When to Jump
When Mike Lewis was twenty-four and working in a prestigious corporate job, he eagerly wanted to leave and pursue his dream of becoming a professional squash player. But he had questions: When is the right time to move from work that is comfortable to a career you have only dared to dream of? How have other people made such a jump? What did they feel when making that jump—and afterward?Mike sought guidance from others who had “jumped,” and the responses he got—from a banker who started a brewery, a publicist who became a Bishop, a garbage collector who became a furniture designer, and on and on—were so clear-eyed and inspiring that Mike wanted to share what he had learned with others who might be helped by those stories. First, though, he started playing squash professionally.The right book at the right time, When to Jump offers more than forty heartening stories (from the founder of Bonobos, the author of The Big Short, the designer of the Lyft logo, the Humans of New York creator, and many more) and takeaways that will inspire, instruct, and reassure, including the ingenious four-phase Jump Curve.

When to Jump Details

TitleWhen to Jump
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 9th, 2018
PublisherHenry Holt & Company
ISBN-139781250124210
Rating
GenreBusiness, Nonfiction, Self Help

When to Jump Review

  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of mini-bios about people who made major career changes. It doesn't really offer any practical advice aside from telling people to just do it.
  • Serendipity Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Watching my niece's gymnastics competition - I use the term "competition" loosely considering I changed her diaper less than 3 years ago - I'm struck by the difference in the little girls' faces as they jump from the balance beam. They are all the same age. They all have had similar classes. Yet, there is a hesitation and almost fear on the faces of some, while others leap without much of a glance at the ground. I was reminded of these girls while reading "When to Jump" by Mike Lewis. Lewis has Watching my niece's gymnastics competition - I use the term "competition" loosely considering I changed her diaper less than 3 years ago - I'm struck by the difference in the little girls' faces as they jump from the balance beam. They are all the same age. They all have had similar classes. Yet, there is a hesitation and almost fear on the faces of some, while others leap without much of a glance at the ground. I was reminded of these girls while reading "When to Jump" by Mike Lewis. Lewis has built a sincere compilation of both his own career change and the stories of over 40 other individuals who take that step into the unsure world of a new career. He organizes it in a way that lays out how to plan one's own career move. The variety of starting points and landing points is vast. Each individual's story is short and to the point, making this an easy to read and widely applicable volume. If you are considering a career change and want a way to organize the chaos that decision may bring there is plenty here you will find useful.The only flaw to this collection is the sampling bias for the stories. Like many business or self-help books of it's kind, the advice is taken from individuals who succeeded in whatever the topic of the book is. There isn't a separate sample of individuals who did the same or similar and wished they hadn't or had to go back to their old ways even if they wished they didn't. I raise this critique simply to say the book offers great encouragement for those who want to plan a "jump." But it does little to remind readers of the adage wherever you go, there you are." Like many of the 40+ individuals detailed in the collection and the girls who leaped headstrong into their gymnastics dismount, who you are will determine a lot about how you view your landing.I whole-heartedly recommend this volume to anyone considering a career jump. It certainly provides a well-considered path to doing that jump wisely.I received an advance copy of this book through a LibraryThing giveaway.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    won from librarything.comgot in mail today
  • Philip Shade
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting premise, but in execution of most use to Wall Street bankers, stock traders, venture capitalists and pretty much anyone who can set aside money to take a year or so off work. If you've got bills to pay and family to support then there's not much you can get from this book beyond "make your jump, when you have a plan."Seriously. That's it. I just saved you hours of time. You're welcome.
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  • Sarah Nosworthy
    January 1, 1970
    I struggle to know what my 'passion' is - but it was nice to see how many people moved from one career to another, and talked about how it worked (or didn't!).Sharing the concept of the book with a friend; and the author's 'passion' being squash, my friend was rather bemused. Understandably too, as it's hardly a profitable career path.
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    2 starsI will be honest, I skimmed a good portion of this book. I read all the sections from the author, as well as the recaps, but I only read about half of the case studies (mostly because a lot of them didn't seem relevant or interesting to me). If I recall correctly, at one point the author says he didn't want this book to be just a series of platitudes without any concrete advice, but that's basically what it is. I found some of the words of encouragement, well, encouraging! But for all the 2 starsI will be honest, I skimmed a good portion of this book. I read all the sections from the author, as well as the recaps, but I only read about half of the case studies (mostly because a lot of them didn't seem relevant or interesting to me). If I recall correctly, at one point the author says he didn't want this book to be just a series of platitudes without any concrete advice, but that's basically what it is. I found some of the words of encouragement, well, encouraging! But for all the talk of how important it is to have a plan, there isn't much elaboration on what makes a successful plan and what mistakes to avoid. As many other reviewers have also pointed out, the author comes from quite a privileged background, and most of the guest writers do, too (I guess the fact that the foreword is by Sheryl Sandberg should have been a warning sign). It's kind of obnoxious to say "you need to have savings to jump!" and then almost exclusively talk to people who came from lucrative careers like finance. Easy to say when you're in an industry like that... And beyond the matter of money, the author's "jump" is to play professional squash? Seriously? It also rubbed me the wrong way that the last few pages of the book are him saying that he never intended it to be a long term "jump" and was already planning his next... writing this book. Sincerely glad I didn't pay for this, and rather checked it out from the library, cuz Lewis is playing us readers. Honestly...As I said, I skipped around with the case studies. I mostly read the ones that had to deal with creative careers (like writing, photography, fashion design, etc.), because those felt most relevant to my interests. Unfortunately I just returned the book to the library so I can't go back to find the name, but one of the guest writers spoke about how she got into photography, and how she had to do a "mini jump" by taking a job in her industry that wasn't her ideal job, but led to better things. She also said that she had taken more "meaningless" jobs while she planned in order to build up her savings. I thought her section had the most realistic and smart advice in the whole book. I also appreciated the advice from the cheesemonger lady, who pointed out that if you are so miserable in your current situation (job, partner, living situation, whatever), you really have nothing to lose and should just get started on your "jump." The longer you wait, the longer you have to live with that unhappiness when you don't have to! That's basically the place I found myself in last year before I decided to quit my job, so I related to that a lot.I feel like the premise of this book had potential, and probably would have been more helpful and informative in better hands. I don't recommend it!
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    author left a Bain Capital job to play pro squash and couch-surf the world for a year and a half in his 20s, then returned to the states to write this book and develop a site and all that about people making bold career moves in an effort to increase life satisfaction. Got his cousin Sheryl Sandberg to write the foreword!most of the book is short essays by other people who made career jumps. A limitation of the book is that they're entirely favorable toward doing so. a few acknowledge that their author left a Bain Capital job to play pro squash and couch-surf the world for a year and a half in his 20s, then returned to the states to write this book and develop a site and all that about people making bold career moves in an effort to increase life satisfaction. Got his cousin Sheryl Sandberg to write the foreword!most of the book is short essays by other people who made career jumps. A limitation of the book is that they're entirely favorable toward doing so. a few acknowledge that their moves failed in conventional sense [e.g., one guy got sober himself but realized that running a recovery house wasn't the business for him after a year or so], and many were forthright about its having turned out to be a lot of work, or less lucrative than prior job, or a source of sleepless nights etc. etc., but all in the end believed it was a good move. It's not a tough call if it's the right idea 100% of the time, so i sense a bit of selection bias in the solicitation of contributors.some of the jumps were broad [bond trader to photographer who started the Humans of New York site, for instance], while others [at least in my perhaps naive reading] seemed so slight as to not really qualify for the category -- ex. "a former advertising operations associate at LinkedIn... internally jumped into a sales analytics position within LinkedIn". others struck me as meaningful changes of direction but not especially amazing -- with all due respect, the bartender who became yoga teacher for instance. lots of people change jobs in the course of their lives, and without actually knowing the stats i might have guessed that perhaps even a majority of 25-yo bartenders don't continue in that field another 40 years until retirement. And if you're going to leave it, yoga teacher is as good as anything else as a next move. my angle on it is perhaps skewed as a 56-year old tenured faculty member with a family, health insurance from the job, etc. etc., but i sort of found all the ones who were young single people with no one depending on them and no great job security anyhow to be kind of unremarkable jumps. maybe more of a dividing line than jump/don't would be employee/entrepreneur, as it seemed that some of the writers with the most turbulence in wake of decision were the ones who elected to start their own businesses, as opposed to just being employed in a slightly or greatly different line of work.
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  • Dimitrios Mistriotis
    January 1, 1970
    I kind of cheated here as I did not read the whole book but only the parts that interested me. Being currently in "jump-mode" I read only the introduction and the final "Don't look back" section. Second cheat is that I did not purchase the book but was given to me on a promotion tour by the speaker.The book has a pattern on what to do if you do not like your job and/or the career trajectory and how to move from there to where you want to be.This theory has emerged from the life of the author and I kind of cheated here as I did not read the whole book but only the parts that interested me. Being currently in "jump-mode" I read only the introduction and the final "Don't look back" section. Second cheat is that I did not purchase the book but was given to me on a promotion tour by the speaker.The book has a pattern on what to do if you do not like your job and/or the career trajectory and how to move from there to where you want to be.This theory has emerged from the life of the author and people that have interacted with him, so we are talking about pure epistimology here. The vast majority of "When to Jump"'s content is two/three page essays of different people around the world in each stage. From this perspective the book is essentially an great articulation of very well edited blog posts about one subject put in one place.The whole premise felt like being in the category of books that one would love if given as a gift but would not buy. I would suggest to resist that tendency and give it a shot if you find it in a bookstore.Reminder to future self: write about my jump.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Some great stories and advice... and some that are pretty skip-worthy. Also, I had to power through the first part which was all about the author's life (it was a little too silver-spooned). I'm glad I stuck with it though and will be looking into some of the contributors' works.
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  • Wayne Sutherland
    January 1, 1970
    If you're thinking or contemplating a life change. This is absolutely your next book!
  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. I would say this book is pretty hit and miss. Some of the stories were interesting and inspiring, more of them were a little blah or general. I was kind of put off by the number of stories in here where the person started off in some kind of high finance job. One or two would've been fine, but I felt like there were too many, especially given that working in that environment probably gives you the types of savings/investment contacts that would make a jump much easier (especially into 2.5 stars. I would say this book is pretty hit and miss. Some of the stories were interesting and inspiring, more of them were a little blah or general. I was kind of put off by the number of stories in here where the person started off in some kind of high finance job. One or two would've been fine, but I felt like there were too many, especially given that working in that environment probably gives you the types of savings/investment contacts that would make a jump much easier (especially into a start-up concept). This focus also gave the book a narrowness that seemed as if Lewis mainly asked a bunch of his friends for some submissions. I didn't really come away with anything new from this book, most of the advice was obvious. The act of listening to it did make me think of my own ambitions and goals, so I'll give it that. My favorite section was the Humans of New York guy because I liked how he really put it all down to the fact that you have to do the work. You can't just keep talking about something, you have to do it and keep doing it, even if no one is watching yet. One other pet peeve I had was specific to the audio version: the section recaps. I started skipping them, but it was annoying to listen to Lewis read off snippets from what I'd already just listened to. If I thought something was interesting, I'd note it down myself, thanks. Meh. I wouldn't really recommend this. I think there are better "follow your dream" books out there.
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  • Jo-Ann Duff (Duffy The Writer)
    January 1, 1970
    There are lots of books out there which promise you your dream life, job and love if you follow the authors simple rules and it can all seem like a bit of a pipe dream. Mike Lewis has tapped into something a little bit different with When To Jump. Using his own experience of taking the leap from venture capitalist to professional squash player as inspiration, Lewis sought out other people who have made the leap.What I like about When To Jump, is that it isn’t full of rags to riches stories and p There are lots of books out there which promise you your dream life, job and love if you follow the authors simple rules and it can all seem like a bit of a pipe dream. Mike Lewis has tapped into something a little bit different with When To Jump. Using his own experience of taking the leap from venture capitalist to professional squash player as inspiration, Lewis sought out other people who have made the leap.What I like about When To Jump, is that it isn’t full of rags to riches stories and people who have changed the world. It’s a collection of stories from ordinary people that have changed their own worlds. Some are complete changes in direction; Jeff Arch, for example, who went from karate school instructor to Hollywood screenwriter, or Rashard Mendenhall who went from professional football player to writer. But, some are as simple, and as frightening, as going for that promotion, or taking a side step into a different department in the same company you work for.The common theme amongst these uncommon stories is to have a B plan. Yes, you can have that little voice telling you to give it all up and become a writer or to quit your lucrative management position to launch a start-up, but you need to be sensible and have a backup plan. It’s not all about ‘the jump’, it’s more about planning the jump so that you have a higher chance of success when you decide to take the leap.I found the stories inspirational, motivational, and above all attainable. Many, many times whilst reading When To Jump, I thought ‘I need to get my jump plan together!’.This is better than your average motivational read. Original, bite-sized stories which will get you thinking, and more importantly listening to your own inner voice.Buy now at Booktopia! Copy given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Syazwanie Winston abdullah
    January 1, 1970
    I actually finished a non-fiction! But this did not feel much like any other self-help books I read. I felt like I was reading the chicken soup books. It was a pretty easy read with bite size chapters. I love the fact that the book were inserted with stories of people who jumped, be it successful or otherwise. It was also close to the heart as I had been thinking of making another jump. It resonated with me for all the past jumps I made too. And how I could have made some jumps better than how i I actually finished a non-fiction! But this did not feel much like any other self-help books I read. I felt like I was reading the chicken soup books. It was a pretty easy read with bite size chapters. I love the fact that the book were inserted with stories of people who jumped, be it successful or otherwise. It was also close to the heart as I had been thinking of making another jump. It resonated with me for all the past jumps I made too. And how I could have made some jumps better than how it had turned out to be. When to Jump is a book that tells the story of the little Voice in you, that tells you what you should be doing to be happier in your life - you know, the voice that you usually ignore in favor of what you think is the right way to live your life! Like studying and be the best in school so you can get a good job and start a family etc. But what if that does not make you happy? But yet, you do not want to live that life, just because you were expected to?It can be a small jump or a big one. But a few important things to do before a jump - it has to have a plan, you will need a backup, get a lot of support from people who KNOW you and you need to have the courage to jump! This books tells you all about the four phases before a jump, and in between the phases, tells you stories of those who jumped. These were the interesting insights and the reflective thoughts of what kind of jump you will need, why you need to jump, when to jump and how to make that jump successful.In the end, the most important thing to remember is that a jump makes you to be who you are. You will not regret it because you jumped, rather than wondering about the what-ifs had you not chosen the jump.
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  • M. Abdul Ali
    January 1, 1970
    Many self-help books show, bolster, and help you plan your life change. This book has a unique angle at providing evidence of people who have made the big jump. The the stories are great - from living the perfect career to not having a career at all and then jumping to something the subject felt a passion for. His examples are great.But I can't help, but comment at how the 'normal' person cannot relate to this. Some stories - like the art gallery owner, perhaps - but the majority of stories come Many self-help books show, bolster, and help you plan your life change. This book has a unique angle at providing evidence of people who have made the big jump. The the stories are great - from living the perfect career to not having a career at all and then jumping to something the subject felt a passion for. His examples are great.But I can't help, but comment at how the 'normal' person cannot relate to this. Some stories - like the art gallery owner, perhaps - but the majority of stories come from someone in a place of privilege and had the leisure and foresight to do and execute on something different. I hesitate to use the term inauthentic in this case. While the message is heard loud and clear, you can plan a change for the course of your life. The fact remains, these are just examples. No two paths are alike and we all have to write our own path.
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  • Priya
    January 1, 1970
    I heard Mike Lewis speak a few months ago and was interested enough in what he had to say to put the book on reserve. While his story is certainly laudable - and I appreciate those that he collected it wasn't quite what I needed. There are certainly a lot of good messages and suggestions, but they all felt like they were coming (despite the diversity of authors) from a place of privilege. I know Lewis says to wait until the time is right, and that you have the funds to take the risk and try some I heard Mike Lewis speak a few months ago and was interested enough in what he had to say to put the book on reserve. While his story is certainly laudable - and I appreciate those that he collected it wasn't quite what I needed. There are certainly a lot of good messages and suggestions, but they all felt like they were coming (despite the diversity of authors) from a place of privilege. I know Lewis says to wait until the time is right, and that you have the funds to take the risk and try something new; while also giving us stories of incremental jumps at the same time, but there was something that I felt was missing. Anyway - I know his work has inspired thousands (which is awesome, since everyone should live their dream life, but this just wasn't for me.
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  • Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of stories of people making jumps. The author's own story is a very small portion of the book.I didn't find the notes or steps that meaningful or useful to me. I think mostly this book will help inspire anyone that already knows what they want to jump to.Most of the stories are about 20 year olds making the jump in their 20s. Even the stories from older folks are tales of when they jumped at a younger age. Of the 40 or so stories, it felt like only 2 were of anyone over 35. The worst part a Lots of stories of people making jumps. The author's own story is a very small portion of the book.I didn't find the notes or steps that meaningful or useful to me. I think mostly this book will help inspire anyone that already knows what they want to jump to.Most of the stories are about 20 year olds making the jump in their 20s. Even the stories from older folks are tales of when they jumped at a younger age. Of the 40 or so stories, it felt like only 2 were of anyone over 35. The worst part about that is hearing these 20 somethings complain about feeling too old to make the jump but then talking about how amazing it was they did it when they were still 15 years or more younger than I am now.
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  • Alex Mancini
    January 1, 1970
    This book didn't blow me away, but it was a good read. I'm definitely the target audience for it, which is why I had to buy it when I saw it on the shelf in Barnes & Noble and read the first few pages. My only qualm with it is that I wish the stories would've gone more into depth about their processes and exactly how they did what they did - but that's because I'm an analytical person who wants to know every single nitty gritty detail about something to really feel like I understand and coul This book didn't blow me away, but it was a good read. I'm definitely the target audience for it, which is why I had to buy it when I saw it on the shelf in Barnes & Noble and read the first few pages. My only qualm with it is that I wish the stories would've gone more into depth about their processes and exactly how they did what they did - but that's because I'm an analytical person who wants to know every single nitty gritty detail about something to really feel like I understand and could, in theory, replicate it, which is the point of the book. It was really great to read so many folks' stories about how they chased their dreams, but I could've used more details of exactly *how* they did it. But I still loved the book.
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  • Corey
    January 1, 1970
    Summary:This book is inspiring because it documents the stories and experiences of numerous people who took jumps towards entrepreneurial endeavours rather than saying in safe, secure jobs. Where it is lacking, is in actionable advice or a clear framework to help people on their way. There's plenty of value to be mined from the personal accounts the book runs through, but the title and the introduction had me primed to come out with a range of tools to implement. In a way I got that, but not how Summary:This book is inspiring because it documents the stories and experiences of numerous people who took jumps towards entrepreneurial endeavours rather than saying in safe, secure jobs. Where it is lacking, is in actionable advice or a clear framework to help people on their way. There's plenty of value to be mined from the personal accounts the book runs through, but the title and the introduction had me primed to come out with a range of tools to implement. In a way I got that, but not how I thought. It's interesting to hear people's stories and business ideas and the author's journey is compelling too. All in all, it's a good book. I would recommend this book to anyone thinking about leaving their current job for something uncertain.The main message I took from this book is a jump doesn't have to be one big leap, rather it's better for it to be a series of steps that build to the point where you simply take another step, and alas, you've jumped. Some notable points:- Phases to a jump:Phase 1: Listen to the little voice. You're sitting at your desk with an idea you'd like to jump for.Phase 2: You are deciding to take action about your idea. Phase 3: Let yourself be lucky. You are going for your jump.Phase 4: Don't look back.- Sometimes we just have to ask a better question. For example, rather than asking "Why can't I write anything that sells?" Ask "What can I write that will sell?"- No one is in a better position to make decisions for you, than you are.- It's hard to put yourself in a position where you might fail, but there is a reward to everything, even failed endeavours. You can learn a lot and at least say you've given it a go. - Having a section of solitude in your life can help you find your true voice and take you closer to a breakthrough. There's something productive in periods of isolated focus.- It is hard to keep doing something if you've identified new priorities and a new value system. It then gets hard to spend time with people who don't share those values and priorities.- Mine your personal network for anyone who may know anyone who knows anything about the subject. Then go meet that person.- A jump doesn't have to start from scratch. By taking it one step at a time and building over time, sometimes a jump is just another step following a series of steps you've already taken.- The most wasted resource on earth is human intention. For any idea, you need a system to filter that early excitement and momentum into action.- Start small, make one of whatever you're doing. Something you can test out.- Your pre-jump experiences set the table for today. - Get a calendar and set a date. Speak using when, not if. - No matter what you do and no matter how long you do it, just do it really well so that when you leave, you've developed your own great brand and you take that with you to wherever you go next.-Never let the negativity make you doubt your own abilities. Persistence is crucial. -
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  • Seri Qadijah
    January 1, 1970
    Love the stories. I am at a crossroads myself, trying to decide on whether i can pursue and persevere in my current job or to do something else. To quit has always been at the back of my mind but i can never made the decision. always felt that i have no reason to jump. perhaps i didnt know what to do or how to do it.stumbling upon this book at such a critical period for me feels like a blessing in disguise. like a sign from above. i will take it all in and make my next move. Thank you to the aut Love the stories. I am at a crossroads myself, trying to decide on whether i can pursue and persevere in my current job or to do something else. To quit has always been at the back of my mind but i can never made the decision. always felt that i have no reason to jump. perhaps i didnt know what to do or how to do it.stumbling upon this book at such a critical period for me feels like a blessing in disguise. like a sign from above. i will take it all in and make my next move. Thank you to the author for making the jump to write this collection of stories.
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  • Gopal Katragadda
    January 1, 1970
    If you ever want inspiration to make a career shift into something that you love OR passionate about, this is the book for you!If you started your current work life based on the erroneous expectations of yourself or of others, but feel trapped, numerous folks from different walks of life, who have made the jump successfully share their stories on how they made the jump.Mike shares a four step process called the jump curve that could be used to translate the idea into a plan
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  • MadRead
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastically helpful book to read if you are indeed considering taking the plunge and quite reasonably have questions over whether you are doing the right thing. Filled with interesting stories of experiences that went well and not so well that help you to realise what feels like the biggest change of your life has been done many times before by many people. Whatever the outcome, this is essential reading before deciding When to Jump.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book and I’m sad it’s over. I don’t know what my jump is yet, but it was really inspiring. Listening to it was especially great because each person read their own story, which just made it all that much more impactful. I’d love a sequel with more peoples’ stories! I’d definitely recommend it to anyone who is still figuring out what they want to be when they grow up.
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  • Sonja
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely disappointing. It is a collection of stories from people who made successful jumps. There is a huge survivor bias. I can only recall one story out of many dozens where the jump failed. In addition, there is no guidance aside from the personal stories. I only gave it two stars because it is quite good light entertainment.
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  • Maya
    January 1, 1970
    I admit I only read half of this book... it’s highly readable in that it’s a collection of short stories about real people who jumped from one career to another. After a while, though, this became monotonous. I think it would have been more helpful to me if I was trying to build the courage to jump, but that’s not really the stage I’m at. Plus, not much practical advice inside.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I would rate this book 2.5 stars. I had such high expectations when I started, but it just fell flat. There was no inspiration like I expected, although I did enjoy some of the stories. The author was annoying, arrogant, and one of those guys who steps in crap and it turns to gold.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I learned of this book through an instagram account I follow. I really struggled to get through the book. I guess if you are looking for inspiration then it could be good but I felt like the ‘case studies’ could have been cut in half and the point would still be delivered.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    If you haven't found a mentor yet to discuss your own jump ideas with, this book can fill the gap for now. It providers real stories of successes and failures with practical advise on how to move forward.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I was really disappointed by this one. The title is super deceiving considering what this really is: a collection of stories from people saying how they got their dream job. Call the book what it really is instead of the super false advertising it is currently called.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I mistook Mike Lewis for Michael Lewis when I saw this book on the New Releases shelf at the library. The entire premise is summed into one sentence: "Have a plan, and then make your jump."
  • Ron
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good read. There were lots of short descriptions of Jumps made by a good number of individuals, and what they learned along the way.Personally, I would have liked more details regarding the author's Jump. It sounds like it was interesting...Book #2, perhaps?
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