Black Hammer, Vol. 2
When a visitor from the outside world arrives on the Farm, looking for the Black Hammer and bringing news of Spiral City to its Golden Age heroes, everything changes. Her arrival stirs up old memories and awakens new hope in the marooned heroes and they make a new attempt to escape their strange prison. - Jeff Lemire's (Descender, All-New Hawkeye) most earth-shattering work yet! - Indomitably illustrated by Dean Ormston (Lucifer, 2000 AD) and Dave Stewart (Hellboy) - Dark Horse does the multiversal epic! Collects Black Hammer issues #7-11 and #13.

Black Hammer, Vol. 2 Details

TitleBlack Hammer, Vol. 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506701981
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Graphic Novels Comics, Fiction, Superheroes, Fantasy

Black Hammer, Vol. 2 Review

  • Philip
    January 1, 1970
    4.25ish stars.Maybe my favorite on-going title. Great character work and a solid, clever plot that deftly balances Golden Age superheroes with New Age struggles. It makes the '90s flashbacks feel like the '40s but it works. This is a big improvement over the first volume; now that the character studies are out of the way, it leaves a lot of room to delve into the plot and expand personalities. Good artwork, not my personal favorite, but it works well for the story, and I appreciate the artistic 4.25ish stars.Maybe my favorite on-going title. Great character work and a solid, clever plot that deftly balances Golden Age superheroes with New Age struggles. It makes the '90s flashbacks feel like the '40s but it works. This is a big improvement over the first volume; now that the character studies are out of the way, it leaves a lot of room to delve into the plot and expand personalities. Good artwork, not my personal favorite, but it works well for the story, and I appreciate the artistic differences between the flashbacks and the current storyline. Looking forward to future installments.Posted in Mr. Philip's Library
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  • Dan Schwent
    January 1, 1970
    Lucy Weber, The Black Hammer's daughter, starts trying to piece together the mystery of The Farm and the town of Rockwood but someone doesn't want her to find the answers she's looking for...Black Hammer volume 2 has fallen into my hands and it's a whopper. The tale of the Black Hammer is finally told and it's an homage to a slew of Jack Kirby creations like Thor, the New Gods, and the Inhumans. Talky-Walky's origin is also revealed, another Mystery in Space type of adventure, just as something Lucy Weber, The Black Hammer's daughter, starts trying to piece together the mystery of The Farm and the town of Rockwood but someone doesn't want her to find the answers she's looking for...Black Hammer volume 2 has fallen into my hands and it's a whopper. The tale of the Black Hammer is finally told and it's an homage to a slew of Jack Kirby creations like Thor, the New Gods, and the Inhumans. Talky-Walky's origin is also revealed, another Mystery in Space type of adventure, just as something sinister happens to Talky-Walky back on the farm.More of Golden Gail's past is reveals, as it the nature of the Event that led to the heroes arriving at The Farm to begin with. More of Abraham Slam and Barbalien's pasts are also revealed. Lucy unravels the mystery of Rockwood and meets her destiny. What the hell are Madam Dragonfly and Colonel Weird up to?Yeah, a lot of shit went down in this volume and it has me salivating for the next one. I love the depth Lemire has achieved in such a short number of issues. The world of the Black Hammer feels like it's been around for decades. The mystery surrounding Rockwood and the Farm is tantalizing and I'm ready to find out just what the hell is going on. Dean Ormstrom's moody, Mignola-esque art is perfect for the series. I really don't have any bad things to say about The Black Hammer. The slow burning mystery of what the hell is the deal with the Farm and Rockwood has me hooked. I'll be sad to see the series end in the next volume, if that's what happens. Four out of five stars.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best ongoing comic series, winner of the 2017 Eisner award for best ongoing series, based in part on the trust they had that this team would create a great story. Lemire seems increasingly to bring together two things he loves: 1) Realistic, character-driven stories based in the bleak and desolate northern Canadian towns he knows well, and 2) superheroes. It’s both a tribute to Golden Age comics for the geeky True Supe Fans, and an explanation to his Essex County fans about why these One of the best ongoing comic series, winner of the 2017 Eisner award for best ongoing series, based in part on the trust they had that this team would create a great story. Lemire seems increasingly to bring together two things he loves: 1) Realistic, character-driven stories based in the bleak and desolate northern Canadian towns he knows well, and 2) superheroes. It’s both a tribute to Golden Age comics for the geeky True Supe Fans, and an explanation to his Essex County fans about why these worlds belong together. It almost feels autobiographical to me, in a way.I liked the first volume set up, trusting a story would emerge, and it sort of begins to. All these superheroes with sad back stories are stuck on a farm in northern Canada: Abraham Slam, Colonel Randall Weird, Talky-Walky, Barbalien, Golden Gail, Madame Dragonfly. Okay, we’re still mainly in backstory here, but all of them in Lemire’s conception are deeply troubled people, true, carefully drawn characters, drawn also with heart by Dean Ormston (and one cute backstory of Walky Talky by David Rubin).In this volume the key event is that Lucy (ooh, what could her connection be to this group?!) shows up to nudge them to escape. She finds the nearby town to be A City That Always Sleeps, and in the library, all the books are blank, hmm. And this hammer. . . hmm, what superhero besides our Black Hammer also carries a hammer? Hmm. I fully expect this is going to be great, and so far it is very good. I say 4.5, fully expecting a 5 for the next volume.
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  • Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    An almost Twilight Zone continuation of interpersonal drama, sharp dialog, black humor, and the increasingly exciting mystery of why the inhabitants of Black Hammer Farm can’t leave post-Crisis. The artwork is shared by David Rubin, whose cleaner style accommodates the vintage tone.
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  • Ivan
    January 1, 1970
    After three months of reading Manga it's good to finally read something that has color. Not much is happening in this volume but writing and melancholic atmosphere are amazing enough to earn this volume 5 stars and place on favorites shelf.
  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Black Hammer's daughter arrives and she's not OK with being stuck on the little farm as the rest of our tragic heroes have been. While she investigates the town we delve deeper into each character's backstory. Lemire has done such a fantastic job of reintroducing these archetypes of our youth with just enough of a tweak to keep you coming back for more. Ordstrom's moody art fits the setting and I really enjoyed David Rubin's fill in issue for the origin of Talky-Walky. Rubin's is a Spanish artis Black Hammer's daughter arrives and she's not OK with being stuck on the little farm as the rest of our tragic heroes have been. While she investigates the town we delve deeper into each character's backstory. Lemire has done such a fantastic job of reintroducing these archetypes of our youth with just enough of a tweak to keep you coming back for more. Ordstrom's moody art fits the setting and I really enjoyed David Rubin's fill in issue for the origin of Talky-Walky. Rubin's is a Spanish artist who in the past year has started to make inroads here in America as his comics are translated to English. I love the retro 40's style animation vibe he brings to his comics. Jeff Lemire's cover for the Abraham Slam issue made me chuckle when he signed it as Lemirefeld.Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Red Panda
    January 1, 1970
    Seriously great stuff; even the 'fill-in' issues are worth five stars. I love this book...
  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    That's more like it! I didn't fall in love with the first volume of Black Hammer, the story was too uneventful and the characters felt derivative. Fortunately, I thought the second one was an improvement.The main storyline finally starts moving as we meet a new character, the daughter of the hero Black Hammer. The characters start to question the place they're stuck in, some make rash decisions, and one of them doesn't even survive til the end of the book. We also get a tease of what actually ha That's more like it! I didn't fall in love with the first volume of Black Hammer, the story was too uneventful and the characters felt derivative. Fortunately, I thought the second one was an improvement.The main storyline finally starts moving as we meet a new character, the daughter of the hero Black Hammer. The characters start to question the place they're stuck in, some make rash decisions, and one of them doesn't even survive til the end of the book. We also get a tease of what actually happened during The Event which led to all the heroes being trapped on the farm, although no straight answers again despite even the title of the book suggesting otherwise.Lemire writes the tense relationships between all of the heroes really well, and the characters themselves open up a bit and become a little more relatable in a way. They're not exactly likeable, but you feel for them and care about their misfortunes.Which is precisely why I am still a bit mad that Lemire decided to make their superhero alter-egos as pastiches of real superheroes. The fact that their superhero selves are dollar store knockoffs of the actual Marvel and DC characters really detracts from the weight of this story, almost turning it into some kind of parody, despite that clearly not being the author's intention. What this book is is basically a dysfunctional family drama, and a good one at that, but every time their corny superhero past comes up, it yanks me right out of the story. I don't know why Lemire does that, because there is no deconstruction or clever commentary behind that, just a silly game of "guess this reference" that cheapens the impact of the actual solid character work that is going on in the foreground. At least make them into more original superheroes, you know? They don't have to be clearly-Captain-Americas, kinda-like-Martian-Manhunters or basically-Shazams.Other than that, I enjoyed the second volume of Black Hammer quite a bit. The plot finally starts moving somewhere, there is more intrigue, more mystery and tension, and the actual characters, dragged down by their alter-egos as they are, still manage to be interesting and layered. I still don't understand all the insane love this comic gets, but at least now I can agree that it's a pretty solid read.
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  • Jedi JC Daquis
    January 1, 1970
    With so many great titles in this comicbook era, it is easy to overlook this genius work written by Jeff Lemire. Black Hammer: The Event combines Lemire's themes of sadness, family and transcending yearning for love and acceptance with sci-fi and drama in this yet another great volume. Black Hammer's main strength is in the deep yet troubled personalities of the Golden Age heroes who were trapped in a strange rural town for a decade. The way they were written were so effective to me that I'd rat With so many great titles in this comicbook era, it is easy to overlook this genius work written by Jeff Lemire. Black Hammer: The Event combines Lemire's themes of sadness, family and transcending yearning for love and acceptance with sci-fi and drama in this yet another great volume. Black Hammer's main strength is in the deep yet troubled personalities of the Golden Age heroes who were trapped in a strange rural town for a decade. The way they were written were so effective to me that I'd rather read their sad (sometimes pitiful) stories rather than them figuring out a way to depart from the world they are trapped in.Oh and I enjoyed the filler backstory issues! Lemire has utilized the flashback technique very effectively and efficiently, tying up their past with their feelings and the things they are currently dealing with. It's like watching LOST, without the crappy ending (I hope Black Hammer doesn't end with that cork thing!)Black Hammer is also beautifully drawn by Dean Ormston. The melty faces and the eerie, almost barren spaces in the pages perfectly conveys the sadness and the mystery that envelopes both the town and the characters.
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this second volume of Black Hammer even better than the great 1st volume! An unexpected visitor from the outside world has appeared on the farm, not only sparking a bit of hope for escape in our heroes but also sparking old memories. Similar to the first installment, it's structured by cutting back and forth between the present times and flashbacks to the past in our heroes' lives. But while in the first book, the flashbacks were used as introductions to our characters' origins, the on I enjoyed this second volume of Black Hammer even better than the great 1st volume! An unexpected visitor from the outside world has appeared on the farm, not only sparking a bit of hope for escape in our heroes but also sparking old memories. Similar to the first installment, it's structured by cutting back and forth between the present times and flashbacks to the past in our heroes' lives. But while in the first book, the flashbacks were used as introductions to our characters' origins, the ones here give us a bit more depth and insight into their present-day emotional state on the farm. And we find out more about who Black Hammer was and what led up to The Event!I've really fallen in love with the world and the characters that Lemire has conjured here, you can really feel the love he and Dean Ormstom have for the classic age superhero stories. But there is also a modern feel to the way he tells the present day story. There's some great new character details here that I really enjoyed, like a look into the early relationship of Colonel Weird and Talky-Walky, and a really fascinating love story with Golden Gail, the nature of which I feel we've never seen before. There are also some great moments with Gail and Barbalien. I also loved seeing life in the town from an outsider's perspective, and focusing on how some of our heroes have given up trying to escape and have accepted their new lives...and some haven't.I was truly bummed to find out that the series was cancelled by Dark Horse, especially after that cliffhanger! But then I got happy again when I learned that it was just part of a reboot and the story will continue this year with Black Hammer: Age of Doom.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Loving this series!! It has amazing plotting, some great artwork, complex characterisation without being overbearing. Ends with a great cliffhanger. So so good.
  • Berna Labourdette
    January 1, 1970
    Es díficil ser objetiva con este tomo, porque es una oda a los superhéroes de la golden age. Es ingenua, pero intrigante,  los personajes están muy bien delineados y la parte gráfica está cuidadísima, en especial cuando dibuja David Rubín. Lo otro agradable, es que si bien podemos hacernos alguna idea de qué es lo que va a pasar, siempre hay sorpresas, como el final de este tomo. Muy buena. 
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  • Elizabeth A
    January 1, 1970
    Book blurb: Once they were heroes. Now, banished from existence by a multiversal crisis, the old champions of Spiral City lead simple lives in a timeless farming town.The thing with people is that you never really know what they'll do in a given situation. In this installment, the stranded superheroes suddenly have a visitor to the farm. Who is she, and how did she get there? Also, if she could get there, can they leave the same way? Oh, the questions. It also turns out that some of the "family" Book blurb: Once they were heroes. Now, banished from existence by a multiversal crisis, the old champions of Spiral City lead simple lives in a timeless farming town.The thing with people is that you never really know what they'll do in a given situation. In this installment, the stranded superheroes suddenly have a visitor to the farm. Who is she, and how did she get there? Also, if she could get there, can they leave the same way? Oh, the questions. It also turns out that some of the "family" are not trustworthy, so then what is one to do?This story continues to flash back and forth in time, and I continue to enjoy some of the plot lines better than others. The mystery deepens in some ways, while other things come to light. I quite enjoy the relationships between members of this dyfunctional found family, and the art continues to be good. However, it seems like this installment is the end of the road. With that cliffhanger ending, and all those unanswered questions, tell me it ain't so!
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  • Stewart Tame
    January 1, 1970
    Things are moving along at a decent pace. The newcomer who showed up at the end of the previous volume brings news of the outside world. The back cover copy claims that she, “... awakens new hope in the marooned heroes and they make a new attempt to escape their strange prison.” That's not really true, or at least not for all of them. What we do get are more flashbacks to the incidents leading up to their imprisonment, as well as a look at what happened to Black Hammer: it's not pretty. We do ge Things are moving along at a decent pace. The newcomer who showed up at the end of the previous volume brings news of the outside world. The back cover copy claims that she, “... awakens new hope in the marooned heroes and they make a new attempt to escape their strange prison.” That's not really true, or at least not for all of them. What we do get are more flashbacks to the incidents leading up to their imprisonment, as well as a look at what happened to Black Hammer: it's not pretty. We do get more info on the town, which seems less ordinary than it appeared at first glance. And we end on a doozy of a cliffhanger. I like this series, and find myself wondering where it's all going. This is going to live or die by its pacing. Too slow, and the readers will lose interest. Too quick, and the ending will be disappointing. There’ve been no missteps yet, which is encouraging. Recommended!
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful melancholy tale. World: Fantastic art the tone is very must informed by it and it's fantastic. The world building continues to be both so nostalgic and fresh at the same time. It's Lemire's signature small town, it's a DC love letter. It'd beautifully tragic and brilliant. Story: A continuation of the slice of life of these heroes trapped where they are. It's the small stories, the past the present the emotions are all real and relatable. It's paced wonderfully and the overarching pl A beautiful melancholy tale. World: Fantastic art the tone is very must informed by it and it's fantastic. The world building continues to be both so nostalgic and fresh at the same time. It's Lemire's signature small town, it's a DC love letter. It'd beautifully tragic and brilliant. Story: A continuation of the slice of life of these heroes trapped where they are. It's the small stories, the past the present the emotions are all real and relatable. It's paced wonderfully and the overarching plot is heavy and full of consequence. I don't want to ruin anything but it's good. It's a quiet look at our hero analogs and a slow slow burn that gives the best vibes of the start of Kingdom Come but is it's own thing. Characters: All of them are beautiful tragic beings and their stories are true and real and raw, so good. I can't even explain how beautiful these characters are realized, they all are...yeah brilliant. That end, so good Onward to the next book!
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    I love how happy this depressing story makes me.Holy shit. Talk about not catching a break. I mean really, Lemire, would it kill ya to just throw one of these characters a bone?Black Hammer is one of my pulls that I get really excited for each month. Within these first two volumes, I have grown to care about each and every character in the book. I feel their plight, I feel their pains, and at times I almost feel guilty for taking so much joy in watching their tale unfold.This is a superhero book I love how happy this depressing story makes me.Holy shit. Talk about not catching a break. I mean really, Lemire, would it kill ya to just throw one of these characters a bone?Black Hammer is one of my pulls that I get really excited for each month. Within these first two volumes, I have grown to care about each and every character in the book. I feel their plight, I feel their pains, and at times I almost feel guilty for taking so much joy in watching their tale unfold.This is a superhero book that I can definitely get behind!
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  • Shadowdenizen
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.
  • Diz
    January 1, 1970
    Black Hammer continues to be one of the best character driven superhero comic books on the market today. Bits of the mystery are revealed, but there are still lots of questions left. There's a surprise at the end that really makes me want to get ahold of volume 3 as soon as I can.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]With the heroes of Black Hammer firmly established, we can now begin to explore their pasts as they work to escap-Oh, wait, no, they're happy where they are. But someone definitely isn't. Black Hammer's daughter is new in town, and she's not about to let the heroes of old go down without a fight.God, these characters break my heart. Everything about their backstories is tragic, and the twist on each character archetype is just a twist of the knife into the soul. Their resi [Read as single issues]With the heroes of Black Hammer firmly established, we can now begin to explore their pasts as they work to escap-Oh, wait, no, they're happy where they are. But someone definitely isn't. Black Hammer's daughter is new in town, and she's not about to let the heroes of old go down without a fight.God, these characters break my heart. Everything about their backstories is tragic, and the twist on each character archetype is just a twist of the knife into the soul. Their resignation to their life in the inescapable town is super depressing, but the sinister nature of everything, not to mention the fact that some of their own seem to be working against them, just adds layer upon layer to the mystery.The fill-in issue with art by David Rubin sets up the Sherlock Frankenstein companion mini (that I also highly recommend), and the final page reveal for issue #13 is one that has me clamouring for the next volume already.Jeff Lemire's comics can blow hot and cold, but Black Hammer is always cooking with gas.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Just brilliant. My favorite current comic.
  • Juan Carlos
    January 1, 1970
    ¿Puedo decirlo? ¿Puedo, puedo? Porfa, porfa, porfa... Lemire es el Kirby actual.Seguimos con éste peculiar grupo de superhéroes encerrados en la granja dentro de ese extraño pueblo que parece artificial.Seguimos conociéndolos un poco más gracias a esos magníficos flashbacks con los cuales Lemire va desgranando el pasado de cada uno de ellos de forma que llegamos a empatizar con cada uno como si fueran personas reales. Lloramos, reímos y nos cabreamos con ellos.A la ecuación se añade la hija de M ¿Puedo decirlo? ¿Puedo, puedo? Porfa, porfa, porfa... Lemire es el Kirby actual.Seguimos con éste peculiar grupo de superhéroes encerrados en la granja dentro de ese extraño pueblo que parece artificial.Seguimos conociéndolos un poco más gracias a esos magníficos flashbacks con los cuales Lemire va desgranando el pasado de cada uno de ellos de forma que llegamos a empatizar con cada uno como si fueran personas reales. Lloramos, reímos y nos cabreamos con ellos.A la ecuación se añade la hija de Martillo Negro, a la cual ya conocimos en el vol 1 pero aquí tiene mucho más protagonismo, y sabemos un poco más acerca de Martillo, la lucha final con el Anti-Dios y su caída.La trama en sí es cierto que no avanza demasiado, pero Lemire se está centrando en que podamos conocer perfectamente a cada personaje a través de sus recuerdos, cocinando a fuego lento la historia cual novela río de forma brillante.La profundidad de cada uno es impresionante, metiendo incluso el tema lgtb sin que quede forzado ni artificial.En cuanto al dibujo poco que decir, Ormston sigue estando a un grandísimo nivel y Stewart hace virguerías con el color . Sobre Rubín, tengo que decir que aunque tiene muchos adeptos a mí no termina de convencerme, pero en su número realiza un buen trabajo (creo que la coloridísima paleta de Stewart hace mucho). En fin, ésta puede ser una de las grandes series de éstos años y puede quedar en el recuerdo como una de las mejores de todos los tiempos.Si ahora mismo me preguntas Marvel o DC, te diré que ninguno, me quedo con los supers de Black Hammer.La edición de Astiberri como siempre maravillosa.
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  • Nicola Mansfield
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent follow-up volume. We met everyone in vol.1 and now in vol. 2 everything starts happening. What they've been waiting for is finally arriving. Bad things are happening and we know who it is. Two members of the family do dreadful things that shock us They feel vindicated but if the others find out it will be even worse. A new Black Hammer discovers their new identity. And the book ends on a significant note, making us excited for the next volume. Will keep reading this!
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  • Rumi Vd
    January 1, 1970
    I read alot of comics, but this one is really high on my favorites list. the writing is superb, the art is fantastic, and the story is getting better and better, bring on the next volume !!
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    I never know what to expect from Black Hammer, and that's largely how I like it. The characters are well developed, complex, and fascinating. I'm really excited to see where this story goes.
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT!?!?! JEFF how ya do me like that!?! It has been 10 years in this lil farm town, some of the supes have accepted their fate while others push to find a way out. The two people in question are Col Weird (who saw Talky Walky was about to do something through building probes) and Madame Butterfly ( who has given the no f*#ks about the town anymore). Lucy Weber makes a discovery and the volume ends.... Oh the longing!! WHY JEFF WHY!!!
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  • Chad Jordahl
    January 1, 1970
    All around excellent. Lots of art extras.
  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very well done wallow in comic book superhero nostalgia. I'm still not sure how this will appeal to anyone who is not a middle-aged fanboy like me who read almost everything DC published in the '70s and '80s. Even I'm having a little trouble with the pacing, as a plot development obvious from the first few pages doesn't occur until the last page of the story. The pages in between are fine, but in general I'm losing patience with stories that want to look at the past through a dark, cra This is a very well done wallow in comic book superhero nostalgia. I'm still not sure how this will appeal to anyone who is not a middle-aged fanboy like me who read almost everything DC published in the '70s and '80s. Even I'm having a little trouble with the pacing, as a plot development obvious from the first few pages doesn't occur until the last page of the story. The pages in between are fine, but in general I'm losing patience with stories that want to look at the past through a dark, cracked lens and reinvent my childhood heroes as losers and villains. I understand the impulse, but as a middle-aged fanboy, I have seen this grim and gritty recasting way too many times for it to seem shocking, novel or imaginative anymore.Oh, I also threw in some demerits for invoking Jack Kirby's Fourth World. I hated those books when they came out and despise them still. I can't believe DC keeps going back to that crap as a source for inspiration even today. Ugh.
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  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    Character FirstSo, all of Black Hammer's superhero companions have been trapped in some dullsville pocket universe for the past ten years. Hammer's daughter, Lucy, is somehow transported into that bland nowheresville as this Volume 2 opens, and being the good reporter she is, she pokes around and starts asking questions. Apart from some flashbacks about the early days of some of the heroes, (Colonel Weird, Black Hammer, Barbalien, Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, and even Talky-Walky), there isn't muc Character FirstSo, all of Black Hammer's superhero companions have been trapped in some dullsville pocket universe for the past ten years. Hammer's daughter, Lucy, is somehow transported into that bland nowheresville as this Volume 2 opens, and being the good reporter she is, she pokes around and starts asking questions. Apart from some flashbacks about the early days of some of the heroes, (Colonel Weird, Black Hammer, Barbalien, Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, and even Talky-Walky), there isn't much "action" going on. But, there is an awful lot in terms of interest, character, and depth. Each hero reacts differently, (despair, frustration, relief, acceptance, regret), to this forced banishment, and those different reactions are played out convincingly. Who knew Pirandello wrote comics?This Volume 2, subtitled "The Event", collects issues 7 through 11, and issue 13, of the Black Hammer series. A lot of attention is devoted to Abraham Slam and Barbalien, especially regarding how they are accommodating to a life of exile on "the Farm". Golden Gail and Colonel Weird get the best flashbacks. Madame Dragonfly is sadly, to me, overlooked. Meanwhile, Lucy starts to become a more and more central character.This Volume confirms all of the good things that have been said about this series - the deconstruction of the Golden Age heroes, the melancholy of the old tropes, the personal toll that is paid privately by these publicly heroic figures. It is a thoughtful homage, but with energy and style all its own. For what it's worth this collection has enough monologuing and enough answering of Lucy's questions that a newbie could jump in at this point, as I did, and pretty easily pick up all of the important character and story threads. So don't be hesitant to come in in the middle of the show.As you might expect, the volume concludes with a display of variant covers and with a very interesting set of work-in-progress pages that demonstrate how a page is penciled and inked. My bottom line is that I wasn't really familiar with Black Hammer before coming upon this Volume 2, and I'm intrigued and impressed enough to keep following the series. Lemire has done a lot of interesting things with these characters beyond the usual superhero mishegoss, and I'm very curious to see where he goes next.(Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Zedsdead
    January 1, 1970
    I continue to delight in the shifting styles, the way the illustration, speech patterns, even the fonts change depending on what period and genre is being evoked. Plot points:(view spoiler)[--Black Hammer's daughter Lucy appears out of nowhere but has no idea how she got there or what she was doing.--Black Hammer's backstory as [Thor].--The battle against Antigod which led, in a burst of light, to the heroes' imprisonment.--Colonel Weird's backstory meet cute with Talky Walky.--Abraham Slam's ba I continue to delight in the shifting styles, the way the illustration, speech patterns, even the fonts change depending on what period and genre is being evoked. Plot points:(view spoiler)[--Black Hammer's daughter Lucy appears out of nowhere but has no idea how she got there or what she was doing.--Black Hammer's backstory as [Thor].--The battle against Antigod which led, in a burst of light, to the heroes' imprisonment.--Colonel Weird's backstory meet cute with Talky Walky.--Abraham Slam's backstory as an aging hero sidelined by younger, more effective newcomers.--Barbalien finally makes a move on the preacher and is kicked out of church.--Gail's backstory: she joyfully retired from crimefighting and found love and peace with [Lex Luthor].--Barbalien's backstory being driven off the police force by homophobes.--Lucy visits the town library and all the books are blank.--Gail tries to commit suicide at the boundary. Barbalien stops her.--Sheriff Deliverance threatens Tammy, so (view spoiler)[Dragonfly melts him. Holy hell, is SHE BEHIND IT ALL?? (hide spoiler)]--Lucy gives Talky Walky a (painfully obvious) avenue to pursue toward freeing them from their prison. So (view spoiler)[Weird appears and murders Talky Walky, saying "I can't allow us to leave." Holy hell, is HE behind it all??? (hide spoiler)]--Lucy picks up her father's hammer and becomes the new Black Hammer. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Derek
    January 1, 1970
    Part deconstruction. Part loving homage.Part gentle parody.Writer Jeff Lemire has created a comic about comics but one that never becomes annoyingly precious or meta. Lemire never seems satisfied with being merely intellectually cute. The reflective nature of his work here serves a purpose: he uses comic book tropes to ask questions about identity - who we are and who we believe ourselves to be. The differences between the two can be devastating. However, they can also be liberating if one has t Part deconstruction. Part loving homage.Part gentle parody.Writer Jeff Lemire has created a comic about comics but one that never becomes annoyingly precious or meta. Lemire never seems satisfied with being merely intellectually cute. The reflective nature of his work here serves a purpose: he uses comic book tropes to ask questions about identity - who we are and who we believe ourselves to be. The differences between the two can be devastating. However, they can also be liberating if one has the courage to truly face them.This is masterful work by a writer at the height of his powers.And the art is really freaking good too.
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