The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle
From the critically acclaimed author of Waiting for Normal and All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook, Leslie Connor, comes a deeply poignant and beautifully crafted story about self-reliance, redemption, and hope.Mason Buttle is the biggest, sweatiest kid in his grade, and everyone knows he can barely read or write. Mason’s learning disabilities are compounded by grief. Fifteen months ago, Mason’s best friend, Benny Kilmartin, turned up dead in the Buttle family’s orchard. An investigation drags on, and Mason, honest as the day is long, can’t understand why Lieutenant Baird won’t believe the story Mason has told about that day.Both Mason and his new friend, tiny Calvin Chumsky, are relentlessly bullied by the other boys in their neighborhood, so they create an underground club space for themselves. When Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself in trouble again. He’s desperate to figure out what happened to Calvin, and eventually, Benny.But will anyone believe him?

The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle Details

TitleThe Truth as Told by Mason Buttle
Author
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062491497
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Mystery, Young Adult, Fiction, Juvenile

The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle Review

  • Christina Hanson
    January 1, 1970
    “You should know. There has been a lot of bad luck. Around me. Like, it follows me.” This quote perfectly sums up the young life of Mason in @heyleslieconnor’s latest book The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle..Mason stands out in his grade, not only because he is the biggest and sweatiest, but he can hardly read or write. Add to this the never-ending bullying by some neighborhood boys, his grief over the death of his best friend, Benny, a little over a year ago in Mason’s family’s orchard, and the “You should know. There has been a lot of bad luck. Around me. Like, it follows me.” This quote perfectly sums up the young life of Mason in @heyleslieconnor’s latest book The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle..Mason stands out in his grade, not only because he is the biggest and sweatiest, but he can hardly read or write. Add to this the never-ending bullying by some neighborhood boys, his grief over the death of his best friend, Benny, a little over a year ago in Mason’s family’s orchard, and the constant hounding by the local police that Mason knows more than he is telling about that tragic day. A new friendship with a boy from school, Calvin, is making everyday life a little easier for Mason, especially when the boys create a secret hideout away from the bullies. But when Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself back in a situation that’s all too familiar. Will Calvin be found or will the string of bad luck surrounding Mason continue?.A book full of courage, friendship, and hope, Mason Buttle and his story will be one that will tug at your heartstrings, and one you won’t forget for a long time. I can’t wait for you to meet him when this book is released in January 2018. 👦🏻🐶🌳🍎🎤🖥🖨📄🚓
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    Mason Buttle is a character I won't soon forget. He is bigger than most of the other seventh graders, he sweats a lot, he can't read or write well and he's relentlessly teased for all of the above. After the death of his best friend Benny he's trying to put back the pieces of his life. This is no easy feat as his family and their apple orchard are being pushed out by developers, the town lieutenant won't give up on the story of Benny's death and the mean-spirited neighbor kids will not leave him Mason Buttle is a character I won't soon forget. He is bigger than most of the other seventh graders, he sweats a lot, he can't read or write well and he's relentlessly teased for all of the above. After the death of his best friend Benny he's trying to put back the pieces of his life. This is no easy feat as his family and their apple orchard are being pushed out by developers, the town lieutenant won't give up on the story of Benny's death and the mean-spirited neighbor kids will not leave him be. But Mason persists. He keeps writing down his truths with the help of new technology in his school and the dedication of a fabulous social worker who teaches him that all these bad things are just preparation for what's to come. With his new friend Calvin and the neighbor's dog Moonie by his side, Mason starts to believe things must be turning around - until Calvin goes missing and the aftermath of that spirals into more and more truths being uncovered. The ending of this could ultimately be considered sad or tragic, but Mason's outlook surely is not. Mason and his story are courageous, full of love and hope. I'd hand this to kids grades five and up, adults and those who can't get enough of Wonder.
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  • Emily Montjoy
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Absolutely loved this heartfelt story. Mason Buttle is a character you fall in love with from the beginning. So many times I wanted to reach through the pages and hug Mason and grab a hold of the bullies who are constantly teasing him. Another book that speaks to the message of kindness and the treatment of others who are different than us. Highly recommend.
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  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Couldn’t stop reading about Mason and his incredible personal journey. This is a new favorite!
  • Alexa L
    January 1, 1970
    This book was stunning. Leslie Connor is a middle grade star. Her characters have so much depth to them. Loved it!
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusMason lives in a "crumbledown" house with his grandmother and ne'er-do-well uncle Drum after the death of his parents in quick succession. Because the family is grieving and disorganized, the family orchard has fallen into disrepair. Mason has learning disabilities (as well as a condition that makes him sweat heavily) that make him a bit slower to process information, especially when writing, and the uncle has a young live-in girlfriend who does not contribute positively E ARC from Edelweiss PlusMason lives in a "crumbledown" house with his grandmother and ne'er-do-well uncle Drum after the death of his parents in quick succession. Because the family is grieving and disorganized, the family orchard has fallen into disrepair. Mason has learning disabilities (as well as a condition that makes him sweat heavily) that make him a bit slower to process information, especially when writing, and the uncle has a young live-in girlfriend who does not contribute positively to the family dynamic. To make matters even worse, Mason's best friend, Benny, was killed falling off a ladder in the orchard, and the investigating police officer, Lieutenant Baird, believes that Mason is responsible and keeps badgering him to write an account of what happened, since Benny's two fathers are bereft. Mason is also bullied by a neighbor Matty Drinker who has his own problems. The saving graces of Mason's life are his resource room teacher Ms. Blinny, Moonie, Matty's dog whom Mason watches, and his new friend, Calvin. His friendship with Calvin starts off when the two are chased after getting off the school bus, but blossoms when the two discover an old cellar in the orchard and work to recreate cave paintings on the walls. Unfortunately, Calvin goes missing at one point, Lt. Baird thinks that Mason is responsible for his disappearance as well, and matters are brought to a boiling point before Mason and his family are able to move forward. Strengths: I love Connor's work, as did my daughter when she was in middle school. She comes up with interesting characters in unique situations, and makes their stories come alive with outstanding details. Mason is no exception. While his situation is sad, his attitude is upbeat. Ms. Blinny is fantastic, and the support that Mason gets at school is exemplary. All of the characters, whether completely pleasant or not, as fascinatingly drawn and intriguing. I enjoyed this one a lot, especially Mason's relationship with the dog, his growing friendship with Calvin, and his sad but eventually improving family situation.Weaknesses: The death of Benny, Lt. Baird's handling of it, and the eventual resolution were all SUPER sad, and perhaps a bit beyond the average middle grade reader's ability to understand. What I really think: This was a fantastic story that I will have trouble finding readers for in my library. Like VanDraanen's The Secret Life of Lincoln Jones, there are a lot of things to recommend this story, but it's a bit long and slow for the majority of my readers. Will buy a copy if I have money remaining in the budget.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    Mason is the biggest kid in his grade and it doesn’t help that he’s also the sweatiest. To make matters worse, he has dyslexia and trouble with reading and writing. His family has gone through a series of tragedies with his mother dying and then his best friend falling out of a tree house in Mason’s family orchard. Since his death, Mason has been trying to tell the police his side of the story, but he can’t write it down and the officer interrupts him and makes it all confusing. Now Mason has a Mason is the biggest kid in his grade and it doesn’t help that he’s also the sweatiest. To make matters worse, he has dyslexia and trouble with reading and writing. His family has gone through a series of tragedies with his mother dying and then his best friend falling out of a tree house in Mason’s family orchard. Since his death, Mason has been trying to tell the police his side of the story, but he can’t write it down and the officer interrupts him and makes it all confusing. Now Mason has a new best friend, one he made when running from the neighborhood bullies who throw balls and apples at them as they get off the bus. The two create a club house for themselves in an abandoned root cellar behind Mason’s house. But trouble seems to find Mason, and soon there is a a new tragedy to overcome.Connor writes books that soar and are completely heartfelt, this book is another of those. Connor looks at what grief does to a family, the time that it takes to recover and what happens when a series of incidents occur to the same family and they can’t return to normal. Still, there is hope in every day things. There is hope in the clean kitchen, NPR playing, banana milkshakes. There is hope in good dogs, new friends and people surprising you. Connor’s book shines with that hope, despite the clutter of their life, the dirt on the carpet, the laundry on the floor.Mason too shines with hope and honesty. He is an unlikely hero with his size and his sweat. And yet, readers will immediately see beyond that. They will see Mason as a friend and a source of protection and care. Readers will also figure things out well before Mason does, including the fact that he is suspected of contributing to his best friend’s death.Filled with heart and hope, this is a wonderful read. Appropriate for ages 9-12.
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  • Angie Simmonds
    January 1, 1970
    Mason Buttle is not your ordinary kid. He is big, he is sweaty and he has dyslexia so bad that he can't read and he can't write but his mind is always working. He thinks a lot about his best friend Benny. Benny died last year. Mason was the one to find him in a crumpled heap at the bottom of the tree fort they had made together. Mason was the last person to see him alive and Lieutenant Baird has questions he keeps asking Mason. Questions he doesn't believe he's getting all the answers to.Then Ma Mason Buttle is not your ordinary kid. He is big, he is sweaty and he has dyslexia so bad that he can't read and he can't write but his mind is always working. He thinks a lot about his best friend Benny. Benny died last year. Mason was the one to find him in a crumpled heap at the bottom of the tree fort they had made together. Mason was the last person to see him alive and Lieutenant Baird has questions he keeps asking Mason. Questions he doesn't believe he's getting all the answers to.Then Mason's new best friend Calvin also disappears and Lieutenant Baird comes around again with some hard questions for Mason. What does Mason know that he's not telling?I loved Mason Buttle. I loved this kid with a heart of gold and a love for the next door neighbor's dog. I loved how his mind saw feelings as colors. I loved how he tried to be so helpful but sometimes it ended up making things worse. I loved his family. His grandma with her "minnow eyes" and her quiet unassuming way. I loved his Uncle Drum who was trying to do the best he could even with a heart full of ache.This book is billed as a book for children but the feelings it invokes are ones that I don't think a younger child will understand. They will enjoy the dog parts, will empathize with the bullying Mason endures, they might even roll their eyes at Shayleen, the girl who came to live with Mason's family and never left. But the bigger emotions, especially at the end of the story are best appreciated by a bigger person. I enjoyed this book immensely. It even brought a tear when the story unfolded. Definitely one to read, and if you do share it with your middle grader, please talk about it with them!
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Mason Buttle is a fascinating boy with a story to tell if only he could. There are many obstacles impeding his voice and deciphering them is the reader’s task. The author uses these challenges intentionally to build mystery and awareness for complexity and diversity throughout the story. The complex issues include: learning and physical disabilities and challenges, anxieties and fears, accidents and sudden deaths of parents and best friends, and financial diversity including poverty. There is am Mason Buttle is a fascinating boy with a story to tell if only he could. There are many obstacles impeding his voice and deciphering them is the reader’s task. The author uses these challenges intentionally to build mystery and awareness for complexity and diversity throughout the story. The complex issues include: learning and physical disabilities and challenges, anxieties and fears, accidents and sudden deaths of parents and best friends, and financial diversity including poverty. There is ample discussion of bullying, both of children, a mother and a pet. The lead character is allowed to think clearly as a narrator but is challenged as a speaker and reader/writer; these are inconsistencies that create a great story but lack credibility. It is for these reasons, the narrator’s voice and the serious issues raised, that I consider this a YA book and not a MG book. It could be an older MG book with adequate supervision and discussion. This is an outstanding book. Once I started it, I could not put it down. Frankly, I think it would make an excellent adult book; the themes within it are complex and presented in creative and amazing ways. I received my copy from the publisher through edelweiss.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this through Edelweiss. Mason Buttle has been dealt a terrible hand. His father left when he was young, his mother is dead, he suffers from a disease that makes him sweat severely and must cope with learning disabilities. Even though his life is hard, Mason looks for the positive side of life and continues to be a ray of sunshine. Two years ago, his best friend died under mysterious circumstances and Mason was the last to see him alive. The police would like Mason to give as much info I received this through Edelweiss. Mason Buttle has been dealt a terrible hand. His father left when he was young, his mother is dead, he suffers from a disease that makes him sweat severely and must cope with learning disabilities. Even though his life is hard, Mason looks for the positive side of life and continues to be a ray of sunshine. Two years ago, his best friend died under mysterious circumstances and Mason was the last to see him alive. The police would like Mason to give as much information about that day, but he has difficulties reading and writing. With the help of a voice to text software, Mason works on telling his story and fitting the puzzle pieces together from that day. Even though Mason is bullied to the extreme, he still makes friends and learn how to stand up for himself. This was a wonderfully written novel. The characters were fantastic and well-developed. Connor's unique voice shines through and makes this an enjoyable, but heart-wrenching read.
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  • The Reading Countess
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: I'm a fan of Leslie Connor. Her Waiting for Normal and All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook (the latter title being a book club selection for my middle graders in which we Skyped with her a few years ago) give windows into worlds for our readers that a large portion, through the grace of God, will not experience. But these complicated characters also reflect back in many of our readers an honest truth (no pun intended) for our kids and a #metoo sense of acceptance that they Full disclosure: I'm a fan of Leslie Connor. Her Waiting for Normal and All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook (the latter title being a book club selection for my middle graders in which we Skyped with her a few years ago) give windows into worlds for our readers that a large portion, through the grace of God, will not experience. But these complicated characters also reflect back in many of our readers an honest truth (no pun intended) for our kids and a #metoo sense of acceptance that they desperately need. And let's not forget about the empathy building that her books bring forth. Our world can definitely use readers who outgrow themselves after closing their books, you know.The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle does not disappoint in any of the areas that I've come to expect from Leslie Connor. She is inexplicably able to create characters that are in turn both seemingly different from the mass population, but also so uniquely human that you can't help but love and root for them. I loved the entire Buttle clan and recognized the hurt and longing associated with rapid fire loss. I adored the many layers that Calvin possessed, wept for Benny's dads, wondered about the lack of parental boundaries going on with Matt's mom, cheered for the safe space Ms. Blinny created for Mason and for all the kids in the school library, and wanted to punch Lieutenant Baird's lights out on more than one occasion-but not as much or as often as those thoughtless boys, especially Matt. And let's not forget the love that a boy has with his dog, even if it IS a borrowed one. Ah, yes, Moonie. We all want (and need) a Moonie in our lives.Tell you what. Don't take my word for it. Check out The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle when it is released later this month. You won't be sorry. Leslie's writing style is pitch perfect for this novel; Mason's simplistic, often disjointed voice rings through loud and clear making this a page-turner from the first to the last word. And oh, what strong last words Leslie Connor leaves in our hearts, too. "Knowing what you love is smart.”
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  • Sarah Peddicord
    January 1, 1970
    Mason is the tallest, sweatiest kid in his grade. He struggles to read and write because the letters blur and change. Mason feels like trouble is all around him after his best friend Benny dies. Redemption is coming in the form of a new friend Calvin. Question continue coming from Llieutenant Baird. It seems like trouble and hope battle for Mason's future. I love Mason. He is charming, brave and loyal. His voice is the voice of many students. One of my favorite parts of reading this story was wa Mason is the tallest, sweatiest kid in his grade. He struggles to read and write because the letters blur and change. Mason feels like trouble is all around him after his best friend Benny dies. Redemption is coming in the form of a new friend Calvin. Question continue coming from Llieutenant Baird. It seems like trouble and hope battle for Mason's future. I love Mason. He is charming, brave and loyal. His voice is the voice of many students. One of my favorite parts of reading this story was watching Mason realize the power of his story. Also, the unrelenting love of Moonie. I highly recommend carving out time to read this new release.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for an ARC of this forthcoming book.What a wonderful contribution to middle grade literature. This book is a treasure. In a time when many tend to think the worst of their fellow man, along comes Mason Buttle. He has many obstacles in his life yet he treats others with empathy and show wisdom beyond his years. We are given a front row seat in Mason's day-to-day experiences and see every bit from his perspective. Leslie Connor has done a fantastic job in Thank you to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for an ARC of this forthcoming book.What a wonderful contribution to middle grade literature. This book is a treasure. In a time when many tend to think the worst of their fellow man, along comes Mason Buttle. He has many obstacles in his life yet he treats others with empathy and show wisdom beyond his years. We are given a front row seat in Mason's day-to-day experiences and see every bit from his perspective. Leslie Connor has done a fantastic job in telling this story for Mason while helping us to see his struggles and triumphs in such an authentic way. We can all learn from Mason Buttle. Highly recommended!
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  • Julia Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Really great new middle-grade novel coming in January. Mason is big, sweaty and everyone knows he can barely read or write. He's also a great friend and has a very interesting family. He's still morning the loss of his best friend Benny Kilmartin, who died in an accident in the Buttle orchard. He has a new friend, tiny Calvin Chomsky. They boys are both chased by the school bullies but they have better things to think about. They are building an underground hideout. Connor captures the character Really great new middle-grade novel coming in January. Mason is big, sweaty and everyone knows he can barely read or write. He's also a great friend and has a very interesting family. He's still morning the loss of his best friend Benny Kilmartin, who died in an accident in the Buttle orchard. He has a new friend, tiny Calvin Chomsky. They boys are both chased by the school bullies but they have better things to think about. They are building an underground hideout. Connor captures the characters beautifully.
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  • Ruth Ann
    January 1, 1970
    First-rate. Great characters with a plot that doesn't back away from hard topics like bullying, change, grief, and death. I love that the author shows that loving families come in a variety of shapes and I especially enjoyed how the author captured the important role a loving pet has in making life full of "pink" (joy and happiness).
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  • Ann Dague
    January 1, 1970
    Very thoughtful book, with a wonderful perspective of several children with special needs, but done in a very respectful and heartwarming way. Children and adults alike will enjoy this uplifting story. Recommend for grades 3 to 6.
  • Sandy O'Brien
    January 1, 1970
    “Happens every month. The lieutenant has questions. He is looking for answers. But he doesn’t like mine.” Mason Buttle is struggling with the death of a friend along with a disappearance of another. This books breaks your heart and mends it together again. #MustRead ‪“Happens every month. The lieutenant has questions. He is looking for answers. But he doesn’t like mine.” Mason Buttle is struggling with the death of a friend along with a disappearance of another. This books breaks your heart and mends it together again. #MustRead
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  • Cheyenne Hixson
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars.https://cheyennereads.wordpress.com/2...
  • Nichole
    January 1, 1970
    I really love Mason ! And this book was such a wonderful read 😃
  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    Leslie Conno is one of my favorite authors, and here is one more reason why. For every middle school, and every elementary school that goes up to grade 6.
  • Scott Fillner
    January 1, 1970
    Captivating story about a character you will just love!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    EARC provided by EdelweissJust as she did with Perry T. Cook, this author has created a character readers can't help but love. Middle grade teachers will want to add this to their libraries.
  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Leslie Connor for sharing a copy of The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle with #bookexcursion! All opinions are my own.Mason Buttle is a loveable, curious, kind, loyal, large, literal, and sweaty seventh grader. Despite experiencing great loss in his life and facing bullying from his peers, he has found some things that work for him: the structure of routine and the safety of the SWOOF - the social worker's office at his school. Mason is still grieving the loss of his friend Benny, wh Thank you to Leslie Connor for sharing a copy of The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle with #bookexcursion! All opinions are my own.Mason Buttle is a loveable, curious, kind, loyal, large, literal, and sweaty seventh grader. Despite experiencing great loss in his life and facing bullying from his peers, he has found some things that work for him: the structure of routine and the safety of the SWOOF - the social worker's office at his school. Mason is still grieving the loss of his friend Benny, whose death under mysterious circumstances is under investigation. When Mason starts to make a new friend, will he be able to keep remembering the friend he lost? Or will the lingering questions cause his new friendship to fail?I am an enormous fan of Leslie Connor's books, and The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle is no exception. Leslie has such a talent for giving a voice to the types of characters that wouldn't otherwise have one. Leslie's books always leave readers feeling like they have a responsibility to listen to the stories of others. I can't wait for this book to make its way into the hands of upper middle grade readers. Definitely a perfect fit for upper middle school and high school bookshelves!
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