A Change Is Gonna Come
Featuring top Young Adult authors alongside a host of exciting new talent, this anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change is a long-overdue addition to the YA scene. Contributors include Tanya Byrne, Inua Ellams, Catherine Johnson, Patrice Lawrence, Ayisha Malik, Irfan Master, Musa Okwonga and Nikesh Shukla.Plus introducing four fresh new voices in YA fiction: Mary Bello, Aisha Bushby, Yasmin Rahman and Phoebe Roy.

A Change Is Gonna Come Details

TitleA Change Is Gonna Come
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 10th, 2017
PublisherStripes Publishing
ISBN-139781847158390
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Short Stories, Anthologies

A Change Is Gonna Come Review

  • Warda
    January 1, 1970
    OUT TODAY! 🎉[3.5 ⭐] I would really like to thank Stripes Books for sending a copy of this book my way!This is an anthology, a collection of short stories by a wide range of diverse, British BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) authors and stories. The title, as written in the foreword of this book, is a song written by Sam Cooke that became an anthem during the 1960's Civil Rights Movement in the USAI absolutely LOVED the concept of this book. It's stories such as these ones that we need more OUT TODAY! 🎉[3.5 ⭐️] I would really like to thank Stripes Books for sending a copy of this book my way!This is an anthology, a collection of short stories by a wide range of diverse, British BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) authors and stories. The title, as written in the foreword of this book, is a song written by Sam Cooke that became an anthem during the 1960's Civil Rights Movement in the USAI absolutely LOVED the concept of this book. It's stories such as these ones that we need more of in the publishing world and releasing this anthology just showcased the importance of having diverse authors and how many stories are out there that need to be told and heard!My personal favourites were The Elders on the Wall, We Who? and Marionette Girl. They were by far the most memorable for me and hard-hitting. I personally didn't connect with as many stories as I would've liked, but I can see myself reading some of these again tbh. The stories are varied in its format as well as topics, catering to all! Highly recommend picking it up.
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  • Bee (Heart Full of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Favourites include: Nikesh Shukla, Yasmin Rahman and Phoebe Roy, they were all just *heart eyes*
  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 stars!This was a fantastic collection of short stories and poems written by 12 BAME authors from the UK, four of which were previously unpublished, but are definitely voices to look out for.The stories in here are wonderfully varied, featuring a range of voices and stories. There were a few I didn't quite love as much as some others but overall the collection is fantastic. Some of my favourites include We Who? by Nikesh Shukla, Hackney Moon by Tanya Byrne, Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby a 4.5/5 stars!This was a fantastic collection of short stories and poems written by 12 BAME authors from the UK, four of which were previously unpublished, but are definitely voices to look out for.The stories in here are wonderfully varied, featuring a range of voices and stories. There were a few I didn't quite love as much as some others but overall the collection is fantastic. Some of my favourites include We Who? by Nikesh Shukla, Hackney Moon by Tanya Byrne, Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby and Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin Rahman. So many of them were so easy to connect to which I find can be a difficulty when reading short stories.I absolutely urge everyone to pick up this anthology. It's so important to support collections like these which support BAME voices and stories, particularly in the British publishing industry.
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  • Neelam
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the stories and related to so many!
  • Robin Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    Twelve fresh, fantastic and well-written stories about change, from twelve new and established BAME authors. My particular favourites were Tanya Byrne's hopeful love story and Phoebe Roy's gloriously weird coming-of-age story, but there are so many wonderful ones in here that it's hard to choose. 12+*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. Please do not use it in any marketing material, online or in print, without asking permission from me first. Thank you!*
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  • Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It felt real and powerful and inspiring.
  • Kath
    January 1, 1970
    A Change is Gonna Come is a collection of short stories and poems written by established and new BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) writers. The main theme of this book is "change" and the authors did an incredible job interpreting it in their most unique and effective ways of story-telling. From contemporary to magical realism to historical fiction to dystopia, this YA anthology explores a lot of important issues that we are currently facing and will surely inspire you to make the change y A Change is Gonna Come is a collection of short stories and poems written by established and new BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) writers. The main theme of this book is "change" and the authors did an incredible job interpreting it in their most unique and effective ways of story-telling. From contemporary to magical realism to historical fiction to dystopia, this YA anthology explores a lot of important issues that we are currently facing and will surely inspire you to make the change you/we need.Honestly, I am not familiar with all the authors including (the established ones) who have contributed their stories/poems in this collection that's why I am very grateful and beyond happy that I got the chance to read this amazing book. Special thanks to Daphne of Illumicrate for referring me to the publisher of this book.I didn't connect to all of the stories as much as I wanted to but I totally enjoyed most of them and some even made me cry. Also, I wish some of the stories were much longer. Anyway, here are my personal favorites:Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby tells a story of a teenage girl who's dealing with OCD and anxiety. She loves Harry Potter, need I say more? I also like how the story ends and until now I'm still wondering what happened.Dear Asha by Mary Bello takes us to Nigeria together with our protagonist, Asha, who recently lost her mother. It's interesting to know some of the culture and traditions of Nigeria.A Refuge by Ayisha Malik is about Sabrina who has found a new friend during her volunteer work in a refugee camp. I liked her character development in this story.Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin Rahman. After a terrorist attack happened in a nightclub, Zaibah becomes more anxious and scared to be in public. She wears her headscarf and knows that she will be harassed but she will not do anything about it. Until a girl (who is like Zaibah but totally different) appears and inspires her.At the very last page, there is a list of the sensitive topics mentioned in the story (that can be triggering to some people) with links to their respective support/helplines and websites which I think is a great addition.I highly recommend this book to all. It's quite refreshing to read some of the stories and characters that I haven't encountered before. I really hope that there will be more of this kind of books in the future.Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.
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  • Sinead (Huntress of Diverse Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Check out my book blog for more book reviews and other bookish posts!I received an ARC of A Change Is Gonna Come from Netgalley. This anthology is target audience are young adults of colour. The stories are written by authors of colour, are for readers of colour and features main characters of colour.Marginalisations that are repped include: multiracial, Nigerian, brown, Jewish, Muslim, blind, OCD, anxiety.Most of the stories in this book are #ownvoices in certain aspects.__One of the first thin Check out my book blog for more book reviews and other bookish posts!I received an ARC of A Change Is Gonna Come from Netgalley. This anthology is target audience are young adults of colour. The stories are written by authors of colour, are for readers of colour and features main characters of colour.Marginalisations that are repped include: multiracial, Nigerian, brown, Jewish, Muslim, blind, OCD, anxiety.Most of the stories in this book are #ownvoices in certain aspects.__One of the first things that struck me about this book is the intersectionality. The stories don’t just feature POC main characters. They show that it is possible to be marginalised in more than one aspect.I enjoyed the variety of genres and writing styles. This book contains poetry and prose. There are fantasy, historical fiction, dystopian, and contemporary stories. This makes the book suitable for a classroom, since most students will be able to find a story written in the style/genre that they enjoy reading.I just have one critique and that is that the narrator in the short story Hackney Moon tells the reader that they know that they are thinking of someone (in a romantic sense), which is a statement that assumes that everyone falls in love. This is aroantagonistic.One of my favourite stories was We Who by Nikesh Shukla. It’s so powerful. The gender of the main character isn’t mentioned, neither is the gender of their best friend, who is slowly starting to have extreme right views. We only know that the MC is brown and the best friend is white. It’s amazing, because it portrays a situation that I’ve been in a lot, where you wonder whether your friendship is worth the hurt that you receive, when your friend starts to have an awful political opinion. Since the gender of the main character and their best friend isn’t mentioned, the reader might find it easier to imagine themselves in the main character’s situation. I think it’s a great story for teenagers and young adults to read. It doesn’t give the reader a solution, but it does show that this situation happens to many people, thus possibly showing the reader that they’re not alone, if this is happening or has happened to them.I am multiracial and it was amazing to read some stories about young adults who were also multiracial. We aren’t main characters that often, so I was so happy about reading about similar experiences, even if I didn’t have the exact ethnicities that the main character had. It made me feel less alone.The book also included a list of the sensitive topics that were the focus of several stories at the back of the book, thus giving people who need content warnings a possibility to check for them there. This is amazing! I was really happy about it.__A Change Is Gonna Come is an amazing anthology that is catered towards young POC. I thought it was wonderful. I wholeheartedly recommend that you read this book, and if you have older children (teens/young adults) or work with older children (i.e. in a library, at a school, etc.), I recommend getting this book for them.It’s a book that I would have loved to have as a teenager. I am 25, thus older than the target audience, and this book was still such an great source of strength for me. It was an empowering read.If you’re looking for a similar anthology geared towards an adult audience, try The Good Immigrant. The stories were great! All the stories in this anthology are non-fiction. Here is my review.Trigger warnings: death of parent, Islamantagonism, ableism in respect to OCD, racism, homoantagonism, mention of a terrorist attack, mention of a refugee situation, aroantagonism (not called out).
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  • Charlotte Burns
    January 1, 1970
    A Change is Gonna Come is a brilliant collection of short stories and poems from a variety of excellent authors, some authors whose work I was already familiar with and several who were new to me. All the pieces related to being marginalised or oppressed in some way and showed the need for change. I loved that there was an index of issues covered as a kind of trigger-warning for readers and also a resources section for anyone affected by the issues raised. Everything in the collection is brillia A Change is Gonna Come is a brilliant collection of short stories and poems from a variety of excellent authors, some authors whose work I was already familiar with and several who were new to me. All the pieces related to being marginalised or oppressed in some way and showed the need for change. I loved that there was an index of issues covered as a kind of trigger-warning for readers and also a resources section for anyone affected by the issues raised. Everything in the collection is brilliant and has a different take on the subject of change. My favourite in the collectiom was Aisha Bushby's Marionette Girl,  a story about Amani, who has OCD, trying to negotiate a world with rituals, until one day something happens that forces her to do something brave. I also loved Hackney Moon by Tanya Burne, which offers a different narrative perspective and tells the story of Esther on thr precipice of an important decision. I loved seeing how Esther grew and changed and the ending melted my heart. We Who was one of the most heart-breaking in the collection, telling a story of friendship and racism that stuck in my mind long after I finished it. Every piece in this collection is wonderful in its own way. I really can't recommend A Change is Gonna Come highly enough: every reader needs a copy on their shelf.
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  • Rosie
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone needs to read this book!
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Very highly anticipated within the UKYA community, I was delighted when I was accepted for an early copy of this on NetGalley. A Change is Gonna Come is every bit as wonderful as I expected and so, so much more.This anthology holds such a diverse collection of stories from a wonderful host of BAME writers, some already well known authors and some fantastic debuts. Covering topics such as bereavement, mental health, racism and sexuality there is so much to be garnered from reading this anthology. Very highly anticipated within the UKYA community, I was delighted when I was accepted for an early copy of this on NetGalley. A Change is Gonna Come is every bit as wonderful as I expected and so, so much more.This anthology holds such a diverse collection of stories from a wonderful host of BAME writers, some already well known authors and some fantastic debuts. Covering topics such as bereavement, mental health, racism and sexuality there is so much to be garnered from reading this anthology. There really is something in here for everyone. Whether you are able to relate to one of the many brilliant characters and stories on a personal level or whether you learn something from reading this anthology, this is a book that should be read by people of all ages and backgrounds.As is the case with any anthology I read, there were some pieces that I didn’t connect with as well as others but every piece in here is unique and I think everyone who reads it will find certain pieces that they connect with on a more deep, personal level. My favourites were Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushy and Hackey Moon by Tanya Byrne. Both of these stories were so delicately written and had me in tears by the end – they really are stand out pieces of fiction. I absolutely have to give a shout out to the following stories too which I thought were exceptionally powerful in their subject matter and their voice: We Who? by Nikesh Shukla, Dear Asha by Mary Bello, A Refuge by Aiysha Malik and Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin Rahman.I certainly feel that this anthology gave me a lot to think about and consider and I am really excited to see what comes from this in the publishing world. I will certainly be keeping an eye out for future works from the authors involved.This collection of stories is sure to provide many teenage readers with their first experience of seeing themselves represented in published fiction and that is very, very special.Huge thank you to NetGalley, Stripes Books and all of the contributing authors for my advanced copy in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    Video review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCECV...
  • Marie Andrews
    January 1, 1970
    A Change is Gonna Come is a collection of short stories/poetry by various authors (both debut authors and already published) with the aim to "give creative space to those who have been historically had their thoughts, ideas and experiences oppressed". This anthology covers a range of topics, with a list of issues raised at the end of the book if you wish to find out more information or get trigger warnings, which I think is a fantastic idea and should be done more frequently with other books! Ot A Change is Gonna Come is a collection of short stories/poetry by various authors (both debut authors and already published) with the aim to "give creative space to those who have been historically had their thoughts, ideas and experiences oppressed". This anthology covers a range of topics, with a list of issues raised at the end of the book if you wish to find out more information or get trigger warnings, which I think is a fantastic idea and should be done more frequently with other books! Other publishers/authors TAKE NOTE!!I often find it hard to review an anthology as an overall rating doesn't reflect all the stories in the book, but this is perhaps the first anthology where I feel all the pieces of writing were equally as good, each with their own unique message. There's something for everyone - whether you're into historical fiction, fantasy or poetry, this YA anthology reflects a larger range of genres. My favourite 3 pieces were....Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby - a short story about a girl who is obsessed with Harry Potter and has severe OCD, which she has to try and overcome after there is a sudden incident which means she cannot follow her usual routine.A Refuge by Ayisha Malik - Sabrina goes to help and volunteer in a refugee camp but meets Homa, a young girl who lives there by herself. They form a brief friendship and Sabrina does everything she can to try and help her.Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin Rahman - There has just been a terrorist attack in a nightclub with seven fatalities and Zaibah fears the next time she goes out in public because of the blame and harassment she receives because she wears a headscarf. That's until she comes across a girl who has she admires for standing up for herself...I definitely recommend this anthology, whether you usually read YA or not. There is something for everyone and the emphasis on characters which are usually marginalised and unfortunately ignored in the wider world is fantastic to read! I really hope there are similar anthologies like this to come in the future!!*I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    As a Brit, I’m always on the lookout for local authors to support, but it’s not easy - American authors dominate the ‘Teen and YA’ sections of most British bookshops. It’s even harder to find diverse #UKYA lit. We’re behind the times when it comes to diversifying our shelves - with some notable exceptions (Patrick Ness, Malorie Blackman and Juno Dawson to name a few), the biggest names in British children’s literature are overwhelmingly straight and white. So when I heard about A Change Is Gonna As a Brit, I’m always on the lookout for local authors to support, but it’s not easy - American authors dominate the ‘Teen and YA’ sections of most British bookshops. It’s even harder to find diverse #UKYA lit. We’re behind the times when it comes to diversifying our shelves - with some notable exceptions (Patrick Ness, Malorie Blackman and Juno Dawson to name a few), the biggest names in British children’s literature are overwhelmingly straight and white. So when I heard about A Change Is Gonna Come - an anthology of black, Asian and minority ethnic British authors - I was immediately excited.The poems and short stories in this anthology explore the theme of ‘change’, and the authors’ interpretations of the theme vary widely, but each story feels undeniably relevant to modern British teenagers - from Nikesh Shukla’s exploration of a teenage friendship torn apart by post-Brexit racial tensions, to Patrice Lawrence’s frighteningly familiar dystopian version of my own city.Like most anthologies, there’s something for everyone in A Change Is Gonna Come, whether you’re a fan of historical fiction, science fiction, fantasy or contemporary. Celebrating and championing the voices of British people of colour, A Change Is Gonna Come is a much-needed collection of stories, and I hope to see it gracing the shelves of libraries and schools up and down the country. Many thanks to Stripes Publishing for providing a copy of A Change Is Gonna Come. The opinions expressed in this review are my own. A Change Is Gonna Come will be released on August 10th.Publisher: Stripes PublishingRating: 4 stars | ★★★★✰ Review cross-posted to Paperback'd Reviews
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  • Cora ☕ Tea Party Princess
    January 1, 1970
    5 Words: A Change Is Gonna Come.This is an absolutely fantastic collection, with something for everyone. I actually liked everything included, which is very rare for me when it comes to anthologies. My mind is blown by how good it was.There is something within the pages to laugh at and cry at. There are authors new and established within the pages, it was great to read some familiar voices - I recognised Patrice Lawrence's story from her writing style - and I discovered some new-to me writers. T 5 Words: A Change Is Gonna Come.This is an absolutely fantastic collection, with something for everyone. I actually liked everything included, which is very rare for me when it comes to anthologies. My mind is blown by how good it was.There is something within the pages to laugh at and cry at. There are authors new and established within the pages, it was great to read some familiar voices - I recognised Patrice Lawrence's story from her writing style - and I discovered some new-to me writers. The poems are beautiful and I read them each over and over. The stories are set across multiple genres and times, all linked by the theme of Change.I think Marionette Girl may become my go-to story for when I need a cry, it is heart-breakingly excellent. It made me cry like a baby.I hope that Stripes are going to continue with their wonderful anthologies, but I can't imagine where they will go next! I just know I can't wait to read more exceptional writers.
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  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    *This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*Diversity is a topic that constantly comes up in conversation in the book world. With a push to get more diverse voices out there both on the writing side and the industry side, and with the successes of new YA books like The Hate U Give, it really does feel like change is on the way. A Change Is Gonna Come is a Young Adult anthology aiming to give voices to those who have “historically had their thoughts, ideas and expe *This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*Diversity is a topic that constantly comes up in conversation in the book world. With a push to get more diverse voices out there both on the writing side and the industry side, and with the successes of new YA books like The Hate U Give, it really does feel like change is on the way. A Change Is Gonna Come is a Young Adult anthology aiming to give voices to those who have “historically had their thoughts, ideas and experiences oppressed.” The overarching theme is change and contributors are from various BAME backgrounds. Well-known writers such as Nikesh Shukla (The Good Immigrant) and Patrice Lawrence (Orangeboy) have made contributions along with many fantastic debuts. When speaking to one of the latter, Aisha Bushby she talked about how Nikesh Shukla is wary of diversity becoming a marketing trend. She agrees and said that while diversity is important, she doesn’t want that aspect to detract from the quality of the stories. My personal favourites from this collection are as follows:“Marionette Girl” by Aisha Bushby tells the story of a girl with OCD who lives her life confined by time. This one is great for anyone who loves Harry Potter references. (Trigger warning for OCD and Anxiety)“Hackney Moon” by Tanya Byrne is the story of how a same sex relationship falls apart over time. The writing is so poetic and beautiful that it reminded me of the writing style in The Book Thief.“We Who?” by Nikesh Shukla showcases the breakdown of a friendship after the Brexit result of the referendum. It addresses the idea of “us v them” mentality and whether it’s possible to be tolerant of different views when you are the thing wishing to be tolerated. There are many more wonderful additions to this anthology and the book has a glossary at the back with links to helplines and research websites if you are affected by any of the stories.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Change is hard; still, maintain the charge.They may have the safety, But the bravery is all ours. This is a wonderful anthology. It's incredibly diverse- including not only different races and religions but also mental health issues and the LGBT+ spectrum. I would love to see this book get more publicity and see more own voices reviews of it too! The vast majority of the stories are well written and beautiful- I really enjoyed all but two, which is much better than I was expecting and both of t Change is hard; still, maintain the charge.They may have the safety, But the bravery is all ours. This is a wonderful anthology. It's incredibly diverse- including not only different races and religions but also mental health issues and the LGBT+ spectrum. I would love to see this book get more publicity and see more own voices reviews of it too! The vast majority of the stories are well written and beautiful- I really enjoyed all but two, which is much better than I was expecting and both of the poems were gorgeous too. The idea behind this is also fabulous and I hope that we see more diverse anthologies. I've definitely found some new authors to look out for too! My personal favourites were Musa Okwonga, Nikesh Shukla and Mary Bello's pieces.
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  • Hannah (fullybookedreviews)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5This is truly a much-needed addition to the growing trend of of YA anthologies. A Change is Gonna Come is collection of poetry and short-stories by UK-based black and other minority ethnic authors. The stories contained within this volume are varied and interesting, featuring protagonists from a wide range of backgrounds: from a girl with anxiety and OCD, to a blind boy who discovers wormholes and time travel. The running theme is, as the title suggests, on the idea of change - whether in the 3.5This is truly a much-needed addition to the growing trend of of YA anthologies. A Change is Gonna Come is collection of poetry and short-stories by UK-based black and other minority ethnic authors. The stories contained within this volume are varied and interesting, featuring protagonists from a wide range of backgrounds: from a girl with anxiety and OCD, to a blind boy who discovers wormholes and time travel. The running theme is, as the title suggests, on the idea of change - whether in the course of an individual's life, or in the wide scheme of global politics, which is, to use 2016's word of the year, a dumpster fire. My only issue is that I find it quite difficult, on occasion, to connect with short story collections, but this is very much a fault of mine, not the book's. 
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  • NizRite
    January 1, 1970
    Very quick read of stories by some established BAME writers and four new ones. Look out for Yasmin Rahman's Fortune Favours the Bold, although I know the author so may be a tad biased! Nikesh Shukla's We Who? is powerful and hard-hitting, and unfortunately resonated with me due to a similar experience.
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  • Annalise
    January 1, 1970
    #ChangeBook is the breath of fresh air the publishing industry needs right now. It’s a collection of short stories and poems from 12 BAME authors centred around the theme of ‘change’ - four of those authors are unpublished and ones to watch out for.I bought this book because I think it’s important to send out a message to the publishing industry that we need more diverse books, more BAME authors. A bonus was the amazing stories inside, which were exactly what I was looking for - stories about cu #ChangeBook is the breath of fresh air the publishing industry needs right now. It’s a collection of short stories and poems from 12 BAME authors centred around the theme of ‘change’ - four of those authors are unpublished and ones to watch out for.I bought this book because I think it’s important to send out a message to the publishing industry that we need more diverse books, more BAME authors. A bonus was the amazing stories inside, which were exactly what I was looking for - stories about cultures other to my own, that weren’t too focused on themes such as gang culture and violence. I loved that there’s a real selection of female BAME voices here, and I’d love to see more and more in future.Every single story in here is absolutely fantastic, covering topics that are regularly in the media nowadays - mental health, grief, sexuality, gender, racism.My absolute favourite story in here has to be Mary Bello’s Dear Asha, but I enjoyed every single story in it’s own right, and can’t wait to read more from these authors.Get down to your nearest bookstore and grab a copy of #ChangeBook - you won’t regret it.
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  • Kirsty (overflowing library)
    January 1, 1970
    the stories in themselves were good but I really struggle with anthologies generally. Would be very interested in reading more from all of the authors.
  • Laura Noakes
    January 1, 1970
    Utterly compelling & powerful.
  • Anthea
    January 1, 1970
    Review on the way!
  • Megan (YABookers)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this free from the publisher via NetGalleyA Change is Gonna Come is a YA anthology written by both new and established BAME authors based on the theme of change – each author approaching the theme differently. I had heard so many brilliant things about this anthology but the hype is to be believed. While there has been active discussions and campaign for more diverse books and voices in YA, I do feel like UK publishing is still overwhelmingly white and straight, especially compared to I received this free from the publisher via NetGalleyA Change is Gonna Come is a YA anthology written by both new and established BAME authors based on the theme of change – each author approaching the theme differently. I had heard so many brilliant things about this anthology but the hype is to be believed. While there has been active discussions and campaign for more diverse books and voices in YA, I do feel like UK publishing is still overwhelmingly white and straight, especially compared to USYA. A Change is Gonna Come is full of dynamic and captivating stories that are definitely needed on the UKYA scene, and hopefully paves the way for more stories by BAME authors.Some of my favourite stories from A Change is Gonna Come include Hackney Moon by Tanya Byrne, Fortune Favours The Bold by Yasmin Rahman, Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby, and We Who? by Nikesh Shukla. I feel like We Who? is an extremely relevant and extremely important story for the modern British teenager. The story focuses on a friendship that has started to fall apart after post-Brexit racial tensions. It’s powerful and truthful. Aisha Bushby’s story Marionette Girl is about Amani, a young girl who suffers from OCD who adheres to a strict routine. Yasmin Rahman’s story highlights the Islamophobia Muslims face in Britain, especially in the aftermath of a terrorist attack and follows an anxious Muslim girl called Zaibah as she tries to navigate this.But, my favourite story of them all is Hackney Moon by Tanya Byrne – an exquisite story following Esther, a Guyanese-British girl who we follow as she goes through her first heartbreak with her girlfriend, and then a new found love. We follow this story through the eyes and narration of the Moon, which made this story all the more wonderful.Overall, I would highly recommend A Change is Gonna Come because it is an inclusive and important anthology full of original and exquisite stories.
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  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with an advance reading copy in exchange for an honest review!This is one of my most anticipated reads for the latter half of this year! Although the anthology features a host of already established BAME authors, it was my first time reading anything by the majority of its contributors.The anthology is made up of short stories that each respond to the theme of change, as well as two poems that are placed at the beginning and the end. Each Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with an advance reading copy in exchange for an honest review!This is one of my most anticipated reads for the latter half of this year! Although the anthology features a host of already established BAME authors, it was my first time reading anything by the majority of its contributors.The anthology is made up of short stories that each respond to the theme of change, as well as two poems that are placed at the beginning and the end. Each piece interprets the theme in a unique way, allowing for a diverse collection of writing that deals with other important and timely issues.As with all anthologies, there were some pieces I didn’t particularly enjoy and others which I loved and could really relate to. Nikesh Shukla’s We Who?, Ayisha Malik’s The Refuge, and Yasmin Rahman’s Fortune Favours The Bold were some of my favourites. Mary Bello’s Dear Asha will also speak to many readers of the diaspora.Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this anthology and my only criticism is that I wish it, or at least some of the pieces within it, were much longer.
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  • Maia Moore
    January 1, 1970
    Original review posted here* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *I loved Stripes’ last YA anthology and was super excited for this one. It’s such a great idea and I was excited to read short stories from authors I already like (Catherine Johnson, Patrice Lawrence) and discover ones I don’t yet know, including four brand new authors who I’m sure I’ll be reading more of in future.I wrote little comments on Goodreads as I read and will embellish on these for each Original review posted here* I have been given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *I loved Stripes’ last YA anthology and was super excited for this one. It’s such a great idea and I was excited to read short stories from authors I already like (Catherine Johnson, Patrice Lawrence) and discover ones I don’t yet know, including four brand new authors who I’m sure I’ll be reading more of in future.I wrote little comments on Goodreads as I read and will embellish on these for each story for my review:The Elders on the Wall by Musa OkwongaFirst poem was excellent, really moved me. It really captured how I see society a lot these days, with the generation above looking down on us, saying we don’t work hard enough when there’s a lot of factors working against us.Marionette Girl by Aisha BushbyA great story from a new writer about a Harry Potter fan with OCD. It packed a punch and I wished it didn’t end, I wanted more!Astounding Talent! Unequalled Performances! by Catherine JohnsonA lovely story about true family – I love Catherine Johnson’s writing.Hackney Moon by Tanya ByrneA unique voice and a lovely LBGT romance with a happy ending 🙂We Who? by Nikesh ShuklaSuch a powerful story, I can relate to this one. Had so many similar Brexit arguments with racist people spouting crap. It tackles how hard it can be to maintain what was a good friendship when you have opposing views.The Clean Sweep by Patrice LawrenceEnjoyed that but think I need a second read to completely get it. I love Patrice Lawrence’s writing and the characters she creates.Iridescent Adolescent by Phoebe RoyThat was a weird little story, very beautiful and poetic.Dear Asha by Mary BelloA very emotional story about death and family. Bought a tear to my eye, and the setting was so vivid and beautiful.A Refuge by Ayisha MalikA girl helps out in a refugee camp and befriends a girl there. A great story with a sad but hopeful endingThe Unwritten Future of Moses Mohammad Shabazz Banneker King by Irfan MasterGotta love a bit of time of travel! Stuck out as something very different in this anthology and I really enjoyed it.Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin RahmanLoved this, probably my favourite of the collection. Great commentary on the way Muslims are treated after a terrorist attack: the idea that they should have to defend themselves or show they disapprove of the actions of a few who are using Islam’s name to do terrible things seems absurd to me, but that’s how a lot of people react.Of Lizard Skin and Dust Storms by Inua EllamsA wonderfully evocative poem that finished off the anthology perfectly.Diversity is being discussed a lot in publishing at the moment, but discussing it isn’t enough, and I love that Stripes has taken action and produced this wonderful anthology. It just goes to show how many talented and varied voices are out there, and that there’s an audience wanting to read their stories.There was something inspiring about this book, and from the title, the foreword and right down to the closing poem, I was hooked. It covers a range of topics and genres, and there’s a great list of useful links for help and research. This is a book I’ll be recommending to everyone, and I hope you pick it up and enjoy it.
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  • Jessie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    A Change Is Gonna Come was a book that, it seemed, everybody couldn’t wait to read. An anthology of YA stories and poetry by Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) writers had been a long time coming, and from the buzz surrounding the publication of this one, it seemed that Stripes had hit the nail on the head and created the book we all wanted. I have devastatingly few books by BAME authors amongst my collection – something that can probably be said for many white readers – and that needs to c A Change Is Gonna Come was a book that, it seemed, everybody couldn’t wait to read. An anthology of YA stories and poetry by Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) writers had been a long time coming, and from the buzz surrounding the publication of this one, it seemed that Stripes had hit the nail on the head and created the book we all wanted. I have devastatingly few books by BAME authors amongst my collection – something that can probably be said for many white readers – and that needs to change. By getting this book out into the hands of so many young readers, all talking about it online, Stripes have taken a big step on that road: they’ve created opportunities for more BAME authors, bringing four new voices to the world of YA, who many readers will now be itching to read more of; they’ve shown the rest of the industry there is a market for this, encouraging other publishers to follow suit; and they’ve shown readers themselves that these stories can exist, and are so worth it, so we’ll be damned if we don’t continue to demand more. This book is important in so many ways, but I didn’t feel obligated to read it because it was important, I felt compelled to read it because it was good. A YA audience is not easily bullshitted, and the reason the book is receiving so much praise is because it is genuinely deserved. With the wealth of different genres represented in the book – two of the entries are poems, and the rest of the short stories are all so different, including fantasy, romance, sci-fi, thriller and contemporary – there really is something for everyone. Nobody expects to love every single entry in an anthology, but hopefully each story can give the reader a window into that genre and author, for them to decide if they want more. My favourite stories came from Yasmin Rahman, in Fortune Favours the Bold, and Patrice Lawrence, in The Clean Sweep – which I got so invested in that I honestly wanted it to be a whole book! Honourable mentions also go to Tanya Byrne, Nikesh Shukla, Phoebe Roy, Mary Bello and Ayisha Malik for their wonderful contributions, and with any I wasn’t quite as fond of, I could still appreciate how well they were written and that somebody else would love them. As well as this diversity meaning that more people will enjoy at least one or two of the entries in the book, it also wonderfully shows that not all BAME stories have to be the same, and smashes any ridiculous notion somebody may have that BAME authors cannot write a specific genre. Within these different stories, some big topics – such as OCD, racism, bereavement and gay relationships – are addressed, which is really important to show that all these things happen to BAME people too; mental illness, for example, is not exclusively a white issue, and yes, Muslims can be gay, despite the one-dimensional picture of BAME people we might be fed by the media. However, I don’t want to make out that it’s a big, heavy book full of issues and negativity; there are some really light, fun entries too. Basically, it does a really great job of showing all the different sides to the human experience and treating characters as fully developed people beyond just their race, which sadly doesn’t always happen when BAME characters are written by white authors. As well as the diversity of genres and subjects, the book showcases some of the diversity within the moniker of ‘BAME’ itself. There are characters (and authors) from a range of different cultures and backgrounds, all in different situations, with different identities. This is so wonderful to see, as it offers a chance to learn a little about different cultures, increases the possibility that readers will be able to see themselves in a character, and again reminds us that we are all completely individual and our experiences will differ wildly. For young, BAME readers, this book will be a breath of fresh air, and may well include the representation of themselves they’ve been waiting for. For young, non-BAME readers, it’s also a vital read because what it offers in terms of education and broadening our horizons is invaluable. But, as I said earlier, the most important thing is that, for BAME and non-BAME readers alike, it will be enjoyable, and really, what unites us more than being able to talk about how much we all loved something?
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  • Sigourney
    January 1, 1970
    Received from NetGalley for review. 4.5 stars ‘I run raging and so afraid/ Joyfully and terrifyingly uncaged.’ – The Elders of the Wall by Musa Okwonga A Change Is Gonna Come feels like a revolution; authors and publishers standing up to say we will make a difference within literature, and bring to the forefront writers, characters, and concepts that are not being represented within books. This collection focuses on a multitude of ideas within its larger theme of ‘Change’ – cultural identity, Received from NetGalley for review. 4.5 stars ‘I run raging and so afraid/ Joyfully and terrifyingly uncaged.’ – The Elders of the Wall by Musa Okwonga A Change Is Gonna Come feels like a revolution; authors and publishers standing up to say we will make a difference within literature, and bring to the forefront writers, characters, and concepts that are not being represented within books. This collection focuses on a multitude of ideas within its larger theme of ‘Change’ – cultural identity, diversity, racism, immigration, changes in outlook and ideas to name a few – and highlight just how important representation of different cultures, ethnicities, sexualities are. White and straight should not be the default and the world needs to realise that – education is the only way ignorance will be beaten and collections like these can only strengthen that education, and ultimately the realisation that people are people. The wonder of the human race is in our differences but we should never forget that at the end of the day we are all people and we are all equally worthy of respect and representation. This is another outstanding collection from Stripes Publishing and I highly recommend it to everyone who can get their hands on it. My favourites were: The Elders on the Wall by Musa Okwonga, Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby, Astouding Talent! Unequalled Performances! by Catherine Johnson, Iridescent Adolescent by Phoebe Roy, and Dear Asha by Mary Bello. The Elders on the Wall by Musa Okwonga – 5/5 stars. A powerful poem about cultural identity and forging your own path. Marionette Girl by Aisha Bushby – 4.5/5 stars. Realistic OCD portrayal and the impact it can have on a sufferer and their family. Astounding Talent! Unequalled Performances! by Catherine Johnson – 4.5/5 stars. This is based on a true story of a circus troupe and a young black man who went on to do great things. Hackney Moon by Tanya Byrne – 4/5 stars We Who? by Nikesh Shukla – 4/5 stars The Clean Sweep by Patrice Lawrence – 3/5 stars Iridescent Adolescent by Phoebe Roy – 4/5 stars. A young girl of Black and Jewish heritage, mysterious bronze feathers, a colour-changing necklace. Reality and mythology blended perfectly. Dear Asha by Mary Bello – 4.5/5 stars. A moving story about a daughter coming to terms with her mother’s death and finding a home with relatives in Nigeria. A Refuge by Ayisha Malik – 4/5 stars The Unwritten Future of Moses Mohammad Shabazz Banneker King by Irfan Master – 4/5 stars Fortune Favours the Bold by Yasmin Rahman – 4/5 stars Of Lizard Skin and Dust Storms by Inua Ellams – 4/5 stars ‘Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.’ – James Baldwin
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  • Juwi
    January 1, 1970
    A much needed anthology. Kind of like The Good Immigrant but for teenagers...accept this is fiction and short stories/poetry and they all had to write a story dealing with change. My fave stories:Marionette Girl- I REALLY WANT A FULL NOVEL OF THIS I WAS SO INVESTED IN HE CHARACTER AND HER LIFE AND HER POOR CAT JHGKDFJGKFHackney Moon- this was cute and defo felt like a...timely story like there was a girl who wore a Black Girl Magic top and they made zines so yeahWe Who? by Nikesh Shukla was very A much needed anthology. Kind of like The Good Immigrant but for teenagers...accept this is fiction and short stories/poetry and they all had to write a story dealing with change. My fave stories:Marionette Girl- I REALLY WANT A FULL NOVEL OF THIS I WAS SO INVESTED IN HE CHARACTER AND HER LIFE AND HER POOR CAT JHGKDFJGKFHackney Moon- this was cute and defo felt like a...timely story like there was a girl who wore a Black Girl Magic top and they made zines so yeahWe Who? by Nikesh Shukla was very confusing at times but the overall message is important. it reminded me of Randa Abdel Fattah's book The Lines We Cross...the whole 'my friend is a far right supporter can i still be friends with them if they don't think i should be here?' like...the friend said: you're okay tho...it's the OTHER PEOPLE...that aren't okay. The Clean Sweep by Patrice Lawrence- it was confusing at times but i liked it and i wouldn't mind a full novel or something similair...especially as it's to do with young people and prisons and reality tv and the scary thing is...it sounds like something that could happen one day the story by Irfan Master is defo one of my faves as i LOVE TIME TRAVEL and it was super cool and interesting and i'd like to see more from that character. last but not least...Fortune Favours the Bold is an important story...because every muslim in the west has been there...'urgh i hope it isn't a muslim' and then increasing islamophobia as well so well done Yasmin!!!! PLEASE WRITE MORE ABOUT THE TWINS!!! those are just some of my fave stories. but please pick this book up and give it a read...buy it for a friend or a sibling or your school library. it's important for the marginalised in society to feel represented in art and our stories do need to be told whether it's to do with religion or sexuality or race or culture etc etc Happy Reading (most of the stories are actually just kind of....sad...heartbreaking...thought provoking etc)
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  • Carmen Haselup
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a stunner! Twelve fresh, fun and beautifully written YA short stories by new and established BAME authors, written around the subject of change. I forgot how much I love short stories. The immediacy, the focus, the variety. I first fell in love with short stories reading Jon McGregor and then Lucy Wood’s Diving Belles. I loved them for the strength of their writing. Then I devoured anthologies, loving the way the format was like a party; a way to meet lots of different authors and v This book is a stunner! Twelve fresh, fun and beautifully written YA short stories by new and established BAME authors, written around the subject of change. I forgot how much I love short stories. The immediacy, the focus, the variety. I first fell in love with short stories reading Jon McGregor and then Lucy Wood’s Diving Belles. I loved them for the strength of their writing. Then I devoured anthologies, loving the way the format was like a party; a way to meet lots of different authors and voices and see who I’d like to stay in touch with. A Change Is Gonna Come is the best of both. It celebrates strong, beautiful, passionate writing. The stories are as diverse as their authors and I relished the time I spent with them. I have discovered new authors – ‘Marionette Girl’ by Aisha Bushby is a beautiful story of a teenaged girl living with severe anxiety, Yasmin Rahman writes of bravery and the confidence found from an inspirational role model, and Phoebe Roy’s ‘Iridescent Adolescent’ is stunning magical realism. I’ve read authors that are established but new to me – Nikesh Shukla’s ‘We Who?’ is a passionate and painful exploration of friendship struggling through the friction of post-Brexit racism. And I’ve enjoyed new work by authors I already loved – Tanya Byrne’s love story ‘Hackney Moon’ with it’s unusual narrative perspective and stunning writing held my heart.A Change is Gonna Come is a showcase and a celebration of BAME voices. It has opened my eyes to other cultures, experiences and thoughts. It has inspired me to read more widely and further outside of my comfort zone. Because beauty and passion lay there and I want more.Source – e-copy kindly sent for review by the publisher
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