Star Wars (Star Wars: Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith, #1)
From acclaimed writer Charles Soule comes a brand-new, exhilarating series exploring Darth Vader's early history. Picking up directly where Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith ends, follow Vader as he receives his legendary red lightsaber and witness Vader's rise to power as a Dark Lord of the Sith!COLLECTING: STAR WARS: DARTH VADER 1-6

Star Wars (Star Wars: Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith, #1) Details

TitleStar Wars (Star Wars: Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 5th, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302907440
Rating
GenreMedia Tie In, Star Wars, Sequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Science Fiction, Superheroes, Marvel

Star Wars (Star Wars: Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith, #1) Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    How did Darth Vader get his red lightsaber? Better question: who fucking cares?! That said, while this may be the flimsy plot of Charles Soule and Giuseppe Camuncoli’s first volume in the rebooted Vader series, Imperial Machine surprisingly wasn’t that bad.I liked that Soule didn’t write any internal monologue for Vader so he remains aloof from the reader, as mysterious, cold and menacing as he is in the movies. In fact, there’s a good balance throughout between writer and artist with Soule know How did Darth Vader get his red lightsaber? Better question: who fucking cares?! That said, while this may be the flimsy plot of Charles Soule and Giuseppe Camuncoli’s first volume in the rebooted Vader series, Imperial Machine surprisingly wasn’t that bad.I liked that Soule didn’t write any internal monologue for Vader so he remains aloof from the reader, as mysterious, cold and menacing as he is in the movies. In fact, there’s a good balance throughout between writer and artist with Soule knowing when to step back and let Camuncoli tell the story with his impressive, sweeping cinematic visuals.And I also liked that Vader is not the invincible force of nature that we’ve seen in other books like Vader Down. Imperial Machine takes place directly after Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith, so Anakin has only just been reborn as Vader (the widely-mocked “NOOOO!” scene opens this book - a bold move). We see him still dealing with the immense physical, mental and emotional trauma he endured in that movie, as well as getting to grips with his unfamiliar new robot body. There are also the remnants of the struggle within him between the Light and the Dark Side of the Force. Vader remains formidable but it was interesting and refreshing to see his moments of vulnerability here.Despite his minor setbacks, it’s still a predictable story with Vader smashing through the contrived obstacles Soule throws in his path like the new rogue Jedi, Master Infil’A, who’s as flat and unmemorable as any of the new characters Soule’s created during his Marvel tenure for the Inhumans, Daredevil et al. Most of all, I couldn’t shake the impression that I was reading a mountain of a molehill with the big “climax” taking place on Mustafar as Vader created his lightsaber and leaving me thinking “… meh.”It’s no must-read or especially memorable but Darth Vader, Volume 1: Imperial Machine is entertaining enough in a shallow, mindless way.
    more
  • Alejandro
    January 1, 1970
    Vader rises! This run is different than the previous with the same title, also by Marvel Comics, moreover it’s set in a different time period too. This run is set right after the end of “Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith”.Creative Team:Writer: Charles SouleIllustrator: Giuseppe Camuncoli WANTED: LIGHTSABER This is a good run, but I felt quite better the previous run by Gillen & Larroca, set between Episodes IV & V.Now, Darth Vader is right after Episode III, inside of a stran Vader rises! This run is different than the previous with the same title, also by Marvel Comics, moreover it’s set in a different time period too. This run is set right after the end of “Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith”.Creative Team:Writer: Charles SouleIllustrator: Giuseppe Camuncoli WANTED: LIGHTSABER This is a good run, but I felt quite better the previous run by Gillen & Larroca, set between Episodes IV & V.Now, Darth Vader is right after Episode III, inside of a strange armor and without lightsaber. Therefore, you’ll witness the path of the new Dark Lord of the Sith, testing and making adjustment to his armor, along with the challenge of finding a new lightsaber, that in the Sith Way it shouldn’t be given but……TAKEN from a beaten enemy, and then the Kyber Crystal should be corrupted with feelings of anger and pain until making it……BLEED, and got its crimson tone.Of course, the Order 66 is giving some trouble to the young Sith since there aren’t many live Jedi left……and while it’s not said clearly, I think that Vader doesn’t want to get a lightsaber from a Jedi that went into hiding after the Order 66, since what worthy can be to beat a coward Jedi that it’s saving his/her butt in a hole? But, thankfully there is an old Jedi custom that when an active Jedi finds troublesome to be part of the Jedi order, they can opt to go into seclusion and they can’t interfere anymore in any matter of the Jedi Order……and if the Jedi went into seclusion before the Order 66, it’s another matter, it was a choice, and also it’s recorded on the Jedi Archives, the whereabouts of the secluded Jedi.And what better if the chosen Jedi wasn’t a puny diplomat but a true fighter?!However, Emperor Palpatine doesn’t trust blindly in the abilities of his new apprentice, especially since he isn’t the same man than before, barely a man actually, and Palpatine knows that any single Jedi out there still alive is a dangerous threat to his new Empire, so……the INQUISITORS come in scene! Loyal enforcers of the Dark Lord of the Sith!
    more
  • Will M.
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a huge fan of Star Wars ever since I was a child but it's weird that this is the very first Star Wars graphic novel I've read. I'm glad though, because it's amazing and I want to read more.Darth Vader will always be one of, if not the most, iconic figure of Star Wars. This new graphic novel series aims to give us a background of Vader's past. It starts off where Episode III ends. This first volume generally shows how Vader got his lightsaber. It also gives a bit of information on how h I've been a huge fan of Star Wars ever since I was a child but it's weird that this is the very first Star Wars graphic novel I've read. I'm glad though, because it's amazing and I want to read more.Darth Vader will always be one of, if not the most, iconic figure of Star Wars. This new graphic novel series aims to give us a background of Vader's past. It starts off where Episode III ends. This first volume generally shows how Vader got his lightsaber. It also gives a bit of information on how he joined the dark side (although this is common knowledge already). This graphic novel is a lot of fun and I can't wait to read more of it. To be honest, Darth Vader is not even my favorite villain of the Star Wars franchise. Darth Maul is my favorite but we don't get to read/watch/hear much about him, unlike Vader. Vader comes in second though, it's great how we see his early dark side days here in this series. I can't wait to read more.5/5. What a great first graphic novel read of 2018! The artwork is one of my favorites out there coupled with a terrific plot. You can't go wrong with this new series!
    more
  • Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    This is how I wish Kieron Gillen’s series would have started. Not just rehash and nostalgia, but introspection and aggrandizement. Anakin Skywalker finishes his dark journey to become Sith Lord Darth Vader. And it’s amazing. Vader embraces the pain and suffering to test, increase, and improve his power. And the Star Wars mythos expands with the history of the Sith light saber being explained, as Vader journeys to the Outer Rim to procure a light saber from the very last Jedi. Epic, beautiful in This is how I wish Kieron Gillen’s series would have started. Not just rehash and nostalgia, but introspection and aggrandizement. Anakin Skywalker finishes his dark journey to become Sith Lord Darth Vader. And it’s amazing. Vader embraces the pain and suffering to test, increase, and improve his power. And the Star Wars mythos expands with the history of the Sith light saber being explained, as Vader journeys to the Outer Rim to procure a light saber from the very last Jedi. Epic, beautiful in his tragedy and resolve, Imperial Machine is the beginning of something great.
    more
  • FanboyBen
    January 1, 1970
    When news first broke that we would be getting another Darth Vader series to follow up Kieron Gillen’s amazing run with the character, I was nervous. Gillen’s series did SO MUCH to flesh out Vader as a character, and I was skeptical about the prospect of ANOTHER series centered solely around him – I mean really, what more could there be to say about Vader that warranted a whole other series, especially so soon after the wrap up of his first series? Even with the the news that the series wouldn’t When news first broke that we would be getting another Darth Vader series to follow up Kieron Gillen’s amazing run with the character, I was nervous. Gillen’s series did SO MUCH to flesh out Vader as a character, and I was skeptical about the prospect of ANOTHER series centered solely around him – I mean really, what more could there be to say about Vader that warranted a whole other series, especially so soon after the wrap up of his first series? Even with the the news that the series wouldn’t be set between A New Hope and The Empires Strikes Back, like Gillen’s series was, but instead immediately post-Revenge of the Sith-when Vader is still new to his role as the Galactic Empire’s chief enforcer and as Palpatine’s apprentice-I was still skeptical and couldn’t help but wish that Marvel would just leave well enough alone.Well, color me surprised-I’ve never been happier to be wrong. Because Charles Soule’s new “Darth Vader” series, though maybe not as deep or as heady as Gillen’s, is a TON of fun. In fact, I think there’s an argument to be made, based on just these first six issues, that Soule might actually be writing the more purely enjoyable of the two series. Watching Vader wrestling with the monster he’s become is thrilling in a way that I didn’t expect: we’re so used to seeing the Dark Lord of the Sith as the walking embodiment of the cool, collected and beyond powerful villain. Seeing him at this stage of his “career,” weakened and still raw over the loss of all that he’s lost, is intriguing, to say the least.It also doesn’t hurt that artist Giuseppe Camuncoli is KILLING it. I’ve never seen any of Camuncoli’s work before, but his colorful, ever-so-slightly-exaggerated-style is perfectly suited to Soule’s highly emotional story. Whether it’s Vader lashing out at the Emperor immediately post-“NOOOO!” moment in “Revenge of the Sith,”, or Vader fighting a Jedi Master atop a collapsing dam, or Vader attempting to corrupt – or, as it’s referred to in-story, “bleed” – a lightsaber’s crystal, Camuncoli continually strikes the perfect balance of “cartoony” meets “grounded,” especially when in regards to how he depicts the impact all of this is having on Vader himself. He’s a great fit for a great story, one that I can’t wait to see the next chapter of.
    more
  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    A Long Time Ago, in a Galaxy Where Every Iconic Prop Has An Origin Story...Jokes aside I really enjoyed "Imperial Machine", it showed the shaky early days of the Empire and Vader's mopping up work for his demanding Master, and, yes, how he acquired a red lightsaber after Obi-Wan famously grabbed his old blue one after their duel in order to be able to give it to Luke 20 odd years later. Yay, continuity!(Sidenote: After learning his father's true identity and deeds, I reckon old LS would have bee A Long Time Ago, in a Galaxy Where Every Iconic Prop Has An Origin Story...Jokes aside I really enjoyed "Imperial Machine", it showed the shaky early days of the Empire and Vader's mopping up work for his demanding Master, and, yes, how he acquired a red lightsaber after Obi-Wan famously grabbed his old blue one after their duel in order to be able to give it to Luke 20 odd years later. Yay, continuity!(Sidenote: After learning his father's true identity and deeds, I reckon old LS would have been glad to be rid of that weapon that killed all those younglings, even if it cost him a hand to do so!)I'm particularly happy to see the Inquisitors introduced, they were a solid feature of the first seasons of TV's Rebels and I'm sure I'm not alone in wanting to learn more about them.
    more
  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Finally, a Marvel Star Wars comic set in a much more interesting time period between the prequels and the original trilogy, instead of that beaten to death space between episodes IV and V. And it’s a surprisingly good comic, too! Starting immediately after the end of episode III, it shows Vader going on a quest to get himself a brand new Sith-red lightsaber. We find out where the red ‘sabers come from and how they’re made as we follow Vader on an action-packed trip to kill a certain Jedi master. Finally, a Marvel Star Wars comic set in a much more interesting time period between the prequels and the original trilogy, instead of that beaten to death space between episodes IV and V. And it’s a surprisingly good comic, too! Starting immediately after the end of episode III, it shows Vader going on a quest to get himself a brand new Sith-red lightsaber. We find out where the red ‘sabers come from and how they’re made as we follow Vader on an action-packed trip to kill a certain Jedi master. It’s not a very deep story, but I had a lot of fun with it, and the artwork was quite nice. Recommended to all Vader fans! This is immediately better than the underwhelming Kieron Gillen series.
    more
  • Gianfranco Mancini
    January 1, 1970
    Vote: 3, 5Not bad at all and artworks were really good, but I enjoyed much more Gillen's Vader run.My most favourite issue was the final humoristic one closing the volume... with the small droid cleaning floor of late imperial officers choked to death by the Sith Lord.It was hilarious XD
    more
  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Soule has a hard act to follow. Keiron Gillen's Vader series was aces. One thing he has going for him is Giuseppe Camuncoli. His art is divine. It looks amazing (as in Spider-man) in a Star Wars book. For this series, we're looking at when Anakin first becomes Vader, right after the end of Revenge of the Sith. The plot for this one was a bit strange. Sith must create their light sabers by taking them from a jedi and making the kyber crystal bleed. I found that last part a little hokey. W Charles Soule has a hard act to follow. Keiron Gillen's Vader series was aces. One thing he has going for him is Giuseppe Camuncoli. His art is divine. It looks amazing (as in Spider-man) in a Star Wars book. For this series, we're looking at when Anakin first becomes Vader, right after the end of Revenge of the Sith. The plot for this one was a bit strange. Sith must create their light sabers by taking them from a jedi and making the kyber crystal bleed. I found that last part a little hokey. What I did like was the jedi master who Vader goes after. he's devoted to only one thing, fighting and has a very neat look about him. The way Vader beats him is badass, using a jedi's weaknesses against him. Then we get introduced to the Inquisitors, lesser Sith who will be hunting down the remaining jedi in hiding.
    more
  • David Dalton
    January 1, 1970
    Love this series background on Vader's early days.Not easy being an apprentice to the Emperor, who happens to be a Master Sith. This is my 2nd Vader collection that I have read this past week. I will look for more.
  • Neil Coulter
    January 1, 1970
    Kieron Gillen's Vader graphic novel series started strong and then fizzled out completely by the end. So I wasn't especially hopeful about the new series by Charles Soule. But I actually quite enjoyed this story. Soule introduces some new elements to Jedi/Sith mythology, and they all work just fine. (This is not usually the case with SW graphic novels--especially the recent Doctor Aphra series.) I also like that the book ends with a glimpse of the formation of the Inquisitors. Anything that conn Kieron Gillen's Vader graphic novel series started strong and then fizzled out completely by the end. So I wasn't especially hopeful about the new series by Charles Soule. But I actually quite enjoyed this story. Soule introduces some new elements to Jedi/Sith mythology, and they all work just fine. (This is not usually the case with SW graphic novels--especially the recent Doctor Aphra series.) I also like that the book ends with a glimpse of the formation of the Inquisitors. Anything that connects to Rebels is great with me. (Except that I found it disappointing how easily Vader defeats the Grand Inquisitor, who is one of my favorite SW villains and should have been able to hold his own longer than he did.)My only criticism of this first volume is that the dialogue doesn't feel like Anakin and Palpatine talking. Instead, it's just generic-Vader and generic-Emperor dialogue. The Lords of the Sith novel did a much better job of making me feel that it was Anakin speaking from within the Vader suit.I hope this series will continue strong. I'm eager for the next volume, and that rarely happens with any SW graphic novel.
    more
  • Jim C
    January 1, 1970
    This is a collection that takes place right after Anakin becomes Darth Vader. In fact, we get the infamous (not in a good way) scene of Vader yelling "NOOOOOOO!" when he finds out Padme is dead. That is the beginning of this collection.I liked this collection and it is a nice story of how Anakin is getting use to being Darth Vader. He is now part of the dark side but the suit that he needs because of his injuries is new. He needs to get use to fighting again and I liked how this collection portr This is a collection that takes place right after Anakin becomes Darth Vader. In fact, we get the infamous (not in a good way) scene of Vader yelling "NOOOOOOO!" when he finds out Padme is dead. That is the beginning of this collection.I liked this collection and it is a nice story of how Anakin is getting use to being Darth Vader. He is now part of the dark side but the suit that he needs because of his injuries is new. He needs to get use to fighting again and I liked how this collection portrayed that. It was weird seeing Vader fallible but it makes sense. This collection also reinforces that Anakin is responsible for his decisions even though we get to see The Emperor playing his mind games. This collection also ties in with Star Wars Rebels and Episode II and neither tie-in was forced.I liked this collection and I am looking forward to seeing more stories about Vader. We can never have too much of his character. The artwork is really good (I did have issues with The Emperor as he was a little too troll-like for my taste) and the cliffhanger at the end really entices me because you know it cannot be good for that character.
    more
  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    This takes place immediately after the end of ROTS, and first of all... I am slain.Him doing all his Darth Vadery things in pursuit of a kyber crystal to make his new red lightsaber is great as usual. I am always completely weak for the "hey it's just one guy in a starfighter" gag. Also, I loved getting to see him customize his own armor! Like, of COURSE he would customize his own armor, this is a completely obvious and required fact! I'm glad someone finally pointed it out! It was also sweet to This takes place immediately after the end of ROTS, and first of all... I am slain.Him doing all his Darth Vadery things in pursuit of a kyber crystal to make his new red lightsaber is great as usual. I am always completely weak for the "hey it's just one guy in a starfighter" gag. Also, I loved getting to see him customize his own armor! Like, of COURSE he would customize his own armor, this is a completely obvious and required fact! I'm glad someone finally pointed it out! It was also sweet to see Vader wipe the floor with the Grand Inquisitor.However... the vision the kyber crystal gives him about what could be, even now, if he decides to take another path MUGGED ME IN AN ALLEY, STOLE MY WALLET & PUT ME IN THE HOSPITAL like WHAT I was NOT EXPECTING... THAT. I would give this graphic novel 4 stars just for that scene, even if the rest were trash honestly.
    more
  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    It's Darth Vader being a bad ass. If that's your thing, this is a book for you.Lucky for me... it is my thing. Its a really fun book. There isn't a heck of a lot of overarching plot depth. I mean, this story takes place between Ep.3 and Ep.4 so we already know that no matter what happens Vader is going to come out on top. It's basically just the Emperor turning Vader into being...Vader. Which, in my books, is something I'm interested in seeing. I also like the idea of why the Sith lightsabers ar It's Darth Vader being a bad ass. If that's your thing, this is a book for you.Lucky for me... it is my thing. Its a really fun book. There isn't a heck of a lot of overarching plot depth. I mean, this story takes place between Ep.3 and Ep.4 so we already know that no matter what happens Vader is going to come out on top. It's basically just the Emperor turning Vader into being...Vader. Which, in my books, is something I'm interested in seeing. I also like the idea of why the Sith lightsabers are red. I loved the saber lore that we got in the Ahsoka novel...and this just added even more lore to it all.And star Wars lore is cool.So is Vader.That's a win for me!
    more
  • Travis Duke
    January 1, 1970
    Good balance of old star wars and new, and by new I mean maybe less than 1/4 if you count that new Jedi. So this takes place right after episode 3 for the most part and it deals with Vader hunting down a red light saber. The Emperor is pulling the strings on Vader making sure he stays in line because it seems Vader still has some Anakin in him. There some really cool moments in here especially seeing Vader fighting, I mean that's what all want to see anyways. Charles Soule is on the right track Good balance of old star wars and new, and by new I mean maybe less than 1/4 if you count that new Jedi. So this takes place right after episode 3 for the most part and it deals with Vader hunting down a red light saber. The Emperor is pulling the strings on Vader making sure he stays in line because it seems Vader still has some Anakin in him. There some really cool moments in here especially seeing Vader fighting, I mean that's what all want to see anyways. Charles Soule is on the right track so I am excited to read more. The art is good, its better than average.
    more
  • Joran
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't at the edge of my seat reading this book, but I was satisfied afterwards. The only thing that was lacking to me in this book, was more of a story. I love how this book explains more deep things about the sith. For instance:This book explains why sith lightsabers are red, what happened in between the 3rd and 4th movie, and how Darth Vader acquired his lightsaber from the 4th movie). I think the author did well with keeping the "Star wars type of feeling" throughout the book, and I enjoye I wasn't at the edge of my seat reading this book, but I was satisfied afterwards. The only thing that was lacking to me in this book, was more of a story. I love how this book explains more deep things about the sith. For instance:This book explains why sith lightsabers are red, what happened in between the 3rd and 4th movie, and how Darth Vader acquired his lightsaber from the 4th movie). I think the author did well with keeping the "Star wars type of feeling" throughout the book, and I enjoyed seeing the younger darth vader fight(He is a lot more athletic!). If you are a star wars nerd, or you like action, and a simple story, I recommend you read this book!
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    How do you follow Kieron Gillen's amazing Darth Vader series? By going back to the beginning of the journey and filling in the blanks, of course.Starting right from the end of Revenge Of The Sith (complete with NOOOOOOOOOO), these six issues follow Darth Vader's quest to find his first lightsaber, which takes him to the Jedi Library, back to Mustafar, and beyond. Soule's characterization as the last human parts of Anakin Skywalker die away (at least until Return Of The Jedi, I guess) is spot on, How do you follow Kieron Gillen's amazing Darth Vader series? By going back to the beginning of the journey and filling in the blanks, of course.Starting right from the end of Revenge Of The Sith (complete with NOOOOOOOOOO), these six issues follow Darth Vader's quest to find his first lightsaber, which takes him to the Jedi Library, back to Mustafar, and beyond. Soule's characterization as the last human parts of Anakin Skywalker die away (at least until Return Of The Jedi, I guess) is spot on, and the Emperor is deliciously manipulative, despite being in the book very briefly. I like that Soule remembers that Anakin was a master engineer, which comes up more than once across the story, too. He really gets put through the ringer in this story, and I mean that pretty literally.Giuseppe Camuncoli has graduated from Amazing Spider-Man over to the Star Wars side of Marvel, and his work is phenomenal. It's very difficult to portray emotions with Darth Vader's helmet, but his body language and the way he frames panels so that his face is cast into different shadows is superb. He also has a good inker/colourist team in Cam Smith and David Curiel, who work to make his art really pop. Camuncoli is an artist who is made or broken by his partners, but these three are a powerhouse.This is a very different animal to the last Vader series, but is definitely out to carve itself a well deserved place in Star Wars canon.
    more
  • Lance Shadow
    January 1, 1970
    so.... according to the front cover this story arc is called "imperial machine". yet it's also called "the chosen one"? wierd, but either way, late review because apparently goodreads decided not to save my review after I wrote it, so this is a rewrite that I really didn't feel like doing. Regardless of my feelings of writing this review, I actually this comic was pretty solid. I didn't know what to think going in, despite hearing all the good buzz surrounding this one. Charles Soule, despite be so.... according to the front cover this story arc is called "imperial machine". yet it's also called "the chosen one"? wierd, but either way, late review because apparently goodreads decided not to save my review after I wrote it, so this is a rewrite that I really didn't feel like doing. Regardless of my feelings of writing this review, I actually this comic was pretty solid. I didn't know what to think going in, despite hearing all the good buzz surrounding this one. Charles Soule, despite being the most prolific writer in the star wars canon comics field, has been a mixed bag for me. Loved Lando and really enjoyed parts of Poe Dameron, but other parts of Poe Dameron as well as his limited series Obi-Wan & Anakin I wasn't a fan of. Fortunately this is one of his better story arcs. And that's a good thing, because we deserve a great darth vader comic. Yes, I know alot of people LOVED kieron Gillen's darth vader run, but I was not one of those people. While Gillen did a great job characterizing Vader and introducing Dr. Aphra, the story got more convoluted and more stupid as the series went on.But with Dark Lord of the sith, we get to see Vader in one of the most interesting stages of his life. I'll tell you more when I get to the next section...THE STORY: this is the origin story for Darth Vader that many people wanted to see in the prequels, but didn't get to see. Sure legends probably told this story more than once, but now it's the canon's turn to do it, integrating some new rules that were established in previous works, namely Ahsoka. We open with a different take on the deservedly ridiculed noooooooooooooooooooo scene from revenge of the sith that's less hilariously stupid and more badass. (still chuckled and did my best cleveland family guy impression when vader said "no" multiple times, but i digress. I think most people will appreciate how much better the comic does this scene). Then, we follow Darth Vader as he seeks to get himself a new lightsaber following the proper sith tradition: taking the lightsaber of a defeated jedi and bleeding the kyber crystal inside it (trust me, its way cooler than it sounds).THE BAD: this comic could have been kriffing near perfect with a better artist at the helm. The character drawings on Vader and sidious often look quite awkward, and the action is stiff. It takes out some of the epic factor that this is trying to give off. We want to see vader kick ass and murder people- and this comic certainly delivers on that front. However, the artwork fails to make it as awesome as we want it to be. The other problem I found is that the Barash Vow is not very well explained. Because of this, what should have been an interesting and compelling concept feels like a rehash of Obi Wan's character developement from revenge of the sith to A New Hope- going into exile only to come back out to help the galaxy. THE GOOD: I had a blast with this one, despite the problems.The story is compelling, and I liked seeing Darth Vader at a stage of his life where he wasn't quite an unstoppable badass yet. It's interesting seeing the very beginnings of him accepting his new lot in life- after all, as obi wan says, he's more machine now than man. Speaking of which, the character of vader is excellent here. You get to see vader kick ass and be awesome like you always want to see him, but at the same time you see how vulnerable he is at this stage of his life, and it makes the comic much more exciting. Rather than just being a surface level explanation of where Vader gets his lightsaber, there is a sense of pain and tension as Vader struggles on his mission. Rather than just feeling like a pointless prequel, Soule gives vader a strong character arc that feels worth revisiting. The jedi master character is pretty cool too. He presents a compelling physical challenge for Vader, but I like his personality too. He's far more eager to pick a fight than most jedi, but deep down you see that his primary goal is still keeping people safe, like a good jedi should. He's not a stereotypical emotionless one dimensional good guy, he's a well rounded person, and more memorable because of that. The worldbuilding is also really great. We get to see the Inquisitorious and how that started, including all the inquisitors that appear in rebels. Not only that, we get to see the sixth brother from EK Johnson's Ahsoka novel and a brand new inquisitor. And of course, we get to see some fun new places featuring the galaxy's more common folk. THE CONCLUSION: This series is off to a promising start. Hopefully Soule can maintain the momentum he has generated and not suffer the same tragic unraveling that Kieron Gillen's Darth Vader run did. But as of this first volume, it's off to a great start with strong characterization, a compelling story, and some really juicy worldbuilding that connects to other stories in the canon and rewards those who invest in all the non-film lore that has been set up in books and TV series. Pick this up, enjoy the beginnings of one of fiction's most iconic villains, and may the dark side of the force be with you.
    more
  • Joe
    January 1, 1970
    I very enjoyable additional to Star Wars lore. This picks up right after the end of Revenge of the Sith (NOOOOOOOOOO!). Vader has his new robot body and needs to get a lightsaber and prove himself to the Emperor. This involves some Jedi fighting and general badassery that is not to be missed. This story is what I imagined the prequels would be. Make this movie guys!
    more
  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    4 ⭐SPOILER ALERT: if you haven't seen or read Revenge of the Sith, don't read this review. In fact, don't read the comic either because you're going to be spoiled BIG TIME.I was really excited to read this comic. There is a lot of time between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope, and we never really knew what happened to Darth Vader post-transition. If you watch both movie back-to-back (even if you add Rogue One in-between), it feels like Anakin immediately became this super villain without any a 4 ⭐️SPOILER ALERT: if you haven't seen or read Revenge of the Sith, don't read this review. In fact, don't read the comic either because you're going to be spoiled BIG TIME.I was really excited to read this comic. There is a lot of time between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope, and we never really knew what happened to Darth Vader post-transition. If you watch both movie back-to-back (even if you add Rogue One in-between), it feels like Anakin immediately became this super villain without any attachments, when the essence of Anakin himself is all about love and attachments. So there is a lot to cover. And this comic does it brilliantly.It begins right after the end of episode III, when Anakin wakes up in his new suit and is told by Palpatine that Padmé's dead. It's a flawless transition from the movie, and the storyline flows perfectly into his apprenticeship as a Sith.The first deed of Lord Vader (post-Jedi extinction) is to make his own lightsaber. For this, he needs to find a Jedi and take his lightsaber, then transfer his own pain into the crystal to "make it bleed" (Palpatine's words). Quite an interesting story that fits perfectly into the Star Wars world (not a surprise, since this is a Marvel comic).What I liked most in this comic is that Vader isn't already the unbeatable villain you see in the original trilogy. There is still some of Anakin left in him, and he is far from strong enough to beat a Jedi in single combat. It's his creativity and his senses that get him through that first battle as a Sith. The same creativity that saved his and Obi-Wan's asses many times during the Clones War. I was glad to see that part of Anakin still alive and the slow steps it takes for him to really become the Vader we all know.There were many double-page illustrations, with the action flowing more left to right than up to down. It was a nice change from what I usually see in comics (I don't read a lot of them, though), a refreshing new way to read it.I am looking forward to reading the next installment. Might even start buying them (which for me is a lot).
    more
  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    You know, when Marvel announced they were doing another Darth Vader series, I rolled my eyes a little. Did we really need another so soon after Gillens excellent run?But I took advantage of ComiXology having the first volume on sale for 69p to give the first volume a read and it is such a good comic. This is what I want from the Marvel Star Wars books. Some of my recent reviews of other Star Wars books have seen me moaning a lot about the art. This does not have that problem. It looks great! Cam You know, when Marvel announced they were doing another Darth Vader series, I rolled my eyes a little. Did we really need another so soon after Gillens excellent run?But I took advantage of ComiXology having the first volume on sale for 69p to give the first volume a read and it is such a good comic. This is what I want from the Marvel Star Wars books. Some of my recent reviews of other Star Wars books have seen me moaning a lot about the art. This does not have that problem. It looks great! Camuncoli is someone I'm familiar with because he's done some work on Spider-man over the years (like some of Slotts Superior run), but he's not an artist that'd make a book an instant buy for me. But he's perfectly suited to a Darth Vader book. He gets the character perfectly from his lack of facial expression most of the time to his overall body language.There's also the story itself. Set just after Revenge of the Sith, it's a period we've not seen much. There is Rebels, but I always see that as something set closer to the original trilogy than the prequels. This is set in the wake of the Jedi purge, with Palpatine even tasking Vader to find a Jedi to take his kyber crystal for his lightsaber.I think it's a good companion book to the Gillen Vader book. It has the advantage of being set early in Vaders time, he's only recently become Darth Vader in this, whereas Gillens is very much post A New Hope ultra pissed off Darth Vader.It's also one of the stronger and better additions to the recent Disney/Marvel Star Wars library.
    more
  • Will Robinson Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    The Iron fist of the Empire rules the galaxy & Charles Soule on a Star Wars quite simply rules. I was not sure what to make of this series since Marvel had already published a great Vader solo series. Even more I was not a fan of the idea of getting year one take on Vader. Boy was I wrong. I admit much of what happens in this book would have made an epic Darth Vader film. Soule captures perfectly all the pain, anger, and cruelty one might come to expect from one of the greatest villains in f The Iron fist of the Empire rules the galaxy & Charles Soule on a Star Wars quite simply rules. I was not sure what to make of this series since Marvel had already published a great Vader solo series. Even more I was not a fan of the idea of getting year one take on Vader. Boy was I wrong. I admit much of what happens in this book would have made an epic Darth Vader film. Soule captures perfectly all the pain, anger, and cruelty one might come to expect from one of the greatest villains in fiction. The artwork by Giuseppe Camuncoli crackles with energy especially in the action panels. But the most satisfying parts of this book are just watching the Emperor and Vader interact. We know the Emperor is lying to Vader and you cringe in every turn in this story as the Emperor clearly has the upper hand. This is a dark story but we do get glimpses of Vader's frailty & humanity. Ultimately Soule shows fans of old school Star Wars the Vader we know and loathe.You have pity for the cybernetic Sith Lord but but you sympathy goes out the door when you witness his unrelenting brutality on the innocent. This story carries the wait of the Star Wars canon with it as we are introduced to the Grand Inquisitor, the Sith jedi hunter that appears in the Star Wars Rebels tv series. I really enjoyed this book. I am looking forward to the next volume as well.
    more
  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    This comic picks up right where Episode III left off. Like directly. There's the whole "Noooooooooo" thing and everything. I liked seeing Vader when he is new to being a Sith. It really is Anakin under there still. Throughout the comic, that Anakin begins to fall away. I liked the mix of prequel and original trilogy aesthetic. Seeing Vader alongside clone troopers was very cool. The Grand Inquisitor even makes a cameo!I read the Dark Horse comics that took place right after Order 66 so certain a This comic picks up right where Episode III left off. Like directly. There's the whole "Noooooooooo" thing and everything. I liked seeing Vader when he is new to being a Sith. It really is Anakin under there still. Throughout the comic, that Anakin begins to fall away. I liked the mix of prequel and original trilogy aesthetic. Seeing Vader alongside clone troopers was very cool. The Grand Inquisitor even makes a cameo!I read the Dark Horse comics that took place right after Order 66 so certain aspects of this comic remind me of those. In this comic, there are jedi who took the Barash Vow prior to the Purge, so they are still out and about in the galaxy. Vader takes this opportunity to take a lightsaber and make it bleed.I really enjoyed this first volume in a new, ongoing comic series. I am absolutely excited for volume two. I give this volume a 5/5.
    more
  • Cale
    January 1, 1970
    AKA Vader: Year One. This takes up immediately after the end of Revenge of the Sith, and chronicles the early days of Vader, as he is getting his lightsaber, dealing with imperials who have no idea who he is yet, and is introduced to Palpatine's extended family of Sith (in a nice connection to a previously isolated concept from Star Wars Rebels). There are some well done action sequences here, and all of the art is pretty good (with some very good color work). Some of the stories are a little we AKA Vader: Year One. This takes up immediately after the end of Revenge of the Sith, and chronicles the early days of Vader, as he is getting his lightsaber, dealing with imperials who have no idea who he is yet, and is introduced to Palpatine's extended family of Sith (in a nice connection to a previously isolated concept from Star Wars Rebels). There are some well done action sequences here, and all of the art is pretty good (with some very good color work). Some of the stories are a little weak, although I like Vader's method of defeating one of the surviving Jedi -it's horrible but perfectly in keeping with where the character is. The whole red lightsaber explanation is... let's go with odd. Other than that, there are some good moments, but it's not a particularly powerful overall story. Still, worth a read.
    more
  • Bram Ryckaert
    January 1, 1970
    This series shows Vader as he's just starting out and he's mad as hell. This is a fun blockbuster-style action romp with little exposition and a fast pace. Camuncoli's art sells the action scenes and Soule throws some new lore into the mix. As a fan of the Clone Wars/Rebels tv shows, I appreciated how a certain group of characters got introduced later on. Add in a few Sheev appearances and you're in for a fantastic exploration of the Dark Side, with Vader on a rampage. This book has a very diffe This series shows Vader as he's just starting out and he's mad as hell. This is a fun blockbuster-style action romp with little exposition and a fast pace. Camuncoli's art sells the action scenes and Soule throws some new lore into the mix. As a fan of the Clone Wars/Rebels tv shows, I appreciated how a certain group of characters got introduced later on. Add in a few Sheev appearances and you're in for a fantastic exploration of the Dark Side, with Vader on a rampage. This book has a very different style compared to Gillen's (excellent) series, but they complement each other well. If you want to read one Star Wars comic, you can't go wrong with Vader. Soule has proven to be a worthy follow-up to Gillen.
    more
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    even though i think Charles Soule is actually a middle school kid who pretends to be an adult who writes mediocre fan fiction, the art (which is truly impressive) and the fact that it’s a fairly solid skeleton of a story taking place within a narrow timeframe helps this little Star Wars romp. Soule gives the audience an untapped slice of a time period (basically right after Anakin’s defeat/change on Mustafar) that shows us how the freshly minted Vader comes to get his light saber and gives us a even though i think Charles Soule is actually a middle school kid who pretends to be an adult who writes mediocre fan fiction, the art (which is truly impressive) and the fact that it’s a fairly solid skeleton of a story taking place within a narrow timeframe helps this little Star Wars romp. Soule gives the audience an untapped slice of a time period (basically right after Anakin’s defeat/change on Mustafar) that shows us how the freshly minted Vader comes to get his light saber and gives us a little bit about the Inquisitors. pretty good read, for a Soule book.
    more
  • Nicis
    January 1, 1970
    La historia de cómo consigue Vader su sable láser rojo luego del fin de las Guerras Clónicas. Un trocito del nuevo lore del canon (los cristales sintéticos ya no existen) y una oportunidad de ver a Vader luchando con uno de los pocos Jedi que sobreviven a la orden 66.
    more
  • Kavinay
    January 1, 1970
    Entirely different from Kieron Gillen's excellent Vader series, this is still a good book. It's basically a Vader Year 1, but far more cinematic and less intrigue oriented than the last series. The only complaint is that it's a bit straightforward: Darth is angry, people will die. But it's executed well--pardon the pun--and sets the stage for a very promising run by Soule.
    more
  • victoria.p
    January 1, 1970
    Picks up right after RotS with Palpatine being his usual terrible self and Vader choosing not to turn back from his terrible choices despite being shown it’s possible.
  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    review-https://youtu.be/tPwkbFmueSI
Write a review