Purple Hearts (Front Lines, #3)
New York Times bestselling author Michael Grant unleashes the gritty and powerful conclusion to the Front Line series and evokes the brutal truth of World War II: War is hell. An epic tale of historical reimagining, perfect for fans of Code Name Verity and Salt to the Sea.Courage, sacrifice, and fear have lead Rio, Frangie, and Rainy through front-line battles in North Africa and Sicily, and their missions are not over. These soldiers and thousands of Allies must fight their deadliest battle yet—for their country and their lives—as they descend into the freezing water and onto the treacherous sands of Omaha Beach. It is June 6, 1944. D-Day has arrived.No longer naive recruits, these soldier girls are now Silver Star recipients and battle-hardened. Others look to them for guidance and confidence, but this is a war that will leave sixty million dead. Flesh will turn to charcoal. Piles will be made of torn limbs. The women must find a way to lead while holding on to their own last shreds of belief in humanity.

Purple Hearts (Front Lines, #3) Details

TitlePurple Hearts (Front Lines, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 30th, 2018
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062342232
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Science Fiction, Alternate History

Purple Hearts (Front Lines, #3) Review

  • Bee (Heart Full of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been a huge fan of this series from day one, and Purple Hearts did not disappoint. In fact, it’s probably the best ending to a trilogy I’ve ever read. THE CLOSURE WAS REAL. We got to see what the characters got up to post-war AND their obituaries so we know what they did with their lives as a whole. Thank you, Michael Grant, I’ve never been more satisfied with an ending. Not to mention, we finally learn who’s been writing these stories! (And I guessed right!)I feel like in each book, the gi I’ve been a huge fan of this series from day one, and Purple Hearts did not disappoint. In fact, it’s probably the best ending to a trilogy I’ve ever read. THE CLOSURE WAS REAL. We got to see what the characters got up to post-war AND their obituaries so we know what they did with their lives as a whole. Thank you, Michael Grant, I’ve never been more satisfied with an ending. Not to mention, we finally learn who’s been writing these stories! (And I guessed right!)I feel like in each book, the girls have an identity breakthrough, and I’m glad that I’ve loved a different girl most strongly in each book. In Front Lines it was Frangie, in Silver Stars is was Rainy, and in this book, I’ve rolled round to loving Rio. She’s arguably been through the most, because her character is almost unrecognisable to the girl who stepped into training. In Purple Hearts, Rio got a particularly wonderful scene about femininity and I cheered her on the whole way through. I really love the hardened person she became. She might have lost her innocent view of the world, but in the end she’s better for it.I also loved that in the book, more than ever, it felt like the girls were interconnected. We’d often see Frangie talking with Rainy or Rio, and I love it best when they’re all aware of each other because, well…it’s just nice, isn’t it? Their moments take you out of the action, (in welcome reprieve) even though there was more explosions and death than ever before! Purple Hearts is gritty and harrowing in all the right places, perfectly capturing the terrors of war. There was also a bigger discussion on deserters and loyalty, which I don’t think has been touched on, but I’m sure if you’d asked the girls in Front Lines what they thought of deserting they’d be giving very different answers to now!Overall, Rainy’s in top from being a bad-ass spy character, Rio has more responsibility and she handles the weight on her shoulders admirably, and Frangie’s still following close behind, patching everyone up. They all make me so proud, and I’m so pleased I picked up Front Lines, and have followed these girls on this truly epic journey.I can’t recommend this series more, it’s got sustained action, lush, well developed characters, and brilliant narrative architecture. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to go pick up Front Lines again.
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  • Karen Barber
    January 1, 1970
    Hats off to you, Michael Grant, for writing what I hope will become a must-read trilogy for anyone.I’ve just finished this surrounded by articles in today’s press about the furore over whether or not to wear a poppy in remembrance of those who fought in war. From this remoteness, even though we can read of atrocities committed throughout the world at the touch of a button, it’s all too easy to forget about the sacrifices of those who went to war. We should never forget.In this final instalment o Hats off to you, Michael Grant, for writing what I hope will become a must-read trilogy for anyone.I’ve just finished this surrounded by articles in today’s press about the furore over whether or not to wear a poppy in remembrance of those who fought in war. From this remoteness, even though we can read of atrocities committed throughout the world at the touch of a button, it’s all too easy to forget about the sacrifices of those who went to war. We should never forget.In this final instalment of the trilogy we follow our favourites through the last push. Battles that might sound familiar, but the details we’re given here vividly bring the events to life. At times this was hard to read. Senseless brutality, questionable moral decisions being taken and a no-holds barred account of what happened. Some of it may have been imagined, and some of it may have been far worse. But it’s important not to ignore...how else will you encourage people to stand up for what is right?Thank you NetGalley for granting me access to this prior to publication. It was a privilege to read...and I’ve pre-ordered my copy.
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  • Hazel
    January 1, 1970
    This ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review An epic tale of a reimagined World War II comes to an explosive end in this third and final book Purple Hearts. Michael Grant created an alternative history in which women were allowed to enter the army and fight alongside the men on the front lines in Europe. Having earned accolades, promotions and the right to go home to America at the conclusion of the previous book, Rio, Frangie and Rainy decide to stay for This ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review An epic tale of a reimagined World War II comes to an explosive end in this third and final book Purple Hearts. Michael Grant created an alternative history in which women were allowed to enter the army and fight alongside the men on the front lines in Europe. Having earned accolades, promotions and the right to go home to America at the conclusion of the previous book, Rio, Frangie and Rainy decide to stay for the remains of the war. It is 6th June 1944, and the battle on the sands of Omaha Beach is about to begin – D-Day.The story rushes into the horrors of the D-Day landings where Rio, now a Sergeant, is leading her platoon through the treacherous battleground, whilst Frangie, the medic, tries to patch up fallen comrades. The author teases the reader with the introduction of new characters who promptly get killed during this fateful day and battles further along the line. There is no sugar coating the horrific experience of soldiers and civilians, regardless of whether the scenes are fictionalized or not.The difficulty with writing a work of fiction about the final years of World War II is that the majority of readers will already know the facts. Therefore, it was impossible for Grant to compose a drastic alternative history. Despite the inclusion of women soldiers, the main events occur exactly as they did in reality, beginning with D-Day before moving on to Liberated France, the Hürtgen Forest, the Battle of the Bulge, and, eventually, VE Day. The three main characters have undergone complete transformations since the beginning of book one. No longer are they the innocent girls mocked for the belief they could be as strong as male soldiers. As horror after horror unfolds, readers are left with only the hope that these three survive.Throughout book one and two, the narrative was interspersed with a commentary from an anonymous female soldier in a bed at the 107th evacuee hospital in Würzburg, Germany. As promised at the beginning of the series, readers finally find out which character this nameless voice belongs to, although it is dragged out until the final pages of the book. The title, Purple Hearts, refers to the medal earned by soldiers injured in battle. Rio, Frangie and Rainy have each received one, along with a few other characters. Unfortunately, many are killed in the battles, some who have been in the story from the start, making this an extremely shocking book. It goes to show how dangerous war is and the brutality WWII soldiers experienced. It is a surprise that as many survived as they did.Although at this point the main focus of the story is the war, there is still the underlying theme of equality, both for women and for black people. Frangie provides the insight into the segregation of blacks, being assigned to black-only patrols and having white patients refuse to be treated by her. However, as the war gets more violent, these lines get blurred until it is (mostly) no longer important the colour of a soldier or medic’s skin.Purple Hearts is a brilliant end to a challenging series. Readers become invested in the characters and are drawn into a story that is so true to form that it is easy to forget that women did not actually take part in the fighting. Evidently well researched, Michael Grant has penned a series that educates whilst it entertains, opening readers’ eyes to the truth about war. This is nothing like a textbook full of facts and figures, it is a moving, personal (forget the fictional bit) account of what WWII was really like. Written with young adults in mind, this is a great series for both teens and older readers.
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  • Grace MacLellan
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible I am speechless after finishing this book. It consumed my whole day as I was unable to turn away until the book was done. Grant has succeeded in creating an intriguing, action-packed, and emotional novel yet again, allowing us to follow these soldier girls until the end. I am especially thankful for the last few chapters detailing the after that these women deserved. It is bittersweet that the series is over, but I wouldn’t want it to end any other way!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    I am so in love with this book; it was explosive, fast-paced and more gruesome than ever. Five big fat, shiny stars from me. Purple Hearts absolutely met the super high standards already set by the previous two books in this utterly addictive alternate version of history. Michael Grant cleverly weaves his characters and their stories together with some genuine events from WWII and perfectly captures the notion that every soldier had their own story, and fought their own version in a War which to I am so in love with this book; it was explosive, fast-paced and more gruesome than ever. Five big fat, shiny stars from me. Purple Hearts absolutely met the super high standards already set by the previous two books in this utterly addictive alternate version of history. Michael Grant cleverly weaves his characters and their stories together with some genuine events from WWII and perfectly captures the notion that every soldier had their own story, and fought their own version in a War which took the lives of so many. At the end of Silver Stars I wasn’t too sure which way Purple Hearts could go – would Rio, Frangie and Rainy be touring around celebrating their medals or would we be straight back into the thick of it with our squad? But these girls don’t know how to give up; so it’s straight back to the War for us and this final instalment plummets the girls right back into the action (and espionage for a certain undercover Shulterman; she’s my favourite – I just can’t help it).I love how well Grant captures how far each of the girls, and other secondary characters, have come. As each of the girls gets a little more responsibility this time around, we see the juxtaposition between “green” soldiers, like the ones our girls used to be, and who they have later become. The character development is just huge but more so than this, revisiting these characters for the final time is actually almost like sitting down for dinner with your friends. I have developed this warm affection for most, if not all, of these characters and somehow this little alternate history feels, to me, like the real deal. This author knows how to drag you in and keep you hooked on every word. And let’s face it, you all want to know who makes it in the end and you all know the odds aren’t looking so hot; that part of history can’t be changed! And Gentle Reader, I know you want to know which character has been writing these mysterious letters to us all this time – you won’t be disappointed.I really enjoyed exploring the idea that everyone is living their own kind of war, or dying in it, and that being an excellent soldier isn’t all there is to it. It was particularly interesting to consider the idea of a “worst war” and the kind of contempt this might have had in reality for soldiers even on the same side. Would you, having faced unimaginable odds on the ground or the front line feel you’d had a harder time than those soldiers elsewhere? Should it even matter if you’re on the same side? I think this final book captures really nicely how different people cope with the tests that a war throws at them, particularly for those soldiers (like Rio) sending their troops into awful conditions, watching your friends and allies dying around you, not really knowing your odds and whether you can be strong enough to keep the madness just out of reach. Surprising moments of camaraderie will bring you back from the edge though and these personal, sweet snapshots really made the book for me. Grant does an excellent job again of representing what it is to be discriminated against, but also how complex that idea actually is when you throw race, sex and even rank into the mix. This setting is the ideal way to capture that in fact because it doesn’t matter who you are, what you look like, whether you wear pants or skirts, what boxes you fit into – you’re still capable of living or dying just the same when the enemy is pointing a gun at you. But of course, outside of the war there is still work to be done on that front.“You don’t recognise combat soldiers by legs or breasts or the hidden bits; you recognise them by their eyes. Maybe a civilian wouldn’t spot it, but we always will. We are our own separate tribe. We know things. And we are none of us, men or women, the people we started out being”.The book ends quite quickly, largely because we are seeing it through the eyes of the character you’ll find has been writing to us so we can only discover what they saw. But I think this works perfectly and fit the nature of the book. I can’t recommend Purple Hearts enough; a fantastic close to what has been the most memorable set of characters and story-lines for me in such a long time. This is an important book because, despite its fictional characters, parts of these stories are true for many and we owe it to the people who gave their lives protecting others, to remember. ARC provided free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Oh boy this book! I’ve been waiting a year for it and it did not disappoint. WARNING SPOILERS!!!!What I love most about this trilogy is that if does not glamorize World War II. It shows the grit of it and all the negative things we like to push away. It’s unsettling and uncomfortable, which is exactly the way War is supposed to be. You shouldn’t be comfortable. The most unsettling chapters (besides the obvious one in the camps) are those from the point of view of replacements. Through the eyes o Oh boy this book! I’ve been waiting a year for it and it did not disappoint. WARNING SPOILERS!!!!What I love most about this trilogy is that if does not glamorize World War II. It shows the grit of it and all the negative things we like to push away. It’s unsettling and uncomfortable, which is exactly the way War is supposed to be. You shouldn’t be comfortable. The most unsettling chapters (besides the obvious one in the camps) are those from the point of view of replacements. Through the eyes of characters we don’t know, we got to see Rio and her squad and how hardened and detached they are. Then, of course, there are the death scenes. When I read Front Lines the first time, there was so much emphasis put on Cassel’s death, and in Silver Star there was a bit less on Suarez and McGraff... then comes Purple Hearts. In the span of a paragraph, both Pang and Stick met their ends. A double blow to the reader. My heart shattered. Also I will say that Strand is still a dick even three books later. He was probably the only character that had zero development in three books. Geer on the other hand went from being my most hated character to one of my absolute favourites. It was gritty, action packed, and gut wrenching. I tore through it.The one thing I wish was that some parts of the book were longer. I wish we could have gotten more about the Hurtgen Forest. The ending on occasion felt a bit rushed, but the victory part was incredibly well executed. Now that the trilogy is done, I have absolutely no idea what to do. I’m so glad I gave this series a chance. It’s probably my favourite YA series. Thank you Michael Grant.
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  • Janine
    January 1, 1970
    I am utterly in love with this series. A moving, powerful story of war and equality that manages to challenge, educate and entertain in equal parts. The author does a brilliant job yet again very cleverly blending fact with fiction to create a believable alternate history of WWII.Readers of the first two books in the series will already be familiar with our wonderful trio of protagonists - Frangie, Rio and Rainy. They are such compelling, unique, memorable characters that I became utterly invest I am utterly in love with this series. A moving, powerful story of war and equality that manages to challenge, educate and entertain in equal parts. The author does a brilliant job yet again very cleverly blending fact with fiction to create a believable alternate history of WWII.Readers of the first two books in the series will already be familiar with our wonderful trio of protagonists - Frangie, Rio and Rainy. They are such compelling, unique, memorable characters that I became utterly invested in them over the course of this series. I was so glad to see them return, although all is not as it once was. In Purple Hearts it becomes evident how much of a transformation they've all gone through. The story feels brutally realistic and my attachment to the characters made it a tough read at times; but that is why it's so good. It is as captivating as it is shocking. I know for sure that in putting this book down it is not the last time I will think of our soldier girls, nor the last time I will read this series I am sure!A brilliant end to a remarkable series. I can't recommend it enough.Thanks to NetGalley and Electric Monkey for providing me an e-copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. I absolutely jumped at the chance to read the conclusion to this series, and will be pre-ordering a physical copy straight away!
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  • Danielle Zimmerman
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t even know where to begin. PURPLE HEARTS is a fitting end to this masterful and gut-wrenching series. While the first two books were violent and graphic, this one was downright brutal. Grant didn’t hold anything back here when it comes to depictions of violence, injuries, deaths, massacres... you get the point. It’s eye-opening and, at time, hard to read. But it SHOULD be. War is hell. There’s nothing glamorous or entertaining about it and we should not treat it as such. Grant’s work here I don’t even know where to begin. PURPLE HEARTS is a fitting end to this masterful and gut-wrenching series. While the first two books were violent and graphic, this one was downright brutal. Grant didn’t hold anything back here when it comes to depictions of violence, injuries, deaths, massacres... you get the point. It’s eye-opening and, at time, hard to read. But it SHOULD be. War is hell. There’s nothing glamorous or entertaining about it and we should not treat it as such. Grant’s work here on PURPLE HEARTS and with the Soldier Girls series in general is nothing short of masterful. It’s a must read series, not just for women or young adults but for everyone. It’ll change the way you look at history, WWII, veterans, and war in general. This is one series that will stick with me forever and I’m grateful for it.
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  • Sinead
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for my review copy of this book.The dark circles under my eyes are testament to how good this book is. Just had to stay up and finish the characters stories. Michael Grant should be applauded on his work here and it has brought up so many areas of history that I want to go out and read about now. I will definitely be recommending to all of my family and friends. It was just a shame that the main books in the series have come to an end.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    A really great ending to the series!
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    What an ending. This book is powerful, graphic, gut-wrenching, and heartwarming all at once. Grant does a superb job. This series will stick with me for a long time.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    4.5A solid conclusion to an underrated trilogy. I've enjoyed the whole ride.
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