Winterfolk
Rain is a homeless teen living with her father in the woods outside Seattle, near a community of other homeless people called the Winterfolk. She finds safety and sanctuary in this hidden world—until the day that safety is shattered when she learns the city plans to clear the woods of everyone who lives there. Now she’s forced to confront Seattle, which is full of strange sights, sounds, people—and memories...

Winterfolk Details

TitleWinterfolk
Author
ReleaseFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062487667
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary

Winterfolk Review

  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think that I have ever read a book that had a homeless person as the main character. The synopsis is not overly descriptive, however, the concept of having to adjust one’s way of life and experiencing the world differently really intrigues me. Looking forward to reading this debut next year!
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  • Sam Kozbial
    January 1, 1970
    I have read quite a few YA books, and I must admit, I do not believe I have read any, which gave me such a detailed look into the life of a homeless teen. This was quite interesting, in that Rain had lived isolated from the outside world in a sort of compound. Her sheltered existence showed in her observations and the narration as she sometimes seemed childlike. When King took her into to the city for her birthday, her inability to interact with strangers and her discomfort with the world at lar I have read quite a few YA books, and I must admit, I do not believe I have read any, which gave me such a detailed look into the life of a homeless teen. This was quite interesting, in that Rain had lived isolated from the outside world in a sort of compound. Her sheltered existence showed in her observations and the narration as she sometimes seemed childlike. When King took her into to the city for her birthday, her inability to interact with strangers and her discomfort with the world at large was obvious. I will say, Rain grew some through the experience, and there was even (what I think) an "event" to punctuate her maturation. I will also say, that this book is beautifully written. Kolby is a true wordsmith, and there was this gorgeous ethereal quality to her writing. My problem with the book was that there seemed to be so many holes. I felt like I was being held responsible for making those leaps, but I would have liked to have been told some things explicitly. And the ending. Well, let's just say....I kept flipping back and forth, thinking I missed something, but nope. It was that abrupt and vague. Overall: An interesting look at the challenges facing homeless youth, but too many unresolved plot threads left me frustrated.
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    How shall I describe this book? At once both hopeful and sad, gritty and yet filled with magic, Winterfolk pairs the harsh reality of homelessness with a magical, lyrical writing style to create an ethereal novel about love, family, belonging, acceptance, and community.Rain lives in the Jungle, the forest outside of town that shelters the Winterfolk. Rain knows how to be invisible, living with her father, King - who is friend, protector, everything - and a collection of souls who use the forest How shall I describe this book? At once both hopeful and sad, gritty and yet filled with magic, Winterfolk pairs the harsh reality of homelessness with a magical, lyrical writing style to create an ethereal novel about love, family, belonging, acceptance, and community.Rain lives in the Jungle, the forest outside of town that shelters the Winterfolk. Rain knows how to be invisible, living with her father, King - who is friend, protector, everything - and a collection of souls who use the forest to take what protection they can to hide from the world. When the Winterfolk's home is threatened by destruction, Rain knows her home is in danger. On Rain's fifteenth birthday, King takes her into town. But a simple trip to see what lies outside the protection of their trees becomes a life-changing journey.Winterfolk is a novel that deserves the time it takes to really sink into the story and join with the unique characters. Rain narrates the story and so everything is viewed through her perspective and individual style. She has a strong imagination and she uses it to view the world in a way that is different from how everyone else sees. At first, her family and friends, those around her, only humour her, indulge her fantasies because it helps her get through each day. Yet, as the story develops, it is Rain who makes the changes. She relies on others, especially King, for food, water and protection, but it is Rain who can make the biggest difference in both her own world and the world that extends outside the borders within which she has always stayed. And so, Winterfolk is the story of a girl finding her voice and discovering its power.The writing style is what stands out in this wonderful book. It is almost like free verse poetry, which makes sense since the author is a poet. This realistic story borders on magical realism, but that's only because of the writing style and Rain's wonderful imagination. Winterfolk is unique and a little different from my usual reading fare, but I enjoyed it as it stretched my perspective and challenged my views.If this book makes you take notice of your surroundings a little more, makes you look up and really see, then perhaps it has achieved its purpose. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Kimberley
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of Winterfolk via Edelweiss. ***3.5 Stars***.Janel Kolby did a stunning job bringing us into Rain’s world: a world that is small by measure, but boundless in her imagination and wonder. Kolby’s handling of Rain’s worldly perspective made for a prose filled with tenderness and compassion. You immediately understand Rain’s perception is built by what’s she’s read in fairy tales/been told by others. That said, when she is finally given the chance to see it for herself, she’s quick I received an ARC of Winterfolk via Edelweiss. ***3.5 Stars***.Janel Kolby did a stunning job bringing us into Rain’s world: a world that is small by measure, but boundless in her imagination and wonder. Kolby’s handling of Rain’s worldly perspective made for a prose filled with tenderness and compassion. You immediately understand Rain’s perception is built by what’s she’s read in fairy tales/been told by others. That said, when she is finally given the chance to see it for herself, she’s quickly forced to learn how difficult it can be to decipher truth from fiction.Seeing how well she adjusts and navigates within this new experience is the crux of the story. However, it also brought me to my main issue: the constant injection of the mythological into very real (and sometimes very dangerous)situations. I was sometimes unsure if I was meant to be reading a fantasy. While I understood Rain to be inexperienced and immature, she was still 15. She could read and comprehend on the level of a basic teenager—thanks in large part to her exposure to books. So, why the fairy tale episodes? Even if I account for the possibility that her flights of fancy was rooted in an inability to cope with certain truths, the continuous need to distort reality was a distraction. It didn’t enhance the story, it disrupted its flow.Even more, it was aggravating—and maybe even painful—to see how bizarrely Rain interacted with strangers: she was, at times, beyond awkward. Unnecessarily so. The supporting characters worked well within the story. Kolby took great care to develop each one’s purpose—no matter the length of time you’re given to knowing them: I developed an affinity for not only Jessibel, but the librarian, and Kerry. Kerry may have offered the most beautiful gift of all to Rain. In the end, the strength of this book is how aware it makes you of our own lack of awareness: Do you really take the time to seethose around you? How much attention are you giving the world at large? Additionally, it speaks to the inhumanity of a world, so geared towards commercialism, that it no longer concerns itself with conservation. Bottom line, this was a sweet read, with a ton of heart, and a lesson to be learned about being more connected to others and your environment.
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  • Celia Daughter)
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say about a book that is set in Seattle and told from the perspective of a homeless girl?First, that is was completely unlike anything I have ever read. I mean, we get this point of view of someone who has never known anything but a tent in the forest. She has only her father as family and the other residents of "The Jungle" who call themselves Winterfolk. Rain is fifteen-years-old. She knows how to read, but not write and keeps a rock garden outside of her tent. Her fiend and protect What can I say about a book that is set in Seattle and told from the perspective of a homeless girl?First, that is was completely unlike anything I have ever read. I mean, we get this point of view of someone who has never known anything but a tent in the forest. She has only her father as family and the other residents of "The Jungle" who call themselves Winterfolk. Rain is fifteen-years-old. She knows how to read, but not write and keeps a rock garden outside of her tent. Her fiend and protector, King, takes her into Seattle one day for her birthday, the day before their home is to be demolished by the city and sets into motion events that turn into a day of firsts. It will sadden you, make you laugh,and maybe even open your eyes a little.The supporting characters were colorful and fit well into the story. Basically, I couldn't put this book down, it was that good. Rain's narrative that was both magical and innocent drove the story. She has never been exposed to the real world so she incorporates what's she read into what is around her in order to cope. Again, it's sad.I would absolutely love to see what else Janel Kolby does and I will scoop it up so fast I may even accidentally buy two books at once. If you're reading this, please write more books. We need them. I need them. Thank you to Edelweiss for the ARC
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  • Trista
    January 1, 1970
    I believe this is the first book I've read that gave such a detailed look inside the life of a homeless teen. Rain lived most of her life with her father, in their tent, moving when forced, never really putting down roots. She was very isolated and sheltered. The book wasn't particularly fast paced even though it mostly took place within a day or two and the focus mainly stayed on Rain and her trying to find her way back after being separated on a trip to Seattle.Rain had just turned fifteen in I believe this is the first book I've read that gave such a detailed look inside the life of a homeless teen. Rain lived most of her life with her father, in their tent, moving when forced, never really putting down roots. She was very isolated and sheltered. The book wasn't particularly fast paced even though it mostly took place within a day or two and the focus mainly stayed on Rain and her trying to find her way back after being separated on a trip to Seattle.Rain had just turned fifteen in the book but she was a very young fifteen. She saw the world so differently and it was clear from the way she interacted with people. The other Winterfolk mostly stayed away from her except for her father and her friend King. She started the book off by being pretty dependent on both of them for everything. Her main focus was on staying invisible, like a ghost, but she grew as the book went on and she began to find her voice.The plot was mostly centered around King taking Rain into Seattle for her birthday. They were going to do laundry, get something to eat, then go back to Winterfolk where her father was finally going to teach her how to make the bracelets he sold to earn them a little cash. To Rain, this was going to be a great day. Then she and King got separated and she had to try to find her way on her own. I was expecting the book to go deeper into the Winterfolk's forced eviction but it felt like that and the ending was a little rushed. This is a book I can definitely recommend to younger readers who are looking to move into the YA section. It would be good for older readers as well, it's just that, as a bookseller, finding books for those younger readers who want to read in the YA section that their parents were okay with is getting more difficult and this one is a really good option. *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Rain is a homeless girl living with her father in a tent in a community of other homeless people. The group has been told to vacate the area because construction by the city will soon begin. As the group must find a new place to go, Rain is given the opportunity to explore the nearby city with her friend King. The two go to the local laundromat, where they are quickly separated. Rain spends the day traveling through the city trying I received this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Rain is a homeless girl living with her father in a tent in a community of other homeless people. The group has been told to vacate the area because construction by the city will soon begin. As the group must find a new place to go, Rain is given the opportunity to explore the nearby city with her friend King. The two go to the local laundromat, where they are quickly separated. Rain spends the day traveling through the city trying to find King and eventually make it back to her father. This day will change Rain's entire life and force her to grow into herself. I had difficulty understanding that this was realistic fiction and didn't realize it until I read summaries online. It read like magical realism, and through that vibe I think I lost the message related to the experience of the homeless in America. It was an interesting concept, which didn't fully blossom into something I could connect with. This novel moved slowly and it was difficult to get into.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Caveat: despite my relatively low rating, I think there are quite a few people out there that will really love this book. My rating has more to do with the fact that I was expecting/hoping for one type of book and got a different type...I was really excited about this one after seeing the prepub reviews. After having helped out in some homeless shelters in Seattle, I thought I might be able to make a real connection with this book. What I didn't know going in is that this book is not realistic f Caveat: despite my relatively low rating, I think there are quite a few people out there that will really love this book. My rating has more to do with the fact that I was expecting/hoping for one type of book and got a different type...I was really excited about this one after seeing the prepub reviews. After having helped out in some homeless shelters in Seattle, I thought I might be able to make a real connection with this book. What I didn't know going in is that this book is not realistic fiction, as I had thought. There is realism in here, yes, but also strong influences of what you could call either magical realism or possibly the results of mental illness.
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  • Mariah Bassett
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Not a lot of books on homeless people, which is sad. There's a lot. I enjoyed Winterfolk, but sometimes Rain was really confusing and kind of crazy (not in a good way.)I almost didn't want to finish this because of how weird the characters were..and how they treated Rain was weird and never explained in my opinion. This book also kind of put me in a bad place because I could easily become someone like Rain. It's on the verge of happening and I can't do anything about it. Anyways, this 3.5 stars. Not a lot of books on homeless people, which is sad. There's a lot. I enjoyed Winterfolk, but sometimes Rain was really confusing and kind of crazy (not in a good way.)I almost didn't want to finish this because of how weird the characters were..and how they treated Rain was weird and never explained in my opinion. This book also kind of put me in a bad place because I could easily become someone like Rain. It's on the verge of happening and I can't do anything about it. Anyways, this book was good: but not what I thought it would be.
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  • Yaiza
    January 1, 1970
    Me ha costado un montón leerlo por cómo está escrito, pero es PRECIOSO
  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    3 out of 5 stars
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