Good Guys
Donovan was shot by a cop. For jaywalking, supposedly. Actually, for arguing with a cop while black. Four of the nine shots were lethal--or would have been, if their target had been anybody else. The Foundation picked him up, brought him back, and trained him further. "Lethal" turns out to be a relative term when magic is involved.When Marci was fifteen, she levitated a paperweight and threw it at a guy she didn't like. The Foundation scooped her up for training too."Hippie chick" Susan got well into her Foundation training before they told her about the magic, but she's as powerful as Donovan and Marci now.They can teleport themselves thousands of miles, conjure shields that will stop bullets, and read information from the remnants of spells cast by others days before.They all work for the secretive Foundation...for minimum wage.Which is okay, because the Foundation are the good guys. Aren't they?

Good Guys Details

TitleGood Guys
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherTor Books
ISBN-139780765396372
Rating
GenreFantasy, Urban Fantasy, Comics, Superheroes, Mystery, Science Fiction

Good Guys Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Fairly light UF superhero fiction with traditional powers, relics, and mystery. Of course, it's fueled by quasi-governmental agencies and assassinations that may or may not be justified, but the real joy in the novel comes from the mystery.Murder. Increasingly interesting and gory effects murder. But to whom? And why?The guilty. :) You know all those bank people who busted the economy, or the a-holes who focused on all their specialty pet projects but completely ignored the plights of the common Fairly light UF superhero fiction with traditional powers, relics, and mystery. Of course, it's fueled by quasi-governmental agencies and assassinations that may or may not be justified, but the real joy in the novel comes from the mystery.Murder. Increasingly interesting and gory effects murder. But to whom? And why?The guilty. :) You know all those bank people who busted the economy, or the a-holes who focused on all their specialty pet projects but completely ignored the plights of the common man? Yeah. Deaders.Feeling conflicted? Me, too.But that's the joy we can gleam from this superhero novel. Magic, relics, and the common man. Minimum wage superheroes???? Come on. You KNOW this has to be a gimmick. A fun one, too. :)I've been a big fan of Brust for a long time now and this modern rendition of the comic tradition is fun as hell. Just bring the beer. Please. The good stuff. Don't get all pansy ass on me.Thanks to netgalley for the ARC!
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan - Tor/Forge for the galley.Definitely 4.5 stars.Okay, this was so very, very good! I've been trying to figure out how to begin reading some of the Steven Brust books but there are so many my head would just spin around whenever I tried to decide on a jumping off point. So this book, a new series, proved to be just the right place. I was definitely impressed with the writing, plotting and just general storytelling ability of Brust. I want this crew back entertain Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan - Tor/Forge for the galley.Definitely 4.5 stars.Okay, this was so very, very good! I've been trying to figure out how to begin reading some of the Steven Brust books but there are so many my head would just spin around whenever I tried to decide on a jumping off point. So this book, a new series, proved to be just the right place. I was definitely impressed with the writing, plotting and just general storytelling ability of Brust. I want this crew back entertaining me as soon as possible.There are two organizations which work to keep the existence of magic from becoming general knowledge. The Foundation and the Roma Vindices Mystici were once a single organization until they had a disagreement about what Franco was doing in Spain. They still work together in a way, both still wanting the same things but the old scars keep the two organizations separate. The crew we are concerned with each have specific abilities that allow them to handle magic-gone-rogue. Somebody is killing and using magic to help. Our team has to use all their magical abilities and the resources of the Foundation to stop this rampage without knowing who the assassin is or how he chooses his victims. The answers will cause a whole lot of shake-ups in the world of magic.These were characters I came to like in a very short time. They aren't perfect, they aren't even admirable in some instances, in fact they are pretty rough all over, not just around the edges, but I just couldn't help but want everybody to come out of the magic fights in good shape. This story is a rock-um-sock-um magic street fight and I would have liked to have a little more explanation from the author of what forces/actions had happened during the fight scenes. Most of that wasn't spelled out and I needed some explanation. Maybe in the next story? I hope so because I want to know more than just who died or was maimed or injured in the fight. Other than that observation, I just enjoyed the heck out of this book!
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  • Chip
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars. A very quick read, somewhat reminiscent of Brust’s early Vlad Taltos books - slightly hard boiled. Also dialogue, rather than description, heavy - like Gregory McDonald’s Fletch (but decidedly less constant humor). Enjoyable enough, but I don’t think anything that’s going to stick with me.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealityIf you take Magic Ex Libris by Jim C. Hines SPI Files by Lisa Shearin, Paranormal Scene Investigations by Laura Anne Gilman, and mix them with a bit of cold war spy fiction and a heaping helping of noir, you’ll get something like Good Guys.Both SPI Files and Paranormal Scene Investigations involve organizations that investigate and clean up after crimes in magical versions of our own world. Libriomancer and its Magic Ex Libris series are part of the mix bec Originally published at Reading RealityIf you take Magic Ex Libris by Jim C. Hines SPI Files by Lisa Shearin, Paranormal Scene Investigations by Laura Anne Gilman, and mix them with a bit of cold war spy fiction and a heaping helping of noir, you’ll get something like Good Guys.Both SPI Files and Paranormal Scene Investigations involve organizations that investigate and clean up after crimes in magical versions of our own world. Libriomancer and its Magic Ex Libris series are part of the mix because in that version of our world, magic is hiding in plain sight, and part of the duty of the magical organization is to protect the world from the knowledge that magic exists. Add in that the libriomancers are fighting a conspiracy both from without and from within, and the magic side of Good Guys is pretty well covered.Because the story in Good Guys follows one particular operations team for the mysterious and magical Foundation as they chase around the world making sure that a magical serial killer does not expose the existence of real magic in the world, even as they investigate the patterns to see if they can both figure out what his game is – and catch him before he reaches its end.Or his. Or theirs.The more they discover about the whys and wherefores of the crime spree, the more they have to ask themselves, are they really the good guys? Or are they just battling their own bureaucracy and running around the world on behalf of an organization that is no better than the one they fight against.Escape Rating B+: It’s been a long time, possibly too long, since I read anything by Steven Brust. I’ll admit that I was expecting a bit more snark. (If you love snarky fantasy with an epic-ish/urban-ish feel, his Vlad Taltos series (start with Jhereg) is marvelous reading crack as long as you don’t try to swallow too many of them at once.)The story in Good Guys is a fairly deft mixture of mystery/investigation with magic, and very much a part of the urban fantasy tradition of magical detectives solving mysteries in a contemporary world that is just a bit sideways from reality.What keeps the reader glued to their chair is the way that the whole thing works. Because we’re both following this one rather eclectic, or possibly eccentric, team of investigators while also watching them plumb the depths of their own organization – and not liking what they find in those depths.There’s a lot of murk, and the frequent changes in perspective between the team leader, the criminal, the new recruit and the bosses on all sides of this mess occasionally muddies waters that are already pretty clouded. While the reader gets invested with Donovan and his team, the perspective shifts sometimes make it difficult to retain that focus. Especially as the author attempts to keep the reader in the dark while showing the criminal’s own thoughts and feelings. It might have worked a bit better, or it would certainly have worked a bit better for this reader, if we’d stayed with Donovan.Which does not mean that the story wasn’t absolutely fascinating, and a whole lot of fun – because it certainly was. The investigation was every bit as twisting and convoluted as the best mystery, while the magical additions gave the forensic side of the equation lots of new toys to play with. Of course, that magic also gave the criminals new toys to play with as well.And Donovan’s constant fight with, and continued attempts to work around, the bureaucracy that is as big a problem as it is a game, will find resonance with anyone who has worked in an organization containing more than three people. Paper-pushing procedures and internal politics are enemies that we all face.In the end, the question of whether Donovan and his mysterious Foundation are really the good guys remains an open one. But their search for the answer is a whole lot of fun.
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  • Mark Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    So I feel it necessary to emphasize that I got an early copy via NetGalley. I think that perhaps the publisher should’ve waited until after another edit before making ARCs available. I must assume that the edited version to come out in March 2018 will have fixed many of the issues I encountered. And issues there were many. Including editing notations within the body of the text. Indies are universally panned for the slightest faux pas, and there is this feeling by both readers and publishers tha So I feel it necessary to emphasize that I got an early copy via NetGalley. I think that perhaps the publisher should’ve waited until after another edit before making ARCs available. I must assume that the edited version to come out in March 2018 will have fixed many of the issues I encountered. And issues there were many. Including editing notations within the body of the text. Indies are universally panned for the slightest faux pas, and there is this feeling by both readers and publishers that indie publishers are somehow not good enough to get a traditional publishing contract. There are a lot of people who see self-publishing as garbage. While I’ve read some really wonderful indie books over the years, I’ve run into some real clunkers. Stories full of clichéd storytelling, bad formatting, and an overall inferior product. Those books don’t usually end up on this blog. For every 100 books I do read and review, there are probable 25 or so that I don’t finish.The Good Guys may have well been one of those poorly published indie works that so many people poo-poo. The story premise wasn’t bad: A team of secret underpaid people track down rogue magic practitioners in modern America (and Europe) and give the smack-down to those that don’t come quietly. Yep, read that story time and again – and by better authors. I’ve been told that the author of The Good Guys, Steven Brust, is quite popular. I’ve never read any of his other works before. But The Good Guys was terrible. Not terrible enough to DNF, but it was a grind to finish reading. Many of my complaints were likely the result of some very poor formatting and/or editing. The POV seemed all over the place. I’m not sure if there was just some missing scene break art or what, but I found myself having to re-read to figure out whose POV I was reading. On top of that, of the many character POVs, one was in first person, while the rest were in third-person perspective. The singular first-person perspective makes sense at the very end of the book, but while reading it, it’s just annoying. I’d rather read the exact same story from Clara Coulson. A much more polished manuscript, and frankly, a better story – one not full of dated clichés, and views better left in the 1950s.My suggestion is to skip the overpriced TOR ebook (I just looked, $13? What the fucking fuck, TOR?), and get all four City of Crows books by Clara Coulson. Coulson’s stories are better, and for only a dollar more, you get a much longer and more satisfying read. I would probably check out another book by Brust, but if it’s a stinking turd like this one, I’m out. I’m not just disappointed by this book; I’m offended that anyone would put it out there. Two stars is my rating, and unless the rest of this review is unclear about how I feel, don’t waste your money on The Good Guys.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    If you want an author to carefully explain to you who his characters are and how they relate to each other, this is probably not the book for you. Donovan Longfellow and his team of two are North American investigators for the Foundation, a secretive group that split off from an even more secretive group called the Mystici, their rivals and, in ways that Donovan doesn't yet know, their colleagues. The main thrust of the Foundation is to keep the existence of magic a secret, so when an assassin s If you want an author to carefully explain to you who his characters are and how they relate to each other, this is probably not the book for you. Donovan Longfellow and his team of two are North American investigators for the Foundation, a secretive group that split off from an even more secretive group called the Mystici, their rivals and, in ways that Donovan doesn't yet know, their colleagues. The main thrust of the Foundation is to keep the existence of magic a secret, so when an assassin starts targeting individuals connected to the Mystici and using magical means to kill them, Donovan must find out who is doing it and why. We're also privy to the purposes of the assassin, who is being manipulated in his turn by a mysterious man named Charlie. Donovan fears that there are those within the Mystici, and even within the Foundation, who are in league with, or manipulating, Charlie. Wonderfully funny, with enough action to keep everyone on their toes.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I've had people enthuse to me about Steven Brust more than once, but his main series is large and sprawling and not exactly my thing, and I've never found a point of entry to his work. When I saw this on Netgalley, a new series starter in a new genre for Brust, I thought I'd give it a try and see if he was actually as good as I'd heard. He is. Not only is this written with assurance and strong craft, not only does it have highly entertaining banter among the diverse, distinct, and non-generic ch I've had people enthuse to me about Steven Brust more than once, but his main series is large and sprawling and not exactly my thing, and I've never found a point of entry to his work. When I saw this on Netgalley, a new series starter in a new genre for Brust, I thought I'd give it a try and see if he was actually as good as I'd heard. He is. Not only is this written with assurance and strong craft, not only does it have highly entertaining banter among the diverse, distinct, and non-generic characters, but it also pulls off the difficult feat of having both moral complexity and a clear moral stance. The characters are imperfect and troubled, the reality they're dealing with is imperfect and complicated, and ultimately there isn't a "side" that is unambiguously and definitely the "good guys"; and yet most of the key characters, in their different ways, are striving to be "good guys" in their own terms, and some are even succeeding. It's noblebright, not grimdark, but it's noblebright with a lot of nuance and some extensive grey areas - yet ultimately hopeful. I found the author's choice to write first-person sections from the perspective of the antagonist, and mix them with omniscient narration about the protagonists, an interesting one. I'm not sure exactly what it does; perhaps its function is to humanise the antagonist, so that we can see how he, too, in his distorted way, thinks he's a good guy, or at least a justified one. The plot - agents of a secret cabal of sorcerers hunt down an assassin - is well paced, with good tension. Overall, excellent, and I would definitely read a sequel.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Good Guys is a new urban fantasy novel from Steven Brust. Brust is the author of the long running Jhereg fantasy series. Urban fantasy is, thus, a slight departure for him, but I’m happy to report that it’ a rather fun read, and one which is willing and able to explore the ethical and moral dimensions of what are, in effect, magical powers.The world is one familiar to any of us. Late-stage capitalism rules the roost. It’s our world, fast cars, skyscr *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Good Guys is a new urban fantasy novel from Steven Brust. Brust is the author of the long running Jhereg fantasy series. Urban fantasy is, thus, a slight departure for him, but I’m happy to report that it’ a rather fun read, and one which is willing and able to explore the ethical and moral dimensions of what are, in effect, magical powers.The world is one familiar to any of us. Late-stage capitalism rules the roost. It’s our world, fast cars, skyscrapers and all. Except a few people in that world can do magic. Teleportation. Shielding from bullets. Precognition. Piecing together patterns from loose threads. These people are split into ideological camps. There are those who are prepared to use their skills to make money in less than ethical ways, and those who refuse to do so. A détente exists between the two ideologies, and both are broadly more concerned with cleaning up the mess of accidental or untrained magic use than with fighting each other. That said, the camp of our protagonists feels more like an underfunded bureaucracy than a secret world of wizards. Everyone’s working for minimum wage, and there are expense claims to be put in after interdimensional travel. No-one has the time to do the job as well as they’d wish, and the group doesn’t have the funds to do as much as it would like to. For a secret organisation of magic users, its institutional underpinnings are delightfully mundane. The griping about claiming mileage after a magical duel, or filling out forms in triplicate to justify magical artefact use work to accentuate the strangeness of magical abilities, whilst grounding them in the modern world.Our protagonist, Donovan, is a fixer, working for the Foundation, one of the “Good guys”. Along with his team, he investigates unauthorised or dangerous uses of magic. This time, though, they’re investigating a murder. Donovan is focused, perhaps a little curt, and trying very hard to remain a professional. His team consists of Susan, an athlete with a penchant for martial arts, and Marci, whose lack of experience is more than made up for by her enthusiasm. They’re a tight knit group, with a closeness born of horrific circumstance and their own unique powers. They’re backed by a diverse and convincing ensemble cast – from the tightly focused researcher down to the broke-but-thoughtful mercenary. There’s some deeply eerie people on display here too, and, given the title, some antagonists who, perhaps, don’t entirely see themselves as bad people. This is a book prepared to believe that everyone is the hero of their own story, and unflinchingly explores that moral vein.The plot is one part murder mystery, one part buddy-cop movie, and one part supernatural magical explosions. The investigation is tense, and the leads, blinds and red herrings the group goes down are plausible, whilst the eventual denouement carries a degree of catharsis. There’s a thoughtful exploration of our heroes moral basis for what they do – tracking down rogue magic users and, euphemistically, dealing with them. In between the investigating and the hard thinking, there’s the occasional shootout, there’s time stops, and people spontaneously catch fire. This is a book which embraces and dives deep into the question of rightful force, and into the ambiguity of a team which does what it thinks is right, at personal cost and at a cost to those they interact with. Above all though, it’s fun. This is a text which challenges preconceptions, and makes you think – and then blows up the building. Where interrogations are largely polite, but when deaths do occur, they’re appalling. The tightly focused mystery is what kept me turning the pages, and the top-notch characterisation gave me the emotional stakes to make the story feel real.As an entry in urban, contemporary fantasy, this is an intelligent work, which challenges genre preconceptions and those of the reader, but also isn’t afraid to have fun. Gie it a try, you won’t regret it.
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  • J.W. Martin
    January 1, 1970
    A big thank-you to Raincoast Books and Tor Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.Although I enjoyed this book, I felt a little mislead by the synopsis. Maybe I read it wrong, but I thought it was going to be dealing with a team of super-powered people working for this mysterious Foundation in righting all the world’s wrongs. This was not the case.That alone made it a little harder to get into, but not much. The personalities of the main characters pulled me A big thank-you to Raincoast Books and Tor Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.Although I enjoyed this book, I felt a little mislead by the synopsis. Maybe I read it wrong, but I thought it was going to be dealing with a team of super-powered people working for this mysterious Foundation in righting all the world’s wrongs. This was not the case.That alone made it a little harder to get into, but not much. The personalities of the main characters pulled me in after a few short pages.Donovan, the leader of the team, was smart and absolutely hilarious. The only thing about him that bothered me (other than the fact that he had no super powers) was that he always called the police to PO-lice. Written exactly that way: PO-lice. It got on my nerves.I have mixed feelings about the writing style. It flowed well. But it jumped around, which was jarring at times. Especially with scenes that were from the perspective of a certain character, when the narrative switched over to first-person. It was the only character written in first-person.The world building was very creative. Packed with magic, but still believable. A great mix of imaginative magic and gritty crime.The main miss for me on this book was the plot. It seemed to be a little simplistic, without too many surprises. I like a plot that tosses me around, doesn’t give me much time to breathe, and keeps sneaking up behind me even when I think I’ve got it clearly in sight.Great world, great characters, and a plot that left a little to be desired. Overall, fun book, absolutely worth a read.
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  • Emily Moore
    January 1, 1970
    To be honest, my first reaction after reading this book was surprise while reading through all of the positive reviews of this book. I thought it was okay, nothing particularly break through in the fantasy or crime genres. I thought this was a first time novel by the author — what I didn't realize Steven Brust is considered pretty prolific in the fantasy and sci-fi department. Just to give him the benefit of the doubt, maybe I had just been sent a poorly edited copy, seeing as I received as an A To be honest, my first reaction after reading this book was surprise while reading through all of the positive reviews of this book. I thought it was okay, nothing particularly break through in the fantasy or crime genres. I thought this was a first time novel by the author — what I didn't realize Steven Brust is considered pretty prolific in the fantasy and sci-fi department. Just to give him the benefit of the doubt, maybe I had just been sent a poorly edited copy, seeing as I received as an ARC. From what I understand this is also the start of a new magical series. Perhaps its a little bogged down in setting up the story and characters to really stand out.The story of Good Guys follows a team of people working for one of the global magical agencies. You have the leader, the magician and the muscle all working together to protect the secret of magic and following up on a suspicious murder. Throughout the story you follow them investigating a mounting number of deaths to prevent not only more murders, but to discover who is orchestrating these magical events. Overall, I thought the novel will definitely appeal to fans of the genre and of the author. While I didn't think any of the magical mechanisms were particularly stand out from other novels, the team does have a nice dynamic that I could see being of enjoyment to readers. My main complaint, again, is in the writing quality that does seem to suffer from a bit of telling and not showing. Large portions of the novel are jumped over by characters blacking out and returning to consciousness later which gives it a bit of stop and go pacing. But, again, I'm hoping this will be solved before publication.I’m providing this review in return for an ARC through NetGalley.
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  • Ron
    January 1, 1970
    In a rare non-Vlad Taltos novel, Steven Brust drags the willing reader in to a world much like our own except that magic is available to a few people based on their genetics. At present there are two magic organizations in the world, both strive to keep magic underground, they just differ in ethics and funding. The fun comes when a disgruntled whistle-blower found out that the SEC official to whom he sent info on bad loans had not taken regulatory action, but rather a bribe which led to loss of In a rare non-Vlad Taltos novel, Steven Brust drags the willing reader in to a world much like our own except that magic is available to a few people based on their genetics. At present there are two magic organizations in the world, both strive to keep magic underground, they just differ in ethics and funding. The fun comes when a disgruntled whistle-blower found out that the SEC official to whom he sent info on bad loans had not taken regulatory action, but rather a bribe which led to loss of employment, divorce, etc. for the whistle-blower. He was approached by an unknown person who provided him devices and support to wreak his vengeance on said official but first a few other targets had to be taken out. And that is where the Foundation's investigative team come in. They hope they are the "good guys" even as they learn more of the background of the Foundation and the reader learns the backstory of the assassin. Brust did a good job of doling out the clues so that the reader and the team were about on pace with each other. Plus, Brust left it up to the reader to decide who actually were the "Good Guys."Thanks Netgalley for the chance to read this title.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    When Donovan is shot nine times, four of those shots are lethal . . . but Donovan doesn’t die because The Foundation picked him up, brought him back, trained him. At fifteen, Marci levitated a paperweight and threw it at a guy she did not like. The Foundation scooped her up, too, and trained her, just like Donovan. And Susan.It’s all about the magic.Now the three can teleport themselves thousands of miles, conjure up shields to stop bullets, read information from the remaining fragments of spell When Donovan is shot nine times, four of those shots are lethal . . . but Donovan doesn’t die because The Foundation picked him up, brought him back, trained him. At fifteen, Marci levitated a paperweight and threw it at a guy she did not like. The Foundation scooped her up, too, and trained her, just like Donovan. And Susan.It’s all about the magic.Now the three can teleport themselves thousands of miles, conjure up shields to stop bullets, read information from the remaining fragments of spells cast by others, even days before. They work for the secretive Foundation because they’re the good guys. Aren’t they?Snarky, irreverent, campy, and filled with fun, readers will find this witty, fast-paced fantasy, peopled with complicated characters, nuanced and hopeful. As the two factions work to keep magic from becoming common knowledge, readers may wish for more information on this world and its magical societies. Nevertheless, it is an entertaining tale of murder with a magic assist.
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  • Keith Blodgett
    January 1, 1970
    Urban fantasy is a new style for Mr. Brust and he tackles it with his usual skill and dry wit. When you work for a shadowy agency and know there another, similar but with different beliefs how do you know you're the good guys? ARE you the good guys? It's a hard question to answer. It also makes for an interesting story line.I've been quite a fan of Steven Brust for decades sometuhe hits homeruns and other times it a base hit. Rarely do you see him strike out. This book I'd call a double. Not wow Urban fantasy is a new style for Mr. Brust and he tackles it with his usual skill and dry wit. When you work for a shadowy agency and know there another, similar but with different beliefs how do you know you're the good guys? ARE you the good guys? It's a hard question to answer. It also makes for an interesting story line.I've been quite a fan of Steven Brust for decades sometuhe hits homeruns and other times it a base hit. Rarely do you see him strike out. This book I'd call a double. Not wow, fantastic! But not horrible either. The story is jerkily told jumping from first person narrative to third and back, over and over. At times information that advances the story is kept from the reader but told to the characters in the book (weird, I know). The story wanders a bit and could stand a little tightening up but it's worth reading and for the first time in a long time I find myself hoping for a sequel or two. . . not twenty mind you but I wouldn't mind a few. I'd like to see the author expand this universe.
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  • Penny Noble
    January 1, 1970
    I have never read this author before reading this book, and I’ll probably read another one by him in the future. I had a hard time getting into this book, but once I did, the book flowed pretty smoothly. This book definitely had an interesting premise, and I did like the characters even if I found them a little two-dimensional and wish we had gotten to know them a little better. This is the beginning of a series, I believe, so maybe in the next book this will be remedied. One other tiny annoyanc I have never read this author before reading this book, and I’ll probably read another one by him in the future. I had a hard time getting into this book, but once I did, the book flowed pretty smoothly. This book definitely had an interesting premise, and I did like the characters even if I found them a little two-dimensional and wish we had gotten to know them a little better. This is the beginning of a series, I believe, so maybe in the next book this will be remedied. One other tiny annoyance was that the characters had a tendency to tell us about events instead of showing. Overall, I did like this book, so don’t take my criticisms too harshly. If you like this genre and/or author, give it a try. Recommend. Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for the e-book which I voluntarily reviewed.
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    January 1, 1970
    Magic is real but don't let anyone with no magic know. Good Guys has a complicated plot that is told from multiple points of view. That allows Brust to tell the story in very small bites and often like the players I was left in the dark about what was really going on. Turns out it is not at all what I though. It stated looking like a job to keep magic a secret and changes as the story progresses. I did enjoy the world building and back story that was revealed as the story progressed. I also like Magic is real but don't let anyone with no magic know. Good Guys has a complicated plot that is told from multiple points of view. That allows Brust to tell the story in very small bites and often like the players I was left in the dark about what was really going on. Turns out it is not at all what I though. It stated looking like a job to keep magic a secret and changes as the story progresses. I did enjoy the world building and back story that was revealed as the story progressed. I also liked the characters. This is a good one for anyone who likes to try to follow and solve a mystery before it is revealed.
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  • Jesse
    January 1, 1970
    I pre-ordered this book. Thought to myself: Steven Brust + Urban Fantasy ... how could that bad? Happy to report, Mr. Brust delivered on all of my expectations. First, Brust is a master craftsman. He has both a talent for world building and a strong sense of pace which keep things moving along and always interesting. Along the same lines, he knows how to deliver on both plot and character with an economy of language I envy.I love the Taltos series and was excited for Brust to branch out and give I pre-ordered this book. Thought to myself: Steven Brust + Urban Fantasy ... how could that bad? Happy to report, Mr. Brust delivered on all of my expectations. First, Brust is a master craftsman. He has both a talent for world building and a strong sense of pace which keep things moving along and always interesting. Along the same lines, he knows how to deliver on both plot and character with an economy of language I envy.I love the Taltos series and was excited for Brust to branch out and give us something in a modern setting. This book delivered in every possible way. Highest recommendation.
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  • Bentgaidin
    January 1, 1970
    "Good Guys," good book. A thriller about a low-level investigation and enforcement team in a secret magical organization, investigating killings in a second secret magical organization. I really liked the characters -- those are always Brust's strength -- and would happily read more books with them. I'm not sure I properly followed all the layers of conspiracy and intrigue going on over their heads, but that might be clearer whenever I go back and reread this. Worth checking out for the characte "Good Guys," good book. A thriller about a low-level investigation and enforcement team in a secret magical organization, investigating killings in a second secret magical organization. I really liked the characters -- those are always Brust's strength -- and would happily read more books with them. I'm not sure I properly followed all the layers of conspiracy and intrigue going on over their heads, but that might be clearer whenever I go back and reread this. Worth checking out for the character voices and the look at that how and why of magical security, even with the tangling of the plot.
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  • Xenophon Hendrix
    January 1, 1970
    This is an entertaining stand-alone fantasy novel by Steven Brust. The primary setting is the modern United States. I think the novel makes an interesting counterpoint to the Alex Verus novels of Benedict Jacka. Neither of the two main groups of sorcerers has actual rules about hurting the normies; they're just worried about giving away the game. One of the ideas running through Brust's book is how wicked that is.
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  • Steven Burnap
    January 1, 1970
    His new urban fantasy books don't pull me in as much as the Vlad books. There's some interesting stuff around ethics...the magical organizations in the book feel far more like real world organizations than your typical "good wizards" vs. "bad wizards". Some of the characters are a bit flat. In general it felt like we didn't get enough time to settle into the world before we getting the intricate "who did what to who when" stuff.
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  • Chuk
    January 1, 1970
    Brust is always good. This is a modern world (but with secret magic) caper novel, we get to see parts of both sides as a team of operatives try to track down a magical murderer, but there are still secrets we have to wait for. The text flows well, the main characters are interesting and I was invested in the story. I'm not sure if there will be sequels. If you like the setups in some of the Vlad Taltos books, you will find some of the same thing to enjoy in Good Guys.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Hardboiled whodunit with magic. The too-frequent slice of life passages didn’t do anything for me, and I thought it was creepy of the author to kill off a major, sympathetic character partway through. But the story features some very smart people working their way through the clues, and I enjoyed that very much. Would be willing to tackle a sequel.
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Great supernatural fantasy!I have long been a fan of Brust's Vlad Taltos books. This is completely different. Written in several voices instead of one, it still manages to be an unbroken story, slowly building in action. The characters including the bad guys are pretty well developed, the hero is complex. A really good read.
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  • Marci
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read where you would never quite know who you were suppose to believe and what was going on. Great for fans of the Incrementalist series as well as perhaps The Magicians. Thanks to Edelweiss for the prepub.
  • Peter Meek
    January 1, 1970
    Slick premise; nicely executed. Confusing (but necessary) switching between 1st and 3rd person POV. I’ll be rereading this many times again.I rarely give 5 star ratings. It’s simple: perfection is rare. 4 stars is a rave rating from me,
  • Saint Lart
    January 1, 1970
    New and niceSB has written so many great books and none has sounded like this. This is as good as them! I’ll miss one character for a while.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Well enough written but it just wasn’t to my tastes. I like the Taltos books much better.
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable twisty read from an old fav author
  • Reynolds Darke
    January 1, 1970
    A good fantasy/spy-type novel. Good, but Brust left his Awesome Pen in his Jhereg pants.
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    It's good to read an urban fantasy novel that isn't trying to be Jim Butcher's Dresden Files.
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