Queer there and Everywhere
This first-ever LGBTQ history book of its kind for young adults will appeal to fans of fun, empowering pop-culture books like Rad American Women A-Z and Notorious RBG. Three starred reviews! World history has been made by countless lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals—and you’ve never heard of many of them. Queer author and activist Sarah Prager delves deep into the lives of 23 people who fought, created, and loved on their own terms. From high-profile figures like Abraham Lincoln and Eleanor Roosevelt to the trailblazing gender-ambiguous Queen of Sweden and a bisexual blues singer who didn’t make it into your history books, these astonishing true stories uncover a rich queer heritage that encompasses every culture, in every era. By turns hilarious and inspiring, the beautifully illustrated Queer, There, and Everywhere is for anyone who wants the real story of the queer rights movement. A Junior Library Guild Selection

Queer there and Everywhere Details

TitleQueer there and Everywhere
Author
FormatKindle Edition
ReleaseMay 23rd, 2017
PublisherHarperCollins
Number of pages272 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Glbt, History

Queer there and Everywhere Review

  • Emily May
    February 1, 2017
    “I understand you. I know how much you have suffered.” More beautiful words were never spoken. Try and read this without becoming an emotional wreck. Just try.Queer, There, and Everywhere is an interesting, accessible, wonderful history book. It offers short biographies on twenty-three queer people throughout history, and serves as a reminder that gay, bi, trans, genderqueer, nonconforming, intersex, asexual and others all have long, beautiful, difficult histories. From Ancient Rome to modern d “I understand you. I know how much you have suffered.” More beautiful words were never spoken. Try and read this without becoming an emotional wreck. Just try.Queer, There, and Everywhere is an interesting, accessible, wonderful history book. It offers short biographies on twenty-three queer people throughout history, and serves as a reminder that gay, bi, trans, genderqueer, nonconforming, intersex, asexual and others all have long, beautiful, difficult histories. From Ancient Rome to modern day San Francisco, a single resounding cry echoes through the millennia: You are not alone.I love that the author has remembered all these people so beautifully. She offers many of them in death what they were often denied in life - the correct gender pronouns - and, where possible, Prager has included direct quotes from them, capturing their humanity so that they become more than long-gone figures of history. They become painfully real.Some of these chapters are heartwarming true romances, others about a lifelong fight for identity and rights, and a few are educational tales about the darkest times of history. I now really want to read Josef Kohout's (Heinz Heger) account of his time as a gay prisoner during the Second World War: The Men with the Pink Triangle. I have read many memoirs from Jewish holocaust survivors, but none from gay survivors, and I plan to remedy that.Though I did know this, it was great to get a reminder that the history of LGBTQIA+ people is not all about hatred and intolerance. I'm sure many teens will be interested in learning about how early societies often accepted non-het and trans people, and it was common for rulers to take both husbands and wives. Contrary to popular belief, the persecution of queer people rose with Christianity, particularly in the fifteenth to twentieth centuries.If anything, I just wish that the book had contained people from outside Europe and North America as well. The intro talked about queerness all across the globe, and yet none of the twenty-three people were from Asia, Africa or South America. Though many were POC. I would love to see more books on queer history from the author, and to see them expand to include other people around the world.That being said, it was still wonderful. The relationship between Abraham Lincoln and Joshua had me in tears, as did the love between Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon. I cannot explain the happiness I felt upon learning that Albert Cashier (transgender Civil War soldier) was not misgendered in death, and was allowed to have his true name on his headstone. And, oh shit, this from Glenn Burke (gay baseball player): “As I reach my final days, I’d like to be remembered as just a down-to-earth good person. A man that tried to never have a bad thought in his mind. A man who really tried to get along with everybody at all times, no matter what the situation. A man who will always love his friends and family. Despite what people are going to say or write about me after I die, I want it to be known that I have no regrets about how I lived my life. I did the best I could.” I'm not crying, I swear. *sobs* Just... a beautiful book. The author's engaging, conversational tone made it so easy to read too. How I wish I had Queer, There, and Everywhere when I was a teen.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Laura
    May 22, 2017
    Today is a time when this book is just so incredibly important for some to understand that queerness has always been around before we even had words to label the acts occurring. I am approaching this from the perspective of someone who views firsthand the resistance of certain people to recognize the way a person identifies - they refuse to accept the normality..joke about the preferred pronoun, and just cannot understand. It infuriates me so much. But this book is a step to remedy such ignoranc Today is a time when this book is just so incredibly important for some to understand that queerness has always been around before we even had words to label the acts occurring. I am approaching this from the perspective of someone who views firsthand the resistance of certain people to recognize the way a person identifies - they refuse to accept the normality..joke about the preferred pronoun, and just cannot understand. It infuriates me so much. But this book is a step to remedy such ignorance. While this book doesn’t provide all of the information by any means..what it does do is illustrate that queer people have always been around.Some of the people included are prominent historical figures who impacted the world in ways that earned their way into our history classes not having anything to do with their queerness, but this doesn’t take away from what they in fact were. Great men (and women) do great things. What shouldn’t matter is what your sexuality or gender is (or skin color for that matter). It is the individual. What is harmful is pretending their feelings did not exist and rewriting their histories to make us more comfortable. Assuming someone is straight because history doesn't outright say otherwise is illogical. The idea here is this: Recognizing the world's rich history of queerness would help reduce homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia, and welcome queer identities to the mainstream with love and acceptance. Some of these individuals did incredible things for the queer rights movement, whether it was acknowledged at that time or not. Some of these individuals may not have "changed the world" as much as some of the others, but they all were ahead of their time in that they weren't afraid to be themselves and there is a very beautiful thing in that.The chapters are fairly short with mini biographies on each of the twenty three people included. Many queer identities are represented in these pages, though I cannot say all are. I still think the author did an excellent job at including the several that are. The book is well-researched with an annotated bibliography, plus a glossary. Also, the illustrations were lovely.What would have been nice is if the book didn’t focus so much on European and North American individuals. I appreciated every person included. It just feels harmful for the book to be called Queer there and Everywhere and ultimately leave out the everywhere part. I loved learning about the history of queerness, however brief, all around the world as it was provided in the intro where the author touches on Asia, Africa, Oceania, and Latin America too. I just wish there was more information. And definitely individuals included from these nations in the 23 people who changed the world. I am left hoping that Sarah Prager decides to write an additional volume..maybe even more. It would be nice to see more individuals represented and have more information too.This book shows that history can be fun!
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  • Eric Smith
    March 19, 2017
    This book is fantastic and so, so important. More non-fiction like this in YA, please.
  • Gillian
    April 13, 2017
    I really enjoyed reading that! I love this kind of non-fiction, even if it really is a basic sort of starter kit with a very clear bias (a bias which I also share, obvs, but which makes it seem a little less HISTORICALLY HISTORICAL and more like historical fun which...wait, why am I complaining about this again). It made me want to research the various figures profiled in here in more detail. I loved the overall message of hope and togetherness and being yourself. I think this is a deeply awesom I really enjoyed reading that! I love this kind of non-fiction, even if it really is a basic sort of starter kit with a very clear bias (a bias which I also share, obvs, but which makes it seem a little less HISTORICALLY HISTORICAL and more like historical fun which...wait, why am I complaining about this again). It made me want to research the various figures profiled in here in more detail. I loved the overall message of hope and togetherness and being yourself. I think this is a deeply awesome book to put in the hands of queer teens and history nerds alike. A lot of the figures I knew quite a bit about, some I knew of but had NO FREAKIN' IDEA they were even RUMORED to be queer (Abe Lincoln?? WHO KNEW NOT I) and some I shamefully had never even heard of and now want to go read up on.The only reason it doesn't get a full five is because it really juuuust skims the surface of each profiled figure, and there's a lack of geographic diversity in the chosen figures. In the Afterward thingamabob, Prager does mention how much she wishes she could have expanded her sights, but for what she wanted to do, she needed to choose historical figures with more sources. I get that, I do, but it still would have been nice to at least have some mini profiles or something about queer figures from different corners of the globe.Another thing that mildly put me off were the sort of ~fictionalized~ intro bits from the 3rd person pov of the figures themselves. The further we moved in time, the more uncomfortable they became for me--like it felt vaguely presumptuous to assume what these people were thinking and feeling, even if I'm sure it was derived from research and sources and whatnot. Though I have to say, I was really not okay with the one from Father Mychal Judge's POV, detailing his death on 9/11. Other people may be okay with that level of detail, but it actually quite upset me, considering the tone of the rest of the book was so hopeful and lovely even when some of the stories were tragic.But overall, that was really great, and I hope there are more queer history books for young adults in the future. Maybe even a volume two with some figures that didn't make the cut! Also, all the stars for that title, because DUH.
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  • Alexis (TheSlothReader)
    June 12, 2017
    Overall I thought this was a very informative look at 23 queer individuals from history, some well known and some unheard of. I really liked Prager's conversational and humorous tone in regards to these people's lives. I learned about a lot of people I'd never even heard of and several of these small entries made me tear up. I liked the focus more on the things these people accomplished than being an emphasis on them being queer. I just wish the entries had been longer so that I could have gotte Overall I thought this was a very informative look at 23 queer individuals from history, some well known and some unheard of. I really liked Prager's conversational and humorous tone in regards to these people's lives. I learned about a lot of people I'd never even heard of and several of these small entries made me tear up. I liked the focus more on the things these people accomplished than being an emphasis on them being queer. I just wish the entries had been longer so that I could have gotten more information on these people.
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  • Maxi (slothreads)
    April 30, 2017
    All these stories are about people who brought originality, courage, and love to their work - whatever that work was, whatever way they set themselves to it. This was a really informative and easy to read history book. Although the writing style was really accessible, I found it a little too relaxed sometimes and never felt the true importance of the facts presented in the book. Even when some really bad things were happening, like chemical castration or being assaulted for being gay, it was al All these stories are about people who brought originality, courage, and love to their work - whatever that work was, whatever way they set themselves to it. This was a really informative and easy to read history book. Although the writing style was really accessible, I found it a little too relaxed sometimes and never felt the true importance of the facts presented in the book. Even when some really bad things were happening, like chemical castration or being assaulted for being gay, it was always presented in some sort of informal writing style, making the situation "not a big deal". It was clear that the author didn't think that, but that's the impression she made keeping that tone through the entire book.
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  • Saruuh Kelsey
    April 25, 2017
    "And as we see in all of these transformative lives, and from the effect reading them has on us today, however you want to live is valid and important-because the mere fact of you, living, makes the world more radiant.Live bravely."Um? So I'm meant to review this now? Can my review be a recording of me sitting in a corner, crying in gratitude and understanding of these people? (And crying from anger on their behalf, too.)Look, bottom line: read this. Queer or not, read it. Trans or NB or Cis, re "And as we see in all of these transformative lives, and from the effect reading them has on us today, however you want to live is valid and important-because the mere fact of you, living, makes the world more radiant.Live bravely."Um? So I'm meant to review this now? Can my review be a recording of me sitting in a corner, crying in gratitude and understanding of these people? (And crying from anger on their behalf, too.)Look, bottom line: read this. Queer or not, read it. Trans or NB or Cis, read it. It will make you feel a full gamut of feelings - hopelessness, despair, fury, empathy, and it'll probably make you smile and laugh. Most of all, if you are queer, this book is full of so much hope and determination. This book is a gift. I want a second volume immediately!
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  • Elise (The Bookish Actress)
    January 10, 2017
    3.5 stars. This book had some very interesting bits but ultimately had some flaws. The narrative style was a bit juvenile. I know that's a totally weird complaint to have, because usually I love non-pretentious history books. But this was almost too casual. And the jokes were usually not funny. In general, I'd recommend this more to preteens. The decision to write about Joan of Arc as a queer person frankly kind of annoys me. She wore men's clothing because it was freeing for her at a time when 3.5 stars. This book had some very interesting bits but ultimately had some flaws. The narrative style was a bit juvenile. I know that's a totally weird complaint to have, because usually I love non-pretentious history books. But this was almost too casual. And the jokes were usually not funny. In general, I'd recommend this more to preteens. The decision to write about Joan of Arc as a queer person frankly kind of annoys me. She wore men's clothing because it was freeing for her at a time when women wore dresses. When I picked up the book and saw the entry, I was ready to read about her having feelings for a woman or stating that she felt like a man internally or something. But no, her dressing in men's clothing to fight was all the evidence. Usually, I'm all up for interpreting every single person in history as lgbtq, and I'd love to read some kind of alternate history about her. But there's just no evidence in her entry. It really takes down the credibility of the book. Altogether, interesting but not life-changing, as I already knew almost all of these people were lgbt (with one notable exception) and knew the lesser-known heroes. Maybe that's just me.div17: diverse nonfiction
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  • Cat (cat-thecatlady)
    February 19, 2017
    this was cute. a really good introduction to some queer icons. definitely a more appropriate read for younger people but nevertheless informative.full review here: https://catshelf.wordpress.com/2017/0...
  • Deyse
    March 9, 2017
    For a book preaching diversity I was disappointed to find such a American/European centered version of queer story, there are only 2 people who aren't North American or European, this is being published by a American imprint so that isn't totally unexpected. Despite this I still enjoyed this one a lot and it definitely pleased my historical nerd side.
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  • Mac Dubista Keso The Bibliobibuli v(=∩_∩=)
    June 5, 2017
    Informative.
  • Danielle
    May 31, 2017
    3.5 starsQueer, There, and Everywhere is a short, bright historical clearly aimed at young teens who are looking for someone like them in the word and I can never fault a book for that. Despite an introduction that starts with the salacious question, “was George Washington straight?” all the life stories in the volume are meticulously researched and include firsthand accounts that the subject would consider themselves LGBTQIA+. (Washington is a hard one as so much of the “evidence” is posed by p 3.5 starsQueer, There, and Everywhere is a short, bright historical clearly aimed at young teens who are looking for someone like them in the word and I can never fault a book for that. Despite an introduction that starts with the salacious question, “was George Washington straight?” all the life stories in the volume are meticulously researched and include firsthand accounts that the subject would consider themselves LGBTQIA+. (Washington is a hard one as so much of the “evidence” is posed by political rivals in an attempt to discredit him, so I was pleased to see he isn’t one of the twenty-two featured biographies.) With one exception, all the included bios are of definitively lesbian, gay, bi, transgender, or genderqueer trailblazers. The one exception, Joan of Arc, leads to my next point and my big issue.I’m a cis woman and I do not wish to speak for the trans community. I did some research and didn’t find any trans reviewers who covered this book, but if you know one and would like to link me, I’d be appreciative. I’m left with a bad feeling about QTaE in regards to trans rep. Of the 22 entries, there are four trans women, one trans man, and a person who may have been genderqueer. Of these people, all of them are deadnamed as part of their biography, which I understand in a historical context. But both Lili Elbe and Renee Richards have their lives divided into before and after sections, where their male names and pronouns are used up until their physical transition. The author says this is how they identified, but I’m uncomfortable with the possibility of misgendering. The glossary of LGBT terms is also a problem. It has entries for “transgender”, “transsexual”, “two-spirit” … and “transvestite”. Hint, cis authors, one of those is a slur and one is rarely used in modern society. (The definition of 2S does state it should only be used by First Nations, so no qualms there.) The definition the book uses for transvestite is “Essentially a synonym for cross-dresser.” First, there is no mention of the word and its diminutive being a slur. Huge oversight. Second, cross dressing is not inherently queer, which is also my issue with including Joan of Arc in the volume. The entry for “transgender” also uses the problematic wording “feel like a woman on the inside”. To keep harping on the glossary, the definition listed for LGBT also includes the line, “You may see other additions after LGBT: “I” (intersex), “2S” (Two-Spirit), “A” (asexual or ally),” [emphasis mine] NONIENONNEINNYET NO Have I been too subtle? In 2017, the A never stands for ally. I don’t know guys, the more I type, the more fault I find with this book. It’s extremely focused on European and American history. The author acknowledges dozens of nations and their queer histories in the introduction, but couldn’t find one historical figure in allllll of Asia or Africa to profile? The actual biographies are two to three pages, so they’re very surface level. I fear my trans friends could be harmed by careless language. And yet, I see this being meaningful to young, queer teens. Especially Sylvia Rivera’s absolutely brutal diatribe on intersection and the queer community’s refusal to stand up for trans rights.
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  • Shelly
    May 16, 2017
    I received an early copy for review, this does not influence my thoughts on the book or this review. Quotes in this review may be different from the final copy of the book. I am so disappointed I didn't like this more but all my problems with it were slightly minor in the grand scheme of the novel's purpose. I'd probably recommend it to teens who have very little knowledge about queer historical figures and are looking for a good place to start before doing their own research.One of the main th I received an early copy for review, this does not influence my thoughts on the book or this review. Quotes in this review may be different from the final copy of the book. I am so disappointed I didn't like this more but all my problems with it were slightly minor in the grand scheme of the novel's purpose. I'd probably recommend it to teens who have very little knowledge about queer historical figures and are looking for a good place to start before doing their own research.One of the main things that annoyed me was the few hundred words at the beginning of each section in the POV of the historical figure. I think it'd be different if it was excerpts from the person's own writings, but it seemed to be fictional which made me uncomfortable at times. Especially since some of the figures are still alive, it felt wrong to read fictional accounts of their thoughts.Another thing that bugged me was that sometimes, the book equated queerness with sex. There were definitely trans and nobinary historical figures that this didn't apply to, but I did feel that a lot of the times, the novel approached queerness as an act rather than an identity, if that makes sense. Though there's no one way to correctly conceptualize queerness and it varies from person to person, I felt there was a strong link between sex and queerness that I probably wouldn't make. The writing style was pretty easy and compelling to read, but I was sometimes caught off-guard by some word choices. For example, at one point, the novel described one of Harvey Milk's lovers as "boy toy" which really felt wrong. It seemed that sometimes, the novel unintentionally passed judgement onto some people. Some of the word choices could've been more thoughtful, in my opinion.I'd also like to add a warning that the novel deadnames almost all of the trans people at the beginning of their individual chapter. The introduction of the book does warn of this, so I'd be extra careful reading it and I thought I'd just add the warning again.Overall, I did enjoy learning more about some historical figures that I was unaware of because history is not my forte. I would definitely use this as a quick point of reference before conducting more thorough research, as it is by no means a comprehensive guide. The back of the book does have a list of A-Z definitions that I think would be good for teens who are still learning, as it defines common words like 'cisgender' and 'asexual'.
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  • Ry
    May 1, 2017
    (spoiler free review: release date: 5/23/17)"Recognizing the world's richhistory of queerness would reducehomophobia, biphobia, and transphobia, and welcome queeridentities to the mainstream withlove and acceptance."-Everyone should read this book. People don't acknowledge the fact that our world, today, would not be same without the brave souls within the LGBTQ+ community. It makes me want to cry that homophobia is still a extremely gigantic problem. LOVE IS LOVE. Before the 1700s, people were (spoiler free review: release date: 5/23/17)"Recognizing the world's richhistory of queerness would reducehomophobia, biphobia, and transphobia, and welcome queeridentities to the mainstream withlove and acceptance."-Everyone should read this book. People don't acknowledge the fact that our world, today, would not be same without the brave souls within the LGBTQ+ community. It makes me want to cry that homophobia is still a extremely gigantic problem. LOVE IS LOVE. Before the 1700s, people were more accepting to the LGTBQ community than we are today. It's so saddening-Queer, There, and Everywhere taught me many, MANY, things about the LGBTQ+ community's history. And historical figures that I knew of, but didn't know they identified as LGBTQ+. Abraham Lincoln was bisexual and it was very fascinating reading about his relationship with Joshua.-The historical figures that I found the most interesting were: Elagabulus, Abraham Lincoln, Lili Elbe, Albert Cashier & Harvey Milk. I may or may not have cried while reading about Harvey Milk...-I loved that the book was written in chronological order. LGBTQ acceptance in history is a rollercoaster. At first we were accepting, then we weren't, then we were, then we weren't.-Also, can we take a moment to applaud the illustrations? They were gorgeous. read this book!
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  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    April 4, 2017
    Hee, I sneakily read this and forgot to put it on Goodreads when I started/finished it. Oops. Labels are put on only some of the people featured in the book, so if you're looking for the outright statement of "X historical figure from the 1400s was asexual," you're unlikely to get that. Still, the notes that some of these people, like Eleanor Roosevelt, had very little/no interest in sex made my Ace Alarm go off gleefully. (Roosevelt also had an "intimate friendship" with a woman and that got he Hee, I sneakily read this and forgot to put it on Goodreads when I started/finished it. Oops. Labels are put on only some of the people featured in the book, so if you're looking for the outright statement of "X historical figure from the 1400s was asexual," you're unlikely to get that. Still, the notes that some of these people, like Eleanor Roosevelt, had very little/no interest in sex made my Ace Alarm go off gleefully. (Roosevelt also had an "intimate friendship" with a woman and that got her included in the book. Abe Lincoln had one with a guy.)The ARC I read used an ethnic slur (g*psy) to talk about a Romani person at one point, but I contacted Prager and she told me that's been corrected and the published book won't have the word. Thank goodness! In case you also read an ARC and were put off by that word barging its way in, you're good.
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  • Mel (Daily Prophecy)
    March 9, 2017
    This book introduced me to some interesting historical people and I loved to read their story, but I wasn't blown away by the writing. It is better suited for a younger audience and I would definitely recommend this title to them. A perfect way to show the diversity there is: it is not simply being straight or gay, there is so much more :)
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  • Maittri
    June 9, 2017
    This book was interesting, funny and so damn important. Loved it to pieces.
  • Kate
    June 9, 2017
    Reading Queer There and Everywhere is like having a conversation with your cool older sister who knows way more about everything than you do. It manages to remain conversational yet still informative, and it was a far more compelling read than I had anticipated. Definitely recommend!
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  • Rashika (is tired)
    May 11, 2017
    ***This review has also been posted on Xpresso Reads I feel like somewhat of a black sheep because I didn’t absolutely love this book but *insert shrug emoji*. I love that we get to learn about so many amazing individuals, I love the detail each section goes into and how easy it is to read and yet, when I look back at the people who are represented in this book, it seems like there isn’t as much rep as their could be. Queer, There and Everywhere is essentially trying to present readers with the ***This review has also been posted on Xpresso Reads I feel like somewhat of a black sheep because I didn’t absolutely love this book but *insert shrug emoji*. I love that we get to learn about so many amazing individuals, I love the detail each section goes into and how easy it is to read and yet, when I look back at the people who are represented in this book, it seems like there isn’t as much rep as their could be. Queer, There and Everywhere is essentially trying to present readers with the stories of amazing queer people across time and remind people that queer people have always been here. For a book trying to achieve that though, it primarily draws on queer people from the western world and those closely tied with the historical movements in the western world. The book at least seems aware that queer people also exist in places that aren’t the western world but it saddened me that this book didn’t give a platform to their lives and stories.There also wasn’t queer rep across the spectrum, which to me is a problem. Not many books like this currently exist that will allow young teens to see themselves reflected in history and it sucks that not all teens who identify as queer will be able to see themselves reflected within the pages of this book. There isn’t as much intersectionality as I would have liked. The majority of individuals talked about are white which is a tragedy.All that said, Queer, There and Everywhere is an important book and one I hope will get into the hands of the teens who need it. I also hope it’ll be on the YA non-fic shelves in libraries as useful resources for people and just other general good vibes. Mostly though, I hope we’ll get another book like this that will do an even better job representing a diverse array of people instead of just focusing on primarily white and western queer individuals.Note that I received an advanced copy of this book for review
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  • Billie
    March 19, 2017
    ETA 3/20/17: After hearing from the author, I decided to give the book another go. And, having read it, I still think, in spite of some occasional adult language, this book feels more suited to an upper Middle Grade audience, rather than Young Adult. That being said, though, I think the information it presents is important, especially now. A couple of the entries felt, to me, like a bit of a reach, but the information presented could support the subjects' "queerness". I'm not the intended audien ETA 3/20/17: After hearing from the author, I decided to give the book another go. And, having read it, I still think, in spite of some occasional adult language, this book feels more suited to an upper Middle Grade audience, rather than Young Adult. That being said, though, I think the information it presents is important, especially now. A couple of the entries felt, to me, like a bit of a reach, but the information presented could support the subjects' "queerness". I'm not the intended audience for this book and most of the information presented was already familiar to me, but I think this would be an excellent addition to the shelves of classroom and school library shelves everywhere.I like the idea of this book and read a couple of the entries before I settled in to start reading from the start. Aaannnd...I couldn't get past the introduction and the author's use of "American Indians". Admittedly, this is an ARC, so this may be corrected in the finished product, but the use of it at all was disappointing. Also disappointing? The deliberate us of GLBT rather than the more common LGBTQ(IA). The author's preferred usage, whether intentional or not, prioritizes men and erases the Queer individuals the book purports to be celebrating. Others may not be bothered by these things and may think I'm overreacting and that's legitimate. I'm only saying that these possibly minor things bothered me enough to keep me from finishing.As for the parts I actually read, for a book being marketed as Young Adult, it definitely read as more Middle Grade. A book like this marketed to the Middle Grade audience would be a great thing, so I'd love to see the marketing for this re-directed.
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  • Paul Decker
    May 8, 2017
    *I received this book as an eARC from Harper Collins via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*This book is an excellent look at just 22 amazing people who shaped what it means to be queer now. There need to be more non-fiction books like this for young readers. The people described in this book are so different from each other, but they all have one thing in common. They were different. They were queer. And they found a way to use that to their advantage in a world where so many were again *I received this book as an eARC from Harper Collins via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*This book is an excellent look at just 22 amazing people who shaped what it means to be queer now. There need to be more non-fiction books like this for young readers. The people described in this book are so different from each other, but they all have one thing in common. They were different. They were queer. And they found a way to use that to their advantage in a world where so many were against them. This book is inspirational, funny, sad, educational, and so much more. I hope this book finds its way into every library's Young Adult section.I give this book a 5/5 and HIGHLY RECOMMEND it! The stories are short enough that this would make a perfect coffee table or waiting room book.
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  • Charlie
    May 10, 2017
    Like:- This was a fun little book about some queer people I've heard of and some I haven't heard of.- Abraham Lincoln and Eleanor Roosevelt were queer?! These things should have been talked about in history lessons. It would be so much more interesting.- The cover is very pretty. - Super extensive bibliography. - I love that the author took the time to explain what queer meant and even inserted a glossary of the most important terms in regards to sexuality and gender identity. - Own voices! The Like:- This was a fun little book about some queer people I've heard of and some I haven't heard of.- Abraham Lincoln and Eleanor Roosevelt were queer?! These things should have been talked about in history lessons. It would be so much more interesting.- The cover is very pretty. - Super extensive bibliography. - I love that the author took the time to explain what queer meant and even inserted a glossary of the most important terms in regards to sexuality and gender identity. - Own voices! The author is married to another woman.Dislike:- The people in here were talked about very briefly. It was more of an overview.- Some of the people in here didn't impress me. I don't feel like they necessarily 'changed the world'. It's obviously great that they were all way beyond their time periods, but I wouldn't say they changed anything.
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  • Earl
    June 10, 2017
    A Young Adult nonfiction book about Queer people throughout time from the creator of the Quist app which shares LGBTQ moments in history.I appreciated the very conversational tone which always helps when dealing with lots of information. Some parts definitely seemed more opinion than fact but readers can usually tell when they get to those sections.Lots of information and source guides are found for each person at the back of the book because some of them, you'd definitely want to read more abou A Young Adult nonfiction book about Queer people throughout time from the creator of the Quist app which shares LGBTQ moments in history.I appreciated the very conversational tone which always helps when dealing with lots of information. Some parts definitely seemed more opinion than fact but readers can usually tell when they get to those sections.Lots of information and source guides are found for each person at the back of the book because some of them, you'd definitely want to read more about- or even check if what you read was true. Includes a glossary as well.
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  • Jessie (Ageless Pages Reviews)
    May 11, 2017
    Nonfic that showcases often ignored lives of gay, bi, lesbian, genderqueer, trans+ people, though sadly pretty Euro and N. American focused. The sections from each person's POV are also.. weird and unnecessary. Interesting but needed more time, diversity, and depth.
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  • Andi Rahmat
    June 14, 2017
    It's Good but the author should choose a figure that really influences because there are some figures that are not very interesting to read. Overall, this book gives me interesting information.
  • Lucy
    April 21, 2017
    I’m not usually one for non-fiction, but late last year I received a copy of Sam Maggs’ Wonder Women and absolutely loved it. Queer, There, and Everywhere looked like a similar project, so I went into this book expecting to be introduced to a similarly diverse range of historical figures.Unfortunately, Queer, There, and Everywhere is a bit of a misnomer. Despite Prager’s introduction, which briefly outlines queer history across the globe (and how colonialism ruined everything), Queer There and E I’m not usually one for non-fiction, but late last year I received a copy of Sam Maggs’ Wonder Women and absolutely loved it. Queer, There, and Everywhere looked like a similar project, so I went into this book expecting to be introduced to a similarly diverse range of historical figures.Unfortunately, Queer, There, and Everywhere is a bit of a misnomer. Despite Prager’s introduction, which briefly outlines queer history across the globe (and how colonialism ruined everything), Queer There and Everywhere is overwhelmingly American- and Euro-centric. Prager even assumes her readers are all American, using phrases like “our President” and “our country”. Prager’s glossary also leaves much to be desired - her definition of LGBTQ+ includes ‘allies’ while excluding actual members of the queer community.If you can look past its Western bias, Queer, There, and Everywhere isn’t a bad book. Prager’s 22 accounts of queer people throughout history are interesting and moving, written in a friendly and informal style. Many of Prager’s subjects were people I’ve never heard of - or had heard of, but hadn’t known were queer. From bad leaders to good leaders; presidents to social justice fighters; scientists to people of faith, Prager has collected together an impressive array of stories sure to inspire queer youth.tl;dr: Queer, There, and Everywhere isn’t as inclusive as it could be, but if you’re interested in learning more about queer history it’s not a bad place to start.Many thanks to HarperCollins for providing a copy for review. The opinions expressed in this review are my own. Queer, There, and Everywhere will be released on May 23rd.Publisher: HarperCollinsRating: 3 stars | ★★★✰✰Review cross-posted to Paperback'd Reviews
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  • Sarah
    March 11, 2017
    *I received a digital review copy from Edelweiss*Queer, There, and Everywhere is a great collection of biographies about historical queer people. I knew some of the individuals but most I had never heard of. This book doesn't go too in depth into the lives of the individuals but it gives a good overview of who they were, their lives, and the effects they had. I actually enjoyed that the chapters were on the shorter side. When I read nonfiction, even if I am enjoying it, I can't help but feel as *I received a digital review copy from Edelweiss*Queer, There, and Everywhere is a great collection of biographies about historical queer people. I knew some of the individuals but most I had never heard of. This book doesn't go too in depth into the lives of the individuals but it gives a good overview of who they were, their lives, and the effects they had. I actually enjoyed that the chapters were on the shorter side. When I read nonfiction, even if I am enjoying it, I can't help but feel as if I am reading something for school. I didn't feel that way with this book. It was written in a very conversational way and was overall really easy to read. I also liked that each chapter began with tl;dr note about who the person was, which was helpful when I didn't know the person. Overall this book is a great introduction to queer history.
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  • Brynn
    January 15, 2017
    This is an amazing resource for middle grade readers. I appreciated the careful use of language that attempts to avoid anachronisms when possible and that strikes a balance between terms used then versus terms employed now. There's a great mix here of well-known historical figures whose queerness is often elided, well-loved queer icons, and relatively unknown individuals recuperated from the shadows of history. It's always difficult to address queer sexualities throughout history since our const This is an amazing resource for middle grade readers. I appreciated the careful use of language that attempts to avoid anachronisms when possible and that strikes a balance between terms used then versus terms employed now. There's a great mix here of well-known historical figures whose queerness is often elided, well-loved queer icons, and relatively unknown individuals recuperated from the shadows of history. It's always difficult to address queer sexualities throughout history since our constructions of it are always shifting, but Prager handles that task with grace and humor!
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  • Breonna
    February 7, 2017
    Loved this for referencing queer leaders in our community. This should be a fairly easy read for YA readers seeing as the author uses current "lingo" that would allow for teens to understand and want to read more.
  • Rich Prager
    February 3, 2017
    Great book. Very well researched, well written, and interesting. The stories are well told, and brings a variety of people to life, celebrating their diversity and their courage to be themselves. Highly recommend for anyone interested in LGBT history, and especially for young adult readers.
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