Peach
Introducing a dazzling new literary voice--a wholly original novel as groundbreaking as the works of Eimear McBride and Max Porter.Something has happened to Peach. Staggering around the town streets in the aftermath of an assault, Peach feels a trickle of blood down her legs, a lingering smell of her anonymous attacker on her skin. It hurts to walk, but she manages to make her way to her home, where she stumbles into another oddly nightmarish reality: Her parents can't seem to comprehend that anything has happened to their daughter.The next morning, Peach tries to return to the routines of her ordinary life, going to classes, spending time with her boyfriend, Green, trying to find comfort in the thought of her upcoming departure for college. And yet, as Peach struggles through the next few days, she is stalked by the memories of her unacknowledged trauma. Sleeping is hard when she is haunted by the glimpses of that stranger's gaping mouth. Working is hard when her assailant's rancid smell still fills her nostrils. Eating is impossible when her stomach is swollen tight as a drum. Though she tries to close her eyes to what has happened, Peach at last begins to understand the drastic, gruesome action she must take.In this astonishing debut, Emma Glass articulates the unspeakable with breathtaking verve. Intensely physical, with rhythmic, visceral prose, Peach marks the arrival of a visionary new voice.

Peach Details

TitlePeach
Author
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherBloomsbury USA
ISBN-139781635571301
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Literary Fiction

Peach Review

  • Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWow, I'm a bit blown away by how bad this was. I almost didn't want to review it, since - contrary to my critics' opinions - I don't actually enjoy writing negative reviews for up and coming authors. But I feel obligated to point out to others what I didn't like, lest they be taken in by the blurb like I was and find themselves similarly disappointed.First, I think it's really important that there are more books out there about sexual assau Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestWow, I'm a bit blown away by how bad this was. I almost didn't want to review it, since - contrary to my critics' opinions - I don't actually enjoy writing negative reviews for up and coming authors. But I feel obligated to point out to others what I didn't like, lest they be taken in by the blurb like I was and find themselves similarly disappointed.First, I think it's really important that there are more books out there about sexual assault and rape because awareness is the first step to change. I've read some truly excellent books on the subject, like Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK; Courtney Summers's ALL THE RAGE, and if you're looking for nonfiction, Alice Sebold's utterly devastating memoir, LUCKY. I get that the goal of these books is to make the reader uncomfortable and sometimes that necessitates the inclusion of unsavory details, because to portray the absolute awfulness of the act, the author has to convey that on a sensory and psychological level. I get that, and when done well, it can be a truly powerful effect. I get that.Second, I am not easily disgusted. I will read pretty much anything, from gritty Scandinavian thrillers to 70s bodice rippers, to memoirs about forensic science. Sometimes I'll feel a bit grossed out, but I've built up a fairly good tolerance over the years and it's hard to really, truly shock me. My only wish as a reader is that such content is used to establish some kind of point or purpose and not just for the sake of shock value. I feel that shock value is demeaning to one's audience, personally.Third, I think sometimes people mistake "shock value" for "good content" and that is not necessarily the case. A book should not get praise for being disgusting. I see this a lot with the so-called dark erotica novels, and I'm sorry, but grossing people out does not making you daring and talented. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, and sometimes a tasteless book is just that - tasteless.The best thing about PEACH is the flattering blurb, which makes it sound like this book is going to be good. An experimental prose novel about a woman dealing with rape? That sounded promising. But PEACH is written in this really disgusting, nonsensical style that I think is supposed to be channeling writers like Bukowski or Joyce (if you believe that Kirkus review), but sounds more like a high school student trying to be "gritty" a la Ellen Hopkins. But failing. Miserably.Here are some samples, in case you think I'm being overly harsh (from the ARC, not the final copy):Thick stick sticky sticking wet ragged wool winding round the wounds, stitching the sliced skin together as I walk, scraping my mittened hand against the wall. Rough red bricks ripping the wool. Ripping the skin. Rough red skin. Rough red head (7).Mam giggles and pinches Dad's cheek. It's okay, Peach. Sex is a good thing. Me and Mam do it all the time. We just did it now on the kitchen table (16).And then I think about what went inside last night and it was a sausage and what if it got stuck, sticky, somehow there was a sperm inside that sausage and I will give birth to a litter of hot dogs? (40)Rage still, rage, rage I could feed. I will feed. I will eat the fear, the loathsome offender. I will feed. Not breed, not brood. I will eat the food of fear. I will shit later and feel better (88).Also, I'm not the biggest fan of trigger warnings (although I get how important they can be for the people who need them), but I am shocked that this book does not have at least some warnings because it is disgusting and graphic AF.***SPOILERS & GROSS CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS TO FOLLOW***After she is raped, she sews herself up DOWN THERE. It's an absolutely disgusting, cringe-worthy scene. And to make matters worse, she bloats up afterwards and becomes sickly, which I took to mean that her period, when it didn't come, was trapped inside.BECAUSE SHE SEWED HERSELF UP.I hope I am wrong about this, but I do not think I am because of what happens afterwards. Also, one word: cannibalism Yeah, this book was pretty horrible and actually ruined my day a little. I'm shocked at how many people are giving this good ratings, because I saw nothing of value in this book at all. It was gross and bad and tasteless, and I completely regret reading it. Had it been any longer, I would have cast it aside without reviewing, but it was short enough that I forced myself to endure. I appreciate what this book was trying to do, and again would like to emphasize the importance of people telling such stories, but there are much better books out there discussing the same topic that aren't so revolting.Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy! 1 star
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  • Matteo Fumagalli
    January 1, 1970
    Videorecensione: https://youtu.be/EBzfVGB6IMELa protagonista di questo fiabesco e inquietante romanzo è una pesca vegetariana. Due genitori disinibiti e innamoratissimi, un fratellino di gelatina, un amorevole fidanzato broccolo, un professore budino. La sua vita viene sconvolta quando subisce un'aggressione da una salsiccia psicopatica, che inizia a tormentarla.Leggere questo romanzo è come subire una versione psycho-horror de "Lo straordinario mondo di Gumball". L'impatto assurdo di questo mon Videorecensione: https://youtu.be/EBzfVGB6IMELa protagonista di questo fiabesco e inquietante romanzo è una pesca vegetariana. Due genitori disinibiti e innamoratissimi, un fratellino di gelatina, un amorevole fidanzato broccolo, un professore budino. La sua vita viene sconvolta quando subisce un'aggressione da una salsiccia psicopatica, che inizia a tormentarla.Leggere questo romanzo è come subire una versione psycho-horror de "Lo straordinario mondo di Gumball". L'impatto assurdo di questo mondo dove ogni individuo è un cibo e dove le auto hanno dei california roll al posto delle ruote, è buffo e straniante allo stesso tempo: pare una maschera per nascondere un dolore lancinante che si fa palpabile sin dalla prima pagina.Estremamente delirante.
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  • Schizanthus
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warnings for sexual assault, murder, animal abuse, possible (?) cannibalismI hate giving a low rating to any book. I have such admiration for authors - for the blood, sweat and tears that go into writing a book in the first place, then having to navigate the publishing world and subjecting themselves to readers who can lift them up or tear them down with their words. If you are interested in reading this book, please don’t just go by my review. There are a lot of 5 star reviews for this Trigger warnings for sexual assault, murder, animal abuse, possible (?) cannibalismI hate giving a low rating to any book. I have such admiration for authors - for the blood, sweat and tears that go into writing a book in the first place, then having to navigate the publishing world and subjecting themselves to readers who can lift them up or tear them down with their words. If you are interested in reading this book, please don’t just go by my review. There are a lot of 5 star reviews for this book as well, and who knows, maybe you’ll be adding one yourself after reading it. My review comes from a place of confusion and ‘this wasn’t the book for me’ rather than malice. I applaud the author for successfully navigating the publishing world and for the many positive reviews I’ve read. Having said that ... my brain hurts! Had I borrowed this book from the library instead of requesting an ARC I would not have finished it.You know those books that hoity-toity book clubs rave about with their “literary masterpiece” this and their “author stunned with their use of [some big fancy word that the general population can neither spell nor use in a sentence]” that? You may listen to these people and smile and nod, but on the inside you’re thinking, ‘How did you get that from this book?’ and ‘I must be completely stupid. I have no idea what you’re going on about.’ I think that’s going to be the unfortunate fate of this book; a polarising “most exquisite piece of writing ever!” or “what the hell did I just read?!”Reading like a stream of consciousness, Peach (the novella) opens with Peach (the person) having just been brutally sexually assaulted and follows her down the rabbit trail of its physical, emotional and psychological aftermath. I came away from Peach having very little grasp on which words were literal, fantasy, hallucination, nightmare or flashback - and I’m not sure I was supposed to. I can handle gruesome, triggery books, I understand the internal turmoil following sexual assault and revenge fantasies, but I. don’t. UndErsTand. This. book.Which brings me to the writing style. There are so many one word sentences, some sentences start with a capital letter and others don’t, words have randomly capitalised letters scattered through them. I expect it was deliberate, intentionally messy and disjointed to reflect the emotional state of Peach and her internal dialogue, but I just found it messy. I understood what was happening (sometimes) but I couldn’t figure out if the author was going for prose, poetry, some combination or something else entirely.There’s the use of food to describe people, including:* The rapist / stalker / maker of creepy hand delivered notes with words cut out of magazines, Lincoln, is sausage, pork, oily, greasy, slimy* Mr Custard, college biology teacher made of custard* Baby, Peach’s brother who remains unnamed is icing sugar, jelly.Mam and Dad are overtly sexual, so much so that I found it as uncomfortable to read as I did the sexual assault. Speaking of Green, Peach’s boyfriend, the same evening of his daughter’s sexual assault - “You make such a cute couple, and the sex sounds amazing, says Dad.” (12%)Immediately following his daughter’s face flushing red with embarrassment, “It’s okay, Peach. Sex is a good thing. Me and Mam do it all the time. We just did it now on the kitchen table. It’s human nature, Peach, don’t be embarrassed. Green is a lucky guy. Most girls won’t put out until they’re married. But not our Peach. and we’re proud of you.” (12%) I’m sorry, what??? Then good ol’ Mam and Dad, along with boyfriend Green remain oblivious to what Peach is going through for the entire novella.So, just two of my multitude of unanswered questions:* Why does Peach’s stomach continually grow larger and larger and larger?* What really happened in the end?Colour me confused!I received a copy of this book from NetGalley (thank you so much to NetGalley and Bloomsbury Circus, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc (UK & ANZ) for the opportunity) in exchange for honest feedback.Please note that the quotes are from the ARC and as such may have been changed prior to publication.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know exactly what I just read but oh.my.god. This book is...different. Unique. Graphic. Stomach churning and unsettling. A book with a modern interpretative prose. I already know I will have to have a second reading to wrap my head around this book. A perfect book to spark discussion.
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  • Latanya (CraftyScribbles)
    January 1, 1970
    What did I just read? How did this make it past editors?As confused and jumbled as its main character, Peach, this novella felt contrived. While Glass's story presents a girl in pain from her sexual assault, it removed key elements that may her pain palatable. I must admit that most of the time, I had no clue to the story's occurrences. I had to read passages doubly or thrice to nail what happened.Who is she? Is she in high school? Is she younger than that? Who sent the letter? Why are her paren What did I just read? How did this make it past editors?As confused and jumbled as its main character, Peach, this novella felt contrived. While Glass's story presents a girl in pain from her sexual assault, it removed key elements that may her pain palatable. I must admit that most of the time, I had no clue to the story's occurrences. I had to read passages doubly or thrice to nail what happened.Who is she? Is she in high school? Is she younger than that? Who sent the letter? Why are her parents so sexual in front of her? Setting? Scene transitions? Cannibalism? Why so crude (Realism's great, being crude for its sake isn't)?Sometimes, I think authors take on heavy subjects without proper expertise. There are better writers handling rape and its painful aftermath. See Speak, Asking For It, The Way I Used to Be, The Female of the Species, and All the Rage. These books grant its readers responsible takes on the topic without sensationalism.Far from a prude and a survivor myself, I take books on the topic seriously. Maybe this novella should have remained in an experimental writing workshop. However, I did like the moments when Peach said how she felt about her rape and what he took from her. But, those minute grains could not cover the mess. 1.5/5 WTFs I recommend those books I've listed instead.
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  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely worth a read, as Glass' approach to creative writing is to be admired, but due warnings for the graphic content and harrowing story-line.In short, this book is a surreal exploration of a life lived after tragedy. As the synopsis states: "Something has happened to Peach. Blood runs down her legs and the scent of charred meat lingers on her flesh."Due to the subject matter, this is a profoundly harrowing read, and the graphic nature used to depict some scenes only adds to this. This is definitely worth a read, as Glass' approach to creative writing is to be admired, but due warnings for the graphic content and harrowing story-line.In short, this book is a surreal exploration of a life lived after tragedy. As the synopsis states: "Something has happened to Peach. Blood runs down her legs and the scent of charred meat lingers on her flesh."Due to the subject matter, this is a profoundly harrowing read, and the graphic nature used to depict some scenes only adds to this. This is a novella that is steeped in imagery, both metaphorical and realistic, that are painted with an evocative vibrancy so jarring as to feel like a slap across the reader's face, on times. Whilst I did find that this added to the poignancy of the piece, it did make this also a painful read. The surreal and abstract narrative-style used reflects the disjointed thoughts of the protagonists, as do the almost stream of consciousness style prose. Traditional grammar has been freed from its constraints and Glass has taken liberties with language to directly correlate with the atmosphere of the story. I appreciate books of this style, as I love to see language explored in various ways that differ from the norm. This experimental approach was brave but also one that started to break down, I felt, as the story-line was expanded.I initially found this completely absorbing and loved having to scavenge for the truth in amongst the fantastical metaphors. But the imagery I earlier appreciated started to dominate the message portrayed and this caused a late and ultimate dissonance between myself and the harrowing story-line.I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Emma Glass, and the publisher, Bloomsbury Publishing, for this opportunity.
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  • Konstantin
    January 1, 1970
    You need more than a strong stomach for reading this piece of work. Blood-churning scenes of dirt, gore and violence will make you want to vomit, but it's also hypnotically rhytmical and atmospheric - it will keep you turning the pages although you won't want to. It covers pretty much every trigger warning; you name it, Peach has it (cannibalism, murder, blood, animal violence, rape, mental health, suicide).So, I'm giving this a four-star rating purely based on the impact it had on me, as it was You need more than a strong stomach for reading this piece of work. Blood-churning scenes of dirt, gore and violence will make you want to vomit, but it's also hypnotically rhytmical and atmospheric - it will keep you turning the pages although you won't want to. It covers pretty much every trigger warning; you name it, Peach has it (cannibalism, murder, blood, animal violence, rape, mental health, suicide).So, I'm giving this a four-star rating purely based on the impact it had on me, as it was definitely the strangest and scariest thing I have read in my life. I can't in good health recommend this to anyone - run away from this story and don't look back. Or, be disgusted by the fact that it is so charming and persuasive - when it most definitely shouldn't be. Glass, I am afraid of you.
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Emma Glass's debut novel Peach is contemporary fiction told in a wholly original way. It's a challenging read both because of the form it is written in and the graphic descriptions. High school student Peach is brutally assaulted and manages to make her way home where her pain goes unnoticed by her family. She decides to carry on with life - stitches herself up, goes to school and meets up with her boyfriend. However, she is plagued by the attack - the jarring memories of smell, taste and touch. Emma Glass's debut novel Peach is contemporary fiction told in a wholly original way. It's a challenging read both because of the form it is written in and the graphic descriptions. High school student Peach is brutally assaulted and manages to make her way home where her pain goes unnoticed by her family. She decides to carry on with life - stitches herself up, goes to school and meets up with her boyfriend. However, she is plagued by the attack - the jarring memories of smell, taste and touch. The reader is left with no doubt of Peach's pain, damaged psyche, and the ultimate consequences to follow.The author's use of imagery and language is both clever and chilling.Unlike anything I've ever read, and I read many genres, this novel left me confused and squeamish.Many have loved this novel, it just wasn't for me.Thank you to NetGalley and Bloomsbury Publishing for an arc of this novel in excahnge for my honest review.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I can see why this isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I loved it. It's not really a novel, it's its own strange new thing. It reads like prose poetry, stream of consciousness, word association, and some deeply weird allegory. The subject matter, a young woman dealing with the after effects of a brutal sexual assault, is not easy, but most of the details are only alluded to or are abstract enough that I didn't feel overwhelmed by it. This was incredibly dark, but I was just hypnotized by the whole I can see why this isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I loved it. It's not really a novel, it's its own strange new thing. It reads like prose poetry, stream of consciousness, word association, and some deeply weird allegory. The subject matter, a young woman dealing with the after effects of a brutal sexual assault, is not easy, but most of the details are only alluded to or are abstract enough that I didn't feel overwhelmed by it. This was incredibly dark, but I was just hypnotized by the whole thing.
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  • Lindsey Lynn (thepagemistress)
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warning: Abuse, sexual assault, rape, self harmEmma Glass has a way with words, that's a fact. Her verse is so well polished that I felt every word dripping into my body and soul. The plot of the book felt a tiny bit off just because it it paced so differently than a normal novel. The story is so raw, harsh and honest and I appreciate the fact that Glass does not sugar coat assault, which we all shouldn't. Her raw emotion and feeling behind the words was just so powerful that I couldn't Trigger warning: Abuse, sexual assault, rape, self harmEmma Glass has a way with words, that's a fact. Her verse is so well polished that I felt every word dripping into my body and soul. The plot of the book felt a tiny bit off just because it it paced so differently than a normal novel. The story is so raw, harsh and honest and I appreciate the fact that Glass does not sugar coat assault, which we all shouldn't. Her raw emotion and feeling behind the words was just so powerful that I couldn't put it down.
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  • Figgy
    January 1, 1970
    - After Reading -Yeah... so the whole time I was reading this, I thought "what the hell am I reading?" and now that I'm finished this hasn't changed much, except moving from present to past tense. What the hell did I just read?I get the feeling this was a mental break for the main character, and a way of processing what happened to her. In order to make the most extreme of fantasies of what she would like to do to her rapist, she had to also dream up a world in which people are made up of variou - After Reading -Yeah... so the whole time I was reading this, I thought "what the hell am I reading?" and now that I'm finished this hasn't changed much, except moving from present to past tense. What the hell did I just read?I get the feeling this was a mental break for the main character, and a way of processing what happened to her. In order to make the most extreme of fantasies of what she would like to do to her rapist, she had to also dream up a world in which people are made up of various food and/or objects.There is a lot of ambiguity throughout... what is real, what is imagined, and how does it all wrap up?I suspect that the ending means (view spoiler)[she either killed herself or was lamenting the loss of her innocence or the person she was before? (hide spoiler)]- During Reading -So... just so I can keep it straight:Lincoln (rapist) = sausage manBaby (little brother) = icing sugar dusted jelly baby?Peach (MC) = an actual peach?Green (boyfriend) = a treeHair Netty = a yeti wearing a hair net, who also works in the cafeteria?Sandy = Peach's best friend who is made of beach sand (because he smells salty)Mr. Custard = their biology teacher... who is also made of custard...Spud = Green's friend. A literal potato.Peach’s parents are sex mad, but not sure what they actually physically look like/if they’re non-human... especially given they have one child who is made of jelly and the other might be a literal peach.Still not sure if allegory or if the MC is having a mental breakdown.
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  • Jaclyn Crupi
    January 1, 1970
    There will be a lot of hype for this slip of a novella next year but it fell well short of the mark for me. The beggining felt derivative of Eimear McBride’s A GIRL IS A HALF-FORMED THING but then it got a bit better only to stumble at the end. At 100-pages in length there wasn’t room for the narrative to settle. The imagery Glass conjures will stay with me but only because it was so disturbingly graphic.
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  • Doug
    January 1, 1970
    While this short novella is certainly powerful and surreally strange, the warnings about the graphic content should not be taken lightly. Aside from the bizarre storyline, which reaches stomach-churning grotesquerie frequently, I thought it strained too hard to be clever - with an annoying reliance on alliteration and onomatopoeia when the shocks don't suffice to keep one's attention.
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  • Gal
    January 1, 1970
    What. The fuck. Did I just read.
  • Jessica Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that was an experience.More like a 96-page poem than a novel, Peach is a visceral and surreal stream-of-consciousness narrative about a woman who has just experienced a horrific sexual assault.The imagery is vivid, abstract, gruesome and harrowing. Glass plays around a lot with language, including lots of alliteration and repetition. Here's an example of her prose style:"Snip. Don't slip. Snip. Don't slip. Snip. Snip. Slip and I will shear and that's the fear the fear the fear."I get what Well, that was an experience.More like a 96-page poem than a novel, Peach is a visceral and surreal stream-of-consciousness narrative about a woman who has just experienced a horrific sexual assault.The imagery is vivid, abstract, gruesome and harrowing. Glass plays around a lot with language, including lots of alliteration and repetition. Here's an example of her prose style:"Snip. Don't slip. Snip. Don't slip. Snip. Snip. Slip and I will shear and that's the fear the fear the fear."I get what she was going for, but I felt too much like I was reading something written by a recent graduate who's trying too hard. Which is to say, it didn't really work for me.Still, I have a feeling certain images are going to stay with me for quite some time—not just because of how disturbing they are, but because of how Glass wrote them. There's something to be said for that.
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Such despair and violence, most of it graphic, is present in this short novella, but it is compelling from beginning to end. There is such an urgency to both its prose and its storyline. The characters, particularly Peach, are complex and strange; they make such peculiar decisions at times, but this serves only to make them feel more human. Emma Glass' use of wordplay within Peach is masterful. Unsettling and markedly interesting, Peach is a strange novella, but such a memorable one.
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  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    Dass es sich hierbei um ein Erstlingswerk handelt, mag man angesichts der sprachlichen Kraft kaum glauben. "Peach" ist kein Buch, das locker-leicht daherkommt. Es rüttelt, es sticht, es brennt, es tut weh. In einer lyrischen, rhythmischen Prosa schreibt die Autorin von der Schülerin Peach, deren Leben durch Vergewaltigung aus den Fugen gerät. Blut strömt ihre Beine herab, „[p]lump klebt klebrig nasse Wolle“ an ihrer Haut, [d]er Geruch von verbranntem Fett verstopft [ihre] Nasenlöcher“ und trotzd Dass es sich hierbei um ein Erstlingswerk handelt, mag man angesichts der sprachlichen Kraft kaum glauben. "Peach" ist kein Buch, das locker-leicht daherkommt. Es rüttelt, es sticht, es brennt, es tut weh. In einer lyrischen, rhythmischen Prosa schreibt die Autorin von der Schülerin Peach, deren Leben durch Vergewaltigung aus den Fugen gerät. Blut strömt ihre Beine herab, „[p]lump klebt klebrig nasse Wolle“ an ihrer Haut, [d]er Geruch von verbranntem Fett verstopft [ihre] Nasenlöcher“ und trotzdem wankt sie nach Hause. Nach Hause, zu ihren Eltern. Zu ihren Eltern, die nichts bemerken. Die nichts bemerken, weil sie zu sehr mit sich selbst beschäftigt sind. Peach muss sich allein helfen, um wieder zur Schule zu gehen, um ihren Freund Grün zu treffen, um zu funktionieren – und dabei stellt sie fest: einfach so wieder zu funktionieren, sich wieder Ganz zu fühlen ist unmöglich, wenn einen nachts die Bilder verfolgen, wenn der Geruch von verbranntem Fett in der Nase aufquillt, wenn der Bauch vermeintlich immer praller wird. Gedemütigt und verängstigt fasst sie einen grausamen Entschluss. Nie wird explizit ausformuliert, was passiert ist, es geht immer um das Danach, aber das beschreibt die Autorin in einer kraftvollen, poetischen und lautmalerischen Sprache, die am ganzen Körper vibriert und einem schier den Boden unter den Füßen wegzieht. Noch stärker wirken die Worte laut ausgesprochen, dabei garantiert schon alleine der Anfang Gänsehaut:„Plump klebt klebrig nasse Wolle. Klebt. Windet sich um Wunden, schließt Schnitt um Schnitt mit jedem Schritt, an der Wand entlang; meine Hand, behandschuht, schrammt daran.“ Hier entfaltet sich auf wenigen Zeilen eine ganze Welt um ein schreckliches Erlebnis, das beim Leser eine enorme Bandbreite an Emotionen hervorruft, welche sich schwer in Worte fassen lässt. Dabei gelingt es Sabine Kray, der Übersetzerin des Textes, den Rhythmus und die Dynamik der Autorin genau einzufangen, sodass die sprachliche Eigenart auch übersetzt wirken kann. Es ist ein düsteres Thema, über das Emma Glass schreibt, das wird auch in ihren Formulierungen deutlich, die sehr intensiv sind und den Leser teilweise an seine Grenzen bringen, aber eines, das nicht im Dunkeln bleiben darf. Fantasie und Realität verschwimmen, der Leser taucht tief in die persönlichen, oft sehr wirren, Gedankengänge von Peach ein – und das ist nicht immer leicht. Manchmal ist es sogar ekelhaft, aber das ist wichtig und richtig und gut. Sicher ist diese Art des Schreibens eine spezielle, die nicht jedem gefallen wird, aber für mich ist es trotz leichter inhaltlicher Schwäche im Mittelteil eines der großartigsten Bücher, das ich seit langem gelesen habe.
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  • Maddie C.
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: this book is not for everyone. Huge trigger warnings for sexual assault, murder and cannibalism.While it is not my place to tell people how to read and interpret a book, Peach is obviously a poetic, experimental novella that tackles very real issues with cleverly constructed imagery that does not shy away from the grotesque of the subject matter it intends to tackle. For that reason alone, I commend it.This book was expertly crafted and beautifully written. Glass’s sharp prose a Full disclosure: this book is not for everyone. Huge trigger warnings for sexual assault, murder and cannibalism.While it is not my place to tell people how to read and interpret a book, Peach is obviously a poetic, experimental novella that tackles very real issues with cleverly constructed imagery that does not shy away from the grotesque of the subject matter it intends to tackle. For that reason alone, I commend it.This book was expertly crafted and beautifully written. Glass’s sharp prose and stylistic choices add so much depth to the story, every sentence felt like a caress and a punch, all at once. It is raw and confusing and unreal, it is visceral and unforgiving: all ways someone who has dealt with sexual assault might feel.A few of my favourite quotes: "Today I decay. I close my eyes to die." "This solid crass mass stuck in my stomach should lift, should leave. But it festers, it offends." "A pure sprinkling of white won't hide the hacked mangled mess of flesh. Won't hide my detest." "As I push my fingers in, I feel a hard sharp shard. I run my fingers over it. There are cracks, there are crevices, rough ridges running deep. The shard is a stone, wedged inside me. A pit sitting snug in the pit of my stomach. It is stuck still to the edges where the flesh has fallen away. Soaking soft flesh. My flesh. My stone. My seed."
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The fear washes away. heart stops pumping. heart stops. Veins drain. Gut-wrenched, I spit from the pit of my stomach, rising up guttural and raw, a mournful moan, ragged and broken. Ragged and broken. When my heart restarts, blood does not flow. I am filled I am saturated with hate.If anything about the above sentences bother you as a reader then I'd advise that you stay far away from this book. The entire book has a kind of stream of consciousness vibe that isn't going to be for everyone. But f The fear washes away. heart stops pumping. heart stops. Veins drain. Gut-wrenched, I spit from the pit of my stomach, rising up guttural and raw, a mournful moan, ragged and broken. Ragged and broken. When my heart restarts, blood does not flow. I am filled I am saturated with hate.If anything about the above sentences bother you as a reader then I'd advise that you stay far away from this book. The entire book has a kind of stream of consciousness vibe that isn't going to be for everyone. But for me, it works. I found this book to be dark, disturbing, and incredibly violent. My heart aches for Peach who is the victim of rape. Rather than telling anyone she keeps it to herself because she just wants everything to be normal again. Only life doesn't work that way as Peach soon finds out. This is not for the faint of heart, I assure you, but it is absolutely compelling and very, very sad. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    An intense and experimental novella about the aftermath of a sexual assault and the impact it has on the victim. I think the style worked partly because the book isn't very long - just 98 pages. I wouldn't say I enjoyed this, but it is definitely memorable. Don't take the cautions on the graphic nature of this lightly, either.
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  • Oryx
    January 1, 1970
    Conflicted. Con. Flick. S- etc. To begin it felt a little too Eimear McBride, a little bit like a shit tribute. And then it got better. And then it veered off and escalated. And then the metaphor quadrupled. And then it turned into Beckett. So basically it was good and I actually really enjoyed it, enjoyed reading bits back to myself, alone, in my room. Voice. No choice. James Joyce? That said, there were some cringey lines that were sloppy and lazy and made me think that the editor was too afra Conflicted. Con. Flick. S- etc. To begin it felt a little too Eimear McBride, a little bit like a shit tribute. And then it got better. And then it veered off and escalated. And then the metaphor quadrupled. And then it turned into Beckett. So basically it was good and I actually really enjoyed it, enjoyed reading bits back to myself, alone, in my room. Voice. No choice. James Joyce? That said, there were some cringey lines that were sloppy and lazy and made me think that the editor was too afraid to be ruthless. I mean, there were some absolute corkers, some Unnamable corkers (see what I did there last page?). To go on. I've gone on. Was good could have been life-changing. Some paragraphs made me shiver. 3.8956672314.8.9
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  • Martina Barlassina
    January 1, 1970
    Ci sono una ragazza/pesca, il suo ragazzo/pianta, i suoi genitori sex addicted, il suo fratellino/gelatina, il suo professore budino e un ragazzo/salsiccia.Un libro che non ha certo carenze nell’ambito dell’originalità ma che non mi ha convinta, pur riconoscendo grossi meriti all’autrice: lo stile è senz’altro unico e la struttura basata sull’uso ricorrente di figure retoriche è sicuramente degna di nota.Peach, la protagonista, è vegetariana e il fatto che venga violentata da una salsiccia unta, Ci sono una ragazza/pesca, il suo ragazzo/pianta, i suoi genitori sex addicted, il suo fratellino/gelatina, il suo professore budino e un ragazzo/salsiccia.Un libro che non ha certo carenze nell’ambito dell’originalità ma che non mi ha convinta, pur riconoscendo grossi meriti all’autrice: lo stile è senz’altro unico e la struttura basata sull’uso ricorrente di figure retoriche è sicuramente degna di nota.Peach, la protagonista, è vegetariana e il fatto che venga violentata da una salsiccia unta, grassa e laida rappresenta un’ottima metafora di come lo stupro sia un atto disgustoso e riprovevole. La nausea provata da Peach permea l’intera narrazione e, confesso, ha in una certa misura colpito anche me, reazione che in genere non mi appartiene.Un plauso, inoltre, alla traduttrice che ha saputo rendere al meglio la lunga serie di allitterazioni e onomatopee, le quali concorrono a rendere il racconto musicale, ritmato e di veloce lettura.Credo però che l’autrice abbia azzardato un po’ troppo: ricoprire il fratellino/gelatina di zucchero a velo piuttosto che di borotalco e far scivolare gli occhiali da sole dalla viscida testa del professore/budino sono certamente lampi di fantasia singolari finalizzati a rendere più “reale” e coerente la narrazione ma, nel complesso, ho la sensazione che manchi comunque qualcosa.Alcune parti del testo rimangono oscure e anche il finale credo possa aprirsi a interpretazioni diverse ma molto fuligginose: con ciò non è mia intenzione sminuire la validità del romanzo ma, semplicemente, si tratta di constatare il fatto che esso non abbia incontrato pienamente i miei gusti.
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  • Ella
    January 1, 1970
    Nb: This is MY book. I paid for it & the companion audio. As always, it's my opinion, which has only gotten stronger since I first listened, then read and read again.Peach is a seemingly normal young woman. She's a "good girl" by her mother's estimation, a college student with a steady boyfriend who lives with her oddly sexual parents and her baby brother whom she adores. She's even a vegetarian. But the reader never meets that Peach. She meets Peach staggering home -- perseverating, incoher Nb: This is MY book. I paid for it & the companion audio. As always, it's my opinion, which has only gotten stronger since I first listened, then read and read again.Peach is a seemingly normal young woman. She's a "good girl" by her mother's estimation, a college student with a steady boyfriend who lives with her oddly sexual parents and her baby brother whom she adores. She's even a vegetarian. But the reader never meets that Peach. She meets Peach staggering home -- perseverating, incoherent, bloody, vomiting and in horrible pain.This entire slim novel is present tense, stream-of-consciousness, and told to us by an extremely traumatized girl who sounds a lot like James Joyce (the author notes this herself at the end.) Joycean or no, it's a good portrayal of the way human brains deal with interpersonal trauma. Getting through the mundane "Get dressed, socks first...push swing door open, hear it swing shut -- swoosh", noticing the weather: "cold" -- detached from everything -- in complete survival mode, telling herself she will just "forget this" and move on.I found her playing with sounds and repetitions of words interestingly poetic, though it's really just another way someone copes with an overloaded brain-body connection. It's much better than, say - muteness, for a book. and not unrealistic. The brain is a majestic thing that will do whatever it takes to get us through things nobody should have to live through."I want to say things but I don't know how to order the words. Sentences slither around my brain. Scattered words, scatterbrain, scattered semantics, scattered seeds..."Peach denies herself any help - even medical - refusing to be "a cliche or victim," and we witness a young woman spiraling: instantly distant from her parents and boyfriend; uncomfortable with even the touch of her pet at times, then overwhelmed with love for these same beings she can't share her pain with. She lies to cover for her physical injuries; wishes she could tell her boyfriend Green, but can't get the words out; holds in bile, fakes having fun, tries to make her face look like it "should," goes through the motions of normal life while holding herself together literally and figuratively.The damage doesn't end there. Her perpetrator, Lincoln, is not finished with Peach. He stalks her, professing his "love" in letters cut from tabloid papers. He feels completely entitled to come to her home, insist on his love for her, demand she not run away, remind her that he's watching, lingering outside her classes, barrage her with creepy letters and much worse. She starts to see him everywhere, but is this post-traumatic stress, or is he real? Peach imagines him as a greasy sausage, smells his putrid odor in the air, sees his greasy slime lingering in the air, on surfaces, windows and feels this greasy meaty mess invading her senses and body. She wonders if others can see what she sees, if her boyfriend hears her heart banging against her ribs?She begins to see everyone as food stuffs (her very kind professor shakes his face, "showering the first row with splatters of custard" and proceeds to tell the class he's not "set yet." He is the only person who is sweet enough -- my word -- to notice she's in some sort of trouble, but she lets the opening slip past.) Her friend Sandy also notices something is wrong, but she's busy berating herself and wondering why he doesn't see her as she now does. She somaticizes her pain into a hard stone in her ever-distending stomach. This makes her instantly "fat" and never stops growing. (like a peach pit -- see?) She physically feels the sniggers of her classmates, she chokes on smells, she can't look at her teacher because he's "bright yellow and very shiny" custard. She's constantly being assaulted by her senses - another very real portrayal of trauma. Even the weather is constantly changing and unreliable.Traumatic process is the entirety of this book, and it leaves the reader as discombobulated as the narrator. It's an extremely effective method to show how shock throws the mind into a complete tornado, despite outwardly being so "normal" that nobody else notices. Because she is acutely post-trauma, we are never sure how reliable this narrator is. We only have her word for what she is experiencing. This is especially true at the end of the novel. It feels like pure fantasy that Peach has devolved into, but since she's telling it, we know she believes it is true. And if it is, it's mighty macabre.At first I didn't like the distance, then it just clicked -- oh, we're experiencing the same off-kilter perception/reality horror that happens to almost anyone who has just been shaken to their very core. Not everyone will have the same exact experience as Peach, but everyone will have their own unique experience. After I cottoned on to this, I was impressed with the way Emma Glass was able to sneak that past me. Lots of reviews have been unforgiving of this novel. I can see how it might seem contrived, but it feels very realistic to me, even if the events aren't "real" at all.I'd imagine, if the novel had continued, what we'd see is some sort of eventual collapse, hospitalization and years of therapy. Maybe after all of that, we'd know what was real, but I doubt it, and frankly, I don't want to read all of that. This book is not really a book -- it's an experience.
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  • Book Pairings (Laci Long)
    January 1, 1970
    I still can’t believe that this is Emma Glass’s debut novel. I can’t get the imagery from her experimental prose out of my head and I read this one in January! (Sorry it has taken me over to get around to writing a review for it) I can definitely see this one making my best of 2018 list. I know that is bold to say this early in the year, but I truly loved this little gem. Before reading on, I just want to give you a trigger warning for sexual assault. This story follows a teenage girl, Peach, af I still can’t believe that this is Emma Glass’s debut novel. I can’t get the imagery from her experimental prose out of my head and I read this one in January! (Sorry it has taken me over to get around to writing a review for it) I can definitely see this one making my best of 2018 list. I know that is bold to say this early in the year, but I truly loved this little gem. Before reading on, I just want to give you a trigger warning for sexual assault. This story follows a teenage girl, Peach, after she is sexually assaulted one night on her way home. We see how this affects her perception of herself and her relationships as she deals with the fear of her attacker returning and continues to keep the secret of her assault. It’s a very visceral read, which I contribute to Glass’s complex wordplay. The characters are all portrayed as food and at first it seems strange, but it really adds to the peculiar and unsettling feeling that was at the pit of my stomach while reading this. The experimental aspects of this story add to the urgency of the storyline and contribute to the emotional suspense. This story is equal parts unsettling and fascinating.
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  • Fra
    January 1, 1970
    All'inizio non si riesce a capire chi siano i personaggi e di che materiale siano fatti, poi tutto prende un senso (o quasi) e la storia scivola via e finisce prima che te ne renda conto.Molte cose restano del tutto incomprensibili, ma in realtà va bene così.Stile duro, conciso, ridotto all'osso, non avrebbe potuto essere altrimenti. A tratti un po' stanca, però.Un consiglio spassionato: le primissime pagine non sono per deboli di stomaco, non fate come me, non cominciatelo su un aereo alle 7 di All'inizio non si riesce a capire chi siano i personaggi e di che materiale siano fatti, poi tutto prende un senso (o quasi) e la storia scivola via e finisce prima che te ne renda conto.Molte cose restano del tutto incomprensibili, ma in realtà va bene così.Stile duro, conciso, ridotto all'osso, non avrebbe potuto essere altrimenti. A tratti un po' stanca, però.Un consiglio spassionato: le primissime pagine non sono per deboli di stomaco, non fate come me, non cominciatelo su un aereo alle 7 di mattina.
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  • Kelly Gunderman
    January 1, 1970
    Check out this, other reviews, and more fun bookish things on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings!Peach is one of those books that I honestly don't even know where to start in terms of writing a review. It wasn't a young adult book - and I've never been more thankful for that - and while it wasn't technically classified as a new adult book either, it seemed to be one to me, so I'm putting it in that category.But in the case of Peach, when I finished reading, I kind of closed the bo Check out this, other reviews, and more fun bookish things on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings!Peach is one of those books that I honestly don't even know where to start in terms of writing a review. It wasn't a young adult book - and I've never been more thankful for that - and while it wasn't technically classified as a new adult book either, it seemed to be one to me, so I'm putting it in that category.But in the case of Peach, when I finished reading, I kind of closed the book, sat there, looked around, and asked out loud: "What the actual hell did I just read?" Yep, that totally happened. And even a few days after finishing the book, I still don't know what the hell I read. Trigger Warnings: Rape, Assault In my opinion, not only is Peach written in a strange manner that is quite similar to the work of Eimear McBride in A Girl is a Half Formed Thing (and if you've read my review for that, I really couldn't enjoy the writing style at all), but it really doesn't capture a good enough image of the characters - any of them. This makes the book feel as though it is lacking something. Part of me wanted to comment on the short length of the book, but I've read books that were short like this before and managed to work out perfectly well, so I don't think the length of the book really affected it too much. The book was short and to the point, but was so full of confusion and "what the hell" moments that I honestly am not sure it was worth reading at all.Peach starts off with the main character, Peach, heading back to her home after suffering a violent rape and assault. She is bleeding, in pain, and in complete shock over what has happened to her. "I wash slowly. With my fingers. Lots of soap. So much soap. I rub. It hurts. Through the suds I watch my tears drown, fall down the drain. I want to follow and fall with them. Drown. Slip down. In the warm. In the dark." As the next few days go by, Peach suffers the emotional and physical trauma that has been inflicted upon her thanks to her attacker - there is a scene when she describes her cuts and how she has to stitch them back together - so it's quite graphic when it comes to details. If that bothers you, this isn't really a book you'll want to read, as things get kind of weird as they go on.Anyway, as time goes on, Peach becomes more and more haunted by her attacker, even to the point where she swears she sees him wherever she is, and she begins receiving letters from him, cut out ransom-note style. But Peach doesn't want to tell her parents or her boyfriend about the attack, and she keeps it bottled up inside, until one night she can't keep it bottled up any longer, and she does what she feels she needs to do to make things right.There is so much weirdness going on in this book. The writing style, as you can see in the quote above, is choppy and almost thought-based on how the character of Peach perceives the world. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, and I was kind of interested in the book despite that, until it started getting really, really weird, toward the last quarter of the book.The last quarter of the book is an absolute freaking mess. There is just so much going on here that makes absolutely no sense at all, and has so much shock value thrown in there that it almost makes the serious subject matter of the rest of the novel seem trivial. For example, the author finds a way to incorporate cannibalism into this book, and it does not fit or belong here, or many any sense whatsoever with the remainder of the story.Another thing I was thrown off by was the relationship Peach had with her parents. At the beginning of the book, they essentially talked about sex with peach as though they were friends, and even went as far to encourage Peach to get pregnant by her boyfriend so that their own baby would have someone to play with. It was kind of messed up, to be honest.I can't think of any reason to recommend this book to anyone - the relationships in the book are unhealthy and twisted, the author throws in things for shock value that take away from the meaning of the story, and the rest of it doesn't make much sense at all.I was really looking forward to reading this one, so I'm really bummed that it ended up being this bad. If it had been any longer of a book, I honestly wouldn't have finished it.Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!
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  • Mel (Epic Reading)
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been thinking for a couple of days about how to describe why I felt like this was a whole lot of nope book. I finished Peach because it is very short and I really didn’t want to hate it. I kept waiting for it to have a moment of true emotional connection or a brilliant moment but it never gave. The TopicPeach is about a teen girl who is raped. An obvious difficult and important topic to accurately portray. Unlike books, like Long Way Down, there is zero literary finesse to Peach. Instead of I’ve been thinking for a couple of days about how to describe why I felt like this was a whole lot of nope book. I finished Peach because it is very short and I really didn’t want to hate it. I kept waiting for it to have a moment of true emotional connection or a brilliant moment but it never gave. The TopicPeach is about a teen girl who is raped. An obvious difficult and important topic to accurately portray. Unlike books, like Long Way Down, there is zero literary finesse to Peach. Instead of taking a tough topic and breaking it down to hit all the right emotional cues, Emma Glass takes rape and throws it in your face... Shock Rock Those of you who remember the original shock rock stars like Alice Cooper, Ozzy Ozbourne or the later 90s versions like Marilyn Manson and Gwar will maybe know what I mean by this. It’s like Peach is a shock book. (Not near as catchy as shock rock, I know). So, what’s a shock book (and yes I just made this up)? Glass takes a disturbing, shocking, uncomfortable topic and throws it in your face. She shoves it down your throat, or otherwise tries to make you stumble back hoping you will be disturbed, disgusted or terrified. The thing about this tactic these days is it generally has less effect on the reader than a carefully crafted, emotionally charged and passionate literary story. Gruesome, descriptive and downright gross just doesn’t make me want to do anything other than put the a book down. In our desensitized world brutal descriptions just don’t evict emotions other than disgust or perhaps even a lack of connection due to constant barrage of media like this. Past the IntroductionHad the opening chapters been graphic and the rest of our story well written I likely would have understood the intent of the shocking opening. But this is not how Peach goes. Instead it continues into a realm of bizarre, and frankly annoying, rhetoric by our lead gal. I almost never felt bad for her and instead just wanted to yell at her to be smarter or less of a narcissist. I never really connected to our lead gal and found myself, (obviously incorrectly) judging her a lot; which is definitely not how we should feel about an abused teen girl. An Example of Poor Emotional ContentI know what you’re thinking... ‘Mel how dare you blame the sexually assaulted girl, do you lack sympathy’? But this is honestly how poorly the situation, and our lead gals emotions and feelings were portrayed. I felt like I wanted to scream at her to be less dumb and annoying. Not because what was written wasn’t perhaps totally true to a sexual assault victims thoughts, motivations or experience; but because it was written so poorly I just didn’t have any connection with this gal. And don’t even start me on her weird bloated stomach and whatever symbolism it was supposed to have. I can’t even express how dumb I found it by the end of the story. OverallA truly good book about a tough topic will make you feel like the character does. It will evict an understanding and emotion in you that you’ve maybe never felt before. Sadly Peach misses on all cues. Reading a book like Long Way Down (also a short story), where a character I have nothing in common with (black male teen in a low end neighbourhood), can evoke an emotional and mental response from me, means I know it can be done.I did have some emotions by the end of Peach; but they were disappointment in the quality of story and major annoyance at the continuing use of shock writing. For this and more of my reviews please visit my blog at: Epic ReadingPlease note: I received an eARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. This is an honest and unbiased review.
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  • Ellis Moore
    January 1, 1970
    I hold Peach very close to my heart, as I am sure so many readers will when the hardback is published on the 11th January 2018. I came across this book through my line of work as an editor, sent to me on submission for consideration of audio and large print rights around January this year (2017). From that moment, I read Peach in one sitting, devoured it till peach juice ran down and off my chin, and knew this book was special. Since this point, I’ve been telling everyone who is of a bookish nat I hold Peach very close to my heart, as I am sure so many readers will when the hardback is published on the 11th January 2018. I came across this book through my line of work as an editor, sent to me on submission for consideration of audio and large print rights around January this year (2017). From that moment, I read Peach in one sitting, devoured it till peach juice ran down and off my chin, and knew this book was special. Since this point, I’ve been telling everyone who is of a bookish nature that this is going to be a big book for 2018, and an outstanding debut for author Emma Glass. Finally, the beautiful proofs came through, and so I knew it was time to fan-girl in written words about this outstanding literary piece of art.This is the story of Peach, whose experiences and thought processes are shown to us through a stream of consciousness, of striking, harrowing imagery and melodic prose."I part my legs slowly and slot the mirror between my thighs. I put my hand over my mouth to stop the sick. I use my other hand to touch. The skin is split. Slit. Sliced.”Although a short story of just short of 100 pages, Peach is saturated in the most beautiful writing I think I have encountered. It is grueling, it is no easy fete to read, but it is a book you experience, you feel every word, every onomatopoeia, every pause and every emotion Peach feels.“Slip the pin through the skin. Start stitching. It doesn’t sting. It does bleed. White thread turns red. Red string. Going in. Going out. I pull. Tug. Tug on the pin. In. Out. Out. Out. Blackout.”When recommending Peach to fellow readers, I have described it as Grief is a Thing with Feathers (by Max Porter) biggest competition – and of course, we all know how well this exploratory book did, winning the 2016 International Dylan Thomas Prize, as well as being shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the Goldsmiths Prize. I have no doubt following its publication next year, there will be many accolades for Peach too. Emma Glass is absolutely outstanding, it is hard to believe she is a debut author and her work is quite frankly, breathtaking – and I don’t seem to be the only one who thinks so either:‘Emma Glass is an immensely talented young writer who takes on, in this dark poetic myth, the big issues: good and evil, violence, redemption. Her fearlessness renews one’s faith in the power of literature.” GEORGE SAUNDERS, bestselling author of the Man Booker long-listed Lincoln in the Bardo. ‘You’ll be unable to put it down until the very last sentence.’ KAMILA SHAMSIE, author of the Man Booker long-listed Home Fire. ‘Impossible to categorise, intimately weird and exhilartingly bold.’ LALINE PAULL, bestselling author of The Bees. I will be lucky enough to (soon) be casting the audiobook reading of Peach, and I really cannot wait to voice this remarkable piece of art, alongside the author. I know you folks might not be lucky enough to have been sent a proof copy, but put the 11th of January 2018 in your calendar – but to be honest, I doubt there will be any way for you to forget – Peach is going to be everywhere.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This short novella does not ease you in gently, the first lines hit you like a trainThick sticky sticky wet ragged wool winding round the wounds, stitching the sliced skin together as I walk, scraping my mittened hand against the wall, Rough red bricks ripping the wool. Ripping the skin. Rough red skin.Slowly we realise that this is the aftermath of a rape and the girl, Peach, is attempting to reach home, to safety, to assess her injuries and get clean.The rest of the novella continues in a simi This short novella does not ease you in gently, the first lines hit you like a trainThick sticky sticky wet ragged wool winding round the wounds, stitching the sliced skin together as I walk, scraping my mittened hand against the wall, Rough red bricks ripping the wool. Ripping the skin. Rough red skin.Slowly we realise that this is the aftermath of a rape and the girl, Peach, is attempting to reach home, to safety, to assess her injuries and get clean.The rest of the novella continues in a similar vein as Peach’s thoughts pour out onto the page. Keeping her rape secret she carries on her everyday life as if nothing has happened, yet her stream of thought, her constant fear that he is ever present, lurking in her head, in the background and everywhere she goes remains.Peach is portrayed as just your normal, average teenager, academically bright, a steady boyfriend and from a loving family. Her rape is harrowing but what I found even more harrowing was the aftermath. How Glass, describes Peach’s inner most thoughts and feelings is revelatory and you almost want to ask her how she knew what to write, where it came from, how she could get so deep into Peach’s psyche.The narrative is in short staccato sentences, almost poetic in its structure, but with immense power and intensity. It is brutal to read but so very compelling and sad.I did find myself at some points wanting to scream at her to tell someone, to get help, but I think that would have made life even more difficult for Peach, who just wants everything to be normal, yet is tormented by an act of such violence, that it consumes all her energy.The ending was just brilliant, in fact the whole novel was brilliant!Emma Glass has written the most stunning debut. It will not be to everyone’s taste and much of it is deeply harrowing and shocking but oh my goodness it is brilliant.Thank you to Bloomsbury and Netgalley for a copy to read and review
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  • Eric Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes reading quotes by authors I admire on the jackets of new books can very accurately indicate the experience I’m about to have. In this case, Emma Glass’ debut “Peach” comes festooned with a string of quotes by prominent authors from George Saunders who calls this a “dark poetic myth” to Laline Paull who describes how this book “shares literary DNA with Gertrude Stein, Herbert Selby Jr and Eimear McBride.” These get at the unusual quality of Glass’ writing, but this book’s radical style Sometimes reading quotes by authors I admire on the jackets of new books can very accurately indicate the experience I’m about to have. In this case, Emma Glass’ debut “Peach” comes festooned with a string of quotes by prominent authors from George Saunders who calls this a “dark poetic myth” to Laline Paull who describes how this book “shares literary DNA with Gertrude Stein, Herbert Selby Jr and Eimear McBride.” These get at the unusual quality of Glass’ writing, but this book’s radical style and approach to characters is wholly unique. It’s at once cartoonish and deadly serious. The story opens with Peach who has experienced a massive trauma and follows her in the proceeding days as she attempts to return to a state of normalcy. In doing so, Glass uses some shockingly innovative methods for getting at painful emotions and actions that can’t be described in a straightforward way. Read my full review of Peach by Emma Glass on LonesomeReader
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