Not Just Lucky
Media star Jamila Rizvi’s exploration of the confidence deficit holding women back, the barriers to career success this can create, and how they might be overcome. Accessible and timely, this is essential reading for millennial women.Australian women are suffering from a crisis of confidence about work, captives to a voice inside their heads that says they’re not good enough. Accustomed to being overlooked and undervalued, even when women do get to the top, they explain their success away as ‘luck’. But it’s not.Not Just Lucky exposes the structural and cultural disadvantages that rob women of their confidence – often without them even realising it. It’s a practical toolkit that will help you negotiate a raise, deal with difficult bosses, overcome imposter syndrome, communicate more clearly, cope with failure, avoid burnout, call out sexism and finally put your hand up for that big promotion. Drawing on case studies, detailed research and her own experience in politics and media, Jamila Rizvi is the warm, witty and wise girlfriend you’ve been waiting for. She’ll give you everything you need to start fighting for your own success and for a more inclusive, equal workplace for all. (She’ll also bring the red wine.)This unashamedly feminist career manifesto is for women who worry they’ll look greedy if they ask for more money. It’s for women who feel small and scared. It’s for women who dream big but dread the tough conversations. It’s for women who get nervous, stressed and worried, and seem to overthink just about everything. It will help you realise that you’re not just lucky. You’re brilliant.

Not Just Lucky Details

TitleNot Just Lucky
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2017
PublisherViking
Number of pages303 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction

Not Just Lucky Review

  • Jocie
    July 24, 2017
    This book is like the cross-generational Lean In. Where I found myself tuning out a bit while reading Sheryl Sandberg's manifesto (simply because it seemed like it was a book for women who were in a very different stage of their career to me), Jamila Rizvi's book felt relevant, regardless of where you are on the career ladder. As someone who is just starting out, I found it as useful as someone who perhaps has a few more years on their career plate.Also the number of times I found myself nodding This book is like the cross-generational Lean In. Where I found myself tuning out a bit while reading Sheryl Sandberg's manifesto (simply because it seemed like it was a book for women who were in a very different stage of their career to me), Jamila Rizvi's book felt relevant, regardless of where you are on the career ladder. As someone who is just starting out, I found it as useful as someone who perhaps has a few more years on their career plate.Also the number of times I found myself nodding along in agreement to whatever Jamila had written was a little embarrassing. It was like a was one of those bobblehead toys.
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  • Jules
    July 25, 2017
    I think the audience that would get the most from Not Just Lucky would probably be young women just entering the workforce. While the information and message is valuable and important, overall there's not any new ideas being presented within this book. I did find some chapters, such as Coping With Setbacks and How To Ask For More, had some affirming insight and practical approaches that would be genuinely useful, and I responded more to the sections of the book that had less mummy-blogger-style I think the audience that would get the most from Not Just Lucky would probably be young women just entering the workforce. While the information and message is valuable and important, overall there's not any new ideas being presented within this book. I did find some chapters, such as Coping With Setbacks and How To Ask For More, had some affirming insight and practical approaches that would be genuinely useful, and I responded more to the sections of the book that had less mummy-blogger-style humour injected after every seemingly bleak statistic.Overwhelmingly, the book focuses on how women can modify their behaviour to adapt to existing, largely sexist work environments, and at a stretch how they can effect small changes within them. The other perspective to this problem is of course how men need to adjust, adapt and change their own behaviour and biases to further equality within the workplace - that Rivzi almost completely declined to engage with this is a massive oversight. I have an issue with the fact that books about women's issues are only addressed to women, when they are everyone's problem. My feminism tells me we need to do more than simply stop using the word "just" in emails and building rapport with our women colleagues to truly overhaul and deconstruct the systemic disadvantage women experience in their workplaces. Getting men on board is a part of this.Not Just Lucky is an extremely accessible book, which contributes to a broader conversation we all need to be having. It's definitely only entry-level though.
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  • Lauren
    July 14, 2017
    This book has changed my world. A must read for women at all stages of their careers which provides insightful guidance and advice. It's written in a conversational, friendly style that never feels lecturing or preachy, all props go to Jamila Rizvi for this. I feel like this book will become my bible of sorts throughout career and personal challenges, love it!
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  • Meagan
    July 7, 2017
    It is the sort of book that resonates with a range of different people for a range of different reasons.I found the use of research, facts and history extremely insightful and affirming. It is engaging, witty and something I highly recommend.
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