Green Sun (Hanson #3)
Hanson thought he had witnessed the worst of humanity after a tour of duty in Vietnam and a stint as a cop in Oregon. Then he moves to Oakland, California to join the under-funded, understaffed police department. Hanson chooses to live - alone - in the precinct that he patrols; he, unlike the rest of the white officers, takes seriously his duty to serve and protect the black community of East Oakland.He will encounter prejudice and hate on both sides of the line... and struggle to keep true to himself against powerful opposition and personal danger. Green Sun is a raw, unflinching novel about America's divided cities and one man's divided soul.

Green Sun (Hanson #3) Details

TitleGreen Sun (Hanson #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 22nd, 2018
PublisherMulholland Books
Rating
GenreFiction, Mystery, Contemporary, Crime

Green Sun (Hanson #3) Review

  • Karl
    January 1, 1970
    In this, the third book by Kent Anderson about Hanson, who thinks of himself as a social worker with a gun, we get multiple views into his character. Like a multi-faceted fun house mirror we get glimpses from all sides of his personality.The novel “Green Sun” is set in 1983, Hanson has returned to police work as a beat cop in the economically depressed neighborhoods of East Oakland, California. In the first book 1987’s “Sympathy for the Devil” we met Hanson as a Special Forces sergeant in Vietna In this, the third book by Kent Anderson about Hanson, who thinks of himself as a social worker with a gun, we get multiple views into his character. Like a multi-faceted fun house mirror we get glimpses from all sides of his personality.The novel “Green Sun” is set in 1983, Hanson has returned to police work as a beat cop in the economically depressed neighborhoods of East Oakland, California. In the first book 1987’s “Sympathy for the Devil” we met Hanson as a Special Forces sergeant in Vietnam. Hanson’s expectations were that he would die in the war. “Sympathy for the Devil” contains some of the best prose ever written. Don’t let the war setting put you off. The book has been called one of the best books written about Vietnam and the behind the scenes occurrences that went on there.In book two, “Night Dogs” (1997), Hanson has become a cop in the North Precinct of Portland, Oregon. He has traded his Bronze Star for a policeman’s badge. Hanson fears nothing, except his own memories. He must work with men who are corrupt and some who would want to destroy him. The book does not shy away from violence. The writing is extraordinary. Now in Book three (2018) Hanson has left behind his teaching position to return to the work he knows best. He is now 38, a bit old to be a start-over cop. Life is not easy for Hanson and he must survive his probationary period. Anderson is adept at finding a terrible kind of beauty in the worst circumstances. The book is a meditation on power, violence and the intractability of pain. It is not filled with the normal clichés usually found in cop stories. Anderson makes it all feel real on all levels. Highly Recommended.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Officer Hanson walking the beat, hitting the street with no fear of dying, surviving Vietnam back from being from one danger zone to another in Oakland, and with death passing him he is making his way up the ropes to get his certificate, so that he can be a chief, a deputy of some place, a year on the street thats all he wanted to get his POST certificate: Peace Officer Standards and Training.The author evokes with great craft all that unfolds in the main protagonist Hanson's days on the streets Officer Hanson walking the beat, hitting the street with no fear of dying, surviving Vietnam back from being from one danger zone to another in Oakland, and with death passing him he is making his way up the ropes to get his certificate, so that he can be a chief, a deputy of some place, a year on the street thats all he wanted to get his POST certificate: Peace Officer Standards and Training.The author evokes with great craft all that unfolds in the main protagonist Hanson's days on the streets, his clocking in and out and trying to make enough arrests to fill his arrest quota every month. This guy is likeable, the hook in the narrative is will he see it through alive, in the narrative he believes he cannot be killed since surviving war. He brushes with various characters that may just put him up to the test, the likes of one Felix Maxwell, Oakland’s major dope dealer, who drives a Rolls-Royce and is a killer to boot, all plays out within the shoes of a character from that show and true narrative the Wire. He has offers made to him from many, from love to hush money, with some possible love interest in the wings and possibly promotion or he just saving general public from harm. As a legit man caring for people he has the reader empathically reading on in his endeavours, conflicts, and dogging bullets.The writing is top notch here, the author has a keen eye for putting you there in the scene, a time of no cctv and just before first mobiles came on to the seen, in and out on the beat becoming alive and intriguing upon the page. Officer Hanson, despite his flaws who has an ability if needed to carry out killing with precision and unflinching swiftness but chooses most times to talk people out of trouble into custody and always use gun last unless except the situation needed it, his enforcing law comes with heart, conscious, and smarts, some would hate him and some like him.The author a veteran of war and an ex-cop has written what he knows with clarity and some good writing, social commentary, and some heart in the details.Review @ https://more2read.com/review/green-sun-by-kent-anderson/
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  • Roger Royer
    January 1, 1970
    While a fascinating look into early 1980's social abuse and specifically the Oakland area and the abuse of the area by everyone there and involved in the area you find one man, our protagonist, Hansen, trying to do a job that he is not all together suited for.Alcoholic and with personal issues that put him against the grain of all around him he survives the purgatory of the book creating a character you are interested in but unsure of throughout. He is a Veteran of the Vietnam war and it's a par While a fascinating look into early 1980's social abuse and specifically the Oakland area and the abuse of the area by everyone there and involved in the area you find one man, our protagonist, Hansen, trying to do a job that he is not all together suited for.Alcoholic and with personal issues that put him against the grain of all around him he survives the purgatory of the book creating a character you are interested in but unsure of throughout. He is a Veteran of the Vietnam war and it's a part of what he is and a good part of his issues.Overall a good read and interesting if you like police dramas as well as life stories.
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  • George Lichman
    January 1, 1970
    At thirty-eight years old, Hanson finds himself the oldest cadet in the Oakland, California, Police Academy. He was a police officer in Portland for four years-a good one, he thought-before quitting to try teaching at a college in Idaho. That didn't work out, so he went to Oakland, hired sight unseen by a Lieutenant who had departed the agency before Hanson even arrived, leaving him at the mercy of a department that opposed his hiring and would do what he could to rid the Oakland PD of the old At thirty-eight years old, Hanson finds himself the oldest cadet in the Oakland, California, Police Academy. He was a police officer in Portland for four years-a good one, he thought-before quitting to try teaching at a college in Idaho. That didn't work out, so he went to Oakland, hired sight unseen by a Lieutenant who had departed the agency before Hanson even arrived, leaving him at the mercy of a department that opposed his hiring and would do what he could to rid the Oakland PD of the old recruit. But Hanson is not a quitter. GREEN SUN is the third novel by Kent Anderson about Hanson following SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL and NIGHT DOGS. It starts at the end of his teaching career in Idaho and follows him through the Oakland Police Academy and about a year as a patrol officer. Despite his antipathy for police work and the people he works with, he takes the job seriously and does his best to do it fairly, usually avoid violence, and get through his eighteen months to earn his Peace Officer Standards & Training (POST) Certificate, so he can move on to another department. "A place where…he'd be the law, an armed social worker enforcing the social contract of that particular jurisdiction. Where justice would be more important that the California Penal Code…and hell, do it without a gun…He didn't need a gun, only morons needed a gun." Hanson struggles every day with his job: the quotas, violence, and ulterior motives of his peers and supervisors."But he was an asshole, he thought. Didn't matter, just another asshole cop. Pretty soon he'd fit right in, one of the guys finally. If he'd start arresting everybody he could, pile up citations and kiss enough ass, he might make sergeant someday, or get on a special drug squad with the special assholes." Hanson doesn't want to be the asshole he thought was becoming but was not perfect. He makes arrests to keep the brass off his back, nearly succumbs to seduction, uses force, befriends a drug dealer, and is no stranger to drugs and alcohol abuse himself. He sometimes feels as if he's already dead, and therefore does not fear death, knowing it's inevitable, even while finding peace with a woman and hope in a young man he befriends in his neighborhood. GREEN SUN has an abstract feel to it, Hanson being disconnected from much of the world and himself, in a state between life and death. Some chapters read like short stories, establishing Hanson as a character and police officer, giving the reader a look at policing in the 1980s, but not otherwise moving the plot forward. In some ways, those are the chapters I enjoyed the most and found most relatable. GREEN SUN offers a vivid look into the failures of policing of the 1980s through the eyes of an imperfect but hopeful character. Set solidly in the era of the establishment of professional policing--"…standardize cops, crank them out and deploy them as interchangeable cop units." --that measured the successes in numbers of arrests and other data while minimizing the value of community policing while solidifying what became the drug war as we know it. The remnants of both of those arguably failed approaches are still being combatted today.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was going to be a police procedural, but it ended up being a meditative, episodic, philosophical, ruminative take on ethical policing that kind of reminded me of The Things They Carry by Tim O'Brien. This is a beautifully surprising novel.
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  • Jean Vaughan
    January 1, 1970
    I feel very fortunate to have received through Goodreads and the publishers Mulholland Books,an uncorrected proof copy of this novel to review.Based around the character of Hanson, a white officer in the PDO district, the tale revolves around this unconventional human in a whirlpool of prejudice between the black and white communities and criminal elements from both sides. His method of working is alien to those so-called colleagues in the department and his struggle to stay true to himself and I feel very fortunate to have received through Goodreads and the publishers Mulholland Books,an uncorrected proof copy of this novel to review.Based around the character of Hanson, a white officer in the PDO district, the tale revolves around this unconventional human in a whirlpool of prejudice between the black and white communities and criminal elements from both sides. His method of working is alien to those so-called colleagues in the department and his struggle to stay true to himself and his beliefs is utterly riveting.His love for a black woman brings it's own difficulties and dangers and his struggle with mind and matter is enthralling.Such a powerful tale, one you can't put down and bound to be a blockbuster.
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  • Jrobertus
    January 1, 1970
    The author was a Special Forces soldier in Vietnam, a police officer in Portland and Oakland, and also an English professor, screen writer and novelist. Clearly he would be an interesting dinner guest. The protagonist of this stunning novel, Hanson, is a Special Forces soldier in Vietnam vet, had been a police officer in Portland and is now working for the Oakland PD, so I guess the author knows his character. The book has received terrific reviews and they are deserved. Anderson’s writing remin The author was a Special Forces soldier in Vietnam, a police officer in Portland and Oakland, and also an English professor, screen writer and novelist. Clearly he would be an interesting dinner guest. The protagonist of this stunning novel, Hanson, is a Special Forces soldier in Vietnam vet, had been a police officer in Portland and is now working for the Oakland PD, so I guess the author knows his character. The book has received terrific reviews and they are deserved. Anderson’s writing reminds me of Michael Connelly, and that is a very good thing. Hanson clearly has issues about the brutal things he has done and is trying to figure his place in the world. Oakland is almost like Vietnam, a place of violence and misery, but Hanson does his best to see what might be good there, to protect it, and to make it better if possible. He earns the grudging respect of the biggest, meanest drug lord in town, but it is an uneasy relationship. Despite Hanson’s nihilistic tendencies, he struggles for redemption with a local woman and her half brother. The descriptive writing is strong and the story unfolds in bites-sized episodes that seem to convey the experiences of a white policeman in a largely black city. As Michael Connelly says, this is “the best of the best in American storytelling today”.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Kent Anderson is flat out a great and profound writer. I have read Sympathy For The Devil, a Viet-Nam saga, and Night Dogs, an amazing police procedural. Green Sun is a home run. Hanson is our hero if he can indeed be called a hero. The book reveals Hanson's Viet-Nam experiences along with what he encounters while on patrol in Oakland, one of the nations most difficult and crime infested cities. Here he fights AIDS, crack, and all manners of crime, punishment, and misery.What makes all the diffe Kent Anderson is flat out a great and profound writer. I have read Sympathy For The Devil, a Viet-Nam saga, and Night Dogs, an amazing police procedural. Green Sun is a home run. Hanson is our hero if he can indeed be called a hero. The book reveals Hanson's Viet-Nam experiences along with what he encounters while on patrol in Oakland, one of the nations most difficult and crime infested cities. Here he fights AIDS, crack, and all manners of crime, punishment, and misery.What makes all the difference here is how Anderson examines being police and being a vet. Hanson looks at life from both perspectives which yield a different and unique view of what it is like to be police. Green Sun is a novel that embeds itself into the reader, making it a read that is hard to forget and meaningful to remember.
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  • Joseph Hirsch
    January 1, 1970
    Kent Anderson is known primarily for two books, "Sympathy for the Devil" about his time in-country during the Vietnam War, and "Night Dogs," his book about his alter-ego Hanson's time working as a police officer trying to cope with his PTSD while patrolling the streets. Books about war and books about cops tend to draw a lot of comparisons with previous offerings in the genres, but that's not necessary when it comes to Anderson, since (based on what I've read by him) his books are a bit better t Kent Anderson is known primarily for two books, "Sympathy for the Devil" about his time in-country during the Vietnam War, and "Night Dogs," his book about his alter-ego Hanson's time working as a police officer trying to cope with his PTSD while patrolling the streets. Books about war and books about cops tend to draw a lot of comparisons with previous offerings in the genres, but that's not necessary when it comes to Anderson, since (based on what I've read by him) his books are a bit better than everyone else's. He most probably had the last word in the very lengthy conversation (more like shouting match) that was Vietnam War literature.His book "Green Sun" finds Hanson deciding to give up being a humanities professor in order to rejoin the police department. Only this time instead of working in Portland, Hanson is working the beat in Oakland, when the the city is ground-zero for the crack and AIDS epidemics. Hanson isn't so much having 'Nam flashbacks as he is discovering that existence in the ghetto is a Hobbesian nightmare and a war in its own right. One could call "Green Sun" a police procedural, but that wouldn't do it justice. Even the best typical offerings from the genre have a paint-by-numbers feel to them (re: Joseph Wambaugh) while Kent Anderson's protagonist sees the ghetto and the police department and everything else through the jungle-jade prism he picked up in Vietnam. The book has an eerie, nigh-on supernatural feel to it. "Green Sun" is not so much a page-turner, as it is a book that sort of worms its way into your consciousness. As in "Sympathy" and "Night Dogs" what makes Hanson such a fascinating character isn't that he seeks death and danger as some kind of typical "adrenaline junky." It's more his way of trying to reconnect with his friends who died in Vietnam, and to challenge a force (maybe God? maybe Death?) whose existence most people aren't really aware of. Hanson is a guy who tries to call the universe's bluff on a daily basis, and part of the suspense (and agony) in reading about his doings is seeing when or if it will all catch up with him and come crashing down. Recommended, in any case.
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  • Adrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent.
  • David C Ward
    January 1, 1970
    One of those portentous, overwritten cop novels in which the tragic/haunted/tortured/deep/wounded/misunderstood existential hero tries to navigate a society where he doesn’t fit in, in part because he’s too good for it and too tragic etc. for people to understand. Has hallucinatory dream sequences to amp up the angst and a giant black rabbit that mysteriously appears for reasons that are unclear. A symbol of something or other. Has the familiar conflict between the lone hero and the Bureaucracy. One of those portentous, overwritten cop novels in which the tragic/haunted/tortured/deep/wounded/misunderstood existential hero tries to navigate a society where he doesn’t fit in, in part because he’s too good for it and too tragic etc. for people to understand. Has hallucinatory dream sequences to amp up the angst and a giant black rabbit that mysteriously appears for reasons that are unclear. A symbol of something or other. Has the familiar conflict between the lone hero and the Bureaucracy. Just once I’d like to read a novel/see a movie in which the Suits are actually right and it’s the cowboy cops - tragic/haunted etc - who screw things up basically because they’re self absorbed numbskulls.
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  • Chris Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    Vietnam Fever Dream, sit at the infamous table,captured US soldiers, defeated hollow eyes,rocking in their chairs blink their eyes fast, sweat puddles in their boots,how they die today, Russian Roulette, Click... Cop stories saturate fiction, there is no point in the telling.Chris Roberts, God in Increments
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