The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs
A sweeping and revelatory new history of the age of dinosaurs, from one of our finest young scientists. "THE ULTIMATE DINOSAUR BIOGRAPHY."  — Scientific AmericanThe dinosaurs. Sixty-six million years ago, the Earth’s most fearsome creatures vanished. Today they remain one of our planet’s great mysteries. Now The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs reveals their extraordinary, 200-million-year-long story as never before.In this captivating narrative (enlivened with more than seventy original illustrations and photographs), Steve Brusatte, a young American paleontologist who has emerged as one of the foremost stars of the field—naming fifteen new species and leading groundbreaking scientific studies and fieldwork—masterfully tells the complete, surprising, and new history of the dinosaurs, drawing on cutting-edge science to dramatically bring to life their lost world and illuminate their enigmatic origins, spectacular flourishing, astonishing diversity, cataclysmic extinction, and startling living legacy. Captivating and revelatory, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is a book for the ages.Brusatte traces the evolution of dinosaurs from their inauspicious start as small shadow dwellers—themselves the beneficiaries of a mass extinction caused by volcanic eruptions at the beginning of the Triassic period—into the dominant array of species every wide-eyed child memorizes today, T. rex, Triceratops, Brontosaurus, and more. This gifted scientist and writer re-creates the dinosaurs’ peak during the Jurassic and Cretaceous, when thousands of species thrived, and winged and feathered dinosaurs, the prehistoric ancestors of modern birds, emerged. The story continues to the end of the Cretaceous period, when a giant asteroid or comet struck the planet and nearly every dinosaur species (but not all) died out, in the most extraordinary extinction event in earth’s history, one full of lessons for today as we confront a “sixth extinction.”Brusatte also recalls compelling stories from his globe-trotting expeditions during one of the most exciting eras in dinosaur research—which he calls “a new golden age of discovery”—and offers thrilling accounts of some of the remarkable findings he and his colleagues have made, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs; monstrous carnivores even larger than T. rex; and paradigm-shifting feathered raptors from China.An electrifying scientific history that unearths the dinosaurs’ epic saga, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs will be a definitive and treasured account for decades to come.

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs Details

TitleThe Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs
Author
ReleaseApr 24th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062490452
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, History, Animals, Environment, Nature, Geology, Palaeontology, Dinosaurs, Historical, Biology, Evolution

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs Review

  • Will Byrnes
    January 1, 1970
    Image from the Smithsonian Hope A Tyrannosaurus Rex is a thing with feathers. ----- Emily Dickinson Steve Brusatte Wait, what? You’re kidding, right? Say it ain’t so. Well, there is some disagreement about this among paleontologists, but, according to Steve Brusatte, while they may not have matched up to Marc Bolan in a boa, and the feathers in question were maybe more like porcupine quills than the fluffy sort of plumage one might find on, say, an ostrich, those things poking out of the T. rex Image from the Smithsonian Hope A Tyrannosaurus Rex is a thing with feathers. ----- Emily Dickinson Steve Brusatte Wait, what? You’re kidding, right? Say it ain’t so. Well, there is some disagreement about this among paleontologists, but, according to Steve Brusatte, while they may not have matched up to Marc Bolan in a boa, and the feathers in question were maybe more like porcupine quills than the fluffy sort of plumage one might find on, say, an ostrich, those things poking out of the T. rex’s body were indeed feathers. And if you think the notion of a 40-foot, seven-ton eating machine, with ginormous, dagger-like, railroad-spike-size teeth bearing down on you, is scary, consider this. They travelled in packs. Sweet dreams! I have to confess that after reading this chapter, I did indeed have at least one dream that night that included multiple representatives of the T. Rex family. Not a wonderful image to induce one back to the land of Nod, after having bolted suddenly upright from REM sleep in fight-or-FLIGHT mode. Hello, lunch - Image from The Real T-Rex BBC special – this one from the MirrorBut I promise not all the revelations in The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs will make you reach for some extra alcoholic or pharmaceutical sleep inducement. What we know about dinosaurs has continued to evolve, at an accelerating rate. Some revelations in the book are surprising and delightful, like the fact that new dinosaur species are being discovered at the rate of about one a week, and that this has been going on a while. There is a lot of catching up to be done since we mastered the basic few, Triceratops, T-Rex, Brontosaurus, Archaeopteryx, Stegasaurus, Dimetrodon, and the usual gang of idiots. Much bigger gang to keep track of these days. [I strongly urge you to check out Brusatte’s U of Edinburgh lecture, linked in EXTRA STUFF, for some very decisively feathered other members of the T. rex family. Fluffy indeed!] Steve Brusatte - looking for Triassic vertebrate footprints in a quarry in Poland – image from palaeocast.com (Sorry, dear. I could have sworn I dropped the engagement ring right here!)Dinosaurs had a pretty long reign as kings/queens of the hill, but they had to begin sometime. Once upon a time all the land was one, linked from north to south, called Pangea. Monster monsoons raked much of the Earth, blistering heat, deserts, jungles, except of course at the poles, which were relatively balmy. This time, from about 300 to about 250 million years ago (mya) is called The Permian Period. Then, boys and girls, the earth split a seam. All that hot material that is constantly coursing through the earth found a way out and spewed forth. Not a good time to be an earthling. It is referred to as The Permian Extinction. 90% of all life was wiped out, by lava flows, fire, global warming, airborne particles blocking the sun, and thus a dramatic, if temporary end to photosynthesis, which killed off most plant life. And the ensuing acidification of water did seriously unpleasant things to aqueous life. But, after things settled down again, which took a while, a new class of critters came to dominate, dinosaurs. Yay! From Pangea to now – image from LiveScience.comThe Permian period was followed by the Triassic, from 250 to 200 mya, fifty million years of nature gone wild (I have that videotape in the attic, I think). Over the course of the Triassic, things on the land started to look like the world we know today. But the continents would have to drift for many millions of years yet before they would resemble our current landmass configuration. The first true dinos showed up around 230 to 240 mya. But they did not have the planet to themselves. There were reptiles, fish, birds, insects, even mammals, small ones.Metoposaurus, Kermit’s g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g-grandma, was an amphibian the size of a Buick, with a coffee-table-sized head, and, unlike those little critters you had to work with in bio lab, these pups had hundreds of very sharp teeth. It hung out by water’s edge to capture anything straying too close. Mostly fish, but watch your ankles.There is interesting material in here about what came before the dinosaurs, (dinosauromorphs, yes, really) and where the line is drawn (arbitrarily) between dino and pre-dino. You, here, you, over there. Like Middle East borders. Brusatte walks us through the timeline of the dinos, from conditions being established at the end of the Permian, their arrival in the Triassic, to their sudden farewell at the end of the Cretaceous. Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous. Go ahead, repeat that a few times. It’s the sequence of periods Brusatte covers here. The first three come in at around 50 million years each, with the Cretaceous hanging on for about 80. The last three, taken together, comprise what is known as the Mesozoic Era, aka The Age of the Dinosaurs. (Which makes no sense to me. Shouldn’t it be The Era of the Dinosaurs? Or the Mesozoic Age? It’s so confusing.) He shows what changed geologically, and how the changes allowed this or that lifeform to arise. (often by wiping out the competition). He also takes us along with him to dig sites around the planet, Scotland, Portugal, Poland, The American Southwest, South America, China, and more, and introduces us to some of the foremost scientists in the field.The characters in Brusatte’s tale are not all of the ancient sort. He populates each chapter with modern specimens notable for their diversity and sometimes colorful plumage. While they may all be brilliant scientists, many could easily be classified as Anates Impar. It would not be a huge stretch to imagine them populating a nerdish Cantina scene. Here are Brusatte’s description of three of them. There are many more. You can spot Thomas [Carr, now a professor at Wisconsin’s Carthage College] from a mile away. He has the fashion sense of a 1970s preacher and some of the mannerisms of Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory. Thomas always wears black velvet suits, usually with a black or dark red shirt underneath. He has long bushy sideburns and a mop of light hair. A silver skull ring adorns his hand. He’s easily consumed by things and has a long-running obsession with absinthe and the Doors. That and tyrannosaurs.Thomas Carr - image from his Twitter pageBaron Franz Nopcsa von Felso-Szilvas…was literally an aristocrat who dug up dinosaur bones. He seems like the invention of a mad novelist, a character so outlandish, so ridiculous, that he must be a trick of fiction. But he was very real—a flamboyant dandy and a tragic genius, whose exploits hunting dinosaurs in Transylvania were brief respites from the insanity of the rest of his life…[he had] expertise in espionage, linguistics, cultural anthropology, paleontology, motorbiking, [geology, and god knows what else].The Baron - image from Albanianphotograpy.comJingmai [O’Connor] calls herself a Paleontologista—fitting given her fashionista style of leopard-print Lycra, piercings, and tattoos, all of which are at home in the club but stand out (in a good way) among the plaid-and-beard crowd that dominates academia…she’s also the world’s number-one expert on those first birds that broke the bounds of Earth to fly above their dinosaur ancestors.Jingmai O’Connor - image from her Twitter pageBrusatte also shamelessly namedrops every A-list paleontologist he has encountered. Of course, it sounds like those encounters were substantial, so I guess it’s ok, but… I was reminded a bit of Bill Clinton’s memoir, in which it seemed that every person he mentioned had either changed his life or was a close personal friend. In a way, the book constitutes a this-is-your-life look at Brusatte’s paleontology career (boy meets bone?), with appearances by many of the people he had learned from or worked with. (they are legion) In addition to the studies mentioned in the book, he is the author of a widely taught textbook, Dinosaur Paleobiology. He is the paleo expert in residence on Walking with Dinosaurs (so much better than the sequel, Fleeing from Dinosaurs) on the BBC. One of the things that has allowed modern paleontologists to make and continue to make ground-breaking discoveries about Earth’s former tenants is the major advance in technology at their disposal. It’s a lot easier, for example, to see inside a fossilized skull to measure the size and shape of internal cavities with the help of a CT scanner than it was before they were available.A new dinosaur, feathered, winged Zhenyuanlong from China - image from The ConversationYou will learn some fascinating new information about dinos, some of it startling. This includes how sauropods managed those looooooong necks, why wild diversification happened when it did, why it took dinosaurs as long as it did to get large and take over. There is a fascinating bit on how some dinosaurs can pack an extra punch by getting air while they breathe in and out, surprising intel on how some of the critters you thought were dinosaurs aren’t, and directions on where you can look to see actual living dinosaurs today. He punctures some of the notions from the Jurassic Park movies. If trapped by a T-Rex, for instance, do not remain motionless. Rex has binocular vision and can see you perfectly well, whether you are sitting down in a port-o-san or hiding in or under a vehicle. Wave buh-bye.If you do not know what this is from you need to get out moreSpeaking of un-fond farewells, Brusatte take us up to and through the biggest bang of them all, on Earth anyway, 66 mya. His description of the horror that marked the end of the dinosaurs is graphic, and disturbing. It was the worst day in the history of our planet. A few hours of unimaginable violence that undid more than 150 million years of evolution and set life on a new course. T. rex was there to see it. Look, up in the sky. It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s…Oh, shitArtwork by Donald E. DavisBrusatte has written an eminently readable pop-science history of the dinosaurs, with accessible info on geology, biology, and the work of paleontologists, who are laboring tirelessly (and maybe obsessively) to find out the answers to questions that are as old as humanity’s awareness of the erstwhile inhabitants of our planet. This is one of those books that should be in every household. You do not need to be a scientist to get a lot out of it. The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs, bubbling with the enthusiasm of its author, will be an enjoyable and enlightening read for homo sapiens of all ages from pre-teen through fossil. Learning more about Earth’s illustrious, impressive, sometimes terrifying, and sometimes adorable former tenants never gets old. Really, who doesn’t love dinosaurs?Review posted – April 13, 2018Publication date – April 24, 2018=============================EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s personal and Twitter pagesEpisode 37 of Palaeocast features Steve talking about Therapods and Birds - December 1, 2014 – 44:00A presentation by Brusatte, who is a wonderful speaker, on Tyrannosaur Discoveries, at the U of Edinburgh – Watch this, really. Great stuff. In the above, Brusatte talks about feathered dinos, among other things. Meet Yutyrannus huali, (artist’s interpretation) a feathered tyrannosaur from China (but you can call him Fluffy) – image from The ConversationA fun article from the BBC - Legendary dinosaurs that we all imagine completely wrong - By Josh Gabbatiss - 3/21/16NY Times – April 4, 2018 - Brusatte is keeping busy, publishing, with his team, a new study about the presence of dinos in Scotland, specifically in the Isle of Skye. In Footprints on Scotland’s Isle of Skye, Signs of a Dinosaur Playground - by Nicholas St. FleurThis image of a sauropod print accompanied the above article – from the University of EdinburghAn interesting lecture (33 minutes) on how paleontologists research dinosaurian social behavior and what they have found - Social Behaviour in Dinosaurs - with David Hone Hone's delivery has a sing-song rhythm that can be a bit soporific, but the content is fascinating. Of particular interest is the basis for juvenile clustering.================================STUFFINGIf you are one of those for whom the reference did not bang a gong, Marc Bolan was the leader of a band named T.Rex. He was one of the progenitors of what was called Glam Rock.Anates Impar - really? You could not do a Google translate? It means Odd Ducks, ok. Sheesh. Really, don’t make me explain everything again, or I’ll have to take points off your final grade. And if you do not know what “the Cantina scene” is, look it up or don’t come back. Yes, now. Run!This flamboyantly feathered Rex image is from Deviant Art – Yeah, I doubt it looked like this too, but a fun image I wanted to shareFull disclosure: - Ok, I stole the final line of the review from my illustrious book goddess. I only steal from the best. Thank you, dearest.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Another ambivalent three stars for a book that has two strands of highly varying success in my opinion.The good part of the book is the clear and vivid writing about dinosaurs. I particularly liked learning new things about dinosaur-like creatures that lived among them but happen to fall outside the classification, and reasons why dinosaurs could evolve to be absolutely gigantic (those big sauropods) or fly. I liked reading about the nomenclature of new and unusual finds (it's not all Latin anym Another ambivalent three stars for a book that has two strands of highly varying success in my opinion.The good part of the book is the clear and vivid writing about dinosaurs. I particularly liked learning new things about dinosaur-like creatures that lived among them but happen to fall outside the classification, and reasons why dinosaurs could evolve to be absolutely gigantic (those big sauropods) or fly. I liked reading about the nomenclature of new and unusual finds (it's not all Latin anymore). The section on the immediate aftermath of the asteroid strike is gripping and horrifying. ("But what fell from the sky was not water. It was beads of glass and chunks of rock, each one scalding hot." [loc. 3428])The bad part is the writing about the author's personal experiences as he grew from an annoying, precocious teen (which he freely admits he was) into a working paleontologist. Frankly he comes off as more than a little self-satisfied--a sighting of the Jerkus brillianticus, if you will. His mentors and collaborators are uniformly amazing and brilliant and are described in a way that makes nearly all of them sound dull and interchangeable, an endless parade of brilliant bearded dudes drinking beer in exotic locales that are mainly described in terms of their nattering locals and unpleasant weather. (If you think I've used the word "brilliant" a lot in this paragraph, you won't believe this book!) Though he names several women paleontologists in these pages, he rarely seems to work with any of them, and notes with apparent enjoyment crass jokes at bars and commentary about their physiques from a speaker at an international conference. The personal recollections strike a disagreeable note that undercuts one of the goals of the book, which is to show how cool it would be to be a paleontologist.Bottom line: Read this, while holding your nose a little bit, if you're interested in dinosaurs.Review copy received from Edelweiss.
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  • Melissa Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    It’s not easy to put scientists’ current understanding of the whole dinosaur world into perspective, but this book accomplishes that feat beautifully. The narrative writing style is so friendly and accessible that readers can sit back and enjoy the ride as Brusatte takes us on a captivating chronological tour of the Mesozoic—the Age of Reptiles—beginning about 250 million years ago and ending 66 million years ago with the famous asteroid (or comet) impact that wiped out all the dinosaurs except It’s not easy to put scientists’ current understanding of the whole dinosaur world into perspective, but this book accomplishes that feat beautifully. The narrative writing style is so friendly and accessible that readers can sit back and enjoy the ride as Brusatte takes us on a captivating chronological tour of the Mesozoic—the Age of Reptiles—beginning about 250 million years ago and ending 66 million years ago with the famous asteroid (or comet) impact that wiped out all the dinosaurs except birds. I enjoyed learning about the dinosauromorphs—dinosaur-like reptiles that lived at the same time as early dinosaurs but are not considered part of the group. At one time, scientists used a half dozen anatomical traits to differentiate the two groups, but recent fossil finds suggest that the line between the two groups is extremely blurry. I was also interested in the discussion of carcharodontosaurs—ferocious carnivorous dinosaurs that had their heyday before tyrannosaurs rose to power. Not surprisingly, my favorite chapter focused on the mighty T. rex. It began with a dramatic narrative hunting scene and then highlighted how the work of scientists—men and women—from around the world has contributed to our understanding the mighty beast. The descriptions of recent cutting-edge techniques were especially vibrant and fascinating.The chapter about how the world changed following the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs (except birds) really puts the reader in the middle of the action. The carefully crafted you-are-there scene setting gave me a strong sense of what Earth was like and how horrible it would have been to experience it. I also enjoyed reading what we know about the transition from dinosaurs to modern day birds.Throughout the text, Brusatte includes engaging personal anecdotes that give readers a flavor of what life as a paleontologist is like. My favorites described some of the discoveries he and his colleagues have made in the field, such as recognizing a sauropod trackway on the Isle of Skye in Scotland and unearthing a trio of Triceratops (playfully named Homer, Bart, and Lisa after the “Simpsons” characters) at Hell Creek in Montana.Traditionally, paleontology has been a white, male world, and this book accurately represents that. But I was glad to see that Brusatte balances those sections by repeatedly drawing attention to the important work of female colleagues as well as the contributions of a diverse array of scientists from around the world. Finally, I appreciated Brusatte’s ability to poke fun at himself. One of my favorite narrative sections recounts how, as a teenager, he had the audacity to cold call Walter Alvarez—one of the world’s leading paleontologists. Amazingly, Alvarez took the call! Many years later, when Brusatte met his idol, Alvarez remembered speaking with him. Scenes like this helped me connect with the author and understand (and admire) the depth of his passion and enthusiasm for dinosaurs.
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  • Amy Wood
    January 1, 1970
    If you're in the market for an expertly written but approachable guide to all things dinosaurs, this is your book. Author and paleontologist Steve Brusatte has written a scientific narrative that effectively spans the entire career of the dinosaurs on this planet, and he makes this story both understandable and legitimately exciting for all non-paleontologist readers. What's more, he paints a vivid and extremely entertaining picture of the blood, sweat, and tears that have been shed (literally) If you're in the market for an expertly written but approachable guide to all things dinosaurs, this is your book. Author and paleontologist Steve Brusatte has written a scientific narrative that effectively spans the entire career of the dinosaurs on this planet, and he makes this story both understandable and legitimately exciting for all non-paleontologist readers. What's more, he paints a vivid and extremely entertaining picture of the blood, sweat, and tears that have been shed (literally) by generations of adventurous paleontologists and fossil hunters, offering humorous personal anecdotes about his time doing field work around the world. Brusatte's enthusiasm for fossil hunting is contagious, and will resonate with anyone who's ever picked up an interesting rock or fossilized shark tooth and wondered how these things came to be. The book also includes illustrations and photos of many of the dinosaurs and locations he describes, which is extremely helpful. My favorite chapter has to be the one about the almighty T. rex, the undisputed King of the Dinosaurs - I found this absolutely fascinating. Clearly the author has done a ton of his own research on the T. rex, but he also includes plenty of references to the stellar work of his fellow paleontologists. The research that's currently being done to better understand the T. rex is pretty amazing, involving cutting-edge technology, and again Brusatte describes this research in a way that's understandable for all. Overall, highly recommended!
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  • Kaushik Thanugonda
    January 1, 1970
    I've never read a book this long faster than this. This book really is a triumph. I have been obsessed with dinosaurs since I was 10 and this book came at a time where I was beginning to rekindle that interest. The author has breathed life into a world that is still outdated in many people's minds - dinosaurs are seen as large scaly monsters that were evolutionary deadends. This couldn't be more false - dinosaurs are among the most successful animals to ever walk this planet, and are still aroun I've never read a book this long faster than this. This book really is a triumph. I have been obsessed with dinosaurs since I was 10 and this book came at a time where I was beginning to rekindle that interest. The author has breathed life into a world that is still outdated in many people's minds - dinosaurs are seen as large scaly monsters that were evolutionary deadends. This couldn't be more false - dinosaurs are among the most successful animals to ever walk this planet, and are still around as birds. The book describes a plethora of species and how they would have lived, walked and how they evolved. It explains in a very simple manner how birds evolved alongside dinosaurs, extinction events, anatomy - stuff that's sometimes quite difficult to get your head around.Even as he paints a picture of a bygone world, the author shows us the behind-the-scenes: the hard working men and women who work in badlands and in sweltering heat, using cutting-edge statistics and research to work out how these animals lived and died. We live in the best time for dinosaur discoveries - more species are discovered everyday, and we have a clearer and clearer picture of their lives.Even when he's talking about the profession, Stephen writes with a passion that is simply hard to ignore. His descriptions of the people working with him are earnest and show the admiration he has for his fellow paleontologists, and it was a real delight to know the real people behind all the research we read and all the dinosaurs we see.Would I change anything about this book? Well, I think it could've used a lot more pictures of the dinosaurs described and a list of them at the end. But this is more of a nitpick than a criticism, and this has been the most exciting and fulfilling pop science read of the year to me. 5/5.
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  • James Lancaster
    January 1, 1970
    There's only two reasons I buy hardbacks.1. It's only £3 at a charity shop2. My kids will destroy paperbacks.The reason i bring this up is because i bought this in hardback because I dont have a good, brief introduction to the history and ecology of the Dinosaurs. The best book besides this is Scott Sampson's Dinosaur Odyssey, which is excellent, it's by far my favourite Dinosaur book. But Rise and Fall is a different animal, it's accessible to near enough anyone who wants to read it, not an eas There's only two reasons I buy hardbacks.1. It's only £3 at a charity shop2. My kids will destroy paperbacks.The reason i bring this up is because i bought this in hardback because I dont have a good, brief introduction to the history and ecology of the Dinosaurs. The best book besides this is Scott Sampson's Dinosaur Odyssey, which is excellent, it's by far my favourite Dinosaur book. But Rise and Fall is a different animal, it's accessible to near enough anyone who wants to read it, not an easy feat for a science book. Moreover, its description of the people behind the fossils is amazing, your kids will find a lot of role models in these pages.Its that rare adult science book, and paleontology book, that can work for anyone. Whether to restore your interest in dinosaurs, or create a new one. Easilly worth hardback price.
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  • Andrew Rosen
    January 1, 1970
    I just read this book. I cannot recommend it enough. It is a well written, well researched, enjoyable book. It ties personal stories of fieldwork and his scientist friends with a factual, scientific, complete story of dinosaurs. His discussions on evolution are clear and to the point. Dr. Brusatte explains what is known and what is still unknown in the world of dinosaurs. I think scientists would enjoy this book, and I know the lay person will benefit greatly from reading it. I am recommending I just read this book. I cannot recommend it enough. It is a well written, well researched, enjoyable book. It ties personal stories of fieldwork and his scientist friends with a factual, scientific, complete story of dinosaurs. His discussions on evolution are clear and to the point. Dr. Brusatte explains what is known and what is still unknown in the world of dinosaurs. I think scientists would enjoy this book, and I know the lay person will benefit greatly from reading it. I am recommending this book to everyone. This is my first review of a book on Goodreads and I could not have picked a better book to review. If you know any Creationists please send them a copy of this book. I am not saying it will change their minds, but the writing style, clarity of argument and scientific backing will or should give them something to think about.
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  • Heath
    January 1, 1970
    The first book about dinosaurs I've read as an adult, and it made me feel like a kid again. I've always avoided books like this because when they get super science-y, it tends to just go right over my head. But this one was totally accessible, engaging, and, quite often, thrilling.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Science writing at its bestI loved this book. It is well written and I found it hard to put down. Author Steve Brusatte weaves a fast-moving story that reads more like a novel than non-fiction. Not only does he clearly and in conversational terms discuss dinosaurs, he also liberally includes personal anecdotes and humor to explain how we know what we know. I strongly recommend this book for anyone interested in science.Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Edelweiss for re Science writing at its bestI loved this book. It is well written and I found it hard to put down. Author Steve Brusatte weaves a fast-moving story that reads more like a novel than non-fiction. Not only does he clearly and in conversational terms discuss dinosaurs, he also liberally includes personal anecdotes and humor to explain how we know what we know. I strongly recommend this book for anyone interested in science.Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Edelweiss for review purposes.
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  • Stephen Yoder
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the smack out of this book. I, along with so many other kids, read all sorts of books about dinosaurs. Now this book has come along--a dino book for adults! (Wait--that sounds slightly saucy. I don't recall that Brusatte gets into the sex lives of dinosaurs. Those details may not arise until more adult paleontological science has occurred.)Brusatte is a great verbal painter. He paints people, rocks, and dinosaurs quite well. I'm going to be thinking for some time about those air sacs i I enjoyed the smack out of this book. I, along with so many other kids, read all sorts of books about dinosaurs. Now this book has come along--a dino book for adults! (Wait--that sounds slightly saucy. I don't recall that Brusatte gets into the sex lives of dinosaurs. Those details may not arise until more adult paleontological science has occurred.)Brusatte is a great verbal painter. He paints people, rocks, and dinosaurs quite well. I'm going to be thinking for some time about those air sacs in sauropod necks, the unidirectional nature of dinosaur breathing (as in birds!), and the fact that birds *are* dinosaurs.I definitely recommend this book, even though it does not contain explicit references to dinosaur sex.I did receive an ARC for the notion that I might write a review.
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  • Rykon
    January 1, 1970
    Поначалу книга показалась скучной, но это просто потому, что я не люблю триасовых протодинозавров и прочую мелкоту. А вот потом она разгоняется и в итоге оказывается одной из лучших книг о динозаврах, что я читал - где образные описания мезозойской жизни сочетаются с самыми последними находками (2016-2017 годы!) и байками из жизни колоритных палеонтологов. Очень круто.
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