Like a Mother
What to read after What to Expect . . . . A badass, feminist, and personal deep-dive into the science and culture of pregnancy and early motherhood that debunks myths and dated assumptions, offering guidance and camaraderie to women navigating one of the biggest and most profound changes in their lives.Like most first-time mothers, Angela Garbes was filled with questions when she became pregnant. What exactly is a placenta? How does a body go into labor? Why is breast best? What are the signs and effects of post-partum depression?But as she discovered, it’s not easy to find satisfying answers. Your OB will cautiously quote statistics; online sources will scare you with conflicting and often inaccurate information; and even the most trusted books will offer information with a heavy dose of judgment. To educate herself, the food and culture writer embarked on an intensive journey of exploration, diving into the scientific mysteries and cultural myths that surround motherhood to find answers to her questions that had only previously been given through a lens of what women ought to do—instead of allowing them the freedom to choose the right path themselves.In Like a Mother, Angela offers a rigorously researched and compelling look at the physiology, biology, chemistry, and psychology of pregnancy and motherhood, informed by research, reportage, and her own experience. With a journalist’s curiosity and discipline, a mother’s urgency, and a food writer’s insatiability, she explores the science behind the pressing questions women have about a number of subjects, including postpartum hormones, breast milk, and miscarriage.Infused with candor and humor, born out of awe, appreciation, and understanding of the human body and its workings, Like a Mother is a full-frontal look at what’s really happening underneath your skin (and to it), and why women need to know.

Like a Mother Details

TitleLike a Mother
Author
ReleaseMay 29th, 2018
PublisherHarper Wave
ISBN-139780062662965
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Parenting, Feminism, Autobiography, Memoir

Like a Mother Review

  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    This. Is. Excellent. I say that as a mother, as a maternal-child health MPH, and as a woman. This tells it like it is, with the science and research and sociology to back it up. I laughed, i underlined, I wrote in the margins. I only wish I’d had this when I was pregnant. She writes about that dreaded postpartum poop with a candor that I loved. This should be mandatory reading for pregnant people. And anyone who loves them and cares for them.
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  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    UPDATE: For those who want more info on breastfeeding - and why pushing new moms to nurse is misguided - check out this article on the Daily Beast: https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-bre... As a new mother and feminist killjoy, I was so excited to read this book. Everything about its premise perfectly encapsulated where my mommy brain now resides. There were so many wonderful parts of this book. The chapter about the placenta was utterly fascinating and contained a level of knowledge that I wish UPDATE: For those who want more info on breastfeeding - and why pushing new moms to nurse is misguided - check out this article on the Daily Beast: https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-bre... As a new mother and feminist killjoy, I was so excited to read this book. Everything about its premise perfectly encapsulated where my mommy brain now resides. There were so many wonderful parts of this book. The chapter about the placenta was utterly fascinating and contained a level of knowledge that I wish I had possessed while pregnant. And then came the chapter on breastfeeding. I knew that it was coming, but I had certain expectations that left me so wanting that I never finished the book. The author goes on for pages about the benefits of breastfeeding - facts that are consistently shoved down the throats of every pregnant woman and new mom. WE GET IT. Her mentions of women who decide not to nurse are very few and far between, and come almost as an afterthought. When my daughter was born I desperately wanted to breastfeed, and when she latched perfectly the first time it was incredible. We were so in sync - even the nurses commented on it. Once I got home, however, the stress of being a new mom, recovering from 31 hours of labor followed by an emergency c-section, and a five day hospital stay due to high blood pressure and an infection left me beyond exhausted. Keeping up with feedings every two hours was impossible in my condition, and when my milk supply decided it couldn't keep up with my daughter's growing appetite I felt like an utter failure. The mental toll this took on me can't be overstated. I struggled and struggled with the decision to switch to formula feeding 100%. I felt like the worst kind of selfish mother, but once I made the decision everything became so much easier - for me AND my daughter. Feminism is about supporting women no matter what choices they decide to make. How we want to live our lives - especially the decisions we make as mothers - isn't up to anyone else. It's between us and our souls/god/whatever. And while I applaud the author for taking on such a hefty subject, she did a grave disservice by not wholly honoring new mothers regardless of their decision to breastfeed or bottle feed.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    There's a pretty good consensus nowadays that pregnancy guides are problematic in various ways. They're condescending, judgmental, and aren't very informative. There's a real need for books that speak more to the science of pregnancy and don't infantilize women when offering advice, and Angela Garbes's book is a step in that direction.While much of this is personal narrative, Garbes does some deep dives into subjects most mothers encounter during pregnancy and childbirth (like wtaf is a placenta There's a pretty good consensus nowadays that pregnancy guides are problematic in various ways. They're condescending, judgmental, and aren't very informative. There's a real need for books that speak more to the science of pregnancy and don't infantilize women when offering advice, and Angela Garbes's book is a step in that direction.While much of this is personal narrative, Garbes does some deep dives into subjects most mothers encounter during pregnancy and childbirth (like wtaf is a placenta, why childbirth destroys your pelvic floor, and why breast milk is the most brilliant human creation ever). She confronts the myth of long-standing pregnancy advice about abstaining from caffeine and alcohol (I love sushi and frequently mused during pregnancy that if I lived in Japan, no one would be telling me to avoid it). And, perhaps most importantly, she talks about stigmas surrounding miscarriage and postpartum depression. Again, this isn't a science-heavy book, but there's a lot of great information that women don't receive during pregnancy that can arm them with more agency in their pregnancies and births. Which is SO desperately needed for maternal care in this country.And a big HELL YES to a pregnancy book by a woman of color. <3
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  • Jaci Millette Cooper
    January 1, 1970
    Motherhood- it's an unfolding. Of course, I don't know this firsthand- I cannot relate, but Garbes’ use of the literal unfolding of paper as a metaphor for the transformation of motherhood, gradual and all at once, makes me almost believe I can empathize: “At first, I see the unfurling of tissue and viscera, the way our placenta, unraveled, would occupy miles of space. Then, the image gives way to a paper fortune teller, the intricately folded piece of paper that my friends played with in the ca Motherhood- it's an unfolding. Of course, I don't know this firsthand- I cannot relate, but Garbes’ use of the literal unfolding of paper as a metaphor for the transformation of motherhood, gradual and all at once, makes me almost believe I can empathize: “At first, I see the unfurling of tissue and viscera, the way our placenta, unraveled, would occupy miles of space. Then, the image gives way to a paper fortune teller, the intricately folded piece of paper that my friends played with in the cafeterias and study halls of middle school. You fold down corner after corner again, creating blank chambers on which to write future possibilities. You place your fingers inside and move them inward and outward, opening and closing and opening and closing, as the paper predicts what might become of you. After, you might unfold it and lay it flat on the table, but it isn’t the same piece of paper. It holds something else now, imbued with hope anxiousness, and curiosity for the future.” (230) As much as I wish I could use a paper fortune teller to help me decide if motherhood is an undertaking I want to experience, I can’t. I’ve instead become research-obsessed. About a year ago, I read an incredibly interesting article about breast milk production of oligosaccharides solely for a baby's gut microbes and I was fascinated. Which other natural phenomena of motherhood are more complex than I ever imagined? It turns out, all of them seem to be. Since then, I have been reading up on the idiosyncratic properties of mother's milk- which, damn my social media algorithms, has also gotten me caught in webs of articles pertaining to motherhood and birth. Research is knowledge, and knowledge is power, and power is control. I am a control freak. I think I'm tricking myself into believing that research will tip the scale and make the decision more evident. The research component is necessary for any decision I make: big or small. I feel isolated in that the most massive internal conflict of my life, (with the most consequences either way, be it good or bad) seems to be an inherent or instinctual desire for most people. I believe I am good with babies and children- I am gentle, creative, loving- all things that would make a quote "good mother." But I am incredibly anxious and, frankly, I just really enjoy my life as is and I hesitate to jeopardize making it something I don't. Is that selfish? Sure, but don’t for one second think that having a child doesn't have its own roots in selfishness. Either way, it isn’t a decision I want to take lightly— and it is a decision I wish more people did not take lightly. Up until recently, I was completely oblivious to how difficult and depressing the transformation into parenthood is: society used to consider it taboo to speak about it in anything other than a positive light, but now more mothers are being open about just how hard it is. As Garbes says, “We lack stories- diverse stories- about pregnancy and motherhood.”I'm already dissatisfied with the care a woman receives after birthing a child and I haven't even come close to experiencing firsthand. My sister's prenatal and postpartum care opened my eyes to the ways our cultural norms relentlessly fail expectant mothers. Doctors, not to mention random members of society, meticulously monitor your body and choices when pregnant, but postpartum care is essentially non-existent! You're on your own. Hormonal changes aside, this lack of support leaves no room for question as to why so many women suffer from postpartum depression. Living away from home and being conscientious of my own hormonal issues, I worry I won't have the support I always envisioned I’d have. The old adage “It takes a village to raise a child” is so true, and we no longer have villages: we live in a culture that is obsessed with autonomy and the nuclear family unit. Now, as Garbes explains, many expectant mothers hire a doula, especially if they live away from extended family. While I think doulas are wonderful, I find it sad that our culture must hire and pay for support, care, and wisdom that we as women should naturally provide one another, especially since those women using doulas are white upper-class— what do other women without family closeby do? Many are an island. They endure the hardship of motherhood alone. This book brought what most books on the topic lack: anatomy and science. I'm sure we all know how babies are made and enter the world, but Garbes puts full body female health into perspective all while not dismissing or undermining anecdotal experience. The most fascinating part of this book is at the end when Garbes discusses the exchange between fetal and maternal cells. Garbes highlights the recently-discovered ubiquity of microchimeric cells in the female body and their role in maternal injury recovery— like in C-section scars, so when someone says they are changed after motherhood, it is true down to the cellular level. If you want an all-encompassing meditation on motherhood from placenta encapsulation, to the fluctuating feelings of self-worth, to the tit-spraying, milk-soaked, post-baby, laugh-out-loud, sex scenes, this book is for you. In fact, think everyone could benefit from reading this, not just expectant mothers, mothers who need to feel less alone, or the baby-curious researchers like me. *This is an ARC- To be published May 2018.*
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  • Katya
    January 1, 1970
    There is some great stuff in this title, and I enjoyed reading it. Garbes is a thoughtful and illustrative writer--she really digs into imagery and detail. I wish, though, that this book had been more heavily edited. There is no clear throughline, and subjects thus receive a random-seeming amount of attention, which varies quite a bit from topic to topic. While of course Garbes makes no claim to having written a comprehensive book, I feel she could have tried a little more to include more topics There is some great stuff in this title, and I enjoyed reading it. Garbes is a thoughtful and illustrative writer--she really digs into imagery and detail. I wish, though, that this book had been more heavily edited. There is no clear throughline, and subjects thus receive a random-seeming amount of attention, which varies quite a bit from topic to topic. While of course Garbes makes no claim to having written a comprehensive book, I feel she could have tried a little more to include more topics or to add more focus to her narrative. Also, despite her best efforts to be inclusive, I wouldn't recommend this book to single mothers or to those who have been unable to breastfeed--while they would enjoy many aspects of it, the focus on human milk and on the amazingness of Garbes' partner might be hard to take. Critiques aside, when this book is good it's great, and I'll remember many anecdotes and factual tidbits from it for quite a while.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I wish this had been longer, because I feel like it touched on so much and could have been thousands of pages. But it’s great and worth reading.
  • Meggie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsI wish I could have read this book before giving birth to my son. Garbes—a journalist—writes about pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum life as a mother in an equally informative and emotional way. I found myself resonating with a lot of her observations about having a child, and I also learned a great deal about pregnancy and being a mother. Garbes’ in-depth research about a topic she was highly interested in—she had just given birth to her first child—created a tone of fascination tha 4.5 starsI wish I could have read this book before giving birth to my son. Garbes—a journalist—writes about pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum life as a mother in an equally informative and emotional way. I found myself resonating with a lot of her observations about having a child, and I also learned a great deal about pregnancy and being a mother. Garbes’ in-depth research about a topic she was highly interested in—she had just given birth to her first child—created a tone of fascination that grabs the reader. Her breakout article about breastfeeding is a must read. Go read it here: https://www.thestranger.com/features/...I only took issue with Garbes’ highly feminist perspective that values women overmuch and does not value the life of unborn children. While she does have many good points (such as that research about men’s health is disproportionate to women), I can’t say her feminist approach persuaded me.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Public library copyThis made me really glad that I am old, and that I had my children long enough ago that maternity clothes were tents and there were topics that just... weren't discussed. Now everything needs to be discussed, apparently. Still, I learned a lot, especially that people talk about miscarriages now. I don't want to be completely out of the loop if my one daughter ever has children. I need to read enough to know what to keep my mouth shut about!Times do change. That's why we have t Public library copyThis made me really glad that I am old, and that I had my children long enough ago that maternity clothes were tents and there were topics that just... weren't discussed. Now everything needs to be discussed, apparently. Still, I learned a lot, especially that people talk about miscarriages now. I don't want to be completely out of the loop if my one daughter ever has children. I need to read enough to know what to keep my mouth shut about!Times do change. That's why we have the term "generation gap".
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    Since becoming pregnant and then becoming a mother, I have had lots of moments where I’ve said to myself, “Why doesn’t anyone TELL YOU about this??!” This book, more than any other pregnancy/parenthood book I’ve read, tells you those things: the gross postpartum issues, the lingering aches and pains, the incredibly complicated emotions, etc. There’s also a lot of really neat-o science throughout! I just thoroughly enjoyed reading this book—it made me feel seen/understood/not alone, not even clos Since becoming pregnant and then becoming a mother, I have had lots of moments where I’ve said to myself, “Why doesn’t anyone TELL YOU about this??!” This book, more than any other pregnancy/parenthood book I’ve read, tells you those things: the gross postpartum issues, the lingering aches and pains, the incredibly complicated emotions, etc. There’s also a lot of really neat-o science throughout! I just thoroughly enjoyed reading this book—it made me feel seen/understood/not alone, not even close.
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  • Chinook
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot, I cried a lot, I contemplated a lot. It’s a good look at the realities of giving birth in America right now, a good exploration into interesting things going on in a mother’s body. It centres the experience of the mother, rather than the child which is refreshing. I think she lost a chance to bring up how flawed some of the studies surrounding claims for breastfeeding, but in general reading this was a healing experience for me.
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  • AnnieLiz Love
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I could give this book more than 5 stars! I’m currently 29 weeks pregnant and this book has been a revelation in the best way possible. I laughed, I cried, I was shocked- Thank you to Angela Garbes for writing this book. It meant so much to me.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Local author! Wacky true science facts! I endorse this.
  • Sam Southerd
    January 1, 1970
    Hated her 30 page discussion on alcohol and pregnancy but the rest was interesting. The book is more her story and experiences than true scientific facts but she did try to weave some science in. Nothing new for me but still enjoyable. Might be too much for a first time mom? Lots of worst case situations graphically described.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This was lower on science than I would have liked, especially because I found this book after so enjoying her article on the science of breastfeeding, but it was fascinating and honest account of one women's experience finding her own way through pregnancy and motherhood.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I have two children, 3 years old and 18 months. So my days are full of diapers, making snacks, so much laundry and someone is on me constantly. So when I read a book in two days, it’s a Big Deal. This is the book pregnant people should read. This is the book their partners and support people should read. This is the book every human who has grown in a uterus should read. It made me cry. It made me laugh. It made me raise my hands and go yes yes me too! Angela covers early pregnancy, what the hec I have two children, 3 years old and 18 months. So my days are full of diapers, making snacks, so much laundry and someone is on me constantly. So when I read a book in two days, it’s a Big Deal. This is the book pregnant people should read. This is the book their partners and support people should read. This is the book every human who has grown in a uterus should read. It made me cry. It made me laugh. It made me raise my hands and go yes yes me too! Angela covers early pregnancy, what the heck a placenta even is, birth plans going sideways, breastfeeding, and perhaps most importantly of all, what is this body now that I’ve given birth? Am I even the same person? Angela writes from her personal experience, yes, but also shares other people stories and the research of so many amazing scientists. It is so good. Go read it. I would keep going but my toddler is throwing a fit.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This is an incredible book—a mix of wonderfully poetic language about pregnancy, birth, and the body; a real passion for the science behind bringing a new life into the world; comfort for women and the various struggles they face in trying to and then becoming a mother; and a wonderful feminist thread connecting everything and pointing out all the various places women's issues and rights have been ignored. Angela's book is part memoir, part heavily researched reporting, and part friend-sourced s This is an incredible book—a mix of wonderfully poetic language about pregnancy, birth, and the body; a real passion for the science behind bringing a new life into the world; comfort for women and the various struggles they face in trying to and then becoming a mother; and a wonderful feminist thread connecting everything and pointing out all the various places women's issues and rights have been ignored. Angela's book is part memoir, part heavily researched reporting, and part friend-sourced stories that expand the narrative arc of what new mothers go through. She also has a keen sensitivity for pointedly discussing mothers often excluded from conversations about motherhood (especially when it comes to science and medical issues)—including women of color, non-binary people among them. I loved this book so much I was sad when I reached the last page. I look forward to reading anything and everything Angela has to write in the future. She has a strong, funny, compassionate voice that makes her work instantly compelling.
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  • Bonnie Limbird
    January 1, 1970
    Even 12 years past pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding, this book was fascinating. It triggered memories I had long since forgotten, as well as several "aha!" moments and a few "Wow!"s. I wish I'd had this to read during my first trimester and through the first few years of motherhood. At it's most basic, it's a pregnancy book, but really it's a call to arms for healthcare to do better by women, to research and learn our bodies and the amazing things they do, to reassure women that our feelings, Even 12 years past pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding, this book was fascinating. It triggered memories I had long since forgotten, as well as several "aha!" moments and a few "Wow!"s. I wish I'd had this to read during my first trimester and through the first few years of motherhood. At it's most basic, it's a pregnancy book, but really it's a call to arms for healthcare to do better by women, to research and learn our bodies and the amazing things they do, to reassure women that our feelings, emotional and physical, ARE valid and to do the work to figure out how to help us be well. The science and research referenced and tranlsated for lay readers in this book should be the foundation of health and human reproductive education for women and men alike. 
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Very informative, well written. Wish I’d had this when I was pregnant and had become a mother the first time. I found I could relate to a lot of the descriptions of a new mother’s postpartum mental, physical and emotional states. Also, science! Loved the detailed (yet not bogged down by scientific jargon) descriptions of the miracle of breast milk, the fascinating placenta, and most of all, microchimerism research. I love the idea that we all carry cells of our closest loved ones — mothers, gran Very informative, well written. Wish I’d had this when I was pregnant and had become a mother the first time. I found I could relate to a lot of the descriptions of a new mother’s postpartum mental, physical and emotional states. Also, science! Loved the detailed (yet not bogged down by scientific jargon) descriptions of the miracle of breast milk, the fascinating placenta, and most of all, microchimerism research. I love the idea that we all carry cells of our closest loved ones — mothers, grandmothers, siblings and children. I am recommending this book to my daughter to read before she starts her ob-gyn clinical in nursing school this fall, to help give her some insight on what her patients are going through.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the author’s interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross and immediately downloaded the book, speeding through it in two days. It is the book I didn’t realize I was waiting for in pregnancy and preparing for childbirth. The author is candid about the physical and psychological challenges and triumphs of pregnancy and childbirth. I thought I had read and learned a lot over the past few months, but was blown away by her chapters on breastmilk, the placenta, and the pelvic floor. I love h I listened to the author’s interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross and immediately downloaded the book, speeding through it in two days. It is the book I didn’t realize I was waiting for in pregnancy and preparing for childbirth. The author is candid about the physical and psychological challenges and triumphs of pregnancy and childbirth. I thought I had read and learned a lot over the past few months, but was blown away by her chapters on breastmilk, the placenta, and the pelvic floor. I love how she wove parts of her own memoir in with the experience of other mothers and science. She explains complicated concepts in an amazingly clear and straight forward way. I loved it and almost wish it was longer.
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  • kaylin
    January 1, 1970
    Finally a book about pregnancy that does not exclusively center the experiences of middle class white women!! After slogging through a lot of crappy pregnancy books this one was such a welcome change. Not only does Garbes talk about outcome inequities during pregnancy and birth (black mothers are FOUR TIMES as likely to die in childbirth in this country) she counters the traditional Western medicalized narrative with real expertise and experiences of women of color without glorifying or exoticiz Finally a book about pregnancy that does not exclusively center the experiences of middle class white women!! After slogging through a lot of crappy pregnancy books this one was such a welcome change. Not only does Garbes talk about outcome inequities during pregnancy and birth (black mothers are FOUR TIMES as likely to die in childbirth in this country) she counters the traditional Western medicalized narrative with real expertise and experiences of women of color without glorifying or exoticizing them. She actually cites the latest and best science (not medical journals from the 1980s) and seamlessly works in her own experiences in a way that’s heartwarming and empowering without being corny. Read it!
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    This book was exactly what I needed! I am currently nearing the end of the second trimester of my first pregnancy. “Like a Mother” inspired me and made me fall in love with my body. I have been finding myself quoting facts from the book daily to whoever will listen. My own mother, who gave birth to 5 babies, told me she had no idea about much of what I was telling her. I am so grateful that I heard the author read the placenta chapter on a podcast I listen to and decided to pick up this book. It This book was exactly what I needed! I am currently nearing the end of the second trimester of my first pregnancy. “Like a Mother” inspired me and made me fall in love with my body. I have been finding myself quoting facts from the book daily to whoever will listen. My own mother, who gave birth to 5 babies, told me she had no idea about much of what I was telling her. I am so grateful that I heard the author read the placenta chapter on a podcast I listen to and decided to pick up this book. It has left me feeling awe for the female body and excited to move forward toward my labor and new life!!!
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  • Sai
    January 1, 1970
    This was an honest and thoughtful personal research driven book which is much needed in the societies we live in - where women are expected to ‘naturally’ take on lives and roles which are difficult to transform into, and traumatic, despite the miracle and joy factor that exists for some. I have often thought we never gave the opportunity to actually understand our reproductive bodies despite the often-default of eventual pregnancy. I do also think this book is important in pointing out the absu This was an honest and thoughtful personal research driven book which is much needed in the societies we live in - where women are expected to ‘naturally’ take on lives and roles which are difficult to transform into, and traumatic, despite the miracle and joy factor that exists for some. I have often thought we never gave the opportunity to actually understand our reproductive bodies despite the often-default of eventual pregnancy. I do also think this book is important in pointing out the absurdity of a world that judges women, subjugated them, puts little to no resources in supporting them medically or socially yet expects them to birth and raise humanity perfectly.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so glad this book exists—it's a fascinating account of the biology of pregnancy and goes into much greater depth (in much fewer pages) than anything else I've read. Her discussions of the culture of pregnancy are also much needed—it's the first book I've read to address pregnancy explicitly within a patriarchal, white supremacist society. It's also one of the only pregnancy books I've read by a woman of color. Finally, I learned far more about breastfeeding and the placenta than I had though I'm so glad this book exists—it's a fascinating account of the biology of pregnancy and goes into much greater depth (in much fewer pages) than anything else I've read. Her discussions of the culture of pregnancy are also much needed—it's the first book I've read to address pregnancy explicitly within a patriarchal, white supremacist society. It's also one of the only pregnancy books I've read by a woman of color. Finally, I learned far more about breastfeeding and the placenta than I had thought possible.Along with Expecting Better and The Science of Mom, Like a Mother is a must-read for the newly pregnant.
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  • Ali Bickford
    January 1, 1970
    I loved some chapters of this book that were about the science of the body ( Breast milk & placenta ) and I appreciated the real life examples from all the other women she interviewed( it felt like ethnographic research). At other moments it was very focused on the authors experiences in a memoir tone and the science to back up her experiences...Thus the 4 stars and why I set down this book and took a month break before finishing. Overall :Will I buy this book for expectant mothers in my lif I loved some chapters of this book that were about the science of the body ( Breast milk & placenta ) and I appreciated the real life examples from all the other women she interviewed( it felt like ethnographic research). At other moments it was very focused on the authors experiences in a memoir tone and the science to back up her experiences...Thus the 4 stars and why I set down this book and took a month break before finishing. Overall :Will I buy this book for expectant mothers in my life over ‘what to expect when expecting?’ A solid Yes.
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  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend this book to all expecting mothers. This book made lots of good points, debunked myths and gave me a clearer idea of the horror of what’s going to happen to me. No matter what you’re looking for in the internet, you’ll always find the answer you’re looking for- is wine bad during pregnancy? Yes it is. Is wine safe during pregnancy? yes it is. She goes into depth about topics such as this, the role of the placenta, miscarriage, birth processes, breast feeding, and post birth comp Highly recommend this book to all expecting mothers. This book made lots of good points, debunked myths and gave me a clearer idea of the horror of what’s going to happen to me. No matter what you’re looking for in the internet, you’ll always find the answer you’re looking for- is wine bad during pregnancy? Yes it is. Is wine safe during pregnancy? yes it is. She goes into depth about topics such as this, the role of the placenta, miscarriage, birth processes, breast feeding, and post birth complications/life.
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  • Amanda Layton
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the mix of science and narrative Ms Garbes uses. The world could use more books like this and I hope she keeps expanding on the topic--especially with a focus on science. I did find, like many books on the science of being a woman, that I was left with not much hope for the world prioritizing women's health. That said, it exposes some truths that need to be out there -- for example, there's more known about ACL tear recovery than childbirth recovery yet millions more people a year I really liked the mix of science and narrative Ms Garbes uses. The world could use more books like this and I hope she keeps expanding on the topic--especially with a focus on science. I did find, like many books on the science of being a woman, that I was left with not much hope for the world prioritizing women's health. That said, it exposes some truths that need to be out there -- for example, there's more known about ACL tear recovery than childbirth recovery yet millions more people a year are affected by childbirth injuries.
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating combination of personal memoir and science-y stuff about pregnancy and the female body (as a non-pregnant woman I really enjoyed it). A reminder that we know so little about the female body and pregnancy. I’m so grateful for the researchers out there that choose to study the placenta, clitoris, uterus, pregnancy, etc with little fanfare and less govt $$. If those parts/processes were connected to the male body we’d have started the research 100 yrs ago. Lots of food for thought! Than Fascinating combination of personal memoir and science-y stuff about pregnancy and the female body (as a non-pregnant woman I really enjoyed it). A reminder that we know so little about the female body and pregnancy. I’m so grateful for the researchers out there that choose to study the placenta, clitoris, uterus, pregnancy, etc with little fanfare and less govt $$. If those parts/processes were connected to the male body we’d have started the research 100 yrs ago. Lots of food for thought! Thank you Ms. Garbes!
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  • shanna washington
    January 1, 1970
    Smart, relatable, relevant to the modern day motherGreat mix of memoir, science , and contemplation. I'm six months pregnant with my first and I feel like it jump started my brain into working again. The writing style is very enjoyable to read. It is full of really interesting information that I've not read anywhere else. It made me feel powerful and have new appreciation what the body can do. I loved it!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This book was incredibly interesting. It's about pregnancy and birth from a feminist perspective. I was taken aback by how little I know about this stuff. For example, the placenta is an entirely new organ that your body grows! I guess I knew this but like...never really thought about it. I haven't had children so I couldn't relate to everything in the book but I feel like it will help me be a better friend to my friends who are pregnant.
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  • JoEllen
    January 1, 1970
    In the same way of thinking as Expecting Better, this book cuts through some of the generalized, moralized, fluffy pregnancy advice to focus on the proven facts. I really appreciate the fresh look at the science of pregnancy and childbirth, especially the focus on the often-overlooked topics like the placenta and breast milk. The culture was also interesting, to hear how the American medical industry has treated childbirth through history. It could have more structure, but I would really recomme In the same way of thinking as Expecting Better, this book cuts through some of the generalized, moralized, fluffy pregnancy advice to focus on the proven facts. I really appreciate the fresh look at the science of pregnancy and childbirth, especially the focus on the often-overlooked topics like the placenta and breast milk. The culture was also interesting, to hear how the American medical industry has treated childbirth through history. It could have more structure, but I would really recommend this book to other expecting mothers and their partners, too.
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