Royal City, Vol. 1
In his most ambitious and most personal project to date, JEFF LEMIRE spins the captivating and engaging story of a family from the small factory town of ROYAL CITY and the ghosts that haunt them. In a return to the literary and thematic territory of Lemire's breakthrough graphic novel ESSEX COUNTY, ROYAL CITY follows Patrick Pike, a fading literary star who reluctantly returns to the once-thriving factory town where he grew up. Patrick is quickly drawn back into the dramas of his two adult siblings, his overbearing Mother and his brow beaten Father, all of whom are still haunted by different versions of his youngest brother, Tommy, who drowned decades ago. As each member of the family struggles to keep themselves above water, it quickly becomes clear that Tommy's death isn't the only dark secret tearing the town, and this family, apart at the seams. Can each member of the Pike family come to terms with their own guilt over Tommy's death, and make peace with the many versions of Tommy that still haunt them, or will they all be dragged down below the river along with his lingering ghost? ROYAL CITY promises to be a sprawling, serialized graphic novel that will chart the lives, loves and losses of a troubled family and a vanishing town, across three decades. Jeff Lemire is the creator of DESCENDER (with DUSTIN NGUYEN), AD: AFTER DEATH (with SCOTT SNYDER), ROUGHNECK, SECRET PATH (with Gord Downie), PLUTONA (with EMI LENNOX), ESSEX COUNTY, SWEET TOOTH, TRILLIUM, and THE UNDERWATER WELDER. He had also written celebrated stories featuring Green Arrow, Animal Man, Bloodshot, Wolverine, Hawkeye, Teen Titans, the Valiant, the X-Men and Inhumans for the major comic book publishers. Collecting issues 1 through 5.

Royal City, Vol. 1 Details

TitleRoyal City, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534302624
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics, Family

Royal City, Vol. 1 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    The fractured Pike family are brought back together to the dying industrial town of Royal City when the elderly patriarch, Peter, suffers a stroke. But they also have another shared commonality: dead Tommy Pike, drowned at age 14, who haunts each of the family in his own way. In this time of crisis, the family must finally confront their dark past. But is Tommy somehow still alive…? Jeff Lemire’s new Image ongoing, Royal City, is being sold as a sequel of sorts to his critically acclaimed modern The fractured Pike family are brought back together to the dying industrial town of Royal City when the elderly patriarch, Peter, suffers a stroke. But they also have another shared commonality: dead Tommy Pike, drowned at age 14, who haunts each of the family in his own way. In this time of crisis, the family must finally confront their dark past. But is Tommy somehow still alive…? Jeff Lemire’s new Image ongoing, Royal City, is being sold as a sequel of sorts to his critically acclaimed modern masterpiece, Essex County. Ehhh… no! It’s not nearly as good but it’s not bad either. Lemire does a fine job of introducing the familial cast: Pat the frustrated novelist, struggling to follow up his bestselling first book; his little brother, Richie, the drunk fuckup; Tara, his sister and local businesswoman attempting to rejuvenate Royal City’s faded glory; and Patti, the matriarch, bitter, sad, and with secrets of her own. We get a strong sense of each character and they all get a decent storyline. I also liked the supernatural Tommy element. You don’t exactly know whether Tommy’s real or not - is he a metaphor for the family’s guilt/trauma or is he a ghost? - or what happened to him way back when, so it’s a consistently intriguing aspect of the story. Rather than Essex County, Royal City reads more like Lemire’s more recent Dark Horse series Black Hammer, in that the story is heavily soap opera-cheesy. There wasn’t enough going on for me story-wise to say I loved reading it and what was going on had me rolling my eyes: the affairs, troubled marriages galore, the forced drama between siblings, particularly the resentment between Pat and Richie. And that pseudo-cliffhanger final page - I could practically hear the opening drums to the Eastenders theme tune! I don’t know why Lemire’s currently fixated on this hokey family saga crap or whether he’s just not that good at executing the sort of drama he’s aiming for, but I wasn’t taken with what he did here (or in Black Hammer either). Art-wise, Lemire’s settled into a comfortable groove where he’s not doing anything different from his usual style. It looks like it’s always looked but his colours this time around are a bit more vibrant and interesting. Don’t get me wrong: the first volume of Royal City is perfectly readable and held my attention, it’s just that the overall effect isn’t that impressive, memorable or unique, and the Essex County comparison really doesn’t help either. Underwhelming, slightly unsatisfying, but mostly ok, don’t expect too much from Royal City.
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  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    The elderly father of the Pike family has a stroke, bringing his family together for the first time in years. As they gather in the dead industrial town of Royal City, the past rears its ugly head reminding them of a terrible event that happened and left them permanently emotionally scarred… Royal City is kind of a throwback for Jeff Lemire to his Essex County days, the comic that made his career. And it’s not bad but it’s also not as good as Essex County was. This bumper 50-page first issue int The elderly father of the Pike family has a stroke, bringing his family together for the first time in years. As they gather in the dead industrial town of Royal City, the past rears its ugly head reminding them of a terrible event that happened and left them permanently emotionally scarred… Royal City is kind of a throwback for Jeff Lemire to his Essex County days, the comic that made his career. And it’s not bad but it’s also not as good as Essex County was. This bumper 50-page first issue introduces us to the disparate members of the Pike family. There’s Pat, the author who lives out of town; Tara, the businesswoman who stayed and is trying to rejuvenate Royal City; Richie, the deadbeat brother; and Patti, their bitter mother. It’s a generic family saga and would be unremarkable except for the haunting layer their brother Tommy brings when he appears… Lemire’s art is Lemire’s art – I feel like most people have decided where they sit with it at this point. I don’t mind it but I don’t love it either. The colours are pleasant and there are a couple of interesting, surreal splash pages. Royal City feels less like the Essex County comics to me and more like Seth’s Palookaville series, but livelier (though not much more!): small, quiet town in the middle of nowhere, tense family relationships, melancholic, wistful tone. I think if you like Palookaville and/or Lemire’s books Essex County, Lost Dogs and The Nobody, you’ll probably find Royal City #1 somewhat enjoyable, though, while it’s an ok beginning, I wouldn’t say it’s as compelling as any of them – yet. Maybe it’ll reach that level of quality as the story unfolds?
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  • Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    Dark, tender, and brilliant, Royal City embodies the soul of tragedy and regret among family. The story delves into the bitter drama and dark past of this family. Each is dealing with demons of their own: failure, divorce, infertility, addiction, loneliness, cynicism. And they are all haunted by the year 1993. What’s apparent is Lemire’s self-awareness, reflecting upon his own life, his successes and failures, and his own mortality. It’s about childhood and the existential pains of growing up, d Dark, tender, and brilliant, Royal City embodies the soul of tragedy and regret among family. The story delves into the bitter drama and dark past of this family. Each is dealing with demons of their own: failure, divorce, infertility, addiction, loneliness, cynicism. And they are all haunted by the year 1993. What’s apparent is Lemire’s self-awareness, reflecting upon his own life, his successes and failures, and his own mortality. It’s about childhood and the existential pains of growing up, death and the way that death takes on a life of its own. Don’t deny yourself a deep and introspective reading experience because of dark subject matter. This may be Lemire’s best indie work yet. As usual, the artwork borders on the surreal, with the subtle watercolors and painterly lines. Lemire really seems to have mastered his own style: cartoony and stylized, yet emotive and immersive. It’s like reading Saturday comics, which I’ve said before, but they’re so powerful and sparse they could make you cry. And I really mean that. Don’t pass this up. While Lemire has a distinct and unusual art style, and a somewhat melancholic, introspective writing style, it’s smart, different, and better than his already great other works.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    Royal City is a new series by Jeff Lemire that harkens back to his Essex County days. No sci fi element, (I think). It’s a family story, set in a small town, Royal City, where Dad has had a stroke. This is the first issue, but it is a 50 page issue, so it’s substantial for a single issue. In it we meet the Pike family: Mom, Dad, Pat (the narrator of the story); Tara, a corporate type; Richie, the drunk. The most powerful aspect of this issue is the variously aged images of Tommy who appears thro Royal City is a new series by Jeff Lemire that harkens back to his Essex County days. No sci fi element, (I think). It’s a family story, set in a small town, Royal City, where Dad has had a stroke. This is the first issue, but it is a 50 page issue, so it’s substantial for a single issue. In it we meet the Pike family: Mom, Dad, Pat (the narrator of the story); Tara, a corporate type; Richie, the drunk. The most powerful aspect of this issue is the variously aged images of Tommy who appears throughout. This feels a little surreal, as if a ghost were continuously present. And could be, we'll find out.I am as familiar and comfortable with Lemire’s art as I would be with anything I know in comics. I know it from Essex County and Underwater Welder through Sweet Tooth and Trillium and so much more. I really like this guy’s heart, evident in the story and art. It’s got heartache written all the way through it. I am in for the second issue and beyond.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    Royal City, (volume one), is set in a small bleak town (one bit of graffiti has it “Royal Shitty”) and features a bleak family who it seems has been falling apart since their brother Tommy died in 1993. But each family member is still visited by Tommy in various ways. The occasion for the book is Dad’s stroke; he’s just had another fight with his wife, and he thinks he hears Tommy’s voice on the radio. While Dad is in a coma, we get backstory on the rest of the family, though our main character Royal City, (volume one), is set in a small bleak town (one bit of graffiti has it “Royal Shitty”) and features a bleak family who it seems has been falling apart since their brother Tommy died in 1993. But each family member is still visited by Tommy in various ways. The occasion for the book is Dad’s stroke; he’s just had another fight with his wife, and he thinks he hears Tommy’s voice on the radio. While Dad is in a coma, we get backstory on the rest of the family, though our main character is Patrick, a struggling novelist who is failing to write his story of Tommy, entitled Royal City. Of course Patrick’s marriage to a film actress is falling apart, as his wife is having an affair. Little brother Richie would just seem to be a drunk., who owes a gang 2K. Sister Tara’s negotiating a deal to end the family business, where her (estranged, of course) husband works, and is trying to get a union going to oppose her. Sound like too much fun? It would appear the town and family are cursed. But I am engaged with this family. I want to see what the thread is that will unravel all this despair. They are stuck in 1993, but why, and how to get out of it?Royal City, for Lemire, approaches the introspective territory of his Essex County, seen through the lens of writer stand-in Patrick. Will the family come together and support each other? Can each of them find redemption? Family, and father-son stories, are the best of Lemire’s work, a touchstone to which he always returns. There is a lot of heart in this story, and a measure of hope underneath it all.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    It's difficult to explain this without giving away too much. I think one thing at least, in the author's note Lemire explains his fear of people calling this "slice-of-life" (because he thinks both retailers and readers see those as boring) ...>immediately shelves on slice-of-life shelf<but really, that's kind of what this is. (Slice-of-life, not boring.)I might just be more accepting of slice-of-life because it has a HUGE presence in manga and anime. If he doesn't want it called that, "ma It's difficult to explain this without giving away too much. I think one thing at least, in the author's note Lemire explains his fear of people calling this "slice-of-life" (because he thinks both retailers and readers see those as boring) ...>immediately shelves on slice-of-life shelf<but really, that's kind of what this is. (Slice-of-life, not boring.)I might just be more accepting of slice-of-life because it has a HUGE presence in manga and anime. If he doesn't want it called that, "magical realism" might be a better category. Although I think magical realism tends to be somewhat girly (Lifetime, chick-lit, etc.) and this series is not.Also, this title is another one in watercolor! It's not the same artist as Descender though the series share an author, but I still enjoy something being handmade.Now that we have a bit of foundation for the story, I'm intrigued at how it might continue.solid 3.5
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    In what seems like a trademark for Lemire, this new series is a pensive, melancholy family drama that examines regret, death, relationships and reckoning with the past. It follows the Pike family as they deal with the near-death stroke of the family patriarch, while each family member is haunted by the youngest brother Tommy, who drowned in an accident, something the family has never gotten over.Once again, Lemire is so efficient here in his visual storytelling, that it packs more of a punch in In what seems like a trademark for Lemire, this new series is a pensive, melancholy family drama that examines regret, death, relationships and reckoning with the past. It follows the Pike family as they deal with the near-death stroke of the family patriarch, while each family member is haunted by the youngest brother Tommy, who drowned in an accident, something the family has never gotten over.Once again, Lemire is so efficient here in his visual storytelling, that it packs more of a punch in it's 160 pages than many of the prose books I've read this year. It's very cinematic in the way he uses imagery and this juxtaposition of said images. The whole graphic novel has a beautiful structure. I love the way each family member interacts with Tommy in a way that they each would prefer to remember him; in ways that suit their present predicament. In a way, it reminded me a lot of one of my favorite TV shows: the HBO classic Six Feet Under, in it's magical realism and in the way it approached tragedy. So if you enjoyed that show, you will love this one: yet another memorable piece of art by Jeff Lemire, and one of the best graphic novels this year.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes I read comics to go on huge fantasies. Sometimes I read them to be in the boots of a superhero. And SOMETIMES I read them to get a bit of slice of life stories. Sometimes I can't connect but I'm glad to say Royal City hits all the right marks. Royal City is really about a shitty little town that connects a family in different ways. Patrick is the "main" character, and I say main because his whole family gets a good amount of character development, and he comes back to town after his fa Sometimes I read comics to go on huge fantasies. Sometimes I read them to be in the boots of a superhero. And SOMETIMES I read them to get a bit of slice of life stories. Sometimes I can't connect but I'm glad to say Royal City hits all the right marks. Royal City is really about a shitty little town that connects a family in different ways. Patrick is the "main" character, and I say main because his whole family gets a good amount of character development, and he comes back to town after his father has a stroke. See, each member of the family sees their little brother Tommy in different forms. Forms they remember him best by and they all talk to him as if he was there. At first it's slightly jarring but once you get into what each family member is dealing with it all makes sense. Good: I fucking LOVED Patrick. His internal struggle + conversations with everyone came off so well done I can't help but connect. Especially since he's a writer and he's stuck on what to actually write. So true. Also, love the sister in here and her fight with her husband was near perfect. The mom storyline is also tragic and watching her slowly breakdown is cry worthy. Bad: I didn't love the last family member's storyline. Just a typical fuck up who owes some local gang money and now is in trouble. I just couldn't connect to this one character. Overall Royal City hits on almost every note. To have multiple interesting characters and pick up steam as it goes really is something special. I hope this series continues to be as good as it started. A 4 out of 5!
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    A new indie comic written and illustrated by Jeff Lemire is always a good thing in my book. He may be a big shot superhero comics writer nowadays, but his more grounded, down to earth indie comics were always his best, and I'm happy to say that Royal City is a welcome return to form. It doesn't quite match the emotional peaks of the brilliant Essex County, but is still a very good story in its own way. Recommended to anyone who's into family dramas and complicated relationships, and of course to A new indie comic written and illustrated by Jeff Lemire is always a good thing in my book. He may be a big shot superhero comics writer nowadays, but his more grounded, down to earth indie comics were always his best, and I'm happy to say that Royal City is a welcome return to form. It doesn't quite match the emotional peaks of the brilliant Essex County, but is still a very good story in its own way. Recommended to anyone who's into family dramas and complicated relationships, and of course to every fan of Lemire's books like Essex County, Underwater Welder and The Nobody.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Not a terrible series by any means but I just found the whole thing kind of depressing and uncomfortable to read. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5Total review score: 2.4
  • OV
    January 1, 1970
    Um dia hão-de faltar-me palavras para adjetivar o trabalho do Jeff Lemire. Hoje em dia direi apenas que é um autor espantoso. Royal City – Volume 1 foi a obra dele que mais me surpreendeu, talvez por não ter lido nada sobre ela. Sou fã da arte dele, não é segredo, mas foi a história que me arrebatou por completo.No primeiro capítulo deste volume – composto por cinco capítulos – podemos acompanhar cada um dos membros desta família, depois do seu patriarca ter sofrido um AVC – há a mãe, dois filho Um dia hão-de faltar-me palavras para adjetivar o trabalho do Jeff Lemire. Hoje em dia direi apenas que é um autor espantoso. Royal City – Volume 1 foi a obra dele que mais me surpreendeu, talvez por não ter lido nada sobre ela. Sou fã da arte dele, não é segredo, mas foi a história que me arrebatou por completo.No primeiro capítulo deste volume – composto por cinco capítulos – podemos acompanhar cada um dos membros desta família, depois do seu patriarca ter sofrido um AVC – há a mãe, dois filhos e uma filha. Durante este capítulo, o autor escolhe semear alguma confusão no leitor, não deixando perceber de imediato de que se trata a história.À medida que a narrativa decorre – inteligentemente pensada, mais uma vez – as peças vão-se encaixando e compreendemos do que se trata este livro, de como todos lidamos de forma diferente com os acontecimentos da nossa vida – neste caso um acontecimento comum a todos eles, e não estou a falar do AVC do pai – e como os encaramos, como os entendemos, como escolhemos vê-los.Não sei que caminho vai seguir a história, mas até ver é fantástica, muito bem escrita, uma narrativa gráfica extraordinária, intimista, complexa, metafórica, densa…e com personagens muito bem construídas e com muito mais camadas do que aparentam ao primeiro quadradinho. Não é das obras mais referenciadas do Lemire, até porque é das mais recentes, mas vale tanto a pena. Recomendadíssima.
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  • Cheese
    January 1, 1970
    I was waiting for some kind of twist, but no just really boring.
  • Tink Magoo is bad at reviews
    January 1, 1970
    This was like a gritty mildly depressing family soap opera. The beginning was slightly confusing, especially since I didn't fully read the synopsis, but the more I read the more I started to enjoy it and I love the illustration style."I'm at the point where I've stopped thinking about who I can be and started to realize that this is who I am.Let's face it, I'm nothing. I'm a fraud, a pretender."
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Lemire returns to his more introspective roots. The story of a family whose patriarch has a stroke. Each family member's life is falling apart and they've never fully recovered from their youngest brother dying years ago. They all still talk to him and see him as they viewed him years ago. I wasn't the biggest fan of the depressing subject matter.Received an advance copy from Image and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    This isn't a happy and funny comic. There are no superheroes nor is there any global threat or space invasion of any kind. There are no monsters, mutants, vibranium or adamantium. there are, however, villains. Bad people. People you wouldn't want to trust or even get to know.Royal City is an everyday comic story. What some would call, Slice Of Life. It is a drama revolving around a fucked up family in a place called Royal City.Jeff Lemire has written (and is writing) some fantastic stuff...the g This isn't a happy and funny comic. There are no superheroes nor is there any global threat or space invasion of any kind. There are no monsters, mutants, vibranium or adamantium. there are, however, villains. Bad people. People you wouldn't want to trust or even get to know.Royal City is an everyday comic story. What some would call, Slice Of Life. It is a drama revolving around a fucked up family in a place called Royal City.Jeff Lemire has written (and is writing) some fantastic stuff...the guy is a machine that is working on so many projects right now that I can't keep track of everything he is up to these days.Royal City, for me, is classic Lemire. I love Descender #1 and Black Hammer #1 but this book is more reminiscent of Lemire's older work like Essex County or his new graphic novel, Roughneck. It is a story about normal people dealing with normal problems. It's sad, it can be depressing, and it can wear you down with the realization of how people can be right fucking assholes sometimes.But you know what? It's freaking fabulous. It's real life - and while I most certainly read to escape real life...sometimes it can be pretty darn entertaining to take a peek at how shitty someone else's life is - which in turn can make you feel a little bit better with your own current lot in things.Royal City is definitely a comic I look forward to reading each and every month and now that the book is on break until October it means that there is a trade coming out sometime soon. If you haven't yet read this and are interested...now is the time to jump on board.
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  • Derek Royal
    January 1, 1970
    Going back to reread this series, partly to refresh myself on the story and partly to remind myself just how good this series is. This is Jeff Lemire at his best, and the kind of story that he thrives in. One of the best of 2017!
  • Elizabeth A
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of the author, was looking forward to diving into this new graphic novel series, and it's really good. This is the story of a small town family; one that has a tragedy in their past. Everyone deals with life events differently, and this family is no different. It took me a little while to figure out what was going on, and when things clicked, whoa nelly! Do not read the summaries, trust the journey the author takes you on, and let things unfold at their own pace. I read this one severa I'm a fan of the author, was looking forward to diving into this new graphic novel series, and it's really good. This is the story of a small town family; one that has a tragedy in their past. Everyone deals with life events differently, and this family is no different. It took me a little while to figure out what was going on, and when things clicked, whoa nelly! Do not read the summaries, trust the journey the author takes you on, and let things unfold at their own pace. I read this one several weeks ago, but have thought about it ever since. I look forward to seeing how this story plays out in the next installment.
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  • Tom Ewing
    January 1, 1970
    A middle-American family saga with the fortune (or misfortune) to come out just when getting into the head of middle America and its decline seemed an urgent task. Not that Royal City is heavy on the politics - one storyline tackles rust-belt economics head-on, but generally this is a character piece, with a dysfunctional family brought back together when its unhappy, passive father suffers a stroke.Dad, Mom and their three kids are all haunted by the memory of a fourth child, who died twenty-od A middle-American family saga with the fortune (or misfortune) to come out just when getting into the head of middle America and its decline seemed an urgent task. Not that Royal City is heavy on the politics - one storyline tackles rust-belt economics head-on, but generally this is a character piece, with a dysfunctional family brought back together when its unhappy, passive father suffers a stroke.Dad, Mom and their three kids are all haunted by the memory of a fourth child, who died twenty-odd years before the story opens - Jeff Lemire actualises this with a device I don’t think you could properly pull off in any non-comics medium, and the surreal, eerie touches it enables help give life to what might otherwise be a rather rote story. This is a book full of beaten-down characters with knotty, deep-rooted problems, and Lemire’s trademark lined and miserable faces are a great fit for it. That said, I still find his figure-work a bit stiff, and the same goes for the soapier end of the dialogue.(Readers in trade will miss the lovingly compiled playlists of indie rock at the end of each issue. Whether that’s a bug or a bonus is up to you.)
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  • Travis Duke
    January 1, 1970
    Lemire creates another solid story revolving around family and relationship. I don't think this is the strongest story he has done in these "family style" books but it is still good. Royal city focuses on the struggles of a pretty average family that are shaken up as their father suffers a stroke. Like his other books there is a "ghost" element that I won't spoil but it is written well. I thought the inner relationships could of had more impact or meaning but I am only comparing this to Lemire's Lemire creates another solid story revolving around family and relationship. I don't think this is the strongest story he has done in these "family style" books but it is still good. Royal city focuses on the struggles of a pretty average family that are shaken up as their father suffers a stroke. Like his other books there is a "ghost" element that I won't spoil but it is written well. I thought the inner relationships could of had more impact or meaning but I am only comparing this to Lemire's other works like essex county or roughneck. I am glad he added color to this book, it helps the art a lot. I wish underwater welder had color but oh well. I will keep reading Lemire until the cows come home.
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  • Stewart Tame
    January 1, 1970
    Nice! This is Lemire back in Essex County mode. He’s done so many other series since then that I’d almost forgotten how well he writes ordinary people. Elderly Peter Pike suffers a mild stroke which leaves him in the hospital in stable condition but unconscious. As sons and daughters and his wife visit, we are introduced to a cast of flawed characters. The Pike family share a tragic past: young Tommy Pike, who apparently drowned back in 1993. The setting itself, Royal City, is almost a character Nice! This is Lemire back in Essex County mode. He’s done so many other series since then that I’d almost forgotten how well he writes ordinary people. Elderly Peter Pike suffers a mild stroke which leaves him in the hospital in stable condition but unconscious. As sons and daughters and his wife visit, we are introduced to a cast of flawed characters. The Pike family share a tragic past: young Tommy Pike, who apparently drowned back in 1993. The setting itself, Royal City, is almost a character in its own right. It's a city in decline, the sort of place that Ben Katchor or Seth could wax lyrical about. This series is moody and spare and just plain gorgeous. Too early to tell where it's all going, but this is a promising beginning. Recommended!
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  • Eleni (OverThePlace)
    January 1, 1970
    Τον Jeff Lemire γνώρισα μέσα από το Essex County, ένα ασπρόμαυρο λιγομίλητο saga μιας οικογένειας με φόντο τον άγριο τόπο του Καναδά. Τον ξανασυνάντησα (και λάτρεψα) με το Sweet Tooth, ένα από τα καλύτερα και πιο σκοτεινά dystopian stories που έχω διαβάσει ποτέ, και τώρα, μετά από τόσα χρόνια που αφιέρωσε σε σουπερηρωικά comics, επέστρεψε και πάλι με μία βαθιά προσωπική ιστορία, το Royal City. Παρέα με την Image, δημιούργησε (γράφοντας και σχεδιάζοντας) ένα serialised comic για την οικογένεια τω Τον Jeff Lemire γνώρισα μέσα από το Essex County, ένα ασπρόμαυρο λιγομίλητο saga μιας οικογένειας με φόντο τον άγριο τόπο του Καναδά. Τον ξανασυνάντησα (και λάτρεψα) με το Sweet Tooth, ένα από τα καλύτερα και πιο σκοτεινά dystopian stories που έχω διαβάσει ποτέ, και τώρα, μετά από τόσα χρόνια που αφιέρωσε σε σουπερηρωικά comics, επέστρεψε και πάλι με μία βαθιά προσωπική ιστορία, το Royal City. Παρέα με την Image, δημιούργησε (γράφοντας και σχεδιάζοντας) ένα serialised comic για την οικογένεια των Pike. Ένα δράμα, με paranormal στοιχεία αλλά κυρίως ανθρώπινα, για την απώλεια και τα απωθημένα. Είναι υπέροχο. Μπορείς να διαβάσεις τα πέντε πρώτα τεύχη που έχουν κυκλοφορήσει ή να περιμένεις τον τόμο που θα φτάσει αυτό τον Οκτώβριο. Ανυπομονώ για τη συνέχεια...
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like it more. Maybe it's my antipathy toward the idea of a (literal) ghost. Maybe i've lost that loving feeling (for Jeff Lemur).I don't regret reading this story, though, because it occupied my mind a little during this week on the road for work.If my attitude doesn't improve with vol 2, i can easily quit the series because i'll forget about it by the time vol 3 is released in October.{links are to other things i'm only about}
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    This was just a family drama and one that wasn't really interesting most of the time. I was being nice by giving it a 3 star rating when I was thinking this was a 2 star book most of the time I read it. I don't see what was so great about this, and possibly it was just because of the author name attached to it. Really average read about a family who talks to their dead relative and sees him in different ways, but not a supernatural book if you understand.
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  • Stephanie (aka WW)
    January 1, 1970
    (Review of Volumes 1 and 2) This series looks to be a favorite of mine from Lemire. The story follows the grown-up siblings of the Pike family as they gather at the bedside of their father, who has had a stroke. As usual for Lemire, the overall feel of the story is dark and the characters’ lives are tough. What sets this one apart from the others is the haunting of the siblings by their younger brother, Tommy, who died decades before in some kind of accident that we, the readers, are not yet pri (Review of Volumes 1 and 2) This series looks to be a favorite of mine from Lemire. The story follows the grown-up siblings of the Pike family as they gather at the bedside of their father, who has had a stroke. As usual for Lemire, the overall feel of the story is dark and the characters’ lives are tough. What sets this one apart from the others is the haunting of the siblings by their younger brother, Tommy, who died decades before in some kind of accident that we, the readers, are not yet privy to. Tommy appears differently to each character; he is frozen in their minds at the age that best fits their memories. I’m hoping, with this series, that there is some brightness to the story by the end. It’s tough to watch Lemire’s characters suffer. If not, I’ll still love it because I’m a fan.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    This is pure Lemire perfection. Probably why he's my favourite author right now. Such a simple sweet family drama. The art really complements the story to perfection. I wont spoil any of the goodness but its really just a family all dealing with personal and family issues, all brought together by a stroke the father has. Highly reccomend this one for people wanting something different to the most of the other comic stories at present. A slower pace look at real life.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 4.5. Can't wait for Volume 2!
  • Kaisu
    January 1, 1970
    Ein Zeichenstil und eine Geschichte, die zum Verweilen einlädt.
  • Chris Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Lemire wants to avoid calls his new series a "slice of life" story, and that's not a description I would have come up with, having subtle hints of the supernatural, but it's a useful term when comparing it to most other comics because it lacks action and centers around the mundane. This first issue lets the reader get to know the Pike family, made up of a father mother, two sons, and a daughter, each of them with distinct personalities. But not in a action comic book way of just giving them Jeff Lemire wants to avoid calls his new series a "slice of life" story, and that's not a description I would have come up with, having subtle hints of the supernatural, but it's a useful term when comparing it to most other comics because it lacks action and centers around the mundane. This first issue lets the reader get to know the Pike family, made up of a father mother, two sons, and a daughter, each of them with distinct personalities. But not in a action comic book way of just giving them character traits. These are real people.The closest writer I can compare this to is Jonathan Franzen, whose The Corrections also centers around a family that gathers together when the father faces a tragic event. The Pikes learn that their father has suffered a stroke and the children make their way home. We also learn that there had been another child who hadn't made it, Tommy, and he serves as our supernatural element. It is his voice over a radio that sparks the father's stroke.Lemire makes this story a place that just feels right. I enjoy seeing the Pikes lead their lives, seeing them for who they are, flaws and all, and there are small curiosities that promise much more interesting things to come. Lemire's artwork is also very nice, an almost surreal watercolor that's reminiscent of his work for AD. Lemire likes to draw his character faces splotchy with red noses and cheeks. His characters are rather homely, like most of us, and yet that surreal artwork prevents this from being just a regular "slice of life" story. There's something more, and it's engrossing.
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  • Chris Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    This is somewhere between realism and magical realism. Those expecting action and violence in their comics will be disappointed, but those looking for a thoughtful look into a family's life after they're struck by near tragedy will find this engrossing. The near tragedy is the father suffering a stroke, but the family is marked by another tragedy in the past, with the death of Thomas, or Tommy, a younger brother. Tommy haunts every single family member in some shape or form. Everyone sees him di This is somewhere between realism and magical realism. Those expecting action and violence in their comics will be disappointed, but those looking for a thoughtful look into a family's life after they're struck by near tragedy will find this engrossing. The near tragedy is the father suffering a stroke, but the family is marked by another tragedy in the past, with the death of Thomas, or Tommy, a younger brother. Tommy haunts every single family member in some shape or form. Everyone sees him differently, the mother seeing him as a young boy, the alcoholic brother seeing him as a young man. Tommy speaks to them as if he is really there, but only they can see and hear and talk to him. Is Tommy real, then? Reading this book makes me think of reading a mix of Jonathan Franzen and Gabriel Garcia Marquez - real, haunting, and sometimes funny.
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  • NORMAN
    January 1, 1970
    Phew that last issue resembled a final one. Thought this story was a limited series. So glad it isn't. I do wish these would come out faster, but that's eishing for the impossible. Lemire's got a lot on his plate. Overall a very haunting story about a family. Dysfunctional by its separatedness, and connected via a dead kid brother. Lots left to the imagination and interpretation. Great comics format usage - Lemire's absolute forte is his self-drawn original stories. I can't stand his $$$ writing Phew that last issue resembled a final one. Thought this story was a limited series. So glad it isn't. I do wish these would come out faster, but that's eishing for the impossible. Lemire's got a lot on his plate. Overall a very haunting story about a family. Dysfunctional by its separatedness, and connected via a dead kid brother. Lots left to the imagination and interpretation. Great comics format usage - Lemire's absolute forte is his self-drawn original stories. I can't stand his $$$ writing, but these user-created ones have so much more obvious passion and love.
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