in the house when all the shops closed down. After he was out of Yemen due to the help of a group of interfaith activists he was still too afraid to tell him mother (still living in a war zone) that he had been talking to Jews.  I found the beginning of this book with his entry into interfaith dialogue more interesting than the story of his escape from Yemen.  I think that is partially because the writing is very plain.  It reads like "This happened and then this happened and then this happened..."  Secondly, I mostly just wanted to shake the guy.  This is not a heroic memoir.  Mohammed Al Samawi isn't brave.  He isn't very good at planning.  He moves from Sanaa to Aden but neglects to bring his passport even though he travels for work.  These things all make trying to flee the country harder.  He uses the distraction of a Northern man like himself being publicly tortured to death in the street by Al Qaeda to escape from his apartment while wondering why no one tries to help that man.  He even refers to himself occasionally as a man-child.  He was in his late 20s in 2015 when this happened.In the end there were so many different lobbying efforts going on that it is not clear who succeeded in getting the order given to let him on the ship from Aden to Djibouti.  I wish this had been investigated.  It seems to be a very strange thing not to know who allowed his transport in a book about arranging his transport.   In the absence of facts, he falls back on the idea that God arranged his rescue.  While comforting for religious people, this makes nonreligious people want to pull their hair out.  Basically he saying that his God ignored everyone else stuck in a war (about religion and power) to concentrate on giving him special attention.  It also diminishes all the hard work that people did on his behalf. [image error] This review was originally posted on Based On A True Story
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  • Caleigh Rutledge
    January 1, 1970
    An important read for today's conflict in Yemen. 4 stars because the harrowing story is, I feel, just the beginning for this author's contribution to his country. I reviewed an early copy of this book as part of the TLC Book Tour - please find my full review available APRIL 17, 2018 at http://www.literaryquicksand.com/2018...
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  • Meg - A Bookish Affair
    January 1, 1970
    "The Fox Hunt" is the story of Mohammed who dreams of making his home country of Yemen a better place where more young people can succeed and be safe. Yemen is embroiled in a brutal civil war where the lines between the various sides and outside influence from brutal terrorist groups are blurred. Mohammed finds himself in a situation where he needs to desperately get out of the country where there seems to be no clear exit. He will largely have to rely on fate and the kindness of almost stranger "The Fox Hunt" is the story of Mohammed who dreams of making his home country of Yemen a better place where more young people can succeed and be safe. Yemen is embroiled in a brutal civil war where the lines between the various sides and outside influence from brutal terrorist groups are blurred. Mohammed finds himself in a situation where he needs to desperately get out of the country where there seems to be no clear exit. He will largely have to rely on fate and the kindness of almost strangers to help him get out alive.This is a truly amazing story that often reads more like a thriller than a true story. Al Samawi spins a great yarn about what his country is facing and what he is facing as an individual. He is one of the lucky ones. There are so many others in his country that have been felled by the violence and never had the chance to even begin to think about escaping the violence. One thing that I kept thinking about throughout the book is how many other Mohammeds are there out there? Individuals with immense promise to make an impact that because of their circumstances are never given the chance to succeed. It's staggering to think about that!Even for an avid newshound like me, there is still so much that I don't know and am not tracking. The Yemen civil war is one of those subjects that I don't fully understand. This book dives into a little of the history to show how the country got to where it is and made it a lot clearer for me. It's a very sad situation that doesn't seem to be getting a lot of airtime in light of other things going on in other countries in the region. This is the perfect book to give you more background on the situation on Yemen as well as a harrowing escape story that ends with a lot of promise!
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    "An army of hate is being raised across the Middle East. I believe that an army of understanding and action can take on that army and defeat it.I'm a living example of the power of human connection." (p. 307)
  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, @tlcbooktours, for my free review copy. All opinions are my own.While reading @alsawami’s memoir, THE FOX HUNT, I was continually relieved by the fact that I’ve never had to know a day in my life of bullets whizzing by my ears and bombs falling from the sky. I have had a fortunate existence, but I’m also very aware that not everyone in this world can say the same. The details and experiences of this book are a reality for many people. I applaud Al Sawami for writing his story and givi Thank you, @tlcbooktours, for my free review copy. All opinions are my own.While reading @alsawami’s memoir, THE FOX HUNT, I was continually relieved by the fact that I’ve never had to know a day in my life of bullets whizzing by my ears and bombs falling from the sky. I have had a fortunate existence, but I’m also very aware that not everyone in this world can say the same. The details and experiences of this book are a reality for many people. I applaud Al Sawami for writing his story and giving a voice to the innocent people of the Middle Eastern conflicts. This is why I love books so much - they help us to have compassion and understanding, they show us how different life can be for someone else, and they teach us about things we may never know about otherwise. Many people came together throughout the world to help Al Sawami escape his dire circumstances, and he has used that kindness to educate people in hopes that we will learn from the situations in order to not repeat the same mistakes. His life was saved when the odds were stacked against him, and we are fortunate that he has chosen to use his voice so that we can learn. It’s like the saying goes, “When we know better, we do better.” Thanks for teaching me, Mohammed, through your words in this book. You’re truly an inspiration for all of us to forgo our differences and to love one another instead.
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story that kept me on the edge of my seat. Imagine being a country torn by civil war and you are a wanted man. The situation is deteriorating and you need to get out – but how? Oh, and that country is Yemen. The Fox Hunt is the memoir of the man in this story.In this time of division and hate a story like this certainly offers hope. For the author of this memoir is a Muslim and he is helped by an international assortment of friends and associates of all religions and beliefs. They co This is the story that kept me on the edge of my seat. Imagine being a country torn by civil war and you are a wanted man. The situation is deteriorating and you need to get out – but how? Oh, and that country is Yemen. The Fox Hunt is the memoir of the man in this story.In this time of division and hate a story like this certainly offers hope. For the author of this memoir is a Muslim and he is helped by an international assortment of friends and associates of all religions and beliefs. They come together to help the PERSON remembering that a person is not the religion they practice but an individual.Despite this book being nonfiction it reads like a first class fiction suspense thriller with a sense of humor. In fact it’s Mohammed’s humor that makes all of the horror palatable. His childhood is not easy and yet he shares the trials with quiet dignity. He is a truly remarkable young man. He is taught from an early age that Jewish people are the worst of the worst. Until one day he is given a Bible and he has to readjust his worldview – which he does. To an amazing degree.I really enjoyed this book even given my general tendency to not read non fiction books. I think if more books like this were read and more people looked past labels like Muslim, Christian, Jewish and looked more at the person the world would be a much gentler place.4.5
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    This book is one that is outside my usual type of reading. It reads as though the author is telling you his story as a friend over a cup of coffee. It is a true story about a Muslim in Yemen, who grew up learning to hate Jews and Christians. When he became friends with a westerner at school, he presented his friend with a copy of the Quran because he was truly concerned that he see the true way. This friend agreed to read the Quran, but only if Mohammed agreed to read the Bible. He did and it wa This book is one that is outside my usual type of reading. It reads as though the author is telling you his story as a friend over a cup of coffee. It is a true story about a Muslim in Yemen, who grew up learning to hate Jews and Christians. When he became friends with a westerner at school, he presented his friend with a copy of the Quran because he was truly concerned that he see the true way. This friend agreed to read the Quran, but only if Mohammed agreed to read the Bible. He did and it was the beginning of his quest to find the truth. Reading the Bible and the Torah, he found many similarities to Islam. Through social media he came to know Jews and Christians and see them as individuals. One description of the book says “Four Strangers, Three Faiths and One Extraordinary Escape to Freedom”. And his story is extraordinary. His sense of humor shines through what could be an action movie. It restores ones faith in humanity. How so many people helped this Muslim from one of the hottest spots for terrorism in the world escape from his homeland where his life was truly in danger is truly remarkable. I highly recommend it!
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Everyday there are immigrant stories: those who entered America illegally and have to leave, those who were born in America but are seen in government eyes as immigrants, thousands of people who left their countries and are now in detention facilities waiting to get somewhere. Out of all these thousands, here is a story of one Yemeni person who had 4 people contacting government officials in India, USA, and other countries day and night for over a month to get Mohammed Al Samawi out of Yemen. I Everyday there are immigrant stories: those who entered America illegally and have to leave, those who were born in America but are seen in government eyes as immigrants, thousands of people who left their countries and are now in detention facilities waiting to get somewhere. Out of all these thousands, here is a story of one Yemeni person who had 4 people contacting government officials in India, USA, and other countries day and night for over a month to get Mohammed Al Samawi out of Yemen. I learned that it took super persuasion by many powerful people to get him out. He was seen worthy of saving because he had worked towards peace between Muslims, Jews, and Christians. That was unusual for a Yemeni.But what one learns most in reading this book is how strong and complicated the infighting between northerners & southerners, Al Qaeda, other groups and the complications added in by Iran and Saudi Arabia. If it takes so much effort to get one person a new home, what chance do thousands of others who fled Yemen have?
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  • Alisa
    January 1, 1970
    An incredible true life story about a young Muslim peace activist who is rescued from war-savaged Yemen by a group of young westerners. The fact that his rescuers are Jews and Christians, people he grew up believing were his sworn enemies, make Al Samawi's tale all the more memorable.This book does an excellent job of explaining the intricacies of the war in Yemen (of which I knew hardly anything about) and puts a very human face on this massive humanitarian crisis. It is also very informative a An incredible true life story about a young Muslim peace activist who is rescued from war-savaged Yemen by a group of young westerners. The fact that his rescuers are Jews and Christians, people he grew up believing were his sworn enemies, make Al Samawi's tale all the more memorable.This book does an excellent job of explaining the intricacies of the war in Yemen (of which I knew hardly anything about) and puts a very human face on this massive humanitarian crisis. It is also very informative about the Muslim religion in general, detailing the differences between the Sunnis and Shias...and how the global powers of Saudi Arabia and Iran exploit their poorer neighbors like Yemen.Al Samawi's thirst for knowledge, his willingness to put aside his distrust of Jews and Americans, ends up saving his life. This is ultimately a story of connection, hope, and love...much needed in these unsettling times.
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  • Gaelen
    January 1, 1970
    I skimmed the first half of this book, which was mostly about how the author awoke from his fundamentalist beliefs and became part of an interfaith group. The second half is where the meat is, as the author tries to escape as Yemen collapses around him. Even though this part of the book is more compelling, I still feel the author was too focused on being grateful to those who helped get him out. Rather than being about the terror and trials of trying to get out from behind enemy territory, it’s I skimmed the first half of this book, which was mostly about how the author awoke from his fundamentalist beliefs and became part of an interfaith group. The second half is where the meat is, as the author tries to escape as Yemen collapses around him. Even though this part of the book is more compelling, I still feel the author was too focused on being grateful to those who helped get him out. Rather than being about the terror and trials of trying to get out from behind enemy territory, it’s more about the logistical and diplomatic efforts being made by his friends on the outside. That help was incredible and admirable, but accounts of emails and phone calls don’t make for particularly compelling reading.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a mind blowing story about how a man from Yemen made connections with people around the world and how those people moved mountains to save that man's life by getting him out of war torn Yemen. The whole time I was reading this book, I thought, this is so extraordinary. I'd never think that a handful of people could make this happen. In that way, this is a story about the power of humanity.Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy the process of reading this book. I did not like the author's voice a This was a mind blowing story about how a man from Yemen made connections with people around the world and how those people moved mountains to save that man's life by getting him out of war torn Yemen. The whole time I was reading this book, I thought, this is so extraordinary. I'd never think that a handful of people could make this happen. In that way, this is a story about the power of humanity.Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy the process of reading this book. I did not like the author's voice and manner of storytelling. But I did like the insight it gave me into a country I previously knew absolutely nothing about.
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  • Sabeeha Rehman
    January 1, 1970
    Are there any skeptics out there who are skeptical about the value of interfaith dialogue? This book will convert you. If there is a book that will drive home the point that there are good people in every faith who will do whatever it takes to do the right thing, this book is it. A Muslim young man is trapped in Yemen during the height of the civil war, and his Jewish acquaintances in Israel and America help get him out. He is for real, as are those Jewish men and women who pull all the strings Are there any skeptics out there who are skeptical about the value of interfaith dialogue? This book will convert you. If there is a book that will drive home the point that there are good people in every faith who will do whatever it takes to do the right thing, this book is it. A Muslim young man is trapped in Yemen during the height of the civil war, and his Jewish acquaintances in Israel and America help get him out. He is for real, as are those Jewish men and women who pull all the strings to bring him to safety to America--I know him, and I know the people who helped him. Its an amazing story, well told, well written.
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  • Suecd48
    January 1, 1970
    I found Mohammed's story fascinating on several levels. First, he is a devout Muslim, confused as to how his faith taught peace yet so many Muslims vow violence. Second, he sincerely and openly wants to know the truth, and as he reads the Bible (starting with the Old Testament), he discovers that many of the stories are similar--even identical!--to the stories he's read in the Koran. Third, he struggles to live at peace with everyone, respecting them and their rights to have a faith different fr I found Mohammed's story fascinating on several levels. First, he is a devout Muslim, confused as to how his faith taught peace yet so many Muslims vow violence. Second, he sincerely and openly wants to know the truth, and as he reads the Bible (starting with the Old Testament), he discovers that many of the stories are similar--even identical!--to the stories he's read in the Koran. Third, he struggles to live at peace with everyone, respecting them and their rights to have a faith different from his in a society that opposes such tolerance. And fourth, he has to find a safe way out of Yemen during the violent civil war breaking out in 2015.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Mohammed Al Samawi is a person to admire and emulate. He is a humanist, a caring questioner, an activist who chooses to put his well thought out love of humanity and understanding of religions into action by working in NGOs. His life thus far shows how good comes from good, how love is the answer, and how serendipity may actually be love at work. His interaction with others who believe and act as he does shows how cooperation, determination, perseverance and, perhaps, divine intervention work fo Mohammed Al Samawi is a person to admire and emulate. He is a humanist, a caring questioner, an activist who chooses to put his well thought out love of humanity and understanding of religions into action by working in NGOs. His life thus far shows how good comes from good, how love is the answer, and how serendipity may actually be love at work. His interaction with others who believe and act as he does shows how cooperation, determination, perseverance and, perhaps, divine intervention work for the good--not always, but certainly so far in his life. His memoir leaves the reader thinking about how many subjective concepts fit into the scheme of our lives.
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  • Travis Arp
    January 1, 1970
    If for no other reason you want to get a better idea of the Muslim faith, and the history of the Middle East conflicts between various Muslim sects, this is a phenomenal book. I gained a much better understanding of the Muslim religion just by reading this book, and the long history of the conflicts between Sunni's and Shiites. But on top of that, this is an incredible story that Mohamed tells of being trapped in Yemen during the height of the civil war and the works of various connections from If for no other reason you want to get a better idea of the Muslim faith, and the history of the Middle East conflicts between various Muslim sects, this is a phenomenal book. I gained a much better understanding of the Muslim religion just by reading this book, and the long history of the conflicts between Sunni's and Shiites. But on top of that, this is an incredible story that Mohamed tells of being trapped in Yemen during the height of the civil war and the works of various connections from around the world to get him out. As someone who travels to the region, I never fully understood the depth of the conflict, but this was an amazing story and a must read.
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  • David Peters
    January 1, 1970
    Great read about the story of a young man coming to the United States, after facing adversity for his interfaith work. Mohammed's story is touching because of the humanity involved with it. People he knew, some well and some barely at all, put aside their busy lives to help him survive. I'm also inspired by the work Mohammed has done - trying to see the relatability in all relgion and to form a holisitc understanding. Sometimes we are brought up believing one thing, only to find out later in lif Great read about the story of a young man coming to the United States, after facing adversity for his interfaith work. Mohammed's story is touching because of the humanity involved with it. People he knew, some well and some barely at all, put aside their busy lives to help him survive. I'm also inspired by the work Mohammed has done - trying to see the relatability in all relgion and to form a holisitc understanding. Sometimes we are brought up believing one thing, only to find out later in life that we may have been wrong.
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  • Yafa Crane Luria
    January 1, 1970
    This story is incredible. Even though we know that it ends with the author's safety, it is a captivating read. I have met several of the people in this book, including Mohammed, had lunch with others, and am a close friend of one of Mohammed's friend, also mentioned on the book. They define the term "Public Servant," doing what they do to save the world because it's the right thing to do and not for fame or glory. As a life-long activist, I can say that the world is in good hands with these Mile This story is incredible. Even though we know that it ends with the author's safety, it is a captivating read. I have met several of the people in this book, including Mohammed, had lunch with others, and am a close friend of one of Mohammed's friend, also mentioned on the book. They define the term "Public Servant," doing what they do to save the world because it's the right thing to do and not for fame or glory. As a life-long activist, I can say that the world is in good hands with these Milennials and their friends. Bravo, Mohammed, on your excellent work.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting book . The author was raised as a devout Muslim and taught that Jews and Christians were his enemies. When Mohammed was twenty-three, he secretly received and read a copy of the Bible. After connecting with Jews and Christians on the internet and at conferences, He became an activist to try to unite Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Yemen where he received death threats and a civil war tore apart his country. Thankfully a group of people with no experience in diplomacy worked to ge An interesting book . The author was raised as a devout Muslim and taught that Jews and Christians were his enemies. When Mohammed was twenty-three, he secretly received and read a copy of the Bible. After connecting with Jews and Christians on the internet and at conferences, He became an activist to try to unite Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Yemen where he received death threats and a civil war tore apart his country. Thankfully a group of people with no experience in diplomacy worked to get him out of Yemen.
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this was an informative, exciting, and inspiring story! I really admire the author's compassion and open-mindedness. And, I am in awe of the the many who helped him, with their commitment, helpfulness, and generosity. This book details the devastating situation in Yemen, but leaves us with hope that things can get better. (I listened to this story on Audible, and felt that the narrator, Assaf Cohen, did an amazing job bringing this story to life.)
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  • Gillian Morris
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in less than 24 hours. A screenwriter couldn't have woven a more edge-of-your-seat thriller - and this actually happened. I was lucky enough to meet Mohammed soon after he made it to the US, but had no idea of the extent of what went on to make his escape possible. I finished the book with a richer picture of Yemen and the Middle East in general, but more importantly, with a profound sense of what extraordinary things can happen when people take a chance on someone.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    A Must Read This is a must read for every American. This should be taught in high school! If I had had any inkling that I could have so much power to change even some small part of the world when I was in my twenties...Wow. I have so much Faith in our younger generations. We must all live as human beings. We all must seek to understand. If this guy can do it, anyone can...and should!
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  • Philip
    January 1, 1970
    If I didn’t know this to be a true story, I would have thought it was a great novel by Tom Clancy, Robert Ludlum, Daniel Silva and other suspense writers I enjoy. The fact that this Mohammed al Samawi’s actual story makes it amazing. This should be a must read book for anyone interested in building cross cultural understanding. Mohammed’s story puts real people to the headlines of a story about which many Americans, I’d wager, know only the basic facts, if that.
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  • vicki groom
    January 1, 1970
    Thank You, Thank You, Thank YouUnderstanding the Middle East is a daunting task! Never in my wildest dream did I think I could begin to grasp what a Yemeni suffered and endured and continue to endure. Thank you writing your memoir. Thank you for sharing your unconditional love of your faith and your aspiration to understand my unconditional love of my faith. Live well and may peace continue to follow you.
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  • Debi Rice
    January 1, 1970
    A real touching memoir of a young man named Mohammed who is truly inspiring. The story is how 4 strangers, three faiths, the power of social media who helped a young man escape from a war in Yemen. How they planned one extraordinary escape to freedom. Truly gave you hope and made you realized just how fortunate we are to live in the United States. This may have been non-fiction this book kept you in your seats. It felt like a thriller.
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  • Steve Sanderson
    January 1, 1970
    Digital salvation Very interesting, compelling read, not at all ponderous or preachy. A human story. We all benefit from understanding that global conflict affects human individuals and societies. This isn’t war in the abstract. The novel aspect is social media and its potential. Worth reading.
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