The Woman in the Water
This chilling new mystery in the USA Today bestselling series by Charles Finch takes readers back to Charles Lenox's very first case and the ruthless serial killer who would set him on the course to become one of London's most brilliant detectives.London, 1850: A young Charles Lenox struggles to make a name for himself as a detective...without a single case. Scotland Yard refuses to take him seriously and his friends deride him for attempting a profession at all. But when an anonymous writer sends a letter to the paper claiming to have committed the perfect crime--and promising to kill again--Lenox is convinced that this is his chance to prove himself.The writer's first victim is a young woman whose body is found in a naval trunk, caught up in the rushes of a small islets in the middle of the Thames. With few clues to go on, Lenox endeavors to solve the crime before another innocent life is lost. When the killer's sights are turned toward those whom Lenox holds most dear, the stakes are raised and Lenox is trapped in a desperate game of cat and mouse.In the tradition of Sherlock Holmes, this newest mystery in the Charles Lenox series pits the young detective against a maniacal murderer who would give Professor Moriarty a run for his money.

The Woman in the Water Details

TitleThe Woman in the Water
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2018
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250139467
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Historical Mystery

The Woman in the Water Review

  • Charles Finch
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first ever 100-star book in my humble opinion. I have written to Goodreads and am hoping they add a unique "100-star" rating just for the book, will keep you apprised of any response I get!
  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    For the eleventh entry in the Charles Lenox series, the author has written an entertaining prequel that sets up the characters well. Lenox is 23 and just done with Oxford. As the second son of a baronet, he is at loose ends with no need to earn money and two desires- to travel and to solve crimes. He decides to open his own private detective agency, an almost unheard of career. Scotland Yard is new itself so this is a brand new undertaking. A murdered woman is discovered and a letter to the new For the eleventh entry in the Charles Lenox series, the author has written an entertaining prequel that sets up the characters well. Lenox is 23 and just done with Oxford. As the second son of a baronet, he is at loose ends with no need to earn money and two desires- to travel and to solve crimes. He decides to open his own private detective agency, an almost unheard of career. Scotland Yard is new itself so this is a brand new undertaking. A murdered woman is discovered and a letter to the newspaper promises another "perfect" crime. Lenox has found his passion, He wants to discover the murderer and gets hired as a consultant to Scotland Yard's investigation. Horrified to be receiving a salary for heavens sake, he and his valet, Graham, rush to solve the crime but are too late. Another body turns up with lots of clues that make little sense. This a really interesting mystery with an unexpected ending. It's a great placed to start the series if you haven't read him before because it's essentially the beginning. For long time readers, it's fun to see how relationships started. It's also quite interesting to read about the beginning of crime investigations. Reading how coroners operators worked was interesting and the history (1850) was informative. Overall, this was an entertaining book well worth the read. I highly recommend it. Thanks to Net Galley for a copy of the book in exchange for a fair review.
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  • ❇Critterbee
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. I simply adore Charles Finch's writing. We return to Victorian-era England, meet a much younger Charles Lenox, and witness his first real case as a detective. He is 23 years old and living on his own in London. His parents are present, and the parts with his Father and Mother are written so beautifully, with such love and sadness. It was emotional, heartwarming, bittersweet, all that without being syrupy or manipulative or too much. Finch got the balance just right, and I was really t Excellent. I simply adore Charles Finch's writing. We return to Victorian-era England, meet a much younger Charles Lenox, and witness his first real case as a detective. He is 23 years old and living on his own in London. His parents are present, and the parts with his Father and Mother are written so beautifully, with such love and sadness. It was emotional, heartwarming, bittersweet, all that without being syrupy or manipulative or too much. Finch got the balance just right, and I was really touched.Alongside the important presence of Lady Jane, brother Edmund and Graham, we have glimpses of Dr McConnell, we see Charles finding his feet as a consulting detective, and his early interactions with Scotland Yard. The case includes boastful letters announcing that a 'perfect murder' has occurred, and that another will be forthcoming. But are the murders what they seem?So far I have not found any Charles Finch book to be lacking, and this one I liked very well. *eARC Netgalley*
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press Minotaur Books for a digital galley of this novel.Important to both first-time and long-time readers of the Charles Lenox mystery series, this story takes place at the beginning of Lenox's career as a detective with his first important case. This is where Lenox and Graham cut their detecting teeth on a very difficult puzzle and establish a relationship with Scotland Yard. At twenty-two years old Lenox has been seven months in London after graduatin Many thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press Minotaur Books for a digital galley of this novel.Important to both first-time and long-time readers of the Charles Lenox mystery series, this story takes place at the beginning of Lenox's career as a detective with his first important case. This is where Lenox and Graham cut their detecting teeth on a very difficult puzzle and establish a relationship with Scotland Yard. At twenty-two years old Lenox has been seven months in London after graduating from Balliol College, Oxford, where Graham served as his scout. Now Graham is serving as valet to Charles as they both try to get his career started. Very soon Lenox will celebrate his twenty-third birthday and begin trying to solve a case very well constructed by author Charles Finch.The body of a young woman is found in a trunk floating at the edge of the River Thames. No identity can be established but a letter to one of the newspapers claims credit for the writer committing the perfect murder. The chilling letter includes information that this will not be the only murder. Scotland Yard doesn't want any help from Lenox and Graham. Then a second body is found.This was a very enjoyable novel to read and to watch as both Lenox and Graham start learning this craft of being a detective. The pressures of the position Lenox holds in society are interesting to see in this novel which takes place in 1850. I have followed this series enough to be basically familiar with the Lenox family and with Charles, the second son, in particular with all that meant. The mentions of the youth and inexperience of Charles Lenox form an important basis for this story but after the halfway point of the novel it would have been nice if the author had given readers the benefit of the doubt as to whether they had already noticed that information.......many, many times.
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  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    Really good read, I look forward to reading more in the series.
  • Mary Truitt Hill
    January 1, 1970
    How delightful to spend some time with the young Charles Lenox and so many of the friends and acquaintances we will come to know in the later books of the series! I hope there will be more stories of the young Lenox.
  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    Author Charles Finch has written 11 or so novels in his "Charles Lenox" mystery series, set in London in the 1850's and 60's. (He's also written a standalone, which I've read). I've read maybe seven or so of his "Lenox" series; I try to catch them when I see them for sale but I think I've missed a few. ("So many books, so little time..."). Anyway, they're a well written series of books, concentrating on Charles Lenox, who has build up a private investigating firm in London after having "come dow Author Charles Finch has written 11 or so novels in his "Charles Lenox" mystery series, set in London in the 1850's and 60's. (He's also written a standalone, which I've read). I've read maybe seven or so of his "Lenox" series; I try to catch them when I see them for sale but I think I've missed a few. ("So many books, so little time..."). Anyway, they're a well written series of books, concentrating on Charles Lenox, who has build up a private investigating firm in London after having "come down" from Oxford. Charles is the son and brother of lowish level aristocrats and he wears his wealth and family quite easily as "the younger brother", who must find a way in society. As with any series, the reader revisits books and characters they feel comfortable with. With his book, "The Woman in the Water", Charles Finch has written a "prequeal", where the reader can discover the backgrounds of the characters they may have grown familiar with in preceding books.In "The Woman in the Water", Charles Lenox is just beginning his post-graduate life in London. His scout at Oxford, Graham, has come down with him and both are determined to begin a private investigating firm. (Actually, Lenox is the lead and Graham just begins as his aide. He soon becomes proficient in the job as he and Lenox go along.) The case - that of two women's bodies being found floating in the Thames - is not the most interesting case - being full of coincidences and professional sword-crossing with those professional fellas at Scotland Yard - but author Finch does his best to keep the readers' interest. But the real importance of the book is the outlining, and then fleshing out, of the various relationships between characters. "Back stories", which are often needed in series books. Charles Finch does a good job at looking at the London of 1850, which is beginning to use the burgeoning railway system to get about, get from City to country and back again.I can definitely recommend this book to long-time readers of the Lenox series, but also to first time readers. It's a good introduction to Charles Lenox and his world.
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  • Tracy Rowan
    January 1, 1970
    Once again I found myself at a disadvantage by joining a series in progress.  The Woman in the Water is a prequel to the Charles Lenox mystery series, and recounts his very first important case, that of two murdered women found in the vicinity of the Thames, one in a trunk, and the other, covered in flowers and laid on a door.  The latter becomes known as the Thames Ophelia because she floated down the river and was beached on the shore. Or was she? From the very beginning, Lenox finds problems Once again I found myself at a disadvantage by joining a series in progress.  The Woman in the Water is a prequel to the Charles Lenox mystery series, and recounts his very first important case, that of two murdered women found in the vicinity of the Thames, one in a trunk, and the other, covered in flowers and laid on a door.  The latter becomes known as the Thames Ophelia because she floated down the river and was beached on the shore. Or was she? From the very beginning, Lenox finds problems with that narrative, but because he's an amateur, and the son of a Baronet, the police don't take him very seriously.  Obviously they should, we all know that from the get-go since this is a prequel to a successful series of mysteries. But it's a time-honored trope, and it does work, mostly by throwing roadblocks up and proving how resourceful the amateur really is.Much of Lenox's origin story is derivative. He's essentially a Sherlock Holmes-era Peter Wimsey, right down to having a valet who also serves as a detecting partner, being the second son of a lord, and having a close relationship with his mother. Fortunately his elder brother and sister-in-law are vast improvements over the Duke of Denver and his horrid wife. And Lenox's father seems a genuinely nice man.  Graham is an excellent Bunter analog as well. As I became familiar with the characters I found myself thinking of the story as pedestrian, but fortunately it began to pick up as Charles takes up the case of one of the two dead women.  By the end, I thought it was a fairly clever mystery, and wanted to read more about Lenox. Finch won me over in spite of what I felt was a lackluster start to the novel.  In the end, there is a lot to like about this book, and like it I did.The month is looking up!
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    The Woman in the Water by author Charles Finch is set in the 1950's England. This is a prequel to the series of Charles Lenox detective mysteries. The young would-be detective is often joked about in his circle of friends and soon catches his first big case. He is taunted by a newspaper notice about a person who has pulled of the perfect murder or crime. This sets in motion a series of events which tests the young detective's abilities and further threatens those he cares about. As you read pay The Woman in the Water by author Charles Finch is set in the 1950's England. This is a prequel to the series of Charles Lenox detective mysteries. The young would-be detective is often joked about in his circle of friends and soon catches his first big case. He is taunted by a newspaper notice about a person who has pulled of the perfect murder or crime. This sets in motion a series of events which tests the young detective's abilities and further threatens those he cares about. As you read pay attention to detail...the clues to the murderer will be found in the details!In my opinion, it seems the Charles Lenox detective mysteries are written a bit slower pace than the Sherlock Holmes if you try to compare the two. So, keep in mind the time period and a bit of a different style of writing. But very well written!
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    What a great idea! This is a prequel to an existing series. It provides the reader with an introduction to Charles Finch and his friends and colleagues with humor and tension and a cracking good case! I’ll be reading more in the series!
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Very charming! Loved the historical details, especially those educational/explanatory asides. Memorable characters (I’m still thinking about them, hoping they are well). Not thrilling, hard, or violent.
  • Wit & Wonder Books
    January 1, 1970
    **ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review**What an unexpected surprise this book was! The Woman in the Water by Charles Finch is a prequel to the Charles Lenox Mysteries. Written in the style of Sherlock Holmes, this book introduces the characters who star in the following books. I read this one before reading the rest of the series, even thought it was the newest release. It can be read as a standalone, but I am planning on reading them all now.Charles Lenox is determined to **ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review**What an unexpected surprise this book was! The Woman in the Water by Charles Finch is a prequel to the Charles Lenox Mysteries. Written in the style of Sherlock Holmes, this book introduces the characters who star in the following books. I read this one before reading the rest of the series, even thought it was the newest release. It can be read as a standalone, but I am planning on reading them all now.Charles Lenox is determined to make himself known as a budding new detective in London in the 1850’s. He scours newspapers for an opportunity to solve a mystery in order to prove himself worthy and build up his business. Upon reading an anonymous letter confessing to an unsolved murder, referred to as the “perfect crime”, Lenox and his trusty valet, Graham, go on a mission to solve the case. They are in a race against time, trying to find the killer before he strikes again.Lenox juggles the murder investigation, while managing his feelings for his best friend, Elizabeth, and appeasing my favorite character, the pushy housekeeper Mrs. Huggins, whose extreme personality kept me entertained. All she wants is to keep Charles’ house running smoothly, but he has a murder investigation to solve and can’t be bothered with such things. Their banter back and forth throughout the book was amusing.I am a fan of mystery and suspense, but usually more contemporary styles. Because of the setting in the mid 1800’s, it took me a couple chapters to adjust to the writing style, as it is well written for the time period, but once I gained some momentum, I couldn’t stop. I read this over my holiday break and was so thankful I didn’t have to put it down! Just the right mix of history, mystery, suspense, and some astonishing surprises. I gave this book a solid 4 stars and cannot wait to grab the next one in the series and delve in!
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher –This chilling new mystery in the USA Today bestselling series by Charles Finch takes readers back to Charles Lenox’s very first case and the ruthless serial killer who would set him on the course to become one of London’s most brilliant detectives.London, 1850: A young Charles Lenox struggles to make a name for himself as a detective…without a single case. Scotland Yard ref I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher –This chilling new mystery in the USA Today bestselling series by Charles Finch takes readers back to Charles Lenox’s very first case and the ruthless serial killer who would set him on the course to become one of London’s most brilliant detectives.London, 1850: A young Charles Lenox struggles to make a name for himself as a detective…without a single case. Scotland Yard refuses to take him seriously and his friends deride him for attempting a profession at all. But when an anonymous writer sends a letter to the paper claiming to have committed the perfect crime—and promising to kill again—Lenox is convinced that this is his chance to prove himself.The writer’s first victim is a young woman whose body is found in a naval trunk, caught up in the rushes of a small islets in the middle of the Thames. With few clues to go on, Lenox endeavors to solve the crime before another innocent life is lost. When the killer’s sights are turned toward those whom Lenox holds most dear, the stakes are raised and Lenox is trapped in a desperate game of cat and mouse. In the tradition of Sherlock Holmes, this newest mystery in the Charles Lenox series pits the young detective against a maniacal murderer who would give Professor Moriarty a run for his money.I have not read any of Charles Finch’s books but this one is making me want to real ALL of them. And I mean ALL OF THEM … (denying my cravings is always an issue for me whether it be stollen-bread, cheese or books!) This book is very well written and the characters well-fleshed out and completely engrossing to the point of distraction from anything else and kept me up WAY past my bedtime. It will be a definite inclusion in this year’s book club, for sure!
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I've read many of Charles Finch's Charles Lennox historical mysteries and enjoyed them. The Woman in the Water is unusual because it details the first investigation by a very young Lennox, who is determined to become a detective, treading cautiously between youthful hubris and social hierarchies, learning as he goes.Sometimes young Lennox makes mistakes and looks foolish, but his occasional flashes of insight outstrip his missteps. He is balancing so much at once: his eagerness and lack of exper I've read many of Charles Finch's Charles Lennox historical mysteries and enjoyed them. The Woman in the Water is unusual because it details the first investigation by a very young Lennox, who is determined to become a detective, treading cautiously between youthful hubris and social hierarchies, learning as he goes.Sometimes young Lennox makes mistakes and looks foolish, but his occasional flashes of insight outstrip his missteps. He is balancing so much at once: his eagerness and lack of experience; his social life and the derision of many of his peers; his love for Elizabeth with her newly married status; his frustrations with dealing with his housekeeper; his reluctance to take the salary of a Scotland Yard consultant; his father's illness; and his love and jealousy of his brother.An anonymous letter claiming to have committed the "perfect murder" claims the interest of both Lennox and his friend and valet Graham. The two spend time each day cutting articles out of the paper and comparing them for possible criminal investigations that might be stepping stones for an aspiring detective. Then the body of the first victim, a young woman, her body enclosed in a trunk washes ashore. There are few clues, but Lennox manages to become involved in the investigation (here, family connections help his cause). The letter writer promises more perfect murders, and Charles races to prevent another murder.In contrast to the more experienced detective in the later books, it is interesting to see how the young Charles Lennox begins to learn and practice his trade. Read in Dec.; blog review scheduled for Feb. 14, 2018.St. Martin's Press/MinotaurHistorical Mystery. February 20, 2018. Print version: 304 pages.
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  • Lorna Gundaker
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of THE WOMAN IN THE WATER, by Charles Finch, from a Goodreads/MacMillan giveaway on January 23, 2018. I read it over the weekend and loved it. This was my first novel by Charles Finch, particularly, the Charles Lenox series of mysteries. This book is described as a prequel, explaining why an aristocratic, Victorian gentleman would decide to delve into the murky world of private detecting and mingling with those beneath him. This book—-and soon to be devoured series—-combines ma I received an ARC of THE WOMAN IN THE WATER, by Charles Finch, from a Goodreads/MacMillan giveaway on January 23, 2018. I read it over the weekend and loved it. This was my first novel by Charles Finch, particularly, the Charles Lenox series of mysteries. This book is described as a prequel, explaining why an aristocratic, Victorian gentleman would decide to delve into the murky world of private detecting and mingling with those beneath him. This book—-and soon to be devoured series—-combines many of my loves: historical fiction, mystery, elegantly written sentences and clever plot, an engaging narrator, and the Victorian period. I am always thrilled to find a new author with a lovely series of books to be explored. The Charles Lenox series looks to be a delight. Thanks, Goodreads and MacMillan!The Woman in the Water explores the dichotomy that exists when a high-born man, Charles Lenox, decides to pursue a low-born career. Gifted at deductive reasoning and discernment, Lenox wants to use these skills in the relatively new line of personal detecting. He is laughed at by the “Yard”, but he and his equally gifted valet, Graham, study the crime reports in the daily London papers as if they were a textbook. This leads to an overlooked post by a man who claims to have committed the perfect crime. Not only that, he will repeat it in exactly one month. Despite a disappointed Lord of the Realm father, direct cuts by some of society, and thwarted love, Lenox and Graham are off in pursuit of the murderer. The ensuing race to find him, along with personal drama’s, both large and small, make for an enthralling mystery. Read it! You won’t be disappointed.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for providing an ARC of this book, in exchange for a fair and honest review.I have read and enjoyed all of the previous books in this series, so it felt a little strange to go back to the earliest days after Charles Lenox left college and decided that he wanted to be a private detective. The author did an excellent job of portraying the young and inexperienced Lenox - quite different from the Lenox that we know in his later days, although different in a realistic way. He's a Thanks to Netgalley for providing an ARC of this book, in exchange for a fair and honest review.I have read and enjoyed all of the previous books in this series, so it felt a little strange to go back to the earliest days after Charles Lenox left college and decided that he wanted to be a private detective. The author did an excellent job of portraying the young and inexperienced Lenox - quite different from the Lenox that we know in his later days, although different in a realistic way. He's a bit full of himself - impressed by his own status and what he sees as his superior intelligence and reasoning abilities. I am glad that he matured in the following books, as I don't think I would have enjoyed reading a whole series with his character as it is here. In this case, though, it really was rather enjoyable, knowing that he would in fact grow out of it.I didn't find the plot as interesting as in the later books. Perhaps because the plot here seemed rather random, while in the later books, there was a more defined point to the crimes. That said, I enjoyed the book for the characters and for developing a bit more of Lenox's back story. While not my favorite in the series, it was well worth reading.If you haven't read the other books in the series, you should. And there really isn't any need to read this one first - I think it's more interesting to read after having read the others.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    This was the perfect read on a Christmas beach vacation. I loved three things about it. The mystery was intriguing. At first I thought it might be a cheap, non-creative crazed serial murderer. But the killer had motive. Next I appreciate the historical research Charles Finch puts into his books. You can always learn something new. Last, but not least, I loved getting more back story on Lenox! Elizabeth didn’t fool me. But I loved meeting Lenox’ father and especially John Dallington. I’d welcome This was the perfect read on a Christmas beach vacation. I loved three things about it. The mystery was intriguing. At first I thought it might be a cheap, non-creative crazed serial murderer. But the killer had motive. Next I appreciate the historical research Charles Finch puts into his books. You can always learn something new. Last, but not least, I loved getting more back story on Lenox! Elizabeth didn’t fool me. But I loved meeting Lenox’ father and especially John Dallington. I’d welcome more stories between this one and Beautiful Blue Death. I got an advance copy. I plan to write the editor about some sloppy editing: random letters dropped y in mid-sentence, a close quote hanging out on its own line. “Pretty sloppy proofreading.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Lenox and his valet are armchair detectives in 1850 London who are on the hunt for what could be an interesting serial killer and their first real case. Women are being found in various locations in or near the water and the killer is sending letters and clues to various newspapers only to be ignored and the events unconnected. With obvious nods to Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie, the witty Lenox and his friend/valet Graham are desperate to track the killer and make a name for himsel Charles Lenox and his valet are armchair detectives in 1850 London who are on the hunt for what could be an interesting serial killer and their first real case. Women are being found in various locations in or near the water and the killer is sending letters and clues to various newspapers only to be ignored and the events unconnected. With obvious nods to Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie, the witty Lenox and his friend/valet Graham are desperate to track the killer and make a name for himself despite his friend's and family's horror that he has a job. The perfect historical whodunnit-all you need is a strong cup of tea, wingback chair and roaring fire to make this mystery complete. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    1850 and Charles Lenox no tlong finished at university is finding it difficult to get cases as a private investigator. How can he prove himself to his friends and Scotland Yard. A letter published in a newspaper which the author claims to have committed the perfect crime would seem to be the answer.This is a prequel to the series as Lenox is only 23 years old, and it is my first read of these stories. It was an interesting mystery, and I am sure that the characters developed as the series contin 1850 and Charles Lenox no tlong finished at university is finding it difficult to get cases as a private investigator. How can he prove himself to his friends and Scotland Yard. A letter published in a newspaper which the author claims to have committed the perfect crime would seem to be the answer.This is a prequel to the series as Lenox is only 23 years old, and it is my first read of these stories. It was an interesting mystery, and I am sure that the characters developed as the series continued. I did at times find the writing style a bit awkward to read. But I expect I will be familiar with it by the next book.A NetGalley Book
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  • Viva
    January 1, 1970
    2 stars = "it was ok" by GR's 5 star rating system.It was ok. This is not a bad book by any means. In fact, I love old tyme Victorian style detective stories and I specifically picked this book for that. However this book lacked excitement and it was a bore to read. The writing just wasn't written in a way that made it interesting and made me want to continue. I had put this book down several times and had to force myself to continue to read it. Some books carry you along, make you want to read 2 stars = "it was ok" by GR's 5 star rating system.It was ok. This is not a bad book by any means. In fact, I love old tyme Victorian style detective stories and I specifically picked this book for that. However this book lacked excitement and it was a bore to read. The writing just wasn't written in a way that made it interesting and made me want to continue. I had put this book down several times and had to force myself to continue to read it. Some books carry you along, make you want to read it. This book wasn't one of them. I'm glad others like it though. I got this as a free ARC.
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    This book serves as an introduction to the Charles Lenox mystery series. However, it not merely a novel that "sets the stage" for the major characters and settings in the series. This does well as a stand-alone mystery which has the reader guessing until the last chapter. I greatly enjoyed reading it and recommend it to anyone who enjoys a captivating mystery. I received this book as part of the Goodreads Giveaway program.
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  • Dgordon
    January 1, 1970
    What a wonderful prequel to the Charles Lenox mystery series. The cast of characters that populate this series all make appearances that establish their relationships with Lenox and how they all go forward. The backstory of Lenox's parents and Lady Elizabeth are particularly revealing and sad knowing what the future will bring. The mystery itself is very good with Lenox trying to solve his first big case involving a serial killer no less. A fun, charming and lovely story.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I did it again. I started a book that has been a series. What I did NOT realize is that this is a "prequel" to the Charles Lenox series. In this book we get to see the back story as he talks about his first case.I recommend this book and I will be looking for the rest of the series to read.My thanks to netgalley and Minotaur Books for this advanced readers copy.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Finch does it again with this one. The amount of characters that are woven in to this book is incredible.
  • John Wintersteen
    January 1, 1970
    The latest coming out in Feb 2018. Next one after The Inheritance.
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