Dragon Pearl
To keep the family safe, Min’s mother insists that none of them use any fox-magic, such as Charm or shape-shifting. They must appear human at all times. Min feels hemmed in by the household rules and resents the endless chores, the cousins who crowd her, and the aunties who judge her. She would like nothing more than to escape Jinju, her neglected, dust-ridden, and impoverished planet. She’s counting the days until she can follow her older brother, Jun, into the Space Forces and see more of the Thousand Worlds.When word arrives that Jun is suspected of leaving his post to go in search of the Dragon Pearl, Min knows that something is wrong. Jun would never desert his battle cruiser, even for a mystical object rumored to have tremendous power. She decides to run away to find him and clear his name.Min’s quest will have her meeting gamblers, pirates, and vengeful ghosts. It will involve deception, lies, and sabotage. She will be forced to use more fox-magic than ever before, and to rely on all of her cleverness and bravery. The outcome may not be what she had hoped, but it has the potential to exceed her wildest dreams.

Dragon Pearl Details

TitleDragon Pearl
Author
ReleaseJan 15th, 2019
PublisherRick Riordan Presents
ISBN-139781368013352
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Mythology, Young Adult

Dragon Pearl Review

  • Rick Riordan
    January 1, 1970
    A Thousand Dangerous Worlds Min is just your regular teenaged fox spirit, living with her family on the dusty backwater world of Jinju.Oh, sure, like all fox spirits, she can change shape into whatever she wants: human, fox, even a dining table. And, yes, she has the power to Charm -- to manipulate human emotions and make people see things that aren’t there. But that’s not very exciting when you’re stuck on the family farm, sleeping every night in a crowded common room with your snoring cousins, A Thousand Dangerous Worlds Min is just your regular teenaged fox spirit, living with her family on the dusty backwater world of Jinju.Oh, sure, like all fox spirits, she can change shape into whatever she wants: human, fox, even a dining table. And, yes, she has the power to Charm -- to manipulate human emotions and make people see things that aren’t there. But that’s not very exciting when you’re stuck on the family farm, sleeping every night in a crowded common room with your snoring cousins, spending every day fixing condensers in the hydroponics dome. Min yearns to join the Space Forces like her older brother Jun did – to see the galaxy and have marvelous adventures!That’s not easy for fox spirits, though. When humans colonized the galaxy, they brought all the supernatural races with them: dragons, tigers, goblins, you name it. But fox spirits? They have a bad reputation as unreliable tricksters. Nobody wants them around. Even now, when humans have spread across the Thousand Worlds, there doesn’t seem to be any place for foxes. Min has to hide her true nature. There’s little chance she’ll be as lucky as her brother and escape her dull existence.Then one day, an emissary from the galactic government visits her family farm. He brings horrible news: Min’s beloved brother Jun has disappeared. Worse, he’s suspected of treason -- of abandoning his post to search for a fabled lost relic that has the power to terraform worlds: the Dragon Pearl.Min knows that Jun would never desert the Space Forces. Something must have happened to him. He needs help! Unfortunately, nobody seems interested in what Min thinks, especially after she knocks the emissary unconscious for insulting her brother’s honor. Her family decides to ship her off to the boondocks to keep her out of further trouble, but Min has other ideas. Jun needs her! She runs away from home, intent on following her brother to the stars. One young fox spirit, alone against the galaxy, will risk everything to find her brother and discover the mystery of the long-lost Dragon Pearl.Buckle up, fellow foxes. Get ready for epic space battles, magic and lasers, ghosts and dragons, interstellar pirates and warlike galactic tigers. The Thousand Worlds hold all sorts of danger, but there are also priceless magical treasures to be discovered. If Min succeeds, she might not just save her brother. She might save her entire planet.The Dragon Pearl will be like nothing you’ve ever read: A zesty mix of Korean folklore, magic and science fiction that will leave you longing for more adventures in the Thousand Worlds!
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  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    The cover of this book is sooooo cute!This was a really good middle-grade book!! Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾
  • megs_bookrack
    January 1, 1970
    Middle Grade Adventure at its BEST!!!This rollicking space opera follows 13-y.o., Min, on her quest to find out what happened to her older brother, Jun.When an investigator shows up at her house, accusing her older brother, Jun, of deserting the Space Forces, Min knows something must be wrong. Jun and Min had dreamed of joining the Forces their whole lives and going on grand adventures together. Now that he is a part of that world, Min knows he would never disgrace his family by deserting.Forced Middle Grade Adventure at its BEST!!!This rollicking space opera follows 13-y.o., Min, on her quest to find out what happened to her older brother, Jun.When an investigator shows up at her house, accusing her older brother, Jun, of deserting the Space Forces, Min knows something must be wrong. Jun and Min had dreamed of joining the Forces their whole lives and going on grand adventures together. Now that he is a part of that world, Min knows he would never disgrace his family by deserting.Forced to flee her home, Min sets out in search of the truth with the hopes of clearing her brother's name and bringing him home. Very quickly, Min is forced to rely on her intelligence and quick wit, as she eludes security, works in a gambling den, stows away on a ship, impersonates a Space Forces Cadet and so much more. She discovers her own strength and makes some great new friends along the way.Min is a really well-rounded, enjoyable character to follow along with. I grew attached to her and loved watching her development over the course of the book. The side-characters, as well, were great. Humorous and likable, they truly added to the story, particularly Sujin and Haneul. It was also great to see a non-binary side character play such an important role in a Middle Grade story.The ending was fantastic, but really it was fantastic the whole way through. Nice, fast pace, smooth transitions from different scenes and a strong build-up to the end. I think it left off in an excellent spot to continue on with the story. I am definitely hoping for more books in this world and with these characters. It is my understanding that we will be getting more. (fingers crossed)The bottom line is, I really had a blast (pun intended) reading this book which, to me, is what Middle Grade is all about. It should be a joy to read a Middle Grade adventure book and I was not disappointed with this one. The writing was very, very strong. I was swept up in the world and I thought the sci-fi elements were top-notch; no surprise considering the expertise and experience that Yoon Ha Lee brings to the table.Thank you so much to the publisher, Disney Book Group and Rick Riordan Presents, for providing me with a copy of this to read and review. I truly appreciate the opportunity. I think RRP Imprint is providing a great service to our book community by offering a platform for diverse voices from around the world to share their myth, legends and folklore. I cannot wait to read more of Min in the future!Original: Happy Book Birthday to Dragon Pearl!!!This releases today, you guys. I am halfway through and having so, so, so much fun reading it. Tons of cool magical concepts, great action, super diverse cast of characters...all the good things!Thank you Disney Book Group and Rick Riordan Presents! Happy to receive this one early - after how much I enjoyed The Storm Runner, I know I will love this one too!!!
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't been this excited for a middle grade novel ever. This sounds like literal perfection.Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch
  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    I read this specifically because it was penned by Yoon Ha Lee. I'm a completionist that way.BUT, I'll be honest, I am not particularly fond of most YA. It tends to be cookie-cutter plots and characters that feel like dough. It's fine if you like fat and sweet things that aren't that good for you but still make you feel warm and fuzzy afterward. And sometimes not even that... sometimes there is just the gnawing guilt and the shame.Not here, though! I really enjoyed it. Yoon Ha Lee proves he can w I read this specifically because it was penned by Yoon Ha Lee. I'm a completionist that way.BUT, I'll be honest, I am not particularly fond of most YA. It tends to be cookie-cutter plots and characters that feel like dough. It's fine if you like fat and sweet things that aren't that good for you but still make you feel warm and fuzzy afterward. And sometimes not even that... sometimes there is just the gnawing guilt and the shame.Not here, though! I really enjoyed it. Yoon Ha Lee proves he can write a cool young Young Adult novel. I'd say the prime age is 11-14. It's all tricksy with a familiar blend of fantasy elements, magic in the way of charms, illusions, and speaking with the dead... mixed with space-opera elements of the 1000 worlds, big ships, lasers, and high-tech security. The mashup is, by now, quite familiar to us. All that's left is a fun story told well. :)Ghosts, more ghosts, spaceship captains with wonky motives, stowaways, impersonations, and the overriding desire to find her poor maligned brother drives this novel, and nicely so. It's a great little adventure.
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  • Nicole N. (A Myriad of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Space opera based on KOREAN mythology. My people! Someone hold me.
  • Dani - Perspective of a Writer
    January 1, 1970
    Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...To keep the family safe, 13 year old Min’s mother insists that none of them use any fox-magic, such as Charm or shape-shifting. They must appear human at all times. Min feels hemmed in and resents the endless chores, the cousins who crowd her, and the aunties who judge her. She would like nothing more than to escape Jinju, her neglected, dust-ridden, and impoverished planet. When word arrives that Jun is suspected of leaving his post to go in se Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...To keep the family safe, 13 year old Min’s mother insists that none of them use any fox-magic, such as Charm or shape-shifting. They must appear human at all times. Min feels hemmed in and resents the endless chores, the cousins who crowd her, and the aunties who judge her. She would like nothing more than to escape Jinju, her neglected, dust-ridden, and impoverished planet. When word arrives that Jun is suspected of leaving his post to go in search of the Dragon Pearl, Min knows that something is wrong. Jun would never desert his battle cruiser, even for a mystical object rumored to have tremendous power. She decides to run away to find him and clear his name.The short review...I see dragons and my eyes gain hearts and I can't help but want to read the book... but add KOREAN MYTHOLOGY and I am totally there!! I have to say that I ended up really enjoying Dragon Pearl especially because of all the Korean tidbits woven into the story (because as a k-drama fan I already knew about most of them so it was like finding the best easter eggs!!) I can totally say READ THIS BOOK because I want everyone to know about and enjoy the little cultural essences of being Korean... That said I didn't quite enjoy the book as much as Rick Riordan explains he did in his introduction in the book (and on goodreads). Yes, it has a monster amount of adventure woven through out and Min sure is a plucky heroine that makes you want to root for her, even when she's lying. It's just everything happened so easily... There was only one moment in all the book where I thought "oh no, she's not going to get away with her shenanigans this time!"This is a middle grade book though. Reality isn't the point here, having a fun adventure is and Yoon Ha Lee does take us on a wild ride with all sorts of magical and sci-fi goodies to ooh and aww over!Cover & Title grade -> B+I really do like the cover of Dragon Pearl... I like that her fox spirit is embodied on the cover as a clue as to what the book is about... And you can certainly tell that its about space. It doesn't really give you the sense of adventure that is in the book though which feels to me like a missed opportunity. This is especially so since this is a middle grade book and not a young adult novel as the cover gives the sense that the protagonist is a lot older than she is.Why did I enjoy Dragon Pearl even though it's certainly a middle grade book?-The Fox Magic!The fox magic is really neat, not only can Min shape shift but she can use charm. She doesn't use it often at home so its not until she's out and about that she really understands all she can do charming others. But don't worry she gets it quickly.-The Goblin and The Dragon + The Tiger!The foxes have the worst reputation, but the best thing is that they are in like company! The other races all have their own qualities and we get to meet the other three supernatural beings up close and personal. The friendship Min finds is really quite realistic too.-Sibling Love!Min is who Min is partially due to her relationship with Jun. She wants to see other worlds because jun inspired her to want to join him. They spent a lot of time star gazing and bonding over these dreams and ambitions. This was quite a powerful relationship with an ending to match!-Ghosts Go A'Haunting!Ghosts are a HUGE deal in Korean mythology and Min gets to meet one... This was really a fun part of the story because its so unexpected... It certainly was a strength in Dragon Pearl. The ghost makes the entire middle of the story super fun.-Space Ship + Space Military!I really loved how mechanically inclined Min was and how it came up in the story as she served in the Space Forces. Really the entire story on the ship was quite fun as she delves into the mystery of why her brother went missing.As a Writer...Min is a character that I had to learn to love. She is quite flawed in the beginning, acting impetuously (and rather stupidly) making assumptions without listening to the facts. That maybe could be fine, but she was quite the liar lying whenever it suited her. Even as an adult I started to get really fed up with it plus added to that she burned bridges so fast! Really she set herself up ad never being able to go home and not thinking about that fact. It was all such a contrived beginning that I really worried at first.Once we left Min's planet Dragon Pearl really took off and became a fun adventure. While I'm not sure about her example to her young readers as NOTHING she did had any sort of consequences I'm positive those same kids will excitedly follow Min on her journey.Dragon Pearl is a grand adventure, perfect for middle grade readers who crave a story that a young adult could love. Told with Korean Mythology in the background we get a wonderful cultural experience that widens readers horizons. Rick Riordan has added another fun read to his bookshelf for kids!⋆ ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Authenticity⋆ ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Writing Style⋆ ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Plot & Pacing⋆ ⭐⭐⭐⭐ World BuildingThanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. It has not influenced my opinions.______________________You can find this review and many others on my book blog @ Perspective of a Writer. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter...Please like this review if you enjoyed it! *bow* *bow* It helps me out a ton!!
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    My first book by this author and I was confused why he'd need a "Rick Riordan presents" on the cover. I still don't know. But Rick Riordan has character art and more insight on his website so maybe he's writing in the universe of the thousand worlds?We follow 13-year-old Minas she is told that her older brother has deserted the military. To clear his name and possibly save him, she embarks on a journey all alone. Apparently, it all has to do with the mythical Dragon Pearl that can supposedly ter My first book by this author and I was confused why he'd need a "Rick Riordan presents" on the cover. I still don't know. But Rick Riordan has character art and more insight on his website so maybe he's writing in the universe of the thousand worlds?We follow 13-year-old Minas she is told that her older brother has deserted the military. To clear his name and possibly save him, she embarks on a journey all alone. Apparently, it all has to do with the mythical Dragon Pearl that can supposedly terraform an entire planet within only a few hours (or destroy it). Naturally, since the rumours of the pearl have spread, several groups of people are on the hunt for it, making Min's quest all the more dangerous. As if a cursed planet full of ghosts wasn't dangerous enough already.I should mention that this isn't just a scifi story about humanity being scattered amongst a thousand worlds. No, there are many other species here, such as magic-wielding goblins (including invisibility caps and wands), dragons (capable of weather control/manipulation), ghosts, and shapeshifters. And yes, Min is one such magic creature. In fact, she is a fox spirit who can change into all kinds of things and "charm" people to influence their feelings and (to some extent) thoughts.Ancient artifacts, intrigues, gambling parlors, spaceships, a blend of Asian folklore and science fiction. But there is also prejudice and discrimination, the annoyance of a big family and chores, friendship and inevitable betrayal. Even gender issues, but so subtly realized, it was barely noticeable, perfectly normal, as it should be. Thus, quite a lot was packed into this story that was definitely written for younger readers. But while it is clear that the story was written for children and young teens (younger than the typical YA crowd), it is still very well written, the adventure sweeps you along and you simply have a good time. What more can one ask of a book?
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  • Kath (Read Forevermore)
    January 1, 1970
    A super fun and adventure filled book that any middle grade (and older) person will enjoy. I was honestly so happy when I heard about this book and my heart was literally jumping out of me because ASIAN REP IN MIDDLE GRADE, I'M LIVIN!! Also, the plotting, the character development, the writing and everything was honestly phenomenal. It taught important lessons, and like all books from the RRP series - with great humor that made me reminisce my younger years of reading uncle Rick's books. **An ar A super fun and adventure filled book that any middle grade (and older) person will enjoy. I was honestly so happy when I heard about this book and my heart was literally jumping out of me because ASIAN REP IN MIDDLE GRADE, I'M LIVIN!! Also, the plotting, the character development, the writing and everything was honestly phenomenal. It taught important lessons, and like all books from the RRP series - with great humor that made me reminisce my younger years of reading uncle Rick's books. **An arc of this book was sent to me by Disney Books/Rick Riordan Presents.
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  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    "Space opera based on Korean mythology."EXCUSE ME?! *hits Want to Read until it breaks*
  • Svenka
    January 1, 1970
    "Space opera based on Korean mythology."Say no more.
  • may ☆彡
    January 1, 1970
    Finally, a book based on KOREAN mythology!! I think I’ve been waiting forever for a book like this!!!!!
  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Korean mythology.A feisty gumiho (fox girl).A plot that does not let up.And sci fi!Color me delighted.Seriously.I was delighted and entertained by this incredibly original and complex world and the action-heavy plot. Occasionally I was like, "just let the girl take a nap or something!" because of the non-stop pace, but Min's relentless temerity and cleverness always saw her through every situation. Of course, her wit and cleverness is what you would expect of a fox.I loved the magic system and t Korean mythology.A feisty gumiho (fox girl).A plot that does not let up.And sci fi!Color me delighted.Seriously.I was delighted and entertained by this incredibly original and complex world and the action-heavy plot. Occasionally I was like, "just let the girl take a nap or something!" because of the non-stop pace, but Min's relentless temerity and cleverness always saw her through every situation. Of course, her wit and cleverness is what you would expect of a fox.I loved the magic system and the coexistence of supernaturals and humans together, along with the presence of ghosts and how everything was intermingled with Korean culture and legend—and it was pure space opera style science fiction, complete with LGBTQIA+ representation (emphasis on the plus! nonbinary/agender rep!! polyam rep!) and military science fiction that made sense.While at times I felt this verged into more YA territory, I went away with the feeling that this was an upper MG novel that would be a solid bridge for MG readers looking to dip their toes into YA waters.Now I'm really going to have going to have read Ninefox Gambit, which has been sitting on my Kindle for a couple years now, because it looks like this book is a standalone and I need more of this author. (view spoiler)[Even if there is a glaring plot hole in that sword. I seriously though Jun had been trapped in it for a while. But why did it smell like him???? (hide spoiler)]I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Alexandra Elend Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    This was... not what I had been waiting. A bit of a let down to be honest.RTC.__________________I've been really excited to read this one thanks to that wonderfully beautiful cover. Yes, the cover influenced me a lot, but the premise is really interesting as well.Ever since reading Aru Shah and the End of Time I've gained more confidence in the works from Riordan Presents and, therefore, I think that giving this book an opportunity is only fair. I'm still nervous though.
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  • Fran
    January 1, 1970
    Such a gorgeous, excellent, beautiful adventure. I would like more right now, please.
  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Min is a young fox spirit living on a planet that has very limited resources. This means she is growing up relatively poor. When her brother is accused of abandoning his position in the galactic fleet, Min runs away to save her family from her rash actions and to find out what really happened to her beloved brother.Min makes mistakes, she discovers things about herself and the choices she makes and adjusts to become the person she really wants to be.Yoon Ha Lee writes a compelling tale of space Min is a young fox spirit living on a planet that has very limited resources. This means she is growing up relatively poor. When her brother is accused of abandoning his position in the galactic fleet, Min runs away to save her family from her rash actions and to find out what really happened to her beloved brother.Min makes mistakes, she discovers things about herself and the choices she makes and adjusts to become the person she really wants to be.Yoon Ha Lee writes a compelling tale of space travel and teenage self discover as Min struggles to find and save her brother. I was invested in the outcome and Min's misadventures. Some of her decision making was cringe worth but relative to a young teen lying her way across her universe. 3.5 starsI received this ARC copy of Dragon Pearl from Disney Book Group. This is my honest and voluntary review. Dragon Pearl is set for publication Jan. 15, 2019.My Rating: 3.5 starsWritten by: Yoon Ha LeAge Range: 8 - 12 yearsGrade Level: 3 - 7Series: Rick Riordan PresentsHardcover: 320 pagesPublisher: Rick Riordan Presents Publication Date: January 15, 2019ISBN-10: 136801335XISBN-13: 978-1368013352Genre: Space Opera | Scifi | Fantasy | TeenAmazon: https://www.amazon.com/Dragon-Pearl-Y...Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/drag...Itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/drag...
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  • Isis
    January 1, 1970
    Aw, this is just delightful. Thirteen-year-old Min runs away from her home planet to find out the truth behind her brother's supposed desertion from the Space Forces, and also, she's a fox. In fact this universe is populated with not just humans, but also supernaturals: creatures from Korean mythology who appear in human form but are actually foxes, tigers, dragons, and goblins. They may have magical powers, but they also have human emotions and human fallibility.It's a fun adventure, suitable f Aw, this is just delightful. Thirteen-year-old Min runs away from her home planet to find out the truth behind her brother's supposed desertion from the Space Forces, and also, she's a fox. In fact this universe is populated with not just humans, but also supernaturals: creatures from Korean mythology who appear in human form but are actually foxes, tigers, dragons, and goblins. They may have magical powers, but they also have human emotions and human fallibility.It's a fun adventure, suitable for the intended middle-grade audience but not shying away from higher stakes and greater consequences. Along the way there are also moral lessons about family and friends and responsibilities, leavened with a solid dollop of humor.
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  • Sophia (Bookwyrming Thoughts)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from Disney-Hyperion in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee is the latest in Rick Riordan Presents, an imprint under Disney that “highlights cultures and mythologies from around the world,” selected by author Rick Riordan. An #ownvoices novel based on Korean mythology and folklore, Lee’s novel follows a fox spirit named Min who runs off on a space adventure to find her m I received this book for free from Disney-Hyperion in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee is the latest in Rick Riordan Presents, an imprint under Disney that “highlights cultures and mythologies from around the world,” selected by author Rick Riordan. An #ownvoices novel based on Korean mythology and folklore, Lee’s novel follows a fox spirit named Min who runs off on a space adventure to find her missing brother and instead finds the highly sought-after Dragon Pearl to save the Thousand Worlds.I found myself struggling with Dragon Pearl at times. There are moments the novel slows from the pace of the action, which could potentially drag the reader’s attention away from Min’s journey. Min’s quest to find her brother is easy, but it is expected as the novel is aimed at a middle-grade audience.Ignore the slowness and the ease of the journey, however, and the story is a magical ride through the Thousand Worlds. I loved seeing Min encountering obstacles and working her way around them while figuring out her own magic. Most importantly, I enjoyed seeing how valuable her relationships are, both with her brother and with the developing friendships with the other cadets.Fans of Rick Riordan’s novels who enjoy a journey through space with touches of mythology will love going on an adventure of their own with Min through Yoon Ha Lee’s Dragon Pearl.This review is originally posted on 60 Seconds Online Magazine
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  • Kristi Housman Confessions of a YA Reader
    January 1, 1970
    There were a lot of things I really liked about Dragon Pearl, but I was a little bit disappointed, too.  I think it was the pacing more than anything.  Certain parts flowed well, but parts were slow and other parts wrapped up too quickly.  Overall, I enjoyed it though.Min is a 13 year old gumiho, a fox.  She can change shapes and use her magic to get into people's heads.  She can make them believe that they never saw her or that someone didn't  pass by them.  She is rarely in her fox form, and u There were a lot of things I really liked about Dragon Pearl, but I was a little bit disappointed, too.  I think it was the pacing more than anything.  Certain parts flowed well, but parts were slow and other parts wrapped up too quickly.  Overall, I enjoyed it though.Min is a 13 year old gumiho, a fox.  She can change shapes and use her magic to get into people's heads.  She can make them believe that they never saw her or that someone didn't  pass by them.  She is rarely in her fox form, and usually looks like a young girl.  Her brother Jun is in the space force and Min was hoping to join him there in two years.  But a man shows up at their house and says that Jun was a deserter.  Min knows that can't be correct, so she sneaks away to find out what happened.  It's believed that foxes are no longer around and people are afraid of them.  So Min has to use her powers, but not get caught.She is able to finally get onto Jun's ship after a lot of other issues.  She takes on the body of a ghost she meets on the ship and pretends to be a cadet.  She finds out more about Jun's mission and why he was missing.   Min must also get the Dragon Pearl before it ends up in the wrong hands. There is a decent amount of action at times and also some betrayal that made the story interesting.  I also loved how there were gumiho, ghosts, tigers, dragon, goblins, space pirates, and more.  I ended up giving Dragon Pearl 4 stars.  It was closer to 3  1/2, but there was enough I liked to push it up a bit.  Thank you to the publisher and netgalley for my copy for review.
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  • Ceillie Simkiss
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come
  • Lourdes
    January 1, 1970
    This got me hooked from the very beginning. Things I loved Min our 13yo main character who's a shape shifting fox spirit, side characters, we have goblins, ghost nonbinary characters and oh everything about it. Review - https://chapterswelove.com/2019/01/15...Thank you to the author and Netgalley for the eArc
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  • ♠️ Tabi ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    oh my gosh was this book written specifically for me???foxes + magic + sci-fi + Korean mythology + expansive space worlds + dragons???????????
  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    Although I've loved all the other Rick Riordan Presents books, I was a little skeptical about this one because the premise seemed like A Lot?? Like I'm here for Korean trickster fox spirits, and I'm here for space opera, but both of them combined seemed like....a lot?? But it actually all worked together really well, and that will teach ME a lesson about doubting Rick Riordan's empire. It's a really fun story and a great example of how easy it can be to make a story inclusive! (eg in the space a Although I've loved all the other Rick Riordan Presents books, I was a little skeptical about this one because the premise seemed like A Lot?? Like I'm here for Korean trickster fox spirits, and I'm here for space opera, but both of them combined seemed like....a lot?? But it actually all worked together really well, and that will teach ME a lesson about doubting Rick Riordan's empire. It's a really fun story and a great example of how easy it can be to make a story inclusive! (eg in the space army, everyone's nametags have gender pronoun identifiers, making it simple and easy for the narrator to identify the nonbinary characters).
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Dragon Pearl is an imaginative fusion of space opera and Korean mythology about a thirteen-year-old gumiho who leaves her planet to find her brother Jun—and clear his name after he's accused of deserting the Thousand Worlds Space Forces to pursue the powerful Dragon Pearl. I loved the premise of this book and thought it had some great elements, but it never quite came together as a whole for me. It bounced from situation to situation after Min left home, and there were too many characters with t Dragon Pearl is an imaginative fusion of space opera and Korean mythology about a thirteen-year-old gumiho who leaves her planet to find her brother Jun—and clear his name after he's accused of deserting the Thousand Worlds Space Forces to pursue the powerful Dragon Pearl. I loved the premise of this book and thought it had some great elements, but it never quite came together as a whole for me. It bounced from situation to situation after Min left home, and there were too many characters with too little characterization for it to be an engrossing read. However, I suspect it will resonate more with middle grade age readers and those who enjoy plot-driven stories over character-driven ones.My Rating: 5/10 — It's OkayFull Review on My Website
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  • autumn
    January 1, 1970
    dnf at page 195unfortunately i thought this had too much dispassionate telling and not enough showing; i didn't feel engaged in any of it. also the plot triggers were pretty flimsy and unrealistic. the korean mythology portrayed is really interesting though!representation: the author is a korean american trans gay man. the setting is based in korean mythology so every character is korean. there is a nonbinary side character (which is treated as a common thing in this world)
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  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    I've accepted that I'm just not going to get around to finishing this. It was super creative, and I loved the idea, and I bet it would an awesome book if I was still in the middle-grade age range. I highly recommend it for any kids who love space adventures and awesome magic. This book tastes like grape juice.
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  • ambsreads
    January 1, 1970
    full review to come.
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Kinda want to read this just to have the novel experience of actually understanding something Yoon Ha Lee has written.
  • Brittney
    January 1, 1970
    *Thanks so much to Disneybooks for sending me an e-arc via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.*this review may contain slight spoilers, first paragraph of review depicts information all found in the goodreads summary2.5 / 5 starsDragon Pearl follows the adventure of Min as she embarks on a quest to seek her brother to clear his name. Min’s brother is condemned for his potential abandonment of his post in the Space Forces. Min does not believe that he is a traitor to his duty, so decides *Thanks so much to Disneybooks for sending me an e-arc via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.*this review may contain slight spoilers, first paragraph of review depicts information all found in the goodreads summary2.5 / 5 starsDragon Pearl follows the adventure of Min as she embarks on a quest to seek her brother to clear his name. Min’s brother is condemned for his potential abandonment of his post in the Space Forces. Min does not believe that he is a traitor to his duty, so decides to find him and clear his name. Min is a thirteen-year-old girl with “fox-magic” that she can manipulate to her own various advantages.I was really intrigued by this story from the beginning to about thirty percent into the book. However, after the thirty percent, it began to gradually grow flat for me. This book is categorized as middle-grade but I honestly don’t view this as a middle-grade book. The language in this book is fairly advanced for a younger audience. If anything, I would say this is extremely upper middle-grade or young adult. Also, I don’t think Min reads like a thirteen-year-old protagonist. Min is extremely mature for her age in this book and she somehow is able to do most everything on her own. *slight spoiler warningThe book started to fall flat once she was on the Pale Lightning. The storyline almost seems to go in a different direction and too many things begin to happen at once. I honestly found this section to the end to be quite boring and confusing. I started to become annoyed by Min and I no longer felt intrigued by her journey or purpose. I was also indifferent towards each new character. This is total opposition from my feelings from the first thirty percent, because I thought the story was well-developed during this section. At times this book attempts to read as middle-grade but then it is suddenly disrupted by language and other inclusions. Min was just not a very personal character to me and I lost all connection with her over time. This book takes an all-action sort of route as it seems like something is always continuously happening. Also certain elements were repeated quite a bit which was a little annoying. I should probably include some positives now. I really liked the inclusion of magic and mythology. I did think some of the magic was a bit too unrealistic and extreme, but I genuinely enjoyed most of magical portrayal. I thought Min’s family history and people were interesting, as well as the world that Min lives in. I also appreciated the author’s subtle inclusion of addressing gender in a way that is desired by each unique individual. The author recognizes that people should address each person by how they view themselves. All characters were supportive of this inclusion and no shaming or insensitivity was included. This was a normal recognition for all characters which was definitely refreshing to see in a book intended for a young audience.I can’t honestly say that I would recommend this book. The story definitely fell flat for me and it was somewhat a struggle to finish. I do hope that a young audience and other readers will appreciate this book though.
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  • Lara Lillibridge
    January 1, 1970
    DRAGON PEARL is a essentially a girl's quest to save her brother, beautifully written as a blend between the old and new—heavily influenced by Korean folklore and set in a distant universe. It actually works seamlessly. The story feels old and new at the same time—grounded in tradition but set in the future. I have no doubt this will be the next Star Wars or other big box office hit someday. Although this was suggested to me on a Middle Grade list, It feels more YA to me. The protagonist, Min, i DRAGON PEARL is a essentially a girl's quest to save her brother, beautifully written as a blend between the old and new—heavily influenced by Korean folklore and set in a distant universe. It actually works seamlessly. The story feels old and new at the same time—grounded in tradition but set in the future. I have no doubt this will be the next Star Wars or other big box office hit someday. Although this was suggested to me on a Middle Grade list, It feels more YA to me. The protagonist, Min, is identified as 13 years old at opening, she definitely seems more mature. The further I read, the harder it was for me to picture her as 13...she felt much closer to 17 to me—particular as she drives a scooter and works in a gambling den. As she moves around the ship and works as a cadet, I really couldn't' sustain the idea that she was 13. That's not a bad thing, and of course it is only my opinion. While young audiences will love that she is really a fox and has fox magic, she is mostly materialized in human form, and the length of the book (over 300 pages) also contributed to it feeling more YA to me. But I think this book will appeal to readers of all ages, and the language is direct and clear and is easily accessible to readers of many skill levels. The way Min materializes as female and male will additionally allow children of different genders to easily see themselves in the protagonist. Noon Ha Lee's world-building is smooth, visual without being too bogged down. Her writing is highly polished, tight, and without wasted words. There are little moments of humor—when shape shifting she got the dimensions wrong for her clothing and came back to human shape with her clothes tugging at her elbows and knees. (17)This book is diverse and inclusive. Women and men are equally represented in positions of authority (guards, ship captains) I love the nondairy characters, who are smoothly introduced as no big deal, for example:“This particular badge has a small symbol next to the name that let me know they should be addressed neutrally, as neither female nor male.” (38)Heavy themes of family, loyalty, and also resourcefulness and self reliance.I received a free copy on Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.
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