The Lost Coast
The spellbinding tale of six queer witches forging their own paths, shrouded in the mist, magic, and secrets of the ancient California redwoods.Danny didn't know what she was looking for when she and her mother spread out a map of the United States and Danny put her finger down on Tempest, California. What she finds are the Grays: a group of friends who throw around terms like queer and witch like they're ordinary and everyday, though they feel like an earthquake to Danny. But Danny didn't just find the Grays. They cast a spell that calls her halfway across the country, because she has something they need: she can bring back Imogen, the most powerful of the Grays, missing since the summer night she wandered into the woods alone. But before Danny can find Imogen, she finds a dead boy with a redwood branch through his heart. Something is very wrong amid the trees and fog of the Lost Coast, and whatever it is, it can kill. Lush, eerie, and imaginative, Amy Rose Capetta's tale overflows with the perils and power of discovery — and what it means to find your home, yourself, and your way forward.

The Lost Coast Details

TitleThe Lost Coast
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 14th, 2019
PublisherCandlewick
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, LGBT

The Lost Coast Review

  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book for free from the publisher (Candlewick Press) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 3.5 stars which rounds up to 4.I had such high hopes for this book, but it ultimately did not live up to my expectations. Let’s start with what I did like. I liked the diversity. There was a lot of sexual (lesbian, ace, etc.) and racial diversity. One of the girls was Filipino which I was super happy about since I’m Filipino. I love seeing Filipino representation. I al I received an ARC of this book for free from the publisher (Candlewick Press) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 3.5 stars which rounds up to 4.I had such high hopes for this book, but it ultimately did not live up to my expectations. Let’s start with what I did like. I liked the diversity. There was a lot of sexual (lesbian, ace, etc.) and racial diversity. One of the girls was Filipino which I was super happy about since I’m Filipino. I love seeing Filipino representation. I also liked the aesthetic of the book. The descriptions perfectly captured that foggy, mystical, Northern California vibe. Now on to what I didn’t love. There were a lot of point of view changes throughout the book which really made it difficult to understand especially in the beginning. Each POV would last for only a few pages so it ended up being a bit jarring and all over the place. As for the storyline, it wasn’t exciting. It felt kind of blah to me until the end which is when things finally got interesting. I also wished the book focused more on June and Hawthorn. They were my two favorite characters and I wanted to explore more of their backstory. Overall, this book had some good moments (Queer POC witches for the win!), but didn’t reach its full potential.
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  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Candlewick Press! One of my most anticipated books of the year. Now...when can I start...THAT SYNOPSIS!THAT COVER!Check, please!
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    between Spellbook of the Lost and Found, Wild Beauty, Toil and Trouble, and this, I'm just going to call magic gay now and have it done with releases: May 14, 2019
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Without even having read The Raven Boys, I feel like I can safely make this my answer to "Do you have anything like TRB but wlw," aka a question that comes pretty much every single month to the LGBTQReads Tumblr. Atmospheric, romantic, and wildly gay. I love Amy Rose Capetta.
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  • Julie Zantopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come-but this was a good one."That girl might have magic in her heart, but never forget how much of her power is handed right to her by other people."Imogen is lost and the Grays want her back and so they call for Danny and she listens. Rush, Hawthorn, June, Lelia, and Imogen are the Grays and Danny may be new to town but she's not new to magic or kissing girls. So, when Danny falls in with the Grays, the local witches that inspire a bit of awe and fear in the locals, she's right at ho Review to come-but this was a good one."That girl might have magic in her heart, but never forget how much of her power is handed right to her by other people."Imogen is lost and the Grays want her back and so they call for Danny and she listens. Rush, Hawthorn, June, Lelia, and Imogen are the Grays and Danny may be new to town but she's not new to magic or kissing girls. So, when Danny falls in with the Grays, the local witches that inspire a bit of awe and fear in the locals, she's right at home. All of the Grays are queer in some way, and it's written on the page that they're ace, bi, lesbian, or queer. There are gender and pronoun discussions, discussions about being ace but still enjoying kissing, about not liking being touched, etc. The diversity that is woven into these characters is beautiful and respectful and I adored every single bit of it. "I've waited forever to meet a girl who doesn't treat her body like a natural enemy."Also, can we just be here for girls supporting girls (whether they're romantically linked or not)? The friendships and relationships in this book are pretty phenomenal even if there is a bit of a power imbalance within them. The Grays are using Danny to get their friend back and she's unsure if that means they'll want/need her anymore and still, they all respect one another. I will say that Danny's relationship with her mother was underdeveloped and explained and that really bothered me...but other than that the relationships were A+. "The trees keep us company as we ride. They keep our secrets, and we never have to ask. ...Maybe that's why girls like us are always in the woods."Have I mentioned that the Grays are witches, that they all have their own power, unique and lush and important to the story? That there are a woods that has unnatural storms, hollow treats that Hermits live in, and climbable trees that beg for girls to explore? The setting is lush and beautiful and I was living for it. "I made every choice myself, including the bad ones. Especially the bad ones. Some of those are the choices I'm most proud of."This is not a novel full of whimsical magic but rather dense fog that can transport you, ghosts that can entrap you, and a hunger for power that can lead you down paths you can't venture back from. There is murder and bloodshed, bones and fear and all of it is intoxicating. If you're looking for a feel good, everyone ends up alive and happy novel, this ain't it. However, it is a beautifully written tale of women, love, friendship, and the lengths we go to in order to find our place in the world."I've found the heart of another secret: the Grays are always touching and kissing each other because so many before us couldn't. Each kiss carries the weight of so many kisses that never were. Every touch is an invisible battle won."Everyone deserves to have love and friendship like the girls of this novel have. They deserve the comfort of touch and the closeness that is afforded to women and often not men. Honestly, such a stunning novel of diversity, badass motorcycle riding babes and soft ladies with power. I loved it a lot.
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  • Mariah
    January 1, 1970
    the year is twenty-gay-teen and I am here for it.
  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Magical ~ Immersive ~ Remarkabletl;dr: This book keeps California weirdCalifornia is a country in and of itself. The landscapes and the people vary so drastically. There is so much California north of San Francisco, and so much of it is unspoiled. Having spent time there, I was thrilled to find this book. But, I wasn't even close to prepared. Capetta's novel is exceptional. Reading so many books, I rarely feel as if a book is truly novel. Capetta's story truly feel special and new. The writing i Magical ~ Immersive ~ Remarkabletl;dr: This book keeps California weirdCalifornia is a country in and of itself. The landscapes and the people vary so drastically. There is so much California north of San Francisco, and so much of it is unspoiled. Having spent time there, I was thrilled to find this book. But, I wasn't even close to prepared. Capetta's novel is exceptional. Reading so many books, I rarely feel as if a book is truly novel. Capetta's story truly feel special and new. The writing is crisp and accessible, and the characters are well drawn. For me, the greatest strength is how she weave whole story out of atmosphere and emotion. This book stays with you, making you see your own environs with a more magical eye. (And, notice how my review says little about the story). Well, if you love reading, grab this book. It is so broadly accessible. Of course, a lover of YA or of magical tales will like it, but everyone will. Also, don't read too many descriptions. Let this fast read unfold anew for you. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Elke
    January 1, 1970
    i received an e-arc in exchange for my honest opinion. please be reassured this made me cry on merit alone and is now my favourite book everthis was so beautiful i have -for the first time in months- an urge to make art or create something that mirrors the light from this book towards other people so they too, can be reached. instead i'm sitting here trying to write something when i only have tears and a heart that's full and a little bit broken and a lot patched up. maybe it'll come out better i received an e-arc in exchange for my honest opinion. please be reassured this made me cry on merit alone and is now my favourite book everthis was so beautiful i have -for the first time in months- an urge to make art or create something that mirrors the light from this book towards other people so they too, can be reached. instead i'm sitting here trying to write something when i only have tears and a heart that's full and a little bit broken and a lot patched up. maybe it'll come out better in art. i'll see later. I’ve found the heart of another secret: the Grays are always touching and kissing each other because so many before us couldn’t. Each kiss carries the weight of so many kisses that never were. Every touch is an invisible battle won. this was the queer witch book of my dreams and i didn't even know i dreamed of one. i am extremely raw and unravelled at this moment so i will maybe come back to this later to fill in more things. now, the only thing i can say is that when June mentioned the pain in her legs first, my heart leapt so fast i thought it would trip over itself. i don't want anyone to be in pain, but i do want to read about people in pain being there for the whole story. for us to be present and part of something and heroes and friends and there. there for everything, even if it means the group slows down because in pain we can't go as fast all days. “I’ll do it,” June said, even though today was a six on the scale of one to barely walking. The pain in her leg had the cold, heartless glitter of snow. that the polyamorous undertones and strong bonds and life friends that you've only known for a little while and the fact that i could imagine queerplatonic relationships made me cry. that the writing was beautiful and everything touched in this atmospheric magic. that this book was magic. magic in the way books are magic. in the way representation and diversity are magic. in the way we, as marginalised people, are magic. that this book was about us. This book is for everyone who is finding out who they are, where they belong, and who they belong with . This book is for the different ones, especially those who live where it’s very hard to be different. I see you. I think you’re magic. that i felt seen by different characters at different times and by this book always.that hawthorn says "bisexual black witch with a pretty strong lean towards masculine folks" because there it is, on page acknowledgement that you can be bi regardless of your gender and the gender of your partner. that those things, or the way you lean most, don't take away your bi card.that the book asks "what word fits you in a way that makes you happy at this very moment? Lesbian? Bi? Pan? Queer?" acknowledging that it can be different and grow and change and that all those words are right and okay and can be right for you but don't have to bethat it talks about boxes and how they don't always define us or fit forever but that nothing and nobody shies away from using the words they use for themselves. It has nothing to do with how lovely and kissable Sebastian is. Even with all the girls I’ve hooked up with, I sometimes find myself wanting to kiss a boy, and that makes it harder for a lot of people — I won’t declare myself and stick to one side of a fence. I don’t know how to explain that I don’t even see the fence. i just. there's so much more to be said about this book. these Grays, but i don't know if i have the words. here are some of theirs & all the rep:Lelia: white, gray ace, nonbinary ("she is fine, at least for now" (this part is OV)). She likes kissing if it's not about rushing to other bases. "I don't date anyone." (so also aro? not my lane, not my answers or my questions, really.)June: "a girl of the girly type variety and i like girl-types." Filipino mom. "Lyme disease had taken the concept that June's immune system would fully recover."Rush: "Fat. Queer. White." has synesthesia. Hawthorn: "bisexual black witch with a pretty strong lean towards masculine folks"Danny: "Queer. it feels right to me. Less limiting in who i am, who i'm with. Less based on whether or not i even feel like a girl on any given day." "I kiss a lot of people, mostly girls."also! i remembered i did not talk about this yet but omg the pov changes! i love books like this! i love perspective switches, and especially if it's from places or things you usually don't expect (the trees! the ravens! (think "The Sun Is Also A Star" and "Sawkill Girls") and other people and pairs and groups and wow)and the writing style. everything is just. soft and atmospheric and beautiful and -more gushing to come here, later, probably.all my love for this book and this author and these characters. And then they see another girl wafting through the forest. Hawthorn stops moving. June and Lelia stop whispering paint over each other’s skin and secrets in each other’s ears. Rush stops singing. They trade looks. These girls have mastered the art of looking at each other. Everything they do is heavy with meaning, like they’re slipping stones in each other’s pockets to keep their bodies from floating away in a riptide. tw's: death/accidental murder, murder, mention of a parent dying of cancer in the past, on page sex (one scene) and references to sex, disapproving family members, probably homophobiasee endless quotes i loved (i would share all my 52 kindle highlights if i could- definitely buying this to highlight and hold these words in my hands)✨ I’d seen a dozen rainbow flags between San Francisco and this stretch of wildness. Every single one felt like a welcome sign.✨ “Are you okay?” she asks. My brain clicks through answers. “Yes. No.”“You can hold both things at the same time”✨ “Time isn’t the only way to know someone,”✨ “She thinks if you get really attached to a single word for someone, that’s not good, because how can a whole person fit inside one word? And then maybe they find one that fits better, or they use more than one, or they never find one that fits — that’s the natural flow of things. But I happen to think that words are important, too."✨ And my mom might be okay with gay, but queer would make her cringe. I’m shaking with the power of it.✨ If there was any bit of fog left in my body, it clears as I stare at the Grays. I drink in curves and angles. I blush at unforgiving beauty.✨ They were in love with each other, and that was good. Love wasn’t the problem.✨ She looked mad, but I knew the anger was just something she’d slapped on over her guilt so she felt fully dressed. Guilt was a naked feeling.✨ (//sex) "I'm ready," Rush says.And I believe her. When I push my hand between her legs, they fall open like a book that’s been waiting to be read. She covers my hand with hers, gives me a guided tour of what she wants. I make circles to keep her safe. I make figure eights, tiny eternity symbols. I’m afraid, the whole time, that I’m on the exact edge of losing her. But she said this is what she wanted. And I believe her.✨ I give her the people she came from: the family that never built her a safe home, the friends that became an entire world. I give her the stories I found when I was looking for her. I give her back to herself, beautiful and confusing and more than anyone could possibly take in at once, the way the far side of a redwood can only be guessed about from where I’m standing.✨ I find something inside me shaped like confidence, and I spin it into a bridge that’s not really solid but might be solid enough for three girls who aren’t fully there.✨ Danny is light on her feet, and watching her pour herself into the work is a bit of shine against black clouds. This girl is a silver lining come to life. Gray turned bright and beautiful. She picks up bones and puts them back down. She hummingbirds around the skeleton. It took them long enough, but the Grays finally start paying attention to the girl in front of them. This is how the Grays fall in love. This is how the Grays do everything. In the weirdest possible way. This is how they go down. Together.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of Candlewick Press. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. Well. Well. It's been exactly a week since I finished this book, and I'm still not quite sure what I read. I'm going to do my best to try to make sense, but mostly I'm just going to be confused and probably revert to one syllable words.There were Disclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of Candlewick Press. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. Well. Well. It's been exactly a week since I finished this book, and I'm still not quite sure what I read. I'm going to do my best to try to make sense, but mostly I'm just going to be confused and probably revert to one syllable words.There were a couple of reasons I was SO excited for this book. Amy Rose Capetta's book, The Brilliant Death, was a brilliant read in 2018, and one of the easiest fantasy books I've ever read. I was in deep. When I heard she was writing a book that involved possible murder, a coven of queer witches, and woods in California, I was SOLD. It sounded like the perfect storm of a good book, and I was pretty ready to take on magical realism.Conclusion after reading this book: I, Book Princess Mandy, will never be ready to take on magical realism.There were just things I did NOT get. I tried so hard, but it took me foreverrrrrr to figure some things out. It took me about 10 chapters to realize that Imogen wasn't dead? I think in the first or second chapter, it is stated that Imogen is found with seaglass in her eyes, and well, I assumed that meant death? But then she popped up in the school hallway a few chapters later and I'm like OH, GHOSTIE NOVEL NOW??? YAY. Only to have to Sherlock out later on that she's apparently walking around like a zombie?? MAYBE??? I STILL DON'T UNDERSTAND IT.And that's the entire thing with this novel - I still don't understand much of it. There were things that I got, but there are still SO SO many things that I don't get. I kind of just sat there going, well, um, I'mma keep going and hope that makes sense, until I ran out of pages and nothing still didn't make much sense. I'm still not really sure if it was the book or me or WHAT, but I really can't elaborate on plot items, because like, IDKKKKK.Plus, it would have helped a bit more to have a more structured narrative. Each short chapter would jump to something new - whether it was narrated by Danny, The Grays (as a collective), stories about two specific girls, birds, etc. There were moments that I really liked having this jump around, but sometimes it did leave me even more confused because it was so jumpy.Characters-wise, I did really like Danny as a narrator. You feel her go through a journey in this novel, and find out where she belongs and how she fits in the world. Finding the Grays is like finding herself in the world, and you see her desperation and desire to be a part of something that she has longed for forever. I did really enjoy her as a main character, and she was messy and realistic. The other characters felt like they had a bit of haze around them, and I never got the full picture for them, but they were still intriguing and dynamic.Capetta brings us such a wholly diverse group of characters as well. From bi to lesbian to gender fluid to ace, there was so much rep from these queer witches. There was also black and Filipino rep in the Grays along with fat rep. From all the Capetta books I've read, she is a master at creating such diverse characters that let so many readers find themselves in the pages that they might not have had the chance to a few years ago.The last thing about this book was the mood/feeling. It is wholly engrossing and captivating. As you might have gotten, I didn't have any clue what was going on at parts, but I still couldn't stop reading. I imagine this book is like what you feel if you were feeling high. Like, that's what I felt after I finished it. But when I was reading it, it certainly felt magical and like I was surrounded in fog on this lost coast.3 crowns and a Belle rating. This was a wholly engrossing but also super confusing read. I think it might be in part with the fact that I struggle with magical realism, but other parts just confusion in general with the book. It did have its magical parts, and the diversity was amazinggggg.
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  • Kristi Housman Confessions of a YA Reader
    January 1, 1970
    This might be a bit hard for me to review.  It's the type of book where not a ton happens, but what happens isn't really what I can write about.  I will say right off that it's a very magical book and it surprised me how much I liked it when I sometimes struggle with books like this.  I'm a fan of more fast paced books and this isn't one of those.  Danny and her mom were living in a small town in Michigan.  Danny started to feel this weird pull.  She would wander without thinking about where she This might be a bit hard for me to review.  It's the type of book where not a ton happens, but what happens isn't really what I can write about.  I will say right off that it's a very magical book and it surprised me how much I liked it when I sometimes struggle with books like this.  I'm a fan of more fast paced books and this isn't one of those.  Danny and her mom were living in a small town in Michigan.  Danny started to feel this weird pull.  She would wander without thinking about where she was going or who she was with.  She would just disappear.  Her mom wasn't thrilled with all the girls she was kissing either.  They decided that a move might help.  When looking at a map of the US, Danny picked Tempest, California without knowing anything about it.  She just knew she needed to be there.I loved reading about Danny's vision of California for the first time.  Especially the redwoods.  There is a quote early on in the book that really stuck out to me.  I have this exact feeling, but in Southern California and not Northern.  I don't believe there was a spell or anything, but I feel a pull there and no where has ever felt like home as much."I'm joking, but the truth is I feel every difference between this place and the one where I grew up.  The food is better.  The Mexican food is infinitely better.  People smile at strangers.  But there's a difference that I don't know how to talk about, something in the air that must have a chemical interaction with my blood."The Grays are a group of queer witches from Tempest that practice magic in the woods by their homes.  One of the girls, the strongest, Imogen, went missing in the woods.  The rest of the Grays cast a spell to find someone that can help them find Imogen.  That person ends up being Danny.  She didn't know she had magic, but the Grays helped her find it.  The book weaves through time and perspective to figure out the mystery or where Imogen went, and why two people have been killed since Danny showed up.The atmosphere in the book was so perfect.  The woods, the massive trees, and the fog.  I was definitely pulled into the mystery, but I also really liked all the people.  Maybe not Danny's mom so much, but that was because it felt like she thought Danny kissing girls was a phase or her acting out.  But everyone else.  They were very open about their sexuality and there is sex in the book.  While Danny questions some of her choices, there is never really any shame for it except from her mom.  And that was just a small part.I could go over each character, but I feel like it's important for you, the reader, to learn about them slowly while reading the book.  The diversity was great.  None of them were perfect and they made mistakes.  And I always appreciate a book that shows teenagers as the imperfect people that they are (or adults). I ended up giving this book 4 stars.  Thank you to Candlewick Press for sending me a copy for review.   Quote above is taken from an arc and may change before final publication. 
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  • Crowinator
    January 1, 1970
    First line from my Booklist review: "In Capetta’s dreamy, enigmatic tale, a restless teen finds friendship, love, and self-acceptance among a coven of queer witches."I loved this book, though I think it's not quite what I expected. The writing captures the same dreamy, creepy, poetic essence that Nova Ren Suma or Frances Hardinge do, but has less actual plot underneath; it's a slow-burning character study of some fascinating, enigmatic people making up a supportive (though not conflict-less) fou First line from my Booklist review: "In Capetta’s dreamy, enigmatic tale, a restless teen finds friendship, love, and self-acceptance among a coven of queer witches."I loved this book, though I think it's not quite what I expected. The writing captures the same dreamy, creepy, poetic essence that Nova Ren Suma or Frances Hardinge do, but has less actual plot underneath; it's a slow-burning character study of some fascinating, enigmatic people making up a supportive (though not conflict-less) found family. The mystery--what happened to Imogen? who or what is doing dark deeds in the woods?--is drawn out a little too long and then resolved in a rush. I will say, at times the poetic details obscure, rather than enhance, meaning, such as(view spoiler)[ when Haven finds her sister Imogen with “two dark but misty pieces of sea glass where her eyes used to be” - I thought that meant dead, but it meant she was just dull and without personality but still living. The Grays talked about her being missing, but what they meant was, her mind was gone. (hide spoiler)] Other times they bring forth surprisingly incisive metaphors. Similarly, the non-linear timeline and non-traditional shifting perspectives can make important plot points easy to miss (I did find myself confused a few times, especially at the end), but they also highlight the wandering, elusive nature of these teens and their story. I also have to say, though, I am not bothered by chapters narrated in the royal we, chapters narrated by a flock of ravens or a grove of trees, or chapters narrated by two people switching perspectives instead of one person telling one story. I like it when authors take risks like that to create a different mood or a nonlinear story, and I think Capetta was successful, though it made the plot more cryptic than it needed to be. This book is a mood and I was here for it.Finally, I love the way the Grays discuss their sexual and gender identities; it's blessedly authentic, as they embrace the power of words to express self-identity but are resistant to being boxed in by labels. It's eye-opening for Danny, who comes from a more conservative area where being gay is different enough, much less using words like "queer" or "nonbinary". I think a lot of teens will respond to it, how normalizing it is, especially the notion that sexual and gender identity can be fluid and not fixed for all time.This is a lot of love in this book, familial love, love between close friends, and romantic love, and it was all so well-portrayed. Ultimately, this book is about finding a place to belong after being lost for so long.
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  • J.A. Ironside
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Candlewick Press for the ARCInitially, I found this a little hard to get invested in. The main pov character, Danny, is difficult to get a bead on initially and it feels like she is keeping the reader at arms length. As you read further, you see that this is deliberate. Danny is lost in her own life and she doesn't have answers for the reader - which is sorta ironic given what her talent turns out to be.Danny and her mother recently moved from a conservative small town in Michigan Many thanks to Candlewick Press for the ARCInitially, I found this a little hard to get invested in. The main pov character, Danny, is difficult to get a bead on initially and it feels like she is keeping the reader at arms length. As you read further, you see that this is deliberate. Danny is lost in her own life and she doesn't have answers for the reader - which is sorta ironic given what her talent turns out to be.Danny and her mother recently moved from a conservative small town in Michigan to the much more liberal Tempest in California. Danny, who is still working out her sexuality and where she fits in, meets a group of girls who seem to be expecting her. There was a fifth girl once but she's missing and Danny can find things. Time is of the essence for this group of witches, however. Mysterious deaths are occurring...You need to give this one room to develop but it's well worth it if you do. This is a spellbinding tale of magic, sisterhood, friendship, acceptance and love. The sparse prose is more literary than you normally see with YA but it perfectly fits the tone of the book. This is also a great book for diverse representation. (The entire coven is queer for example.) If you're looking for something very typical in YA then this may not be for you. Rather than offer answers, this book examines what the right questions are. Don't expect one true loves for example, but instead enjoy the fact that many different kinds of love are celebrated in the bonds that the Greys feel for each other. In the end this will resonate most with those who once felt or still do feel, out of place in their own lives. It's not quite perfect - there are one or two minor plotholes for example - but it's such a beautiful book that it doesn't matter. Recommend for those who like intelligently written literary fantasy featuring queer witches.
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  • Lina~Blackbird Queen
    January 1, 1970
    After the wonder that was The Brilliant Death, I will read anything this woman writes.
  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    Full review: http://sunstormsandthunderclouds.blog...I received this book, in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley from Candlewick Press, with thanks to both! I throughly enjoyed this book. I didn't know what to expect from this book, and I know I say that a lot, but I genuinely didn't. I find some stories containing LGBTQIA+ characters can usually fall into being a cliche, where their identification label is their sole character trait, but this book wasn't that at all. This book explore Full review: http://sunstormsandthunderclouds.blog...I received this book, in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley from Candlewick Press, with thanks to both! I throughly enjoyed this book. I didn't know what to expect from this book, and I know I say that a lot, but I genuinely didn't. I find some stories containing LGBTQIA+ characters can usually fall into being a cliche, where their identification label is their sole character trait, but this book wasn't that at all. This book explored sexuality and gender identities in such a nice way, where the characters were more than just who they decided they wanted to kiss or what they were attracted too. It was integrated as an important part of these characters and their journeys but I liked that the author didn't use it as the only thing about these characters, for example, Leila is fiesty, she has heartache and she's real, Rush is quiet and intelligent, musically literate and has sythesthia (another thing I'd never really seen a YA author tackle.) The authors writing style was very ethereal and it really captured my attention.
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  • Rachel Macklin
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.This is the most unabashedly queer thing that I've read in a long time. The Lost Cost centers around Danny, who moves with her mother to Tempest, California, and the Greys, a small group of witches who accept Danny as one of their own. The writing was gorgeous at atmospheric (if a little purple at times). This book felt a little slow at points, but the ending wrap up made the slow pacing feel worth it.
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5 Stars*I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Did your hear that crash? That was my expectations falling to their doom.I requested this book on Netgalley not having read the summary because in the first line of it there "queer witches" and that's all I needed to know. Or so I thought.I'm being way mean which isn't fair because this book wasn't bad, not by a long shot, but I expected so much more.Danny just moved to Tempest, California with her mom when she ends *3.5 Stars*I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Did your hear that crash? That was my expectations falling to their doom.I requested this book on Netgalley not having read the summary because in the first line of it there "queer witches" and that's all I needed to know. Or so I thought.I'm being way mean which isn't fair because this book wasn't bad, not by a long shot, but I expected so much more.Danny just moved to Tempest, California with her mom when she ends up at a party that has her stumbling in the woods. There, she meets the Grays, four teenage witches and friends who tell her they had been waiting for her. As Danny grows closer to them, she uncovers her powers and does everything she can to help them.As I mentioned, I was very sure I would love this but I just had so much trouble getting into the story. As much as I liked the characters and even if I enjoyed the storyline, it was very hard to read because of the writing style. And that's very much a me problem, I just can't get into books when the style is so lyrical. Maybe it's because English is my second language, who knows? Anyway, that really put me off and I had a lot of trouble focusing and being really engaged in what was happening. Also, the different points of view and flashbacks didn't help me focus... Still, if you like a lyrical story, as I wish I would, you should definitely read this one, especially thanks to the queer representation that was amazing.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Here's what I liked about this book:-Gorgeous cover art (shallow of me, I know, but LOOK at it!)-Moody and atmospheric setting (love the drifting fog and stretching redwoods)-Magical Realism -Diversity (both racial and sexual) that feels natural to the characters, rather than stereotyped or tacked on as an after-thought-Strong young women finding their own paths, through their own methods-- successes and missteps alikeHere are aspects I felt detracted a bit from the story:-Disjointed at times du Here's what I liked about this book:-Gorgeous cover art (shallow of me, I know, but LOOK at it!)-Moody and atmospheric setting (love the drifting fog and stretching redwoods)-Magical Realism -Diversity (both racial and sexual) that feels natural to the characters, rather than stereotyped or tacked on as an after-thought-Strong young women finding their own paths, through their own methods-- successes and missteps alikeHere are aspects I felt detracted a bit from the story:-Disjointed at times due to constant POV changes. POV changes come with each new chapter, with each chapter typically only 2-3 pages long. To add to the confusion, chapters also leap backwards and forwards in time by months and years. This meandering, untethered feeling was especially disorienting in the first half of the book, when the reader is still trying to figure out who is who, but became less disruptive as the story picked up at the end. It may sound odd, but personally, my favorite POV did not come from Danny or the Grays, but from the ravens. Their telling had a sense of primal urgency, their simplistic sentences reverberating beautifully with meaning. -Some integral moments in the story felt rushed over, enough to have me turning back pages to see if I had missed something. This left several important moments with the potential to stun and thrill feeling somewhat dull and clipped.Overall, this book was not as exciting or unpredictable as I had hoped. I feel that it had the potential to be more than it was. However, it was still an enjoyable read with some striking moments.Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Emily (emilykatereads)
    January 1, 1970
    I just want to read all the books featuring queer witches omg
  • mahana ❀
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by Candlewick Press via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. I've heard nothing but amazing things about Amy Rose Capetta in the past, so I was excited to finally read one of her titles, but this was massively disappointing. I know everyone discusses how hard it is to write reviews for three star books, but this is more of a two. If there was no diversity and discussions about being queer (the main character's identifier, not my u ARC kindly provided by Candlewick Press via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. I've heard nothing but amazing things about Amy Rose Capetta in the past, so I was excited to finally read one of her titles, but this was massively disappointing. I know everyone discusses how hard it is to write reviews for three star books, but this is more of a two. If there was no diversity and discussions about being queer (the main character's identifier, not my use of the word to describe her sexuality), I definitely would've lowered this rating. Danny and her mother move to California after she randomly chooses a place on the map. There, she encounters the Grays, a group of queer witches who cast a spell to entice her to the area. One of their own, Imogen has recently disappeared. She's still present in the town, but all of her personality is gone. And they believe Danny is the only one who can get her back. Except, dead bodies and mysterious sets of bones in tourist shops begin showing up. The Lost Coast follows the Grays and Danny as they try to uncover the mystery behind the bodies and Imogen's peculiar disappearance. Let's get one thing out of the way: Amy Rose Capetta's writing is beautiful. It was the millions of perspective changes and jumping chapters that had me confused. We get Danny's perspective in the first point of view, then it switches constantly between inanimate objects and other people in the town through the third person. It's jolting and not at all cohesive, making it extremely difficult for you to adjust in the beginning. Even if their writing is flowery and interweaves stunning poetic prose, it was disjointed and confusing to read. In addition, I wasn't a fan of the lack of explanations. I understood that Capetta was attempting to build mystery in the beginning, but by the 40% point, I couldn't tell you three things about the basic plot of this book. However, I did like that we weren't spoon-fed information about the characters or romance and you could interpret their actions for yourself. It was only the fantastical element and its lack of explanation that had me confused - and irritated if I'm being honest. There was one other aspect of the writing that I disliked: some of the similies made no sense. Something along the lines of "they kissed like burning paper" or "her legs opened like a book begging to be read" just felt awkward and weird to me. For one, it confused me and didn't allow my brain to properly evoke images because the similes were so strange. Secondly, they didn't even make sense most of the time.I appreciated the wonderful diversity. We're introduced to the six queer witches - also known as the Grays. They're all of different backgrounds, but they mesh well together. Through this group of witches, we're given queer, lesbian, non-binary, fat, Pacific Islander, asexual, Filipino, and much more representation. I particularly loved this because I've only read one other book with Pacific Islander representation in the past (I'm half Pacific Islander if you weren't aware). However, I could never distinguish between the characters. They were all a jumbled mess, making up one person in my mind. I only fully understood two of the Grays' powers fully, and the rest were just blank faces with no purpose in my imagination. In other words, it never felt like any of the characters - other than Danny, Imogen, and Rush - were fully fleshed out. We didn't get to know them on anything other than a surface level. Since this review has been inherently negative, I'll discuss how much I loved the commentary on being "queer". Personally, I prefer not to use that word because a lot of people in the community find it uncomfortable - which is valid and I like to respect their wishes. However, it's the identifier Danny wishes to use for herself. She loves kissing girls, much to her mother's dismay. In her old town, she's renowned as the girl who will kiss any other girl, which lands her in some heat. However, in the beginning, we see Danny interacting with a male, toeing the line of flirting. It's made abundantly clear later that she does find men attractive, but has a preference for girls (and the label of queer). She has a difficult relationship with her mother, who finds it difficult to understand that her daughter is sexually attracted to people of the same gender. This theme of acceptance arises a lot in the story, which I appreciated. It's something a lot of LGBT+ teenagers have to experience; their parents don't inherently hate them, but they don't exactly accept it. Though, Danny is confident in her identity and doesn't allow anyone else to diminish that. I also really liked the romance brewing between Rush and Danny. Since they're really the only two characters given dimension, we got to know them on a more personal level than the other characters. Rush has a connection with Imogen, where they were briefly seeing each other before her disappearance. This causes tension between her and Danny in the present, where the latter definitely displays an interest in Rush. However, I also felt like this was a romance between all of the main characters. The Grays all love each other and whether that's on a platonic or romantic level is really up to the reader to decide. Something else I appreciated: the sex positivity and openness throughout the novel. We're given on-the-page sex scenes between two girls that focuses on consent and respect between the individuals. Additionally, there's plenty of kissing scenes between two girls for you to enjoy. The Lost Coast is a book about finding where you belong in the world. In the sense of a sexuality spectrum, romantically, or with other people. The writing was disjointed and jumped between different perspectives too much, but it was beautiful prose. The plot was incredibly confusing - only heightened by the writing - and it was difficult to pay attention most of the time. Most of the characters had no dimension and fell flat, though the development of the main character was admirable. It's not something I'd recommend unless witch books are interesting to you. Blog ♡ Twitter
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  • Nia •ShadesOfPaper•
    January 1, 1970
    You can find this review and others on my blog shades of paper “One girl unreachable, one girl finally here, one boy dead.” I was super excited about this book because I’m always down for a good witchy novel, and since the ones I’ve read before weren’t as I pictured or had in mind, I’m still on the hunt for the perfect witchy book for me.I have to say that one of the first things I noticed about this story was the writing. It was very flushed and descriptive, and so lyrical that fit really wel You can find this review and others on my blog shades of paper “One girl unreachable, one girl finally here, one boy dead.” I was super excited about this book because I’m always down for a good witchy novel, and since the ones I’ve read before weren’t as I pictured or had in mind, I’m still on the hunt for the perfect witchy book for me.I have to say that one of the first things I noticed about this story was the writing. It was very flushed and descriptive, and so lyrical that fit really well with the tone set in the novel. At first it threw me a bit of because there was a lot of information and I was a bit confused about what was going on and how everything was written, but as I kept reading I started to love it more and more.I feel like there was a lot happening but nothing really happened that made the plot keep going until half way through. It had a lot of POVs and jumps from present to past that I think sometimes didn’t add anything to the plot but only so the reader could know more about the different relationships between some of the characters. I enjoyed some perspectives more than others, but at times I just got confused because there were all these scenes and jumps that I couldn’t really distinguish what was going on.Regarding the characters I feel they needed a bit more work. Though I loved the representation of all these girls and I think their friendship was so precious and incredibly tight, it’s true that I found that some characters were more complex and distinguishable than others. There were some of the girls that I kept mistaking from one another, and the ones that I feel we got a lot more information to create a picture of them in our heads were Danny, Rush and Imogen. However, I really enjoyed the interactions between Rush and Danny, and overall the dynamics of their relationship and the romance. “It takes longer than anyone will admit, to grow into who they are, to feel it deeper than skin, to know. It is easier than they believe to forget.” The atmosphere pf the book was amazing and one of my favorite things. Throughout the entire novel I had this sense of anticipation and mysteriousness that kept me wanting to know what happened with Imogen and how everything tied up. The descriptions were very lyrical and whimsical, and the tone fit so well with how eerie everything appeared.However, even though I had some issues with the pacing of the story and how slow and uneventful it felt during the first half of the novel, the second half was absolutely amazing. There were some little twists and turns that kept me seat the edge of my seat and wanting to know what was going to happen next, and not only that but I feel we got some answers to questions that affected the plot, and that the book became much fast paced and entertaining. I feel the climax of the story was really well done, and the ending too.Overall, it was a solid book and though it took a bit for the story to start being interesting, I ended up really enjoying the ending and the second part of the book more than the first one, and even though there are some things that could have been more descriptive and the characters could have been more complex, it was s whimsical story. “They know what happens in sunlight and darkness, and what slides through the spaces between. Magic is moving fast tonight. Some of it is trapped in human bodies.” TW: talking about homophobia, death, manipulation, murder.I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This doesn’t change my opinion whatsoever. All thoughts are my own.Actual rating: 3.5⭐️
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. When you go on vacation in Atlantic City and for days it rains, flash floods and there is even a tornado, you read a lot of books and write the reviews to upload when you are home. LOL. Here we go again - The spellbinding tale of six queer witches forging their o I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. When you go on vacation in Atlantic City and for days it rains, flash floods and there is even a tornado, you read a lot of books and write the reviews to upload when you are home. LOL. Here we go again - The spellbinding tale of six queer witches forging their own paths, shrouded in the mist, magic, and secrets of the ancient California redwoods.Danny didn’t know what she was looking for when she and her mother spread out a map of the United States and Danny put her finger down on Tempest, California. What she finds are the Grays: a group of friends who throw around terms like queer and witch as if they’re ordinary and everyday words, though they feel like an earthquake to Danny. But Danny didn’t just find the Grays. They cast a spell that calls her halfway across the country because she has something they need: she can bring back Imogen, the most powerful of the Grays, missing since the summer night she wandered into the woods alone. But before Danny can find Imogen, she finds a dead boy with a redwood branch through his heart. Something is very wrong amid the trees and fog of the Lost Coast, and whatever it is, it can kill. Lush, eerie, and imaginative, Amy Rose Capetta’s tale overflows with the perils and power of discovery — and what it means to find your home, yourself, and your way forward.This is a great YA novel that lets you know that no matter what labels and words that there are to describe, you, that it is okay for you to be YOU no matter what labels you and others impose on you. It is well written and the story is engaging and YA and adults as old as myself will love the story - I found it spellbinding (LOL) and enjoyable. A great read for anyone questioning themselves and the above-mentioned labels: read this and be yourself.As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by Millennials on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 NOTE: I cannot link this review to LinkedIn - there is something wrong with the linking/programming and it will not happen.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "Everything we do has intention. Most magic doesn't change the world. It's about being in the world. Appreciating its gifts."This was one of those books that started off at a very quick pace but it slowly started to lose its steam toward the middle and went downhill from there. I was instantly sold on the fact that this was about a diverse group of witches who didn't give a f**k. That they didn't let small minded people get in their way and that they did what pleases them. But the story was medi "Everything we do has intention. Most magic doesn't change the world. It's about being in the world. Appreciating its gifts."This was one of those books that started off at a very quick pace but it slowly started to lose its steam toward the middle and went downhill from there. I was instantly sold on the fact that this was about a diverse group of witches who didn't give a f**k. That they didn't let small minded people get in their way and that they did what pleases them. But the story was mediocre and very predictable. I don't think that you should rely heavily on having diverse characters because the story is what should hold it all together. The glue simply wasn't there for this.What I enjoyed was how the trees felt and breathed life into this story. How they drew people to them. It was very eccentric in a way that made me want to read more about the Redwoods of California. The downhill slope is what made this disappointing. It didn't keep up with the steady pace that it started with. Plus I was looking for something a tad bit more creepy and this had none of that. It was a modern-day crummier version of The Craft. There are better witch books in the YA field. I would look elsewhere for that and maybe watch The Craft while you're at it.
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  • Samantha Beard
    January 1, 1970
    Rounding up from something like a 4.5. I loved a lot of this book, but I didn't feel like I got to know some of the characters very well. That's the heart of my misgivings, but it's a minor thing in this case. The emotional core of this book comes from knowing the group, and not the individuals. I'll talk more about it on the blog!
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  • Shelby M. (Read and Find Out)
    January 1, 1970
    1.75 stars. Review to come.
  • Melissa Jacobson
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 1.75 I received an E-Arc via netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Oooooooooooof. I have no idea what went wrong here. A book about queer witches? Sign me up! Unfortunately I could not tell you a single freaking thing that happened in this book. I disliked pretty much every character, that is when I could figure out who they were and why they were being so generic and bland. This was one of my most anticipated books of the year but I just...I did not like anything about I exc Actual rating 1.75 I received an E-Arc via netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Oooooooooooof. I have no idea what went wrong here. A book about queer witches? Sign me up! Unfortunately I could not tell you a single freaking thing that happened in this book. I disliked pretty much every character, that is when I could figure out who they were and why they were being so generic and bland. This was one of my most anticipated books of the year but I just...I did not like anything about I except for the atmosphere. The atmosphere was brilliant but damn. I was bored and annoyed and I wanted to slap every character every two seconds. Big oooof.My Booktalk - https://youtu.be/3oqRwZZ-oRY
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    This book absolutely excels at being an atmospheric read. Amy Rose Capetta is very capable of making you feel like you're there. Unfortunately, the plot of this falls a little flat for me. Overall, this is an enjoyable queer and atmospheric witchy read, but nothing truly exceptional. I received an ecopy of this through netgalley; however, all opinions are my own.
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  • Bree
    January 1, 1970
    After finishing this book, I'm really not sure how I feel. But I think I'm leaning towards dissatisfied. Which in of itself is quite sad because there was so much potential here. (On a side note, I might not just click with the author's style as this is the second book I have read where I have struggled to read and enjoy it, despite having elements I like thrown throughout).To start, this book really had tons of elements that I adore. First off, witches. I love witch stories, especially ones tha After finishing this book, I'm really not sure how I feel. But I think I'm leaning towards dissatisfied. Which in of itself is quite sad because there was so much potential here. (On a side note, I might not just click with the author's style as this is the second book I have read where I have struggled to read and enjoy it, despite having elements I like thrown throughout).To start, this book really had tons of elements that I adore. First off, witches. I love witch stories, especially ones that include basic witchcraft as did the Lost Coast (i.e. spells, enchantments, crystals, potions). Despite this element being strong throughout the story, it wasn't enough to sell me.Next, we have the LGBT+ element - overall all of the main cast (the witches) were queer in some way. While I loved this aspect, it fell a bit flat for me. I never understood if the queerness was somehow related to the witchcraft (because the MC Danny seemed to hint at being an outsider and her family not understanding her liking other girls), or if the being a witch was a metaphor for being queer, OR if being queer was just that and it didn't have a deeper meaning or connection to the witchcraft. Unfortunately, this made me confused and continuously wonder if I was missing something. Although, the rep was still great and it is worth mentioning. Lastly, there was a mystery element - which, when combined with witchcraft, makes perfect sense. But again, it all fell flat.There could be a few reasons why I found this story to be so flat. For starters, I had a hard time connecting with any of the characters. The story was told in short chapters in different perspectives. Sometimes these perspectives were Danny or "The Grays" (the main coven of witches Danny joins), but then we would get random chapters from the high school students, the trees, the ravens, etc. It sounds incredibly cool, but those chapters never added anything for me because it took me away from learning about the MCs. All the characters just blended together, which makes me believe it should have just followed one perspective.Second, there were so many mysteries set up and only half resolved. For instance, Danny's entire backstory is alluded to, but we never actually know what happens. We know Danny leaves her home of Michigan because she gets in trouble (this is learned pretty early, so not really a spoiler). We get a brief paragraph about an incident that happened in Michigan, but I honestly never thought that the ONE incident was the reason to leave her family behind so that her and her mother could move to California. Maybe if more happened it would make sense? But it seemed super unrealistic (I'll admit that the one incident was pretty scary, but I work with TONS of teens who have risky behaviors on a daily basis and their parents solve the issues with therapy, not moving away... [foster care and placements are another story]). If the one incident was the reason her mom decided to move her, then I'm not satisfied with that.Third, I don't think anything really made sense. I'm sitting here typing this trying to sort through my scattered thoughts - and they aren't scattered because I have a lot to say. They're scattered because I'm trying to see the point of the story. Sure, the author pretty much tells us the point on the last page, but it seemed pretty weak. One pro the book has for it was the sex scene (the scene itself isn't graphic, but it is alluded to as "sex magic" a page later). I thought the scene was tactic and beautifully written. It was probably my favorite scene in the book, and it was only one page.At this point, my thoughts are still scattered. Maybe I'll come back in a few days and add more, but for now I will leave you with this:I'm really underwhelmed and unimpressed with this book. Personally would not recommend.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this book for free from LibraryThing Early Reviewers and Candlewick Press in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I really, really enjoy Amy Rose Capetta’s writing style. If you’ve been around this blog before, you’ve heard me babble about how much I enjoyed Echo After Echo. This book has a similar feel in its characters, but the aesthetic of a town among the Redwoods feels so vibrant and alive. Amy Rose Cap Disclaimer: I received this book for free from LibraryThing Early Reviewers and Candlewick Press in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.I really, really enjoy Amy Rose Capetta’s writing style. If you’ve been around this blog before, you’ve heard me babble about how much I enjoyed Echo After Echo. This book has a similar feel in its characters, but the aesthetic of a town among the Redwoods feels so vibrant and alive. Amy Rose Capetta is a master of atmosphere, and I fall into her books so easily. I am here for anything she writes. Even when the story or the characters aren’t amazing, her writing style gets me to the end easily.With the same characteristic as Echo After Echo, The Lost Coast was a book I could have easily read in one sitting. In fact, the only reason I didn’t is because we’re in the process of packing up all our possession as I write this, and I’ve been stealing time to read. Still, I found myself pushing my self-imposed boundaries because I didn’t want to put it down. I love Tempest, the way it seems to settle into the land. I love the variety of buildings and people. I love how the students at school seem to speak with one voice, carving out only the Greys and Danny. It’s a whispering place that feels old and clouded with cool fog and falling crow feathers and basically I’m just a sucker for any witch story set on the Pacific Coast.The story line is a little lose here. I will admit – The Lost Coast feels like you’re going in circles, and once the secret is revealed… it’s a bit anti-climatic. The ending left me wondering what happened to Danny after the story. It was interesting to follow a protagonist on the edge of things: Danny works with the Greys, but I never felt like she truly became one of them. Therefore, the relationships we see are between other people, and I personally didn’t feel any emotional attachment or investment in Danny herself. I don’t think we got to know any of the characters deeply enough to really love them. Vague curiosity, but not attachment.For the feel of this novel, Amy Rose Capetta gets full marks. But the story tried to do a lot of things and they all jumbled together and tripped over one another. It could have been a little better developed and a little more depth would have been nice. It was almost there – it was so close – but didn’t quite make it. I loved the feel of this book, but the story wasn’t as good as it could have been.Still, if you like that witchy aesthetic and books like The Price Guide to the Occult and The Wicked Deep, you simply must read this one. Tack on the many shades of LGBTQ+ rep here, and it’s a beautiful thought. If you’re looking for yourself in YA magical realism, you may just find yourself in one of the Greys.______________I love the way Amy Rose Capetta writes. 💜 Great aesthetics in this one and good themes, though I found bits of it a little messy. RTC. 💕
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    i want to scream into the world with how much i loved this book. honestly i just saw the “queer witches” in the synopsis and immediately was sold. and then it got even better when i started actually reading it?? the dream. i basically adore this entire story but my favourite parts:⇒ obviously all the friendship, support and love (every kind of love) between Danny, June, Rush, Lelia, Hawthorn and Imogen. Like, Danny felt like an outsider at the beginning, she didn't know them like they all knew e i want to scream into the world with how much i loved this book. honestly i just saw the “queer witches” in the synopsis and immediately was sold. and then it got even better when i started actually reading it?? the dream. i basically adore this entire story but my favourite parts:⇒ obviously all the friendship, support and love (every kind of love) between Danny, June, Rush, Lelia, Hawthorn and Imogen. Like, Danny felt like an outsider at the beginning, she didn't know them like they all knew each other, and she could feel all the love between them, but she started to feel part of the group and all their love between all of them i kinda want to cry thinking about it⇒ part of the same point but their relationship?? with them being so touchy with each other and sometimes sharing kisses and all and!! i loved these polyamorous vibes, all these bonds and it wasn't necesseraly romantic but they love each other! they support each other! they feel comfortable with each other! they found people like them and it's so important for me⇒ another point with me gushing about their relationship but i really, really loved it and i don't think i can make it justice talking about it, but know how much i loved it thank you very much⇒ THE DIVERSITY!! obviously they were all queer and they had that in common but they were different too, Lelia saying she's nonbinary and grey ace, Hawthorn saying she's “bisexual black witch with a pretty strong lean towards masculine folks” but then also talking about boxes and calling yourself queer because this is how you feel at the moment⇒ the povs. we start with Danny's first person narration and at first i thought this was gonna be like that for the entire book but no! we had a lot of “the grays” chapters, them as a whole group like they are and it fit really well, but also random narrators like the trees, the students from their high school or the ravens. AND we jumped time in time, most of it was “now” but we had some “six weeks ago” and “five years earlier” just at the right time for us to understand more. but not too much, we were still in a complete mystery to what happened to Imogen so obviously we can't stop reading, no, not right no, what do you mean i have to eat? reading is more important⇒ the complete feeling of magic envelopping this whole story. they was so much magic all around it so when i say it's a magical book i'm right
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    When Danny and her mother pick a random spot on the map to move to, they have no idea that Danny’s hand with the pin in it was being controlled by others. Now, in a small town in Northern California, the people who guided that selection need her to help them find their lost friend, Imogen. This group, a small sort of coven that the local kids call the Grays, are in high school and hang out together doing magic, which comes naturally to them. Being with them leads Danny to discover her own magic- When Danny and her mother pick a random spot on the map to move to, they have no idea that Danny’s hand with the pin in it was being controlled by others. Now, in a small town in Northern California, the people who guided that selection need her to help them find their lost friend, Imogen. This group, a small sort of coven that the local kids call the Grays, are in high school and hang out together doing magic, which comes naturally to them. Being with them leads Danny to discover her own magic- she is a dowser, a finder. She must find the lost Imogen- who is, in fact, physically present, but with her soul gone. There is someone or something in the redwood forest that is willing to kill; can Danny overcome it and find Imogen? And is she anything more to the Grays than a useful tool? She is falling in love with one of them and really wants to know…This sounded like a book I’d love, even though it’s YA- northern California? Check. Girls working magic? Check. Quest? Check. But I had a hard time really getting into the book. The book has good atmosphere, good descriptions of location, and good diversity of characters (racial, sexual orientation, gender). But the characters still blended together when the action got going and I had trouble remembering who was who. The never seemed to be in school, and other than Danny’s mother and the parents of Imogen, never seem to wonder where they are. Even Danny, who constantly breaks curfew to be with the Grays, mostly does as she pleases. The move to California was brought on by Danny doing something that required a ‘clean slate’- it’s never said *what* she did, but it seems to have something to do with her falling in love with another girl. What her mother thought about her joining a group of queer girls is never stated! Three stars.
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