The Sun Does Shine
A powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent thirty years on death row for a crime he didn't commit.In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free.But with no money and a different system of justice for a poor black man in the South, Hinton was sentenced to death by electrocution. He spent his first three years on Death Row at Holman State Prison in agonizing silence—full of despair and anger toward all those who had sent an innocent man to his death. But as Hinton realized and accepted his fate, he resolved not only to survive, but find a way to live on Death Row. For the next twenty-seven years he was a beacon—transforming not only his own spirit, but those of his fellow inmates, fifty-four of whom were executed mere feet from his cell. With the help of civil rights attorney and bestselling author of Just Mercy, Bryan Stevenson, Hinton won his release in 2015. With a foreword by Stevenson, The Sun Does Shine is an extraordinary testament to the power of hope sustained through the darkest times. Destined to be a classic memoir of wrongful imprisonment and freedom won, Hinton’s memoir tells his dramatic thirty-year journey and shows how you can take away a man’s freedom, but you can’t take away his imagination, humor, or joy.

The Sun Does Shine Details

TitleThe Sun Does Shine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 27th, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250124715
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Crime, True Crime

The Sun Does Shine Review

  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Last year I read Bryan Stevenson's book Just Mercy through Blogging for Books. It was crushing to read about a justice system based on convictions and political gain at the expense of innocent men. It led me to read I Can't Breathe by Matt Taibbi about the death of Earl Garner and Michelle Ko's Reading with Patrick about her former student who lands in jail. Each book is a moving account of the stories behind the Black Lives Matter movement. So when I saw that one of the Death Row inmates that S Last year I read Bryan Stevenson's book Just Mercy through Blogging for Books. It was crushing to read about a justice system based on convictions and political gain at the expense of innocent men. It led me to read I Can't Breathe by Matt Taibbi about the death of Earl Garner and Michelle Ko's Reading with Patrick about her former student who lands in jail. Each book is a moving account of the stories behind the Black Lives Matter movement. So when I saw that one of the Death Row inmates that Stevenson had represented had written his own book I had to read it.Ray Hinton had a record and had paid his dues. He was working in a guarded facility when a murder took place, but an enemy in romance told police that he had seen Ray at the crime scene.Ray was poor. Ray was black. Ray had a record. With lousy representation, a partially blind expert munitions witness, and the system stacked against him, he was sent to prison for murders he did not commit. The Sun Does Shine tells of his struggle for justice, his decline into anger and hatred and how he found hope and acceptance. He became a model prisoner, befriending the other inmates and working to improve their lives. He asked for their food to be covered to keep out dust and insects. He asked for books to keep the inmates from dwelling on their problems. He started a book club. He kept up morale.Ray changed lives. A former KKK member who killed a black teenager called Ray his best friend.It was the continuing love of his mother and support of his best friend that kept Ray going for thirty years. Even after his mother passed, he heard her inspiring voice to keep fighting. Ray knew he had what many others on Death Row had lacked: a loving family and abiding faith.Bryan Stevenson was overworked but took on Ray's case. They had to fight the Alabama court system that would not accept the evidence that would prove Ray's innocence. When Ray was finally released he had lived on Death Row longer than he had been free. It was a shock; the world had changed. The first night of freedom he slept in the bathroom because the bedroom was too large and strange. He was given no compensation. He had no Social Security or pension or savings built up. He would have to work to support himself the rest of his life.I was devastated and I was inspired by Ray's story. I received a free ebook from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    You need to read this book! Heart-wrenchingly tragic and extremely inspiring - written with true flair and style.
  • sarah corbett morgan
    January 1, 1970
    WOW! This is a must-read memoir. Somewhere in the middle of Ray's story about his 30 years on Alabama's death row, I realized he'd been wrongfully convicted while I was still in nursing school (1985). While he survived and watched 54 prisoners walk past his cell to be electrocuted, I graduated with a BS, worked a 20-year career, raised my kids, married again, built a house, and traveled. Ray stayed in his 5 x 8-foot cell 23 hours a day and fought for the truth. The enormity of the injustice is s WOW! This is a must-read memoir. Somewhere in the middle of Ray's story about his 30 years on Alabama's death row, I realized he'd been wrongfully convicted while I was still in nursing school (1985). While he survived and watched 54 prisoners walk past his cell to be electrocuted, I graduated with a BS, worked a 20-year career, raised my kids, married again, built a house, and traveled. Ray stayed in his 5 x 8-foot cell 23 hours a day and fought for the truth. The enormity of the injustice is staggering. Convicted of two murders on false testimony, trumped-up ballistics reports, and underrepresented by a court-appointed lawyer, 29-year-old Ray was sentenced to death. It is only because of who he is as a person and an incredible lawyer who believed in him that the prosecution eventually dropped the charges. But it took the Supreme Court of the United States to make them do it. They have yet to apologize or compensate him for the lost years. While incarcerated Ray, at first filled with hate for everyone involved, learned to forgive. He became a model for others, formed a book club, and practiced compassion for others. The way he survived those endless days and nights is a most extraordinary tale. At the end of the book, there is a list of men sitting on death row in the United States as of March 2017. As Ray points out, statistics show that one out of every ten of them is innocent. The list is long. Too long. Read them all, he says, and pause at every tenth name and say…"innocent." I'd also like to give a shout out to Lara Love Hardin who helped Ray tell his story. Her words moved me deeply and made this book a more than compelling read.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Publication Date: March 27, 2018 (advanced copy made possible by Net GalleyIn education, we call things like humor, creativity, persistence, work ethic, faith, and collaboration as "soft" skills. They are off content skills that are not graded or tested, but students who have these soft skills seem better equipped not just for school but for life. The wrenching memoir of an innocent black man who spent 30 years on death row in Alabama not for any crimes he committed but for being poor, black and Publication Date: March 27, 2018 (advanced copy made possible by Net GalleyIn education, we call things like humor, creativity, persistence, work ethic, faith, and collaboration as "soft" skills. They are off content skills that are not graded or tested, but students who have these soft skills seem better equipped not just for school but for life. The wrenching memoir of an innocent black man who spent 30 years on death row in Alabama not for any crimes he committed but for being poor, black and convenient is really a model of how these soft skills helped Mr. Hinton to survive on death row. He not only survived, but he helped others, even if it was just to help others to escape their minds for a little while. This is a story of compassion and unconditional love. In this world of #blacklivesmatter, this is a story of hope, faith and love.
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  • Morgan Tallman
    January 1, 1970
    Thirty years. THIRTY years. Years. Anthony Ray Hinton spent 30 years fighting for his life. Fighting for his innocence. And I know, he will spend the rest of his years fighting to end the death penalty. This book was an emotional roller coaster, and I can not even begin to imagine what those 30 years must have been like. I'm only 20 years old, 2/3 of his time in prison. I'd spend another 1/3 of my entire life so far, in a 5 x 7 cell. The injustice in Ray's case, in Alabama, is unimaginable to me Thirty years. THIRTY years. Years. Anthony Ray Hinton spent 30 years fighting for his life. Fighting for his innocence. And I know, he will spend the rest of his years fighting to end the death penalty. This book was an emotional roller coaster, and I can not even begin to imagine what those 30 years must have been like. I'm only 20 years old, 2/3 of his time in prison. I'd spend another 1/3 of my entire life so far, in a 5 x 7 cell. The injustice in Ray's case, in Alabama, is unimaginable to me. I don't have words to explain everything this book made me feel, and how powerful and important it is for everyone to read his story. To hear his story. The sun does shine, Ray. And I sincerely hope you get to, or have already been able to, meet Sandra Bullock
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    EVERYBODY needs to read this book. It moved me profoundly. It is the true story of an innocent black man on death row in Alabama for 29 years. I don't normally read non fiction (this does actually read like a novel) but I was recommended it. Now I am passing my recommendation on. Read it people!!!
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  • Barb
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely well written, reads like a novel and is impossible to put down for very long.This book needs to be read by everyone.
  • Melody Boggs
    January 1, 1970
    This review can also be found on my blog, Where the Words Take Me.Thank you, NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press, for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. It’s strange what you can get used to. When I got the email promoting this book, I was blown away by the premise. In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton, a black man living in Alabama, was convicted of two counts of murder, one count of attempted murder, and armed robbery and sentenced to death by electrocution. The catch? He was totally inn This review can also be found on my blog, Where the Words Take Me.Thank you, NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press, for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. It’s strange what you can get used to. When I got the email promoting this book, I was blown away by the premise. In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton, a black man living in Alabama, was convicted of two counts of murder, one count of attempted murder, and armed robbery and sentenced to death by electrocution. The catch? He was totally innocent of the crimes they accused him of committing; the only evidence the prosecutors offered during the trial was his mother’s gun as the murder weapon, which hadn’t been fired once in over 25 years. This so-called “evidence” along with bogus ballistics reports and racism from an all-white jury, judge, and prosecution ensured that Ray would spend almost 30 years on death row before he was ruled innocent in 2015.Ray’s innocence, however, doesn’t happen magically, if the time it took is any indication. What follows in The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row is a long, uphill struggle for the truth to become known and justice to be served. Ray’s story is one of finding hope in hopelessness, love instead of hatred, and light instead of darkness–and he struggles at first. For three years, Ray doesn’t speak to anyone on death row, letting hate and rage fester inside of him as he loses faith in almost everything he’s ever believed in.Until one day, the inmate in the cell next to him starts crying–a common occurrence on death row–but he sounds so anguished, so hopeless that Ray realizes something crucial about us humans. Hatred is a choice but so, too, is compassion.Thus, Ray starts to show compassion along with his natural humor and positive outlook to his fellow inmates, some of them the worst of the worst–murderers, sadists, and rapists–and some innocent like him. What I love about Ray’s memoir is that he so thoroughly understands how complicated life is and how complicated people are, even the ones on death row. He makes a family out of these men, starts to give them something to hope for, and, in some cases, changes their lives.The guards, too, are part of this equation, and the complicated nature of their relationship with the inmates defines much of the conflicted nature of existence on death row: How could they take us to the doctor, feed us, commiserate with us, and then lead us to our deaths? It messed with our minds after a while. These men were our family also. We were all in this dark, dank, tiny corner of the world acting out some perverse play where we laughed together six days of the week, but on Thursdays, they killed us. Imagine living like that. Imagine knowing a month before you’re going to die because these men who feed you and let you out of your cell for an hour every day told you the date. Imagine watching them practice marching you to the execution chamber until that day finally arrives, and in the meantime, they start to treat you real nice. Imagine what that does to a person. Now imagine watching it happen to people you know, people you talk to every day from inside your 5 x 7 cell over and over again, never knowing when you’re going to be next. That was Anthony Ray Hinton’s existence, in between worrying about his appeal.It isn’t all bleak, though. Ray’s humor and honesty keeps the book refreshing even as it moves into darker and more serious topics. Readers are lucky because Ray himself is lucky. He has a mother who loves him unconditionally and believes in him without a doubt, and who raised him to be an amazing person. He has a best friend named Lester who never once in 30 years fails to come see him during visiting days at the prison. He has a faith in God that is tested, nearly abandoned, and then found again, a faith that is so totally genuine and loving of others that you can’t help but gravitate toward it. And, eventually, he finds a legal champion and a steadfast friend in Bryan Stevenson, a fellow African American man who works tirelessly to get Ray off death row and free from prison.There’s a lot in this book to take in, and I won’t lie: I cried many times throughout, and I’m not the crying sort. So much of it, though, was moving, and if it wasn’t moving, it was heartbreaking, particularly with how long the legal process to prove his innocence actually took because the State of Alabama didn’t care or want to hear it.However, at its core, The Sun Does Shine is about forgiveness. It takes a lot of strength for a person to forgive someone. It takes unimaginable strength to forgive an entire system and a whole host of people for taking 30 years of your life due to racism, forcing you to live in hell on earth, and making you witness execution after execution while they actively deny your legal cases for innocence. Somehow, Ray manages to find it within himself to do so, even after he struggles to adjust to an un-regimented life outside of prison and three decades of technological advancement he wasn’t even aware of. Somehow, he realizes that this terrible thing happened to him so he could pursue his higher purpose: ending the death penalty forever. [The death penalty is] the symbol elected officials hold up to strengthen their tough-on-crime reputations while distracting us from the causes of violence. The death penalty is an enemy of grace, redemption and all who value life and recognize that each person is more than their worst act. I don’t know where you stand on the death penalty, lethal injection or otherwise. I don’t know if you’re staunchly for it, against it, or on the fence about it. Maybe you’ve never given much thought to it at all. In any case, I encourage you to read this memoir because it brings this vague yet decisive punishment that most of us will never face or witness with our own eyes to the forefront. It makes us confront the fact that incredibly fallible and oftentimes biased people administer this punishment to the point where one out of ten people are sent to death row yet are innocent of their accused crimes.If you don’t think that’s a lot of people, if you don’t think that it matters, then flip to the back of the book. Read the names and after every tenth person, say, “Innocent.” You’ve got a ton of names to read, but this review can wait.In addition to the flaws of the death penalty, The Sun Does Shine also raises questions about America’s prisons, racial biases, and deficient legal systems, about how the rich and guilty are treated better than the poor and innocent. Ray’s memoir will stir much debate and discussion should you pick this book up for your next book club (encouraged) or assign it to your classroom (doubly encouraged).Plus, there’s much here in the way of empathy and calls to action, and that’s something that’s sorely needed in the world right now. As my good friend Bryan Stevenson says, the moral arc of the universe bends toward justice, but justice needs help. Justice only happens when good people take a stand against injustice. The Sun Does Shine will be published on March 27, 2018, and I can’t wait for you guys to pick it up!
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  • Kristen Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect companion to Just Mercy. So interesting and painful to hear of Ray’s struggle in jail and with the court system. My only criticism of this book and Just Mercy is that I wish they showed a bit more of where we are now- what has been accomplished? What are they still working toward? What are their objectives? It’s a great story, but I wish there was something a bit more meaty, especially for the readers that want to do something more to help- to even know where to begin looking. But overal Perfect companion to Just Mercy. So interesting and painful to hear of Ray’s struggle in jail and with the court system. My only criticism of this book and Just Mercy is that I wish they showed a bit more of where we are now- what has been accomplished? What are they still working toward? What are their objectives? It’s a great story, but I wish there was something a bit more meaty, especially for the readers that want to do something more to help- to even know where to begin looking. But overall, a deeply moving and inspiring book about keeping hope and never giving up, as well as the horrors and injustices of our so-called justice system.
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    This is the most convincing case against the death penalty you’ll ever read. How would you like to be arrested by racist police, tried by a racist assistant district attorney and a racist judge before an all white jury in Alabama? Of course you are Black.The crime? Murder. The murder of a restaurant manager, car jacked and taken back to his restaurant, forced inside and turn over the night’s cash, then shot in the head.Where were you? Miles away, cleaning a huge warehouse with a large crew, dire This is the most convincing case against the death penalty you’ll ever read. How would you like to be arrested by racist police, tried by a racist assistant district attorney and a racist judge before an all white jury in Alabama? Of course you are Black.The crime? Murder. The murder of a restaurant manager, car jacked and taken back to his restaurant, forced inside and turn over the night’s cash, then shot in the head.Where were you? Miles away, cleaning a huge warehouse with a large crew, directed what to do and under his supervision – a warehouse surrounded by a razor wire fence with a gate guard checking people in and out.But you’re Black. The police find an old gun that hadn’t been fired for 25 years and claim the ‘ballistics expert’ lies and claims it’s the murder weapon, recanted 30 years later. The judge years later ‘knew you were a killer by looking at you’, your appointed attorney hardly bothered to defend you for the state’s $1,000 telling you that he ‘ate $1,000 for breakfast.Soon, you are on death row. There you will stay for 30 years, until one Bryan Stevenson meets you and spends 15 years getting you freed from prison.This is a remarkable story of an innocent man condemned to spend 30 years of his life on death row, watching some 54 men and women led to their murder by the state of Alabama.And yet Anthony Ray Hinton grew to help those on Death Row maintain hope, turn away from despair, and accept all, including a former KKK member who had killed a 16 year old Black boy.Out of this tale of racist injustice comes this amazing man, full of hope and full of forgiveness and one, who, more than any other, loves each day of his life of freedom. A MUST READ.
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  • Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of "The Sun Does Shine" on Goodreads First Reads. Wow, what a story that Anthony Ray Hinton has told. It's so hard sometimes to realize that things like this happen. Anthony Ray Hinton is an amazingly strong man to endure all of this with so much grace and forgiveness.
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  • Jen Naughton
    January 1, 1970
    Reading about thirty years on death row through the eyes of an innocent man is gut-wrenchingly hard. Hinton's story flashes back and forth in time from the early days after his arrest when he felt convinced that it would all be straightened out to his Mother dying while he was trapped on Death Row and finally to his release after a Supreme Court Ruling in his favor. It is both hard and easy to believe that there could be such a terrible miscarriage of justice in what seems like an easily provabl Reading about thirty years on death row through the eyes of an innocent man is gut-wrenchingly hard. Hinton's story flashes back and forth in time from the early days after his arrest when he felt convinced that it would all be straightened out to his Mother dying while he was trapped on Death Row and finally to his release after a Supreme Court Ruling in his favor. It is both hard and easy to believe that there could be such a terrible miscarriage of justice in what seems like an easily provable case of mistaken identity. In any case, Ray makes the best of a lousy situation and I was not at all surprised to see that he now speaks to groups about forgiveness.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    This book is powerful and unputdownable; an incredible testament to the indefatigable spirit of a man facing an injustice so blatantly clear, that it's stunning he survived at all, much less thrived and is able to tell his his story in such an astoundingly beautiful way. This book is the definition of narrative-nonfiction. It reads like a novel, and breaks your heart as you let in sink in that it is indeed a true story of unspeakable injustice. But speak Anthony Ray Hinton does, and he does it s This book is powerful and unputdownable; an incredible testament to the indefatigable spirit of a man facing an injustice so blatantly clear, that it's stunning he survived at all, much less thrived and is able to tell his his story in such an astoundingly beautiful way. This book is the definition of narrative-nonfiction. It reads like a novel, and breaks your heart as you let in sink in that it is indeed a true story of unspeakable injustice. But speak Anthony Ray Hinton does, and he does it so well, painting a picture of his death row home of nearly 30 years so vividly, that he takes your breath away as you read his experiences. While this book certainly stands on its own, if you've read Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy, this a must read follow-up to that book. Mr. Stevenson fought tirelessly for Ray through his Equal Justice Initiative and talks about Ray's case in Just Mercy. The Sun Does Shine, we hear Ray's story of hope and survival in his own words. This is an important book. I will be recommending it to everyone.
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  • Amy Sunshine
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair/honest review.This book was heart breaking and uplifting and eye opening all at once. It is the true story of Anthony Ray Hinton who spent 30 years on death row for crimes he didn't commit. Hinton shares his story so openly and honestly. It's hard to imagine how he remained so positive when the deck was stacked against him and he was surrounded (literally) by hate and death. A truly amazing story of faith - in others, in God - I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair/honest review.This book was heart breaking and uplifting and eye opening all at once. It is the true story of Anthony Ray Hinton who spent 30 years on death row for crimes he didn't commit. Hinton shares his story so openly and honestly. It's hard to imagine how he remained so positive when the deck was stacked against him and he was surrounded (literally) by hate and death. A truly amazing story of faith - in others, in God - and survival.
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    The Sun Does Shine tragically illustrates that innocent until proven guilty is not a guarantee in our criminal justice system. Anthony Ray Hinton's story should be read in high school classes across the nation.I received an ARC from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Shirley Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    Anthony Ray Hinton is roughly my age. When Hinton went to prison for a crime he didn't commit, I was having my first child. By the time he was released from death row, my 'child' was 30 years old. It's hard to wrap one's mind around the depth of the injustice experienced by Ray Hinton. His book is a moving testimony to the human spirit of resilience and hope. Love, faith, books, imagination and Bryan Stevenson conspired to keep Hinton alive and eventually released. An amazing story - and a must- Anthony Ray Hinton is roughly my age. When Hinton went to prison for a crime he didn't commit, I was having my first child. By the time he was released from death row, my 'child' was 30 years old. It's hard to wrap one's mind around the depth of the injustice experienced by Ray Hinton. His book is a moving testimony to the human spirit of resilience and hope. Love, faith, books, imagination and Bryan Stevenson conspired to keep Hinton alive and eventually released. An amazing story - and a must-read. To be published in March 2018.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    10 STARS......This is an incredible journey Ray Hinton takes us on; I laughed, cried and was very angry from page to page. Such a profound human being. How does one stay positive when 30 years of precious life has been stolen from them? He speaks of his loving God often in the book, impressively his beliefs remain strong during the most difficult times in his life. Before we get to death row and sadly for much of the book, we get a close up and personal tour of a very broken and corrupt justice 10 STARS......This is an incredible journey Ray Hinton takes us on; I laughed, cried and was very angry from page to page. Such a profound human being. How does one stay positive when 30 years of precious life has been stolen from them? He speaks of his loving God often in the book, impressively his beliefs remain strong during the most difficult times in his life. Before we get to death row and sadly for much of the book, we get a close up and personal tour of a very broken and corrupt justice systems. How could so many individuals paid and trusted by our government to protect "the people", turn their heads at so much obvious injustice? His initial attorney (Perhacs) turned my stomach. On several occasions I had tears streaming down my cheeks in either frustration or sadness, I don't think I have ever read another book that stirred so much emotion in me.Ray takes us on a journey into death row; we meet and get to like his cell mates who many undoubtedly have committed heinous crimes, but as he points out, "people are more than just the worst thing they have ever done". He is able to keep his humor and travel outside his mind while 50 plus cell mates (they become family) are marched by his cell to the electric chair.Ray has a unique mind that has the ability to travel outside of the prison walls and create a full life for himself. Traveling the world he created experiences for himself that kept his sanity, ie marrying Halle Berry, visiting Queen Elizabeth, playing pro ball, etc. It's truly amazing. What brought all this full circle for me was after his release he states "I realize it was easier for my mind to leave the row when I was inside than it is now that I'm free". Wow.... We get the pleasure of meeting Lester, Ray's life long best friend and hero who never falters in his love for his friend or misses a visit in 30 years. We also meet Bryan Stevenson who tirelessly fought for 15 years to prove Ray's innocence. Bryan is an angel sent personally by God (who else could make this happen after 30 years) to save this man.In closing, I would be remiss if I didn't mention that prior to reading Ray's story, I was pro death penalty, eye for an eye. I can no longer hold on to that belief or I would be just like all the others that turned their heads at his innocence. Many thanks to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for an ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. A book I will NEVER forget. GET YOUR COPY..... 10 STARS....
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  • Mona AlvaradoFrazier
    January 1, 1970
    This is an inspirational, well-written memoir. In 1985, twenty-nine-year-old Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. He was in a secure building working at his job, miles away, on the night of the murders. Hinton goes through a mockery of a court trial and is convicted. "They weren't making a mistake, They were setting out to send an innocent man to death row. And they were willing to lie to do it." Mr. Hinton's story is not only about racism but This is an inspirational, well-written memoir. In 1985, twenty-nine-year-old Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. He was in a secure building working at his job, miles away, on the night of the murders. Hinton goes through a mockery of a court trial and is convicted. "They weren't making a mistake, They were setting out to send an innocent man to death row. And they were willing to lie to do it." Mr. Hinton's story is not only about racism but about poverty, corrupt prosecutors, and a broken criminal justice system; one which kept him on death row for 30 years.There are so many areas I highlighted that I wanted to remember, quotes that speak to his faith, compassion for others, gentleness, and resiliency. "Tonight I would pray again. Pray for the truth. Pray for the victims. Pray for my mom ...pray that the nightmare I had been living ...would end somehow."For years he had an incompetent lawyer but someone mentioned Mr. Hinton's case to Bryan Stevenson and he worked on the case for the next twenty years.All the while Hinton made friendships with the inmates on death row, even a former KKK member, although he rarely saw any of them. He established a book club, read books and scripture to inmates and kept them from committing suicide; even his own guards asked him for advice. Throughout the years of failed appeals, Hinton heard and smelled fifty-one men die in the electric chair. The author takes the reader through the frustration, anger, hopelessness of the trial and the prison but also illustrates the hope and profound capacity he had for forgiveness. His relationship with his mother and best friend are beautiful to read. Released in 2015, Mr. Hinton returned to Alabama and now speaks on prison reform and the power of faith and forgiveness. I was given an ARC by NetGalley for a fair and honest review.
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  • Laura Dallas
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone should read this book. Our criminal justice system is broken, and it is stealing the lives of innocent people, most of whom are poor and non-white. Anthony Ray Hinton was on death row for 30 YEARS for a crime he had nothing to do with. He was working in a locked warehouse miles away. The gun "connecting" him to the crime had not been fired in 25 years. He was sentenced to death because he could not afford a lawyer who actually cared if he was innocent or a competent ballistics expert. P Everyone should read this book. Our criminal justice system is broken, and it is stealing the lives of innocent people, most of whom are poor and non-white. Anthony Ray Hinton was on death row for 30 YEARS for a crime he had nothing to do with. He was working in a locked warehouse miles away. The gun "connecting" him to the crime had not been fired in 25 years. He was sentenced to death because he could not afford a lawyer who actually cared if he was innocent or a competent ballistics expert. Praise the Lord for Bryan Stevenson who worked many years to finally get the real evidence in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. I read "Just Mercy" by Bryan Stevenson, who wrote the forward to this book, and it is one of the most powerful books I have ever read. It is filled with the true stories of many others like Hinton who sit innocent behind bars, even children. Hinton's story is incredible. After a very dark three years on death row, Hinton realizes that he still has choices. He chooses to return to his faith in God, encourage and befriend his fellow inmates, as well as the guards, and he even starts a book club. Hinton is vulnerable in this book giving us his true thoughts and raw emotions at his worst and at his best. Imagine being locked up on death row with the screams of madmen, the smell of the dying, the rats, the roaches, the darkness, and the thoughts of all that you are missing; yet, you are innocent and only your mom and your best friend believe you. Hinton shows us what it was like, and we need to know. Praise the Lord he was set free to share his story with the world.I received this free eBook from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book "The Sun Does Shine" from Netgalley for my honest review. This was an amazing read. Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with a crime he did not commit. He was at work where there was a guard and you had to sign in and out. There were other employees who should have been able to tell the police that he was at work. But he was arrested because he was a poor black man. The police did not care about him they only cared that they were going to close the case. The state of I received this book "The Sun Does Shine" from Netgalley for my honest review. This was an amazing read. Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with a crime he did not commit. He was at work where there was a guard and you had to sign in and out. There were other employees who should have been able to tell the police that he was at work. But he was arrested because he was a poor black man. The police did not care about him they only cared that they were going to close the case. The state of Alabama didn't care either. When trying to appeal, the state of Alabama didn't care about his rights or the fact that he had proof that he was innocent. He could have been put to death. He was on death row watching as the state put inmates to death. The state of Alabama took 30 years of his life! I was interested in how his life was going throughout the book. You need to have hope and faith and good people trying to help you. This book was well written and although it does have a lot of legal jargon it was interesting and not at all boring.
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  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    Almost a year ago, I read Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson and it profoundly changed how I thought about prisons, capital punishment and racism in the justice system. Not that I didn’t know the inherent problems, I had just never had it so succinctly and emotionally laid bare for the reader. This memoir is the story of one of the death row inmates that Stevenson helped free. Hinton’s case was so ridiculously mishandled, smeared by racism and hindered by his lack of funds to pay for legal representa Almost a year ago, I read Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson and it profoundly changed how I thought about prisons, capital punishment and racism in the justice system. Not that I didn’t know the inherent problems, I had just never had it so succinctly and emotionally laid bare for the reader. This memoir is the story of one of the death row inmates that Stevenson helped free. Hinton’s case was so ridiculously mishandled, smeared by racism and hindered by his lack of funds to pay for legal representation that it is devastating to read about. Somehow through thirty years living in a 5 by 8 foot cell on death row, he was able to retain hope that his innocence would be proclaimed. I’m having trouble summarizing how important I think his story is so just read this book…read Just Mercy and then read this book. I received a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    This is a difficult book to read but because it is a true story, and very interesting, you also hate to put it down. It was very well written. You can’t help but feel the frustrations and disappointment in Ray’s story. How sad there was so much racism and corruption in Alabama ~really throughout the Deep South~ in the early seventies. No one wanted to listen to a convict on death row that was saying he was innocent. And even fewer people wanted to even try to help because he was poor. His nine s This is a difficult book to read but because it is a true story, and very interesting, you also hate to put it down. It was very well written. You can’t help but feel the frustrations and disappointment in Ray’s story. How sad there was so much racism and corruption in Alabama ~really throughout the Deep South~ in the early seventies. No one wanted to listen to a convict on death row that was saying he was innocent. And even fewer people wanted to even try to help because he was poor. His nine siblings didn’t try to help him. Ray’s Mother and his best friend Lester believed in him and loved him unconditionally- I came away with great respect for these two even without meeting them. A good book. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an advance copy for my honest review.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This was such a gut-wrenching book. It's hard to explain how a book about an innocent man's time on death row was life affirming and hopeful, but Anthony Ray Hinton's story is just that. I will be mentally and emotionally processing this book for the rest of my life. In a world where so many horrible things are happening, where there is so much hate, this b I received an advanced copy of The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This was such a gut-wrenching book. It's hard to explain how a book about an innocent man's time on death row was life affirming and hopeful, but Anthony Ray Hinton's story is just that. I will be mentally and emotionally processing this book for the rest of my life. In a world where so many horrible things are happening, where there is so much hate, this book gave me a lot to think about.
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  • D’Anna Lerma
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley.There are not enough words to describe the range of emotions I felt while reading The Sun Does Shine. I am in awe of Hinton's persevering hope while on death row for crimes he did not commit. Equally inspiring and heartbreaking, this book is a glimpse into how broken the criminal justice system is.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This story is a perfect example of why we should abolish the death penalty? How many wrongfully convicted people have been innocently killed? Anthony Ray Hinton's story is captivating and one everyone should read. His strength, courage and forgiveness towards the system is inspiring. I recommend it!
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  • Dick Whittington
    January 1, 1970
    An outstanding memoir of an African American man framed for murder who spent 30 years on death row in an Alabama prison before he was able to find the right lawyer who believed and helped prove his innocence. Highly recommended.
  • Agnes Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    I was amazed at how one innocent individual could be imprisoned on death row for 30 years and still be able to forgive like Ray did. The death penalty is a travesty!
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