The Middleman
The three volumes of The Middleman--basis of the TV show on ABC Family this summer--is now offered in one explosive tome. They tell the complete story of Wendy Watson--art student turned crime-fighter for the world's most absurdly secretive organization--who battles monsters, aliens, and talking primates.

The Middleman Details

TitleThe Middleman
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2008
PublisherViper Comics
ISBN-139780980238549
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fiction, Science Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics, Humor

The Middleman Review

  • James
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the short-lived series "The Middleman," a send-up of classic superhero tropes and other popular culture. So I sought out the comics on which it was based. Two of the three stories were familiar as they became actual episodes (although the comic has a bit more adult humor). Fun and entertaining.
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  • Cat Herine
    January 1, 1970
    My first introduction to the Middleman was through the sadly short-lived series on ABC Family (RIP to both). This comic is a compilation of three volumes, the first two of which later became episodes on the show. There are some differences, such as minor dialogue changes and most notably race lifts for characters like Wendy and Noser. These changes merely improve an already great premis, and add more depth to the show. The comic is wacky and fun, making for a light read. It does get progressive My first introduction to the Middleman was through the sadly short-lived series on ABC Family (RIP to both). This comic is a compilation of three volumes, the first two of which later became episodes on the show. There are some differences, such as minor dialogue changes and most notably race lifts for characters like Wendy and Noser. These changes merely improve an already great premis, and add more depth to the show. The comic is wacky and fun, making for a light read. It does get progressively darker by the third volume though (I'm looking at you, Middleboy), with the ending leaving on a cliffhanger.The addition of assorted AUs penned by different authors was interesting to read, but I wish they had been able to sneak another volume.
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  • Willow Redd
    January 1, 1970
    How can you not love the Middleman? It's the kind of story that mixes the best of classic comics, 60's Batman kitsch, Men in Black, Hellboy, and the pulps of the 30's and 40's. It's brilliant!Here we have the first three collected volumes; featuring monkeys with guns, lab-created tentacle beasts, an army of masked wrestlers, and the return of the Middleman's arch-nemesis. Add to that a collection of new tales exploring the very curious history of the Middleman through history, a cover gallery, a How can you not love the Middleman? It's the kind of story that mixes the best of classic comics, 60's Batman kitsch, Men in Black, Hellboy, and the pulps of the 30's and 40's. It's brilliant!Here we have the first three collected volumes; featuring monkeys with guns, lab-created tentacle beasts, an army of masked wrestlers, and the return of the Middleman's arch-nemesis. Add to that a collection of new tales exploring the very curious history of the Middleman through history, a cover gallery, and a pin-up gallery and we have The Collected Series Indispensability.Absolutely a blast to read, my only real issue is that I wish there was more! Although I have ordered the TV series box set to get more Middleman in my life for the moment.
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  • Sheldon Wiebe
    January 1, 1970
    Saving the world from evil so you don't have to!The graphic novel that was adapted from an unsold television pilot script and then adapted for television when the graphic novel was successful.A great ride in which Wendy Watson - struggling artist and temp worker - is threatened by an unimaginable experiment gone wrong; maintains her cool, and becomes sidekick to The Middleman, a gosh-all-heck-gee-whiz-to-pieces, honest to goodness righter of wrongs and hi-tech superhero (because all those villai Saving the world from evil so you don't have to!The graphic novel that was adapted from an unsold television pilot script and then adapted for television when the graphic novel was successful.A great ride in which Wendy Watson - struggling artist and temp worker - is threatened by an unimaginable experiment gone wrong; maintains her cool, and becomes sidekick to The Middleman, a gosh-all-heck-gee-whiz-to-pieces, honest to goodness righter of wrongs and hi-tech superhero (because all those villains you read about in comics? ARE REAL!).Great fun!
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    A mild rating because it shared some aspects with the show, and I liked the show, but the show made a lot of upgrades in characterizations and plots. I really disliked the alternate endings.
  • Timothy Nichols
    January 1, 1970
    Geeky and hilarious. Well worth the time.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the TV show so I loved the comic. Just a fun read. :)
  • Erica McGillivray
    January 1, 1970
    Skip the comics, just enjoy the TV show. All plot, characterization, and other issues were fixed by the TV show.
  • Sunil
    January 1, 1970
    The Collected Series Indispensability contains all three volumes of The Middleman so far, and it's definitely worth checking out. There are some minor differences that may cause a little cognitive dissonance, but nothing huge. Wendy is Caucasian with red hair rather than Cuban with black hair, the Middleman is blond, and Noser is white. There's less Lacey and no Tyler. But other than that, the first volume (The Trade Paperback Imperative) is almost word-for-word, shot-for-shot the pilot, and the The Collected Series Indispensability contains all three volumes of The Middleman so far, and it's definitely worth checking out. There are some minor differences that may cause a little cognitive dissonance, but nothing huge. Wendy is Caucasian with red hair rather than Cuban with black hair, the Middleman is blond, and Noser is white. There's less Lacey and no Tyler. But other than that, the first volume (The Trade Paperback Imperative) is almost word-for-word, shot-for-shot the pilot, and the second volume (The Second Volume Inevitability) is almost identical to "The Sino-Mexican Revelation." There are still some great lines and moments that didn't make it into the show, however (at least one because the show is quite clearly—and endearingly—low-budget). It's pretty neat to see the episodes in comic form (their original form!), as it gives you even more appreciation for the people bringing them to life on TV. Unsurprisingly, the show is very much in the spirit of its source material, given that Javi is behind both.The third volume (The Third Volume Inescapability), however, is where it's at, as it's a story we haven't yet seen on the show (although one line/moment did appear in modified form last week), and I'm anxiously awaiting the integration of some of the elements of that storyline into the show, if it lasts. Obviously, reading the third volume may spoil you for the show, but it's a good story. It's a good comic overall, actually, as it doesn't adhere to any one panel structure, simply using the medium however is best to tell the story.You even get "The Alternate Ending Paradoxicality!" Which is...what it sounds like. It features, um, well...I won't tell you what it features because it must be seen to be believed.Finally, you get Legends of the Middleman, which is a few stories—drawn by different artists—featuring the adventures of Middlemen past. They're very amusing, and I think they're basically AU since they break continuity and they're too ridiculous (yes, even for this comic) to be true.
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  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    Dubby, if you're reading this, you probably have either seen or heard of the painfully short-lived and amazing Middleman TV show. If you enjoyed that show, dig into the comic that started it all.Volume one is literally verbatim the first episode, "The Pilot Episode Sanction." Like, it's the script set to comics. There's nothing I can say in a review to elucidate that point. And since that was a great starter episode for a series, it was also a fun read. Volume two is pretty much "The Sino-Mexica Dubby, if you're reading this, you probably have either seen or heard of the painfully short-lived and amazing Middleman TV show. If you enjoyed that show, dig into the comic that started it all.Volume one is literally verbatim the first episode, "The Pilot Episode Sanction." Like, it's the script set to comics. There's nothing I can say in a review to elucidate that point. And since that was a great starter episode for a series, it was also a fun read. Volume two is pretty much "The Sino-Mexican Revelation", introducing the lovely and amazing Sensei Ping. It also includes my favorite aspect of that episode: the time being told in different time zones, real or fictional. I thought that was hilarious. Volume three introduces us to Manservant Neville who is damn near identical to Mark Sheppard (casting applauded). The rest is a smattering people and organizations that appear throughout the series (a great deal shows up in the "Obsolescent Cryogenic Meltdown"), plus an interesting storyline regarding the Middleman's nemesis. There's also a twist surprise ending that the show unfortunately did not survive long enough to get to. It would have been amazing. Finally, there's an additional ending that was added after publication that expands on the story in volume three. It's exactly the kind of ending readers want when the story ends and leaves you craving more. It's like...dessert. It's word dessert. With pictures. And Soviet bears. And a roughly alternate-universe Middleman-looking Wendy from "the Palindrome Reversal Palindrome." Also, a small section at the end has Ida tell us about Middlemen of the past, which was kinda swell (and vaguely familiar...).This was pretty awesome and totally worth reading if you enjoy the TV show. I'm signing off now, Dubby. Take care and remember our motto: fighting evil, so you don't have to"
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this up because I had seen the TV series and was a big fan. The TV series was goofy and fun, about an employee for a secret organization and his sidekick who are called in to investigate aliens, the supernatural and anything else out of the ordinary. It's a bit like the X-Files, but with the emphasis on the corny and fun, rather than the serious and creepy.This collection contains three limited series and several stand alone issues. The first two limited series were remade almost direct I picked this up because I had seen the TV series and was a big fan. The TV series was goofy and fun, about an employee for a secret organization and his sidekick who are called in to investigate aliens, the supernatural and anything else out of the ordinary. It's a bit like the X-Files, but with the emphasis on the corny and fun, rather than the serious and creepy.This collection contains three limited series and several stand alone issues. The first two limited series were remade almost directly as episodes of the TV show. The third however, goes in a darker direction than the TV show, which remained light throughout it's short run. The one big difference is that the level of violence and carnage is a little higher and more explicit than the TV show (but I guess that's what you get for having the show on ABC Family). The third collection ends on a bit of a cliffhanger that was never resolved. Or at least not so far. The stand alone issues show various Middlemen in different time periods.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    After watching the TV series "The Middleman," I knew that I really wanted to read the comic book it was based on. Most of the storylines in this collected omnibus of all of the comic books were later used in the series, but I enjoyed seeing them again in comic book form with some additional material (and some special effects that are easier to draw than create for television). As a fan of the television series, it is fun to see how the concept of the characters and storylines either stayed the s After watching the TV series "The Middleman," I knew that I really wanted to read the comic book it was based on. Most of the storylines in this collected omnibus of all of the comic books were later used in the series, but I enjoyed seeing them again in comic book form with some additional material (and some special effects that are easier to draw than create for television). As a fan of the television series, it is fun to see how the concept of the characters and storylines either stayed the same or changed due to casting and other creative decisions. There are also some panels of art that were so fun that I want to photocopy them and hang them on the wall. THE MIDDLEMAN comic books feels a lot like the television series -- a fun, witty story that does not take itself too seriously and yet has a big heart. Especially for anyone who is a major fan of the television series, I feel this volume is truly indispensable.
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  • Pj
    January 1, 1970
    Okay. Like several of the others listed here, I came to this through the short lived TV series. The first two parts were word for word translated to the screen so it is only through the minor differences in character and the final third that the books contains things new. I wonder if other fans may miss things invented for the show. (Although it would be almost impossible to render in print I wanted the energy drink **** to be in the book.) That said, it's still a real hoot. This belongs to the Okay. Like several of the others listed here, I came to this through the short lived TV series. The first two parts were word for word translated to the screen so it is only through the minor differences in character and the final third that the books contains things new. I wonder if other fans may miss things invented for the show. (Although it would be almost impossible to render in print I wanted the energy drink **** to be in the book.) That said, it's still a real hoot. This belongs to the rare area of comics that seem to have remembered to have fun. Short lived in print and on screen - but worth visiting again and again.
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  • Cristina
    January 1, 1970
    Almost at the end of this fine comic series and I can't stop from being saddened. I first saw the tv series on ABC Family, thought it had a comic book feel and lo and behold it was a comic book! Same on ABC for cancelling the show for it captured the voice of the comic so effortlessly! The story, comic or tv, had both whimsy and edge, and amazing dialogue (bravo for the actors who had to say it!).
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to go to the source material for the ABC Family network show that I had seen so many positive reviews for. Do I think its great? No, but it is a pleasant read, and I found more enjoyment with the last installment that told tales of The Middleman in different settings (sword & sorcery, steampunk and WWII). If you like MIB (both the movie and the comic that spawned it) you'll likely enjoy this. Also, a little more time is spent trying to develop the characters than MIB the comic did.
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  • Ali
    January 1, 1970
    This was way more charming than I remembered from my first reading several years ago. I really enjoyed the sharp humour and silliness (one thing that stands out for me in particular is in the scene with all the luchadores, which also includes Wally/Waldo and Fozzie Bear in the crowd). I didn't like the alternate ending or the Middleman-through-the-ages snippets at the end, which maybe soured the overall experience for me the first time around. The comics themselves are delightful.
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  • Michelle Morrell
    January 1, 1970
    Wendy Watson is a typical struggling artist when a close call with a disaster of comic book proportions brings her to the attention of The Middleman, who ropes her into being his assistant and Middleman in training. Clever writing and bizarre situations ensue. This came to my attention thanks to the woefully short-lived tv series. I actually like the series better than the comics, but both are a fun ride.
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  • Mark Baker
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the TV series based on this from summer of 2008 and had to see how it began. The three stories collected in this book did form the basis of three episodes. Definitely worth reading for fans of comic books or the TV show.Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    The only bad thing about this book is that the first two thirds of it have been reproduced so ably in the television show. It's a simple idea executed with so much wit, that it's impossible not to fall in love with it. Perhaps the biggest surprise, is that despite how blatantly it rips off pop culture, it doesn't feel at all derivative, but rather completely fresh and new.
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  • Jarlos
    January 1, 1970
    volume 3 takes all the classic cliches and twists of pulp golden era comics and makes another funny adventure with a surprising twist at the end. this collection contains volumes 1-3 and additional tales including a fantastic barbarian adventure thats very funny and drawn by the fantastic Josh Howard and a very witty tale that ties in to Sherlock Holmes.
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  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    January 1, 1970
    I like the comics better than the TV show. It flows so well and the detail is amazing - everything that happens in the background.The feel of the book is nice too, it has a nice weight to it.The characters are awesome. The dialogue is witty. I want there to be more!
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    So snarky and delightful. The James Bond spoof had me laughing out loud. Seriously, there always has to be a genetically-modified shark, and this was the most glorious genetically modified shark of them all.
  • Pete
    January 1, 1970
    I read this after the television show. Both the show and comic were just too much fun. Hopefully Javier finds time to do more Middleman comics in the future (although he already has done one follow-up to the TV series in comic form that is worth checking out.)
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  • Amy M.
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this graphic novel. The characters and plot were hilarious, the dialog snappy and the parodies are spot on!The only thing that I didn't like was the ending and I wished it was longer! I hope they will release more volumes to (please) resolve the twists at the end!
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  • Angel
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this which i bought after falling totally for hte TV show. Sad about how it ended though! And I'm not quite to the end but where's the Middleman's love he was pinning for?! I so thought it was mentioned in here....
  • Icepick
    January 1, 1970
    This was so much fun. I have to admit, I came to the comics through the short-lived TV series. Hopefully, there will be more of both in the future. Really, about as much fun as anything you can think of.
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't quite finished this one (I figured 4:30am was late enough to stay up reading) but it's awesome. I'd seen the equally amazing TV show first and decided it was time to read the source material. Does not disappoint. Rivals the Tick in terms of humor, action and character. Recommended.
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  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I liked the show, and usually the book is better...
  • William
    January 1, 1970
    http://chainletters.wordpress.com/200...
  • Mike Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Insanely fun book. I only wish it were longer. I guess I'll have to read it a few more times.
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