Walking the Bones (Ryan DeMarco Mystery #2)
When long-buried secrets come back to the surface...The bones of seven young girls, picked clean and carefully preserved, discovered years ago... that's all Sergeant Ryan DeMarco knows about the unsolved crime he has unwittingly been roped into investigating during what is supposed to be a healing road trip with his new love, Jayme.DeMarco is still reeling from the case that led to death of his best friend months ago and wants nothing more than to lay low. Unfortunately, the small southern town of Jayme's idyllic youth is not exactly a place that lets strangers go unnoticed--especially strangers who have a history of solving violent crimes. And if there's anything DeMarco knows, it's that a killer always leaves clues behind, just waiting for the right person to come along and put all the pieces together...Walking the Bones is a story about things buried--memories, regrets, secrets, and bodies. Acclaimed author Randall Silvis delivers another heart-stopping investigation as DeMarco finds himself once again drawn into a case that will demand more of himself than he may be willing to give.

Walking the Bones (Ryan DeMarco Mystery #2) Details

TitleWalking the Bones (Ryan DeMarco Mystery #2)
Author
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherSourcebooks Landmark
ISBN-139781492646914
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Walking the Bones (Ryan DeMarco Mystery #2) Review

  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    More of a character study than a mystery. This is a slow burn character study of Detective Ryan DeMarco--roughly 30% is about a case, the remaining 70% is about DeMarco struggling to find his footing after the death of his former friend, Thomas Huston. Having read the first book in the series, Two Days Gone, which was extremely dark and slow moving (I described the first book as gray and colorless), I was expecting something similar in Walking the Bones. However while the pacing is similar, th More of a character study than a mystery. This is a slow burn character study of Detective Ryan DeMarco--roughly 30% is about a case, the remaining 70% is about DeMarco struggling to find his footing after the death of his former friend, Thomas Huston. Having read the first book in the series, Two Days Gone, which was extremely dark and slow moving (I described the first book as gray and colorless), I was expecting something similar in Walking the Bones. However while the pacing is similar, there’s finally some light in Ryan DeMarco’s life. Feeling like he isn’t making an impact as a detective, DeMarco decides to take early retirement. His girlfriend, Jayme, talks him into buying an RV and traveling around the U.S. Their journey is interrupted by the death of Jayme’s grandmother, which takes them off course into Kentucky. While there, they are approached by a group of three senior citizens , who are independently investigating a serial killer who murdered 7 young African American girls. The group lures DeMarco and Jayme into helping them discover who committed these heinous crimes.Not only is DeMarco reeling from Huston’s death, he also is also battling demons of his past, as he shoulders the responsibility for the death of his young son and failed marriage. Also mixed in are snippets from his childhood, which help to explain a lot about his character. Jayme is the only thing keeping him afloat, but he’s struggling to fully open up and share his feelings with her, putting their relationship at risk. As he and Jayme dig deeper into the case of the seven dead girls, it threatens to tear their relationship apart. The book starts off slowly, but the pacing does pick up. I found the mystery interesting, and I had no clue who the serial killer was. However I have a feeling this won’t work for everyone, since it’s more character driven than plot driven. I really like DeMarco’s character, and his relationship with Jayme, which was enough to keep me invested. I hope there is a third book in which we learn more about Jayme--the little bits about her past that were revealed were quite intriguing.!Warning--there's a disturbing scene involving a puppy=(I received a copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    I have so many series that I already follow, I decided to be a bit more picky this year. I read the first in this series, actually it is the beginning, last year and liked the main character DeMarco. This is the second in series, and liked it better than the first, so I made what for me is a good decision to pick up this relatively new series. Very character driven, DeMarco, man still reeling from his last case, his violent childhood, and a state of recent tragedies, is trying to come to terms w I have so many series that I already follow, I decided to be a bit more picky this year. I read the first in this series, actually it is the beginning, last year and liked the main character DeMarco. This is the second in series, and liked it better than the first, so I made what for me is a good decision to pick up this relatively new series. Very character driven, DeMarco, man still reeling from his last case, his violent childhood, and a state of recent tragedies, is trying to come to terms with his life as it is now. It is very introspective, contains flashbacks to his youth, and shows us his doubts in his new relationship, the guilt he feels moving forward when others do not have this option. Taking leave from the police force, he is traveling with new love and fellow officer Jamie, when her Grandmother's death forces them to detour to her old hometown. There he will find himself embroiled in the discovery of the bones of eight young women hidden in a church wall. The fate of these young women will haunt him, and also introduce him to three elderly people in the town that have a vested interest in the case.I enjoy these characters, the in-depth look at how we process our past, how in reflects on our present. Slower paced, but interesting, so I never minded. I actually like character driven stories, they seem less shallow to me, and after a few thrillers that left me with a kind of meh feeling it was a welcome relief to read one that drew me in intellectually and emotionally.ARC from Edelweiss.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is on a road trip in an RV with his girlfriend, Jayme. He is still dealing with the death of his best friend months ago and is hoping to relax and enjoy his time alone with his girlfriend. While DeMarco and Jayme are in in Jayme's hometown it becomes common knowledge that DeMarco is known for solving violent crimes. He is soon wrapped up in the cold case mystery of the bones of 7 young girls who have been discovered years earlier. Both DeMarco and Jayme want to solve the mu Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is on a road trip in an RV with his girlfriend, Jayme. He is still dealing with the death of his best friend months ago and is hoping to relax and enjoy his time alone with his girlfriend. While DeMarco and Jayme are in in Jayme's hometown it becomes common knowledge that DeMarco is known for solving violent crimes. He is soon wrapped up in the cold case mystery of the bones of 7 young girls who have been discovered years earlier. Both DeMarco and Jayme want to solve the murders of the young women. The bones have been carefully preserved and they both hope to find clues that will lead them to the killer. This is a cold case but one that they can't leave behind. For me, this seemed to take years. I had very high hopes for this book but it just felt like it dragged and dragged and dragged. Ryan and Jayme had relationship issues that consumed many of the pages. When they weren't having sex or running, they were dealing with jealousy over past lovers, being open emotionally, etc. I should point out that this is the second book in the Ryan DeMarco Mystery series. The first book in the series is "Two Days Gone" which I read and also gave 3 stars. Perhaps I was being impatient, but the investigation took forever. I had high hopes for this book and although it was enjoyable, I found it to be a little slow and I grew impatient. This book is well written but slow. It is still a good read and mystery. I received a copy of this book from Sourcebooks landmark and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com
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  • Judy Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Ryan DeMarco returns following Two Days Gone landing on my Top Books of 2017 with a gripping follow-up from the acclaimed author, Randall Silvis — WALKING THE BONES. Join me Blog Tour Host Jan 23. Enter to Win Book Giveaway Contest Jan 15-Feb 1. The continuation of Ryan DeMarco leads Marco and his partner to an unsolved murder case of seven African American girls who went missing from 1998 and 2004. A story of things buried―memories, regrets, secrets, and bodies.Dark hidden secrets are u Ryan DeMarco returns following Two Days Gone landing on my Top Books of 2017 with a gripping follow-up from the acclaimed author, Randall Silvis — WALKING THE BONES. Join me Blog Tour Host Jan 23. Enter to Win Book Giveaway Contest Jan 15-Feb 1. The continuation of Ryan DeMarco leads Marco and his partner to an unsolved murder case of seven African American girls who went missing from 1998 and 2004. A story of things buried―memories, regrets, secrets, and bodies.Dark hidden secrets are unraveled and exposed in this gripping psychological suspense crime mystery thriller (procedural) with a strong literary twist. The shocking conclusion will leave you gasping, with thoughts of Vladimir Nabokov’s classic Lolita. “The past is never past, she thought. Every second of their pasts lay gathered inside them. Every incident of their pasts had constructed their present, every cell interlocking, layer upon layer. The past is omnipresent." Picking up from Two Days Gone, Sergeant (49 yrs. old) Ryan DeMarco of the Pennsylvania State Police is still suffering from the loss of his best friend, Thomas Hutson, his son, Ryan Jr. and the demise of his marriage. Guilt-ridden, he continues to wrestle with his demons spending time at the cemetery. They were all gone. Only Jayme remained. He hopes he will not ruin her life. Currently, he is dating Jayme Matson (fellow Trooper), and she is quite concerned about his well-being. She has convinced Ryan to take a medical leave of absence for three months rather than retire. She decides to join him. They rent an RV and hit the road to visit her sick grandmother in Kentucky, her hometown. However, when they arrive, they become involved in a murder mystery. Seven young females reduced to bone. Seven skeletons found in a four by fourteen by ten-foot space between the walls of a local church. Each of the girls — are between fifteen to nineteen years of age. All light-skinned African American girls. Not a single Caucasian. Each cocooned in a clear plastic sheeting and sealed with silver duct tape. Each meticulously, obsessively cleaned and stripped. One per year from 1998 to 2004. A fetish for girls of color, or a hatred of them? Cause of death? "Sometimes the bones talk, and sometimes they hoard their secrets."Who was the killer? It had to be someone who knew about the false wall in the church and how to access it. A regular visitor, the pastor, or someone well-known in the community? Later the church was torched. Flashing back and forth from Ryan’s childhood to the present –we learn more about his earlier childhood. The one which still haunts him. Between Ryan’s internal struggle, his grief and guilt, emotions, insecurities, disturbing dreams, regrets, his troubled ex-wife Laraine, and his current relationship with Jayne – he has his hands full. The tensions and drama run high. Will he screw up his second chance at happiness? “Unless you have chaos inside, you cannot give birth to a dancing star.”—Freidrich Nietzche Neither Ryan nor Jayne knows where their relationship may be going, but they are along for the rocky ride. (Mixed with a few family members and locals). Plus we learn about both their pasts.In the midst of their personal affairs, they are drawn into this old mystery. From a senior amateur group of six concerned citizens (Da Vinci Cave Irregulars). Determined to solve this case and help in any way they can —to a registered pedophile, minister, Mennonite, a groundskeeper, a foreman, a tarot-car-reading librarian, a retired coroner, a reclusive chiropractor millionaire, among others.They have folders for the players: Suspects: Chad McGintey (statutory rape), Lucas McGintey (drug possession), Aaron Henry (teacher), Virgil Helm (caretaker), Eli Royce (pastor & narcissist), and the victims. Each of the victims had circumstances and were reported missing in the Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. The all were between five feet and five four. Petite. The cause, date, time, and place of death were undetermined. Runaways. Had their families given up on them long before their bones ended up in Aberdeen? In addition to Ryan’s haunted past, afraid he was becoming his father—now the seven girls are starting to haunt him as well. Will the cemetery, a bear cage, or being trapped in the woods give him the answers they are desperately seeking?"History never really says good-bye. History says, see you later.” — Eduardo GaleanoWith rich, evocative language, a twisty plot, and well-developed characters, Silvis once again delivers an extraordinary piece of art. Not only is WALKING THE BONES a phenomenal suspense crime mystery, but it also possesses an intense character study. I loved Two Days Gone; however, the followup further delves into the heart and soul of DeMarco and his tormented childhood as well as adulthood. Both parts of the story (Ryan’s) and the (murder mystery) are equally as gripping. The secret behind the girl’s death was unpredictable and a clever twist. Silvis lyrical prose is spellbinding. Beautifully written, and profoundly moving, an emotional and haunting meditation of acceptance, love, trust, and survival. (an intriguing character). I enjoyed Jayme’s personality — a strong sassy and witty female counterpart to Ryan’s complicated, moody, emotional, deep, and grief-stricken side, at times. A delicate balance of humor. Enjoying Silvis’ writing and look forward to reading his backlist. Highly Recommend both Two Days Gone and WALKING THE BONES. For fans of intelligent well-plotted literary mystery suspense thrillers. Looking forward to seeing what is coming next!Also recommend Only the Rain. (2018) A special thank you to Sourcebooks and #NetGalley for an early reading copy. JDCMustReadBooks
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for an advance copy of Walking the Bones, the second novel to feature Sergeant Ryan Demarco of the Pennsylvania State Police.Following the events of Two Days Gone DeMarco is a broken man, angry, grieving and perhaps depressed. In an effort to help him his girlfriend, Trooper Jayme Matson, decides that a road trip in an RV is the answer. When Jayme's grandmother dies they detour to Aberdeen, Kentucky where they get involved in trying to sol I would like to thank Netgalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for an advance copy of Walking the Bones, the second novel to feature Sergeant Ryan Demarco of the Pennsylvania State Police.Following the events of Two Days Gone DeMarco is a broken man, angry, grieving and perhaps depressed. In an effort to help him his girlfriend, Trooper Jayme Matson, decides that a road trip in an RV is the answer. When Jayme's grandmother dies they detour to Aberdeen, Kentucky where they get involved in trying to solve the cold case mystery of seven skeletons of young women of colour found walled up in a local church.I enjoyed Walking the Bones more than I thought I would after the first few chapters where my heart sank. The novel opens with DeMarco in a dangerous situation and thinking he might die and most of the novel covers events up to that point. I prefer a straightforward linear timeline but this chapter certainly grabs the reader's attention. The first few chapters also have an alternating point of view with descriptions of 3 pensioners carrying out unspecified surveillance but fortunately this is soon dropped when they meet DeMarco. I have not read the first novel in the series, Two Days Gone, and I'm not sure if this is good or bad. The events in it are referenced frequently and the perpetrator identified so there's not much point but, on the other hand, perhaps a fuller knowledge of the events would have added understanding to DeMarco's angst. Oh, and did I mention frequent, random flashbacks to DeMarco's troubled childhood? I actually came to enjoy them although I can't see much relevance to them, other than to explain some of DeMarco's personality.Walking the Bones is a more literary novel than I usually read so the angst ridden DeMarco and his problems didn't really engage me. Matson, on the other hand, is an excellent character, strong, feisty and caring. Fortunately they are both top notch investigators and have a great case to investigate which held my attention from start to finish. I liked the vignettes of the characters they met from the venal pastor to the wannabe white supremacist. Walking the Bones is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Faouzia
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars rounded to 4 stars.Last year i came by chance upon Two Days Gone, the first book of the Ryan DeMarco series and it was an agreeable surprise for me. So i was looking forward to reading this new bookOnce again we meet Sergeant Ryan DeMarco, more depressed and broken than ever after the last case that took his friend's life, his only glimmer of hope is with Jayme. So they embark together in a road trip that leads them to Jayme's hometown. There, he was requested to take a look at a cold 3.5 Stars rounded to 4 stars.Last year i came by chance upon Two Days Gone, the first book of the Ryan DeMarco series and it was an agreeable surprise for me. So i was looking forward to reading this new bookOnce again we meet Sergeant Ryan DeMarco, more depressed and broken than ever after the last case that took his friend's life, his only glimmer of hope is with Jayme. So they embark together in a road trip that leads them to Jayme's hometown. There, he was requested to take a look at a cold case.7 well preserved skeletons of young girls, were found in the wall of the main church of the town. The only thing they knew were the identities of the 7 girls. No crime scene, No murder weapon, No cause of death and No connections between the girls. All the usual suspects were interviewed at the time with no result.So DeMarco and Jayme decide to take a fresh look at the case. The mystery of the skeletons was an intriguing factor. The interesting part was that the story seemed to be mainly a journey inside the head of DeMarco. As he was looking for clues, we kept getting more insight into his past. Chapters about his childhood were put now and then. The actual case he was working on seemed more like a background story for his own.This was interesting but also a bit tiring sometimes. Which leads me to what i did not like about the book. The crime was intriguing, but it was practically solved in a couple of chapters. I mean i liked reading all that thinking behind it, but i felt it deserved more elaboration and a bit less dwelling on DeMarco, i mostly sympathized with him, but sometimes i almost skipped the parts were he was thinking alone about everything that went wrong in his life, and that happened a lot in the book, it felt repetitive a lot.In general, i liked the organization of the book. Quick, short chapters that held my attentions. Theaddition of chapters of both his past and Jayme's was also interesting. And the characters were fascinating, especially the mysterious group we get to meet at the beginning.Last remark, although the two books are not exactly related, i would recommend to start with Two Days Gone, as it will gove more insight into Ryan DeMarco.Thank you to the Publisher, Author and NetGalley for this copy in exchange of an honest review.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsA trio of septuagenarian crime fighters, two men and a woman are on the watch for pedophiles and other n’er-do wells. They are outfitted with the latest gear and disguises and provide the reader with some chuckles at their very serious antics. They live in Evansville, Illinois.Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is retiring from the Pennsylvania State Police. He is still suffering from the death of his friend Thomas Huston nearly a year earlier. He shot the man who killed his friend. DeMarco’s son is a 4 starsA trio of septuagenarian crime fighters, two men and a woman are on the watch for pedophiles and other n’er-do wells. They are outfitted with the latest gear and disguises and provide the reader with some chuckles at their very serious antics. They live in Evansville, Illinois.Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is retiring from the Pennsylvania State Police. He is still suffering from the death of his friend Thomas Huston nearly a year earlier. He shot the man who killed his friend. DeMarco’s son is also dead, although from another incident. Trooper Jayme Matson, Ryan’s girlfriend, convinces him to take a leave of absence instead. She will also take leave and they will travel. Ryan is uncertain as they go to buy an RV, but Jayme convinces him. They’re on the road enjoying themselves when Jayme gets a phone call that her grandmother has passed away. They travel to Aberdeen, Kentucky. While in Aberdeen, the three septuagenarians conspire to lure Ryan into looking into the murder of seven young girls who were walled up behind a wall in an old church. One per year for seven years. They capture Ryan’s interest. In other words, they rope him into investigating the case. Jayme and DeMarco’s investigation moves glacially slowly. They interview many, many people and discard suspects one by one. The killer is vicious and somewhat of a surprise. What led to the killings is a bigger surprise.DeMarco and Jayme learn a lot on their journey. Not just about criminals and killers, but also about themselves. About forgiveness, loss, friendship and love. DeMarco learns much about himself and to throw off his past. This book is well written and plotted. It starts out a little slowly, but once the basic introductions are made, the pace and suspense pick up. I like both Jayme and DeMarco. I thought that DeMarco was as closed off and mysterious as the brief synopsis led the reader to believe. I thought he was self-effacing and humorous. I like the gentle teasing that DeMarco and Jayme trade back and forth. I want to thank NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for forwarding to me a copy of this interesting book to read and enjoy.
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  • Gatorman
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent entry in the recent Ryan DeMarco series which finds Ryan and his new love Jayme investigating the decade old murders of seven young African-American women in Jayme's former Kentucky stomping grounds after being derailed on a road trip due to the death of Jayme's grandmother. The story focuses heavily on character development and past experiences of both Ryan and Jayme as they both struggle with Ryan's sadness over the death of his friend and infant son, crumbled marriage and abusive fa Excellent entry in the recent Ryan DeMarco series which finds Ryan and his new love Jayme investigating the decade old murders of seven young African-American women in Jayme's former Kentucky stomping grounds after being derailed on a road trip due to the death of Jayme's grandmother. The story focuses heavily on character development and past experiences of both Ryan and Jayme as they both struggle with Ryan's sadness over the death of his friend and infant son, crumbled marriage and abusive father. Silvis uses humor perfectly to offset the great tragedies that have befallen Ryan. These are characters you truly care about. The mystery takes a bit of time to develop but does so rather solidly with a satisfying resolution. Silvis is a terrific writer which elevates this one into literary thriller category. A new series that's getting better. Looking forward to the next one. 4.5 stars. Highly recommended.
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  • Scottsdale Public Library
    January 1, 1970
    Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is back in this fascinating mystery, accompanied by his new love, Jayme, and more than a few regrets from his past. Their RV vacation takes the couple back to Jayme's childhood town when her grandmother dies and straight into the puzzle of finding the killer or killers of seven young women, a case long gone cold. The author has created a mesmerizing character in DeMarco, who has experienced his share of tragedies and truly wants to escape those bad memories. Fans of Jack Re Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is back in this fascinating mystery, accompanied by his new love, Jayme, and more than a few regrets from his past. Their RV vacation takes the couple back to Jayme's childhood town when her grandmother dies and straight into the puzzle of finding the killer or killers of seven young women, a case long gone cold. The author has created a mesmerizing character in DeMarco, who has experienced his share of tragedies and truly wants to escape those bad memories. Fans of Jack Reacher, give this book (and series) a try. You won't be disappointed!-- Louisa A.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    Follow up to the excellent Two Days Gone, Walking The Bones is the second Ryan De Marco thriller and features Sergeant De Marco and his girlfriend Jayme taking a leave of absence from their jobs in the police and driving across the US in a camper van. Ryan is suffering from burnout and feelings of loss after his last case and really wants to retire but Jayme is trying to prevent this by suggesting the road trip.En route they hear that Jayme's grandmother has died and they drive to the small town Follow up to the excellent Two Days Gone, Walking The Bones is the second Ryan De Marco thriller and features Sergeant De Marco and his girlfriend Jayme taking a leave of absence from their jobs in the police and driving across the US in a camper van. Ryan is suffering from burnout and feelings of loss after his last case and really wants to retire but Jayme is trying to prevent this by suggesting the road trip.En route they hear that Jayme's grandmother has died and they drive to the small town of Aberdeen for the funeral. Whilst there they are asked to look into a crime- bones of 7 girls have been discovered in the cavity of a church wall. Who is responsible? Ryan and Jayme must use all their skills to find out and Ryan, in particular, must try and survive in some very extreme circumstances.Not only is this a mystery story it is also an examination of how guilt can affect human behaviour. We have flashbacks to Ryan's life as a child living in a trailer with his violent father as well as dreams where his dead son appears. As in the last book there are several literary quotations which tie in with the themes of the novel. At times it is quite slow moving with a lot of detail but it always held my attention.There are many references to the earlier novel so I would suggest reading this first in order to enjoy the full potential of Walking The Bones which is perfect for fans of literary noir thrillers.I raced through this book enjoying both the mystery aspect as well as the burgeoning romance between Ryan and Jayme. Learning more about both of the main characters' family backgrounds was also interesting and I am now looking forward to the next instalment.Thanks to NetGalley and the the Publishers for my arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Suz Jay
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to have the opportunity to obtain an Advanced Reader Copy (ARC) of this book from Net Galley.The second installment in the Ryan DeMarco mystery series provides a vision quest through the protagonist’s psyche. DeMarco is mentally deconstructed and reassembled as he deals with his best friend’s death, childhood scars, ghosts of the past, and promises of the future, while solving a murder mystery. The story shifts between past and present as DeMarco quits his job and takes an extended I was excited to have the opportunity to obtain an Advanced Reader Copy (ARC) of this book from Net Galley.The second installment in the Ryan DeMarco mystery series provides a vision quest through the protagonist’s psyche. DeMarco is mentally deconstructed and reassembled as he deals with his best friend’s death, childhood scars, ghosts of the past, and promises of the future, while solving a murder mystery. The story shifts between past and present as DeMarco quits his job and takes an extended road trip with his lady love Jayme. A relative’s death brings a detour to Kentucky and the introduction to a cold case involving the discovery of the bones of seven young women, who went missing between 1998 and 2004. DeMarco feels a special connection to the dead women, who were castoffs from society, beaten down and broken-hearted. He longs to obtain justice for the poor souls, whose sad lives were terminated too soon. He works the list of suspects in search of clues the other investigators missed.Brilliant writing, solid characterization, and a fascinating whodunit engage the reader. While the focus of the book is on DeMarco and Jayme, Silvis creates a unique and fascinating cast of secondary characters. By the end of the book, one can’t help but wonder what the third book in the series will bring for DeMarco. Walking the Bones is a tour de force follow up to the fantastic series starter, Two Days Gone. I can’t wait to get my hands on the next installment.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    My first exposure to Randall Silvis was Two Days Gone, and Walking the Bones picks up the story of Ryan DeMarco as he is still recovering from the death of his friend. Walking the Bones begins as a road trip instigated by his girlfriend Jayme, but the cold case of seven young women drags him (kicking and screaming) into investigating who killed the young women and stacked them behind a hidden wall in a church. The book was simultaneously interesting and slow. For me, the most interesting charact My first exposure to Randall Silvis was Two Days Gone, and Walking the Bones picks up the story of Ryan DeMarco as he is still recovering from the death of his friend. Walking the Bones begins as a road trip instigated by his girlfriend Jayme, but the cold case of seven young women drags him (kicking and screaming) into investigating who killed the young women and stacked them behind a hidden wall in a church. The book was simultaneously interesting and slow. For me, the most interesting characters were the three elderly "detectives" who involve DeMarco in the case and are treated rather disdainfully. The two books featuring Ryan DeMarco are markedly different from Silvis' Blood and Ink, a dark comedy. All three of the books I've read by Silvis feature his love of literature and skillful descriptions, but my favorite is Blood and Ink with the hapless protagonist, Nick.Read in Oct.; blog review scheduled for Jan. 4, 2018.NetGalley/SourcebooksCrime/Mystery. Jan. 23, 2018. Print length: 464 pages.
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  • Susan Wingate
    January 1, 1970
    “The Ryan DeMarco Mystery series by Randall Silvis sets a new standard for noir mystery, a standard not soon to be scaled by any other author any time soon. WALKING THE BONES, the second book of the series, is a story both fragile and gritty with main character Sergeant Ryan DeMarco grappling to understand the meaning of life. In a tango with the reader, Silvis is a master-manipulator. He twirls you out to the furthest edges of your imagination, letting you spin away only moments before snapping “The Ryan DeMarco Mystery series by Randall Silvis sets a new standard for noir mystery, a standard not soon to be scaled by any other author any time soon. WALKING THE BONES, the second book of the series, is a story both fragile and gritty with main character Sergeant Ryan DeMarco grappling to understand the meaning of life. In a tango with the reader, Silvis is a master-manipulator. He twirls you out to the furthest edges of your imagination, letting you spin away only moments before snapping you back into his grasp, back to where he wishes to lead you next. Throughout the story, I kept expecting the ghosts of DeMarco’s past to reach out of the dirt from their graves and drag him under. In a most introspective, eloquent way, Silvis has created a world as disturbing and beautiful as real life, with all its heart-wrenching wonders. Silvis’ WALKING THE BONES is story where regret is DeMarco’s closest friend—a friend who wants to devour him.” -Susan Wingate, Amazon Bestseller, www.susanwingate.com.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    "If not for the termites, the poor girls might never have been found.”This is the second book in author Silvis' series about Pennsylvania State Police Sergeant Ryan DeMarco. I enjoyed the first book TWO DAYS GONE but liked this offering even more.These aren't your normal plot driven murder mysteries. I called the last one a "literary murder mystery" and I consider this to be the same. The characters are everything in these books.This book takes place a few months after the first one. Sgt. DeMarc "If not for the termites, the poor girls might never have been found.”This is the second book in author Silvis' series about Pennsylvania State Police Sergeant Ryan DeMarco. I enjoyed the first book TWO DAYS GONE but liked this offering even more.These aren't your normal plot driven murder mysteries. I called the last one a "literary murder mystery" and I consider this to be the same. The characters are everything in these books.This book takes place a few months after the first one. Sgt. DeMarco decides he wants to retire but he's talked into taking a medical leave for a couple of months instead. Jayme, fellow officer and his woman friend, takes time off also and they end up buying a used RV and start traveling.They end up in the small Kentucky town that Jayme grew up in when they learn her grandmother has passed on. And while there for the funeral they get approached about a cold case that involves seven dead young girls.I loved the progression of this novel, the fleshing out of the characters especially Ryan and Jayme, and the wonderful nature passages that take place in the Kentucky woods.There were quite a few times , while reading the nature scenes, that I thought about a favorite author of mine - Gene Stratton-Porter. There probably aren't a lot of people any more that remember her books but she wrote beautifully about the Limberlost swamp and wetlands of Indiana. I felt Silvis' love for nature in his passages just like I used to feel in Stratton-Potter's books from when I was younger.This is a great mystery novel plus just being an all-around good book. I highly recommend it. I received this book from Sourcebooks Landmark through Edelweiss in the hopes that I would read it and leave an unbiased review.
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  • Danielle Rose
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley. The below is my honest, unbiased opinion. Thank you, Randall Silvis, the publisher, and NetGalley, for allowing me to read an early copy.When long-buried secrets come back to the surface...The bones of seven young girls, picked clean and carefully preserved, discovered years ago... that's all Sergeant Ryan DeMarco knows about the unsolved crime he has unwittingly been roped into investigating during what is supposed to be a healing road trip with his new love, J I received an ARC from NetGalley. The below is my honest, unbiased opinion. Thank you, Randall Silvis, the publisher, and NetGalley, for allowing me to read an early copy.When long-buried secrets come back to the surface...The bones of seven young girls, picked clean and carefully preserved, discovered years ago... that's all Sergeant Ryan DeMarco knows about the unsolved crime he has unwittingly been roped into investigating during what is supposed to be a healing road trip with his new love, Jayme.DeMarco is still reeling from the case that led to death of his best friend months ago and wants nothing more than to lay low. Unfortunately, the small southern town of Jayme's idyllic youth is not exactly a place that lets strangers go unnoticed--especially strangers who have a history of solving violent crimes. And if there's anything DeMarco knows, it's that a killer always leaves clues behind, just waiting for the right person to come along and put all the pieces together...Walking the Bones is a story about things buried--memories, regrets, secrets, and bodies. Acclaimed author Randall Silvis delivers another heart-stopping investigation as DeMarco finds himself once again drawn into a case that will demand more of himself than he may be willing to give.I was immediately hooked when I saw this gorgeously eerie cover, and Silvis did not disappoint. The setting and characters are just creepy as the cover, and the twists, turns kept me clutching the book until the very end. I thought the character development was really well done. This mystery was a slow burn, but overall, very well done. A must read!
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  • Maranda
    January 1, 1970
    Ryan DeMarco is a troubled character that because of his abusive father and the loss of his son struggles with "Love" relationships and his own violent tendencies. I had not read Mystery #1 but did not feel too lost. Lengthy read that took about 25% into the book before any real action and connection was evident between happenings. That being said the remainder of the novel was full of investigative information in solving a cold case of the murder of seven young women entombed in the wall of a c Ryan DeMarco is a troubled character that because of his abusive father and the loss of his son struggles with "Love" relationships and his own violent tendencies. I had not read Mystery #1 but did not feel too lost. Lengthy read that took about 25% into the book before any real action and connection was evident between happenings. That being said the remainder of the novel was full of investigative information in solving a cold case of the murder of seven young women entombed in the wall of a church. Ryan's girlfriend Jayme like Ryan is employed with the police dept in Pennsylvania. When Ryan seeks to retire at an early age Jayme also takes a lengthy vacation with him and their travels lead them to Kentucky and the site of this serial killing. Character reveals about Jayme are touched on and will probably be more completely included in a future installment. Not so much a cliff hanger which I so hate; but a knowing that not all has been revealed with Ryan and Jayme. "A copy of this book was provided by SOURCEBOOKS Landmark via Netgalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion."
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  • Pratibha
    January 1, 1970
    There was a time I liked the thrillers fir pace and action. I guess I have finally realized that it's not true in real life and to be able to totally relate to the story , you need flawed characters ,a slowly evolving story line and a truth that is just out there to be explored by the right set of mind. This book scores well on all the counts. I am not a fan of irregular narration but that alone added so much depth to the story telling.There were very few dull moments in the book and all felt ve There was a time I liked the thrillers fir pace and action. I guess I have finally realized that it's not true in real life and to be able to totally relate to the story , you need flawed characters ,a slowly evolving story line and a truth that is just out there to be explored by the right set of mind. This book scores well on all the counts. I am not a fan of irregular narration but that alone added so much depth to the story telling.There were very few dull moments in the book and all felt very much in place. Brilliant writing and amazing characterization. I will be reading the first book by the author soon.
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  • Susan Angela Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    Walking the bones by Randall silvis.Sergeant ryan demarco is on a healing trip with his new love Jayme. But the bones of 7 young girls are found. This was a little slow and confusing to begin with but then all of a sudden I couldn't put it down. I wanted to know who the killer was and why. 4*. Netgalley and sourcebooks landmark.
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  • J.E.
    January 1, 1970
    Although my inclination was to devour this book as I did the first one in this series, I paced myself so I could savor the beautiful prose and the masterful way Silvis develops his tales. Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is a tortured soul, consumed by missed opportunities and might-have-beens. His tragic past refuses to release its grip on his soul, and the novel explores many of the experiences that have shaped the man. Filled with painful memories and engrossing vignettes of his childhood growing up as Although my inclination was to devour this book as I did the first one in this series, I paced myself so I could savor the beautiful prose and the masterful way Silvis develops his tales. Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is a tortured soul, consumed by missed opportunities and might-have-beens. His tragic past refuses to release its grip on his soul, and the novel explores many of the experiences that have shaped the man. Filled with painful memories and engrossing vignettes of his childhood growing up as 'trailer trash,' (how Ryan sees himself), Walking the Bones is a journey of discovery and an attempt to climb back from the psychological edge of despair. The story also contain a mystery, but the tale of the seven skeletons meanders, like a backwoods stream, convoluted, at times almost dry, but on a determined course. Ryan's lover, Jayme Matson, is as interesting as Ryan. It is a return to her hometown for the funeral of her grandmother that offers up the mystery and a path to, if not redemption, at least reclamation of DeMarco's self. What a pleasure to read a literate, insightful, psychological thriller. Perhaps an added bonus for romance lovers, Silvis provides a satisfying number of sexual encounters between Ryan and Jayme and a thoughtful consideration of the redemption love offers. The book ends with a teasing suggestion regarding the third installment. Can I pre-order that one now? ;)
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  • Arybo ✨
    January 1, 1970
    This book is well written, the prose is rich and complex, it digs into the minds of the protagonists, De Marco and Jayme. The reader discovers the life of the sergeant through chapters that refer to his childhood. The book is divided into sections, divided into chapters, which are focused on the cold case story, childhood story of Ryan, and Jayme POV part. At the begin, I was involved with the story of Ryan’s past, but then the book began to slowly grow to a repetitive point. I lost interest at This book is well written, the prose is rich and complex, it digs into the minds of the protagonists, De Marco and Jayme. The reader discovers the life of the sergeant through chapters that refer to his childhood. The book is divided into sections, divided into chapters, which are focused on the cold case story, childhood story of Ryan, and Jayme POV part. At the begin, I was involved with the story of Ryan’s past, but then the book began to slowly grow to a repetitive point. I lost interest at a certain time, in the middle of the reading. As I said, the book is well written, but leaves a little indifferent, it’s not so gripping and passionate as a thriller, it is more a mystery. The most interesting part is inherent to the club created by those who are involved in the old case. Moreover, the setting of a provincial town is very interesting. I recommend it to those who are ready for a long journey, because if you do not have time you can not read this book. I received a free copy from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review •••
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  • Michelle (Michelle's Book Ends) Shealy
    January 1, 1970
    "Seven young females reduced to bone," Hoyle said. His eyes remained fixed on DeMarco's. "Seven skeletons in a four by fourteen by ten-foot space between walls. Each one cocooned in clear plastic sheeting. The kind painters use to cover a floor. Each cocoon sealed with silver duct tape."....Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is back for the second book of this mystery series. We first met Ryan in “Two Days Gone,” a previous book I reviewed. I enjoyed that one, and looked forward to the next installment. It d "Seven young females reduced to bone," Hoyle said. His eyes remained fixed on DeMarco's. "Seven skeletons in a four by fourteen by ten-foot space between walls. Each one cocooned in clear plastic sheeting. The kind painters use to cover a floor. Each cocoon sealed with silver duct tape."....Sergeant Ryan DeMarco is back for the second book of this mystery series. We first met Ryan in “Two Days Gone,” a previous book I reviewed. I enjoyed that one, and looked forward to the next installment. It didn’t disappoint!After events in the first book, Ryan is just trying to take some down time. With his new girlfriend, Jayme, Ryan finds himself drawn into another investigation. While visiting Jayme’s hometown he is made aware of an unsolved crime. Seven young girls gone, and nothing but their bones left behind.Very descriptive, draws you in from the very first page. Well defined characters and a chilling story line make for a great suspense, mystery thriller.Small town life, where everyone knows something about someone. Could it help Ryan solve these crimes? Even if he is a reluctant part of this, some things you just can’t walk away from.While this book is a stand alone, I think it always helps to read the series. It’s interesting to see character development. You never know if a character in the first book is who you think they are. I like to see the life changes, and the roads they take.Ryan has been through some tragedy and heartbreak. Is Jayme his saving grace? Will his down time bring him back to the state police department or take him permanently away?Will Ryan and Jayme find justice for these young girls?Thank you Randall Silvis, Netgalley, and Sourcebooks Landmark
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  • Ashley Gillan
    January 1, 1970
    This series has officially come into its own! I loved this book - it was a awesome ride from start to finish.Note: this book picks up where the first leaves off. It can be read as a stand-alone, but it would probably be helpful to read the first beforehand to understand why Ryan is struggling. Anyway, the central mystery is great, incredibly intriguing and with plenty of suspects (and nasty ones at that) to keep readers interested. I didn't guess the ending before the end - when enough clues had This series has officially come into its own! I loved this book - it was a awesome ride from start to finish.Note: this book picks up where the first leaves off. It can be read as a stand-alone, but it would probably be helpful to read the first beforehand to understand why Ryan is struggling. Anyway, the central mystery is great, incredibly intriguing and with plenty of suspects (and nasty ones at that) to keep readers interested. I didn't guess the ending before the end - when enough clues had been revealed to give the audience a major hint. Like I said, there's plenty of layers to keep the wheels turning.I also loved the development of Ryan and Jayne in this book. They really became likable, real characters that I can't wait to read more about in the future. Their relationship is sweet and genuine - I actually laughed out loud a couple times at their quips. There's definitely a lot more adventures in the future for them and I will absolutely be picking future books in this series up.Highly recommended.
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  • Suganya
    January 1, 1970
    Check out my book review on my blog:https://suganyamo.wordpress.com/Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post.*Thank you, NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark, for providing me with a ebook copy in exchange for my honest opinion.*Spoiler-free ReviewTitle: Walking the BonesAuthor: Randall SilvisPaperback Pages: 464 PagesPublishing Company: Sourcebooks LandmarkGenre: MysteryGoodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...Synopsis:The bones of seven young girls, picked clean and carefully pres Check out my book review on my blog:https://suganyamo.wordpress.com/Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post.*Thank you, NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark, for providing me with a ebook copy in exchange for my honest opinion.*Spoiler-free ReviewTitle: Walking the BonesAuthor: Randall SilvisPaperback Pages: 464 PagesPublishing Company: Sourcebooks LandmarkGenre: MysteryGoodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...Synopsis:The bones of seven young girls, picked clean and carefully preserved, discovered years ago... that's all Sergeant Ryan DeMarco knows about the unsolved crime he has unwittingly been roped into investigating during what is supposed to be a healing road trip with his new love, Jayme.DeMarco is still reeling from the case that led to death of his best friend months ago and wants nothing more than to lay low. Unfortunately, the small southern town of Jayme's idyllic youth is not exactly a place that lets strangers go unnoticed--especially strangers who have a history of solving violent crimes. And if there's anything DeMarco knows, it's that a killer always leaves clues behind, just waiting for the right person to come along and put all the pieces together...Walking the Bones is a story about things buried--memories, regrets, secrets, and bodies. Acclaimed author Randall Silvis delivers another heart-stopping investigation as DeMarco finds himself once again drawn into a case that will demand more of himself than he may be willing to give.My thoughts: First of all, I have not read the first book in this series, “Two Days Gone”. To be honest, I didn’t know this was part of a series. But I think is still easy to follow if you have not read the first book. I don’t usually read mystery novels. I prefer to watch mystery movies or tv shows. I find that reading mystery novels tends to stress me out. Rating:3/5 StarsCharacters: Sgt. Ryan DeMarco is still affected by his first case and it causes him tremendous mental stress. He is haunted by his past including his abusive father and the loss of his son. His character very dark and it took away from me enjoying the book. Trooper Jayme Matson was a better developed character. I enjoyed reading her sections. She was quite witty in comparison to the dark De Marco. But I think because the novel was overall really dark and full of angst it was difficult to truly enjoy her character.Plot: The plot was good. It kept moving forward but at times it was a little bit slow but it still moved forward. There were frequent flashbacks about DeMarco’s childhood which I didn’t think really helped the story. I didn’t think there needed to be so many flashbacks in order to understand his troubled childhood.Writing Style: The writing style was a little difficult to read. It was very gray toned and to be honest a little depressive. I understand what the author was trying to do, because the main character is suffering from a major trauma and we, the reader, as supposed to feel what he is feeling. I guess you say it well written, because I had to take breaks when I was reading this. Final Decision:Rating: 3/5 Stars Overall, I would say this novel was a much darker than I anticipated. But it was well-written and was able to affect my own emotions while I was reading this. It just wasn’t my cup of tea. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading books that dark and full of angst.
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  • Lori L (She Treads Softly)
    January 1, 1970
    Walking the Bones by Randall Silvis is a highly recommended mystery, procedural, and character study.Is the past ever really in the past? Sgt. Ryan DeMarco plans to retire from the Pennsylvania State Police after the recent events (from in the first book in the series, Two Day's Gone) that have tilted his world. Several months previously, his best friend died, as did his baby son, and his marriage ended. DeMarco is also still trying to overcome trauma from years ago in his own childhood and upbr Walking the Bones by Randall Silvis is a highly recommended mystery, procedural, and character study.Is the past ever really in the past? Sgt. Ryan DeMarco plans to retire from the Pennsylvania State Police after the recent events (from in the first book in the series, Two Day's Gone) that have tilted his world. Several months previously, his best friend died, as did his baby son, and his marriage ended. DeMarco is also still trying to overcome trauma from years ago in his own childhood and upbringing.His girlfriend, Trooper Jayme Matson, with the secret assistance of his supervisor, Cmdr. Kyle Bowen, talks DeMarco into taking temporary leave instead. Jayme takes some of her accumulated leave, and the two head out in an RV, planning on rest, relaxation, and hopefully healing. Instead, Jayme's grandmother dies, so the two head to the small town of Aberdeen, Kentucky, for the funeral. What they also find is an unsolved murder and three elderly people who want him to look into the case, a case that the local police have given up on trying to solve.The carefully cleaned and preserved bones of seven young women were found four years ago behind a secret wall in the First Baptist Church. The victims were all African-American teenagers who had gone missing between 1998 and 2004. There were four leading suspects, but no charges were ever brought against anyone. DeMarco knows from experience that clues are always left behind; you just need to find them and a new way to look at the case. He and Jayme decide to look at the case.First, I didn't read Two Day's Gone before Walking the Bones, but I was still able to follow the plot without a problem and highly enjoyed this fine procedural/character study. Plenty of the background information from the first novel is here, certainly enough to follow the case and DeMarco's internal struggles.Additionally, while the case is solved, this is more of a character study rather than an investigation. Sure, they investigate, but along the way DeMarco's character is revealed with scenes from his recent trauma, to his very difficult childhood. He is a man who is close to the breaking point, dealing with memories and regrets from the past and present. De Marco also had a boatload of things he never really addressed from his childhood, especially the abuse, which is surfacing after the other traumatic events.The writing is really quite good and descriptive, as the chapters move between timelines. The plot, while drawn out, held my attention, although I did admittedly start skimming through all the sex scenes between DeMarco and Jayme, which became a bit too much when there were some real problems that needed to be solved and some investigating that needed to be done. All of the characters are well-developed and portrayed as unique individuals. This made the investigation interesting and engaging. I was surprised at the ending.Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of Sourcebooks Landmark.http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2018/0...
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  • Heather Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    This story picks up where Two Days Gone, book 1 in the Ryan DeMarco Mystery ends. DeMarco is still mouning the passing of his son more than a decade earlier and the loss of his friend Professor Huston and his family earlier in the year. Not coping well with this emotional burden, he heads off in an RV along with his romantic partner Trooper Jayme Matson. It isn't long before they get pulled into a cold case that won't let either of them walk away. The bones of seven young women had been found hi This story picks up where Two Days Gone, book 1 in the Ryan DeMarco Mystery ends. DeMarco is still mouning the passing of his son more than a decade earlier and the loss of his friend Professor Huston and his family earlier in the year. Not coping well with this emotional burden, he heads off in an RV along with his romantic partner Trooper Jayme Matson. It isn't long before they get pulled into a cold case that won't let either of them walk away. The bones of seven young women had been found hidden in a church. Though they had been identified, no one was ever charged in their murders. This just doesn't sit well with either Ryan nor Jayme.I found the pace of the story a bit slow in the first quarter where we are learning more about DeMarco's back ground and what events made him the man he is. Additional details of Jayme's background are slowly revealed and tend to balance his memories. Once they hit their stride in this renewed investigation, the pace of the story picks up and begins to soar. At this point I only stopped reading as I couldn't keep my eyes open any longer.I still love the character of Sergeant Ryan DeMarco. He makes for a great investigator and someone I want to spend my time with. Jayme is still a bit of a mystery to me and that's a good thing. If everything about a character was spelled out in the opening chapters, it would make for a less enticing read and would leave less for future chapters.This is an excellent follow-up to the series debut. You could possibly read this on it's own as author Randall Silvis did a wonderful job of catching the reader up on what happened in the first book, though he didn't spoon feed us, he made us work to glean the details. The two are very different style books. The first is more about the investigation and why the murders happened, where this one is more about DeMarco and what makes him tick. I certainly hope that there will be more for him to investigate in the near future.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.In Walking the Bones by Randall Silvis, the discovery of the bones of seven murdered young women is a fascinating mystery that has been impossible to solve for the past few years. In this second installment in the Ryan DeMarco Mystery series, Ryan and his girlfriend (and fellow state trooper) Jayme Matson agree to give the case a second look during their stay in Aberdeen, KY.Still haunted by the death of his baby son several years earlier and struggling to cope with the death of his cl 4.5 stars.In Walking the Bones by Randall Silvis, the discovery of the bones of seven murdered young women is a fascinating mystery that has been impossible to solve for the past few years. In this second installment in the Ryan DeMarco Mystery series, Ryan and his girlfriend (and fellow state trooper) Jayme Matson agree to give the case a second look during their stay in Aberdeen, KY.Still haunted by the death of his baby son several years earlier and struggling to cope with the death of his close friend, Thomas Huston, Ryan is ready to retire from Pennsylvania State Troopers.  Jayme and their boss know he will regret the decision, so they come up with a plan for Ryan to take some time off before his retirement becomes official. While traveling together in their recently purchased RV, Jayme receives word her beloved grandmother has passed away so the couple heads to Aberdeen for her funeral. Not long after their arrival, Dr. Hoyle, Rosemary Toomey and David Vicente appeal to DeMarco to investigate the still unsolved murders of the girls whose remains were found behind a false wall in a local church. Will Ryan and Jayme be able to uncover the identity of their killer?Hoyle, Rosemary and David have worked hard to solve the murders but they have run into dead ends at every turn. Their main suspects are Eli Royce, Aaron Henry, Chad McGintey and Virgil Helm. Royce is the pastor of the church where they remains were discovered and he has since moved out of state and now leads a mega church that is quite prosperous. Aaron is a former teacher who is a convicted child molester. Chad is a white supremacist who was once employed as handyman at the church where the remains  were found. Virgil also worked at the church and no one has seen him since he disappeared right before the bones were discovered.  With high hopes that Ryan and Jayme can figure out which of the four is the young women's killer, Holye, Rosemary and David turn all of their files over to the couple.Although they have their doubts they can achieve what no other law enforcement agency has yet to accomplish, DeMarco and Matson methodically review the information and then proceed with their investigation. They re-interview Royce, McGintey and Henry and begin searching the still missing Helm. Their investigation yields a few new clues but will these discoveries be enough to unmask the killer? Can Ryan and Jayme track down Virgil? And if so, will he have new information that will help them crack the case?Interspersed with the chapters detailing the investigation are flashbacks to Ryan's childhood. These memories are quite informative and provide valuable insight into what shaped him into the man he is today. As he becomes more aware of how deeply the events of his childhood continue to affect him, he gradually realizes he is in danger of repeating the past. DeMarco also continues to wrestle with the longstanding guilt from his son's death and by novel's end, he is much closer to coming to terms with his loss. Ryan also begins to admit the depth of his emotions for Jayme but before their relationship can move forward, he must deal with his still unresolved marriage to his son's mother, Laraine.Despite the confusing weaving back and forth in time in the first several chapters, Walking the Bones is a fast-paced and compelling murder investigation. Jayme and Ryan are complex characters with realistic and easy to relate to strengths and weaknesses. Their investigation into who might have murdered the seven young women is interesting but readers will have to be patient as DeMarco and Matson meticulously unravel the threads of the perplexing case. Randall Silvis takes the story in a very unexpected direction and the truth about who killed the girls and how their remains ended up in the church is somewhat shocking. Old and new fans of the Ryan DeMarco Mystery series will enjoy this newest installment which features a very intrepid crime solving duo.
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  • Sharon May
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks so much to NetGalley, Sourcebooks Landmark, and Randall Silvis for the opportunity to read and review the second Ryan DeMarco mystery - another winner!I read the first book and while it's not a must read to enjoy, you certainly learn the backstory of DeMarco's grieving and resultant issues due to the death of his best friend. Ryan DeMarco, a Sergeant with the Pennsylvania State Patrol, is burned out and contemplating retirement. His first bright spot is his new relationship with fellow tr Thanks so much to NetGalley, Sourcebooks Landmark, and Randall Silvis for the opportunity to read and review the second Ryan DeMarco mystery - another winner!I read the first book and while it's not a must read to enjoy, you certainly learn the backstory of DeMarco's grieving and resultant issues due to the death of his best friend. Ryan DeMarco, a Sergeant with the Pennsylvania State Patrol, is burned out and contemplating retirement. His first bright spot is his new relationship with fellow trooper, Jayme. In order to persuade Ryan to stay on the force, Jayme convinces her boss to try and let her get him away and reconsider. They buy a used RV and head out.When Jayme's grandmother dies, they make a detour to Kentucky to be with her family. There, they find themselves drawn into helping to solve a mystery of 7 dead girls found entombed in a church. The case brings to light Ryan's past and issues about commitment and anger.I really enjoy these books. They may be a tad too long and the author tends to sprinkle the book with words that I have to look up, but they are intriguing mysteries along with lots of character introspection. Can't wait to read the next book in this series!
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  • The Color of Ink
    January 1, 1970
    Ryan Demarco is pulled into an investigation during some much needed down time. Just because secrets and bodies are buried years ago doesn’t mean they will stay hidden. This case takes everything Demarco has and more to wrap it up. I would have loved to read the first prior, but it wasn’t necessary to enjoy this read. The story was well thought out and interesting. It took me a little time to really get pulled into the story, however I’m really enjoying this character and the way the story final Ryan Demarco is pulled into an investigation during some much needed down time. Just because secrets and bodies are buried years ago doesn’t mean they will stay hidden. This case takes everything Demarco has and more to wrap it up. I would have loved to read the first prior, but it wasn’t necessary to enjoy this read. The story was well thought out and interesting. It took me a little time to really get pulled into the story, however I’m really enjoying this character and the way the story finally hooks you in. Sometimes it’s hard for me to really put my finger on that exact thing that makes or breaks a star for a review. This read is one I can tell you exactly what it is. Its equal parts intriguing and slow moving, but I’m not so sure I would change anything. This one is definitely worth a read and deserves that fourth star for sure. Enjoy!
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Well done procedural with a more expansive story about the protagonist- DeMarco- than most. DeMarco and his lover Jamye Matson are on a road trip meant to heal his wounds after the death of his friend and his shooting of the murderer. Both DeMarco ad Matson are expert investigators and, when called upon by a trio in Jayme's hometown to look into the deaths of seven young girls over seven years, well they find themselves back in the saddle. The investigation goes slowly, in part because they aren Well done procedural with a more expansive story about the protagonist- DeMarco- than most. DeMarco and his lover Jamye Matson are on a road trip meant to heal his wounds after the death of his friend and his shooting of the murderer. Both DeMarco ad Matson are expert investigators and, when called upon by a trio in Jayme's hometown to look into the deaths of seven young girls over seven years, well they find themselves back in the saddle. The investigation goes slowly, in part because they aren't locals, but as you might expect, they find there are lots of secrets and lies. No spoilers here but it's a well written and carefully plotted novel. I had not read the first book but that wasn't a problem as Silvis gives you the back story. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.
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  • Anne Walker
    January 1, 1970
    I gave it three stars because the plot was good and the main characters, Sergeant Ryan DeMarco and his girlfriend Trooper Jayme Matson were fairly well-drawn. The writing was more in the style of a formulaic juvenile novel (think RL Shine) where chapters are short and often seem to end arbitrarily but sometimes have that teaser to make you jump in to the next chapter. The main characters are strong but have backgrounds that are so sadly dysfunctional it adds an additional layer of melancholy to I gave it three stars because the plot was good and the main characters, Sergeant Ryan DeMarco and his girlfriend Trooper Jayme Matson were fairly well-drawn. The writing was more in the style of a formulaic juvenile novel (think RL Shine) where chapters are short and often seem to end arbitrarily but sometimes have that teaser to make you jump in to the next chapter. The main characters are strong but have backgrounds that are so sadly dysfunctional it adds an additional layer of melancholy to an already heinous string of murders.
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