Lost Connections
From the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, a startling challenge to our thinking about depression and anxiety.Award-winning journalist Johann Hari suffered from depression since he was a child and started taking antidepressants when he was a teenager. He was told—like his entire generation—that his problem was caused by a chemical imbalance in his brain. As an adult, trained in the social sciences, he began to investigate this question—and he learned that almost everything we have been told about depression and anxiety is wrong. Across the world, Hari discovered social scientists who were uncovering the real causes—and they are mostly not in our brains, but in the way we live today. Hari’s journey took him from the people living in the tunnels beneath Las Vegas, to an Amish community in Indiana, to an uprising in Berlin—all showing in vivid and dramatic detail these new insights. They lead to solutions radically different from the ones we have been offered up until now.Just as Chasing the Scream transformed the global debate about addiction, with over twenty million views for his TED talk and the animation based on it, Lost Connections will lead us to a very different debate about depression and anxiety—one that shows how, together, we can end this epidemic.

Lost Connections Details

TitleLost Connections
Author
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherBloomsbury USA
ISBN-139781632868305
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Psychology, Health, Mental Health, Science, Self Help

Lost Connections Review

  • Mallory
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. First, I would like to note that, as a psychiatric nurse, I like to consider myself a mental health professional who knows a little something about things like depression and anxiety. Second, I’m also certified in choice theory/reality therapy, which meshes pretty well with a lot of ideas in this book. Third, as someone who copes with (self-diagnosed) anxiety and depression, I’d like to think I know a few th I received a copy of this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. First, I would like to note that, as a psychiatric nurse, I like to consider myself a mental health professional who knows a little something about things like depression and anxiety. Second, I’m also certified in choice theory/reality therapy, which meshes pretty well with a lot of ideas in this book. Third, as someone who copes with (self-diagnosed) anxiety and depression, I’d like to think I know a few things. So there’s what I feel qualifies me to make the statement I’m about to make:“Duh.”That’s what I kept saying over and over throughout this book. As the author when through his reasons for depression, I was dumbfounded that these aren’t all accepted by the medical and psychiatric community without question. Then he gets into the scientific studies and actual research, and you may actually start to feel angry (like I did) that they aren’t. Then, if you’re as entrenched in this system as I am, you’ll know why. The picture of a patient laying on a couch, telling the psychiatrist all of their problems is an antiquated picture of the mental health system. Somehow, over the years, the psychiatrist’s couch has moved from a place to discuss the problems in your life and hypothesize how they came to be, to a place where you list off symptoms and are given a drug that’s supposed to fix everything. This book is important to the field of psychiatry, I only wonder how long it will take for the mainstream psychiatrists and mental health professionals to realize it. In conclusion, if you didn’t feel like reading this rambling review: read this book, it’s important. Even if you don’t think you’re depressed, read it. You know someone who is and maybe this book can help you to help them, even if you find nothing personally useful in it (though I’d be surprised if you didn’t).
    more
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression and the Unexpected Solutions is by renowned UK author journalist Johann Hari. Through extensive research and interviews with a host of experts, educators and other medical professionals; the connection between depression and anxiety is established with its huge impact on all aspects of humanity. In addition, Hari shared his own stories of near death illness after food poisoning in Vietnam, and diagnosis with depression and acute anxiety Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression and the Unexpected Solutions is by renowned UK author journalist Johann Hari. Through extensive research and interviews with a host of experts, educators and other medical professionals; the connection between depression and anxiety is established with its huge impact on all aspects of humanity. In addition, Hari shared his own stories of near death illness after food poisoning in Vietnam, and diagnosis with depression and acute anxiety and his prescribed treatment with psychiatric medication. The UK has the highest antidepressant use in Europe, 1 in 10 male American high school students are prescribed powerful stimulants for focus and attention deficits, 1 in 5 Americans are taking medication for psychiatric conditions. Addiction to illicit opioid substance has reached epidemic levels in the USA; with the life expectancy of white males decreasing for the first time in peacetime history. With the use of psychiatric medication skyrocketing, it is easy to trace the history of usage. For decades nearly all of the research, development of psychotropic medications are funded, advertised, marketed, and heavily promoted for public consumption by powerful corporate interests in the pharmaceutical industry. Hari found that studies submitted for FDA approval always presented these drugs in the most favorable conditions even if the clinical trial evidence showed no difference between the use of antidepressants vs. placebo’s. The side effects, he noted are very real: weight gain, profuse sweating, and sexual dysfunction. In the worst cases, there may be an increased risk of suicide. The 1960’s pop singer Dale Shannon reportedly committed suicide after taking Prozac. Despite the pharmaceutical industry payouts of exorbitant sums of money from lawsuit claims, the profit margins are increasingly higher than ever.There are several instances noted of the placebo effect: The “Perkins” Wand of Dr. John Haygarth at Bath General Hospital (1799) was highly effective when moved (without touching) over a patient with debilitating pain, treatments were repeated as needed with much success. During WWII when morphine ran out on the battlefield, soldiers were told that the IV saline solution was morphine-- it worked! When Hari began taking Seroxat (Paxill)-- he believed in the “chemical imbalance of the brain” theory. Many doctors believed that depression was caused by reduced levels of serotonin in the brain. Since no one actually knows what a chemically balanced brain looks like, this claim or explanation is a “myth” with no scientific proof according to professor Jo Anna Moncrief (University College London). Hari found his depression and sadness remained or returned after the dosages of his medication were increased, the same in 65%-85% of other patient data studies. Traveling over thousands of miles, Hari visited an Amish Village in Indiana to compare levels of anxiety and depression and the reasons the Amish remain separated from mainstream society. A housing project in Berlin, and a city in Brazil that banned public advertising were studied along with a clinic in Baltimore that researched the effects and experience of trauma. “Chasing The Scream” (2015) wasn’t as challenging for him to write as this book, since we have been “systematically misinformed” regarding depression and anxiety. Hari presents 9 proven causes related to disconnection with suggestions ways to reconnect that will heal and transform lives. **With thanks and appreciation to Bloomsbury Publishing USA UK via NetGalley for the DDC for the purpose of review.
    more
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    Throw away all you're books on depression, this is the only book you will ever need, Well written with research all over the world. I loved the part about child trauma, parts about healing and people coming together. I learned a lot about myself in this book too. I have a different outlook on life now.Thank you Good Reads for the free book for my honest review.This should be a bestseller.Cherie'
    more
  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2...
Write a review