The Women with Silver Wings
The thrilling, as-yet-untold history of the Women Airforce Service Pilots, the daring female aviators who helped the United States win World War II.When Japanese planes executed a sneak attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Cornelia Fort was already in the air. At twenty-two, Fort was a failed debutante hoping for a fresh start as a flight instructor in Hawaii. She and her student had just taken off when the bombs began to fall, and they barely made it back to ground that morning. Still, when the US Army put out a call for women pilots to aid the war effort, Fort was one of the first to respond. She became one of 1,900 women from across the nation--chosen from an application pool of more than 25,000--to converge on Sweetwater, Texas, to train for the U.S. Army Air Force in the hope of earning their silver wings.In The Women with Silver Wings, historian Kate Landdeck introduces us to these young women as they meet even-tempered, methodical Nancy Love and formidable, demanding visionary Jacqueline Cochran, the women who first envisioned sending American women into the air, and whose rivalry would define the WASP. For women like Cornelia, it was a chance to serve her country--and to prove that women aviators are just as skilled and able as men.While not authorized to serve in combat, the WASP helped train male pilots for service abroad and risked their lives to ferry bombers across the Atlantic. Cornelia herself would not survive the war. But even taking into account these tragic losses, Love and Cochran's social experiment seemed to be a resounding success--until, in 1943, with the tides of the war turning and fewer male pilots needed in Europe, Congress pulled out the rug from under the WASP. The program was disbanded, the women sent home. But the bonds they'd made during their time together never failed, and over the next few decades, they banded together to fight for recognition as the military veterans they were--and for their place in history.Beautifully written and painstakingly researched, The Women with Silver Wings is an unforgettable portrait of these fearless, groundbreaking women and their long fight for justice.

The Women with Silver Wings Details

TitleThe Women with Silver Wings
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 21st, 2020
PublisherCrown
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, War, Feminism, North American Hi..., American History, World War II, Historical, Aviation, Womens, Military Fiction

The Women with Silver Wings Review

  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    I figured the odds were good when I picked this one up that I would find this to be an interesting read. I've read quite a few books about female aviators and also the roles women played during World War 2 but this is actually the first time I've had the opportunity to read a nonfiction book devoted to the two subjects. It truly was an honor to learn more about these women and this book was definitely a worthwhile read.After the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States needed pilots to go I figured the odds were good when I picked this one up that I would find this to be an interesting read. I've read quite a few books about female aviators and also the roles women played during World War 2 but this is actually the first time I've had the opportunity to read a nonfiction book devoted to the two subjects. It truly was an honor to learn more about these women and this book was definitely a worthwhile read.After the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States needed pilots to go fight in the war. The WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots) was a group formed during World War 2 that trained pilots, tested aircraft, and also ferried aircraft. Essentially by having female pilots take on these responsibilities this freed up more male pilots to go fight in combat. Sounds like a great thing, right? Unfortunately given society norms and gender roles at the time, these women faced a battle of their own in order to be taken seriously. And what's worse is even decades after the war, these female aviators barely got a smidge of recognition for helping win the war.One of the reasons I wanted to read this book is about 20 years ago when my grandmother was in her 80s, she randomly told me how during WW2 she was going to get her pilot's license to help with the war effort but ended up not being able to take the exam because her mother thought it was too dangerous. This was the first time anyone in our family had heard this story, and now that she has passed away, it remains one of my favorite moments with her. One of the things that boggled my mind is all she needed was 7 lessons in the air and that's something that was basically confirmed in this book. Nowadays I think most of us know you need a lot of hours to get your pilot's license but back then you didn't need much at all. One of the women featured in this book I believe was deemed qualified to fly, after less than 5 hours in the air. Even though I knew this fact from reading previous books about female aviators, it still is crazy to me that there were serious discussions back then about whether or not a woman should be able to fly during her menstrual cycle. I do love how there was really no way a ban could be enforced because most men weren't going to want to ask the female pilots if they were on their period before every flight. And also these women would most likely have lied if questioned anyway because they had common sense and realized they were more than fully capable and qualified even if it was a certain time of the month. This book provides a good history of how the WASPs got their start as well as what led to it coming to an end in 1944 before the war was even over. The book features quite a few of the women associated with the WASPs and a decent amount of info is given about their backgrounds as well as their lives after the war. One thing I found fascinating is so many of the women pilots went on to start families and didn't really discuss their experiences during the war with them. They basically figured it was all about the kids and nobody really cared about mom's life prior to becoming a mother. It really wasn't until decades later when the government was attempting to give these women some recognition, that many family members got to actually learn more about the WASPs. I'm glad the author mentioned how the vast majority of the women pilots were white. It does break your heart there were women of color wanting to help the nation and yet many were turned away. In general the author did a pretty decent job showing the good things about the women and the program as well as the bad. This is a good read particularly if you enjoy nonfiction books about World War 2 and/or anything related to women doing extraordinary things. Thank you to Crown and Netgalley for providing me with an advance digital copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Karen R
    January 1, 1970
    4.5. Every so often a book comes my way that is incredibly inspiring and will live long in my heart. This story about the daring and brave women airfare service pilots (WASP) is one of them. I admire the authors meticulous research regarding these passionate and trailblazing aviators who flew during WWII and was riveted by the womens accomplishments, hurdles and setbacks. I loved the letters, photos and diaries which provide tremendous insight into personal histories. Their discrimination and 4.5. Every so often a book comes my way that is incredibly inspiring and will live long in my heart. This story about the daring and brave women airfare service pilots (WASP) is one of them. I admire the author’s meticulous research regarding these passionate and trailblazing aviators who flew during WWII and was riveted by the womens’ accomplishments, hurdles and setbacks. I loved the letters, photos and diaries which provide tremendous insight into personal histories. Their discrimination and having to fight so hard for veteran recognition, however, made me angry! This debut by Author/Historian Landdeck (a licensed pilot) reports in her author notes that she knew most of the WASP women named in the book. A fascinating must-read. Thanks to Crown Publishing for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Loraine
    January 1, 1970
    I am not an avid non-fiction reader, but I found this new release absolutely fascinating. The Woman's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron or WAFS was developed during World War 2 to find women who were already certified pilots who could ferry airplanes (any that were used in the war) from either a base to a repair station or from the United States to Britain. This was still the early years of aviation and these ladies from all different life situations (housewives to university graduates) were independent, I am not an avid non-fiction reader, but I found this new release absolutely fascinating. The Woman's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron or WAFS was developed during World War 2 to find women who were already certified pilots who could ferry airplanes (any that were used in the war) from either a base to a repair station or from the United States to Britain. This was still the early years of aviation and these ladies from all different life situations (housewives to university graduates) were independent, strong, and gutsy. They relieved men who could be then sent to the front lines. Their stories are riveting, and their life afterwards interesting. They were never given military status but considered civilian employees. It was not until 1977 when many were in their 80's and 90's when they finally received military status and given benefits that should have belonged to them from the beginning. I highly recommend this book to any of those interested in World War 2 women's service, and the pictures that are at the beginning of each chapter highlight the women. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.
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  • Toni Osborne
    January 1, 1970
    The inspiring True Story of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War 11Ms. Landdeck is an associate professor and teaches courses on the twentieth century United States and global war. What an interesting read her book is. The Women with Silver Wings is the culmination of her 20 years of research on the Women Airforce Service Pilots. The WASP were the first women in history to fly for the U.S. military, serving between 1942 and 1944 at the height of World WAR 11. These daring female The inspiring True Story of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War 11Ms. Landdeck is an associate professor and teaches courses on the twentieth century United States and global war. What an interesting read her book is. “The Women with Silver Wings” is the culmination of her 20 years of research on the Women Airforce Service Pilots. The WASP were the first women in history to fly for the U.S. military, serving between 1942 and 1944 at the height of World WAR 11. These daring female aviators who helped the United States win WW 11 only to be forgotten by the country they served.It has been a privilege for Ms. Landdeck get to know these women over years and to tell the stories of these amazing women in action. At the height of WW 11 more than 1000 women volunteered as civilian pilots to relieve men for overseas duty. They ferried planes across the country from factories to points of embarkation, towed targets behind planes to train ground and air gunners, test flew planes after repairs and other domestic flying duty that the Air Forces needed done. The author describes in details their day to day life: the months of training, were they were stationed, the types of aircraft they flew and their down time. The WASP were deactivated in December 1944 up to 1977 they continued their battle to be officially recognised as part of the Military. In 1984 each pilot was awarded the WW 11 Victory medal and others the American Theater Ribbon and Campaign Medal. In 2009, after decades-long battle, the women contributions finally honored and were granted the Congressional Gold Medal and officially recognized as military veterans. The status fully recognised in 2017. This book is superbly researched and consists of numerous vignettes of the remarkable pilots. It is smoothly written with relatively short chapters to keep us interested. In whole an easy read and a great educating tool.On the down side: I found too much was said for a regular size book, information seemed cramped in. I was deeply into this book for most part but ¾ in, things started to turn in circle, became repetitive and dragged somewhat. I was anxious to see the ending by then. Having said this, I still would recommend this book to those who love this time in history.I received an ARC from Crown Publishing via NetGalley for my thoughts.
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  • Maureen Caupp
    January 1, 1970
    My favorite book of 2020 so far!The Women with Silver Wings tells the story of the women who trained and served as Women Airforce Service Pilots during WWII. Over 1000 thousand women served as WASPs and 38 women were killed while training or performing their work. These women were passionate about flying and serving their country in a time of need and truly were the first women pilots for the United State military, but Congress and the Armed Services refused to recognize them as a part of the My favorite book of 2020 so far!The Women with Silver Wings tells the story of the women who trained and served as Women Airforce Service Pilots during WWII. Over 1000 thousand women served as WASPs and 38 women were killed while training or performing their work. These women were passionate about flying and serving their country in a time of need and truly were the first women pilots for the United State military, but Congress and the Armed Services refused to recognize them as a part of the military during their service. After the WASP program was disbanded the women were told to go home and return solely to their role as housewives, much like other women who had worked for the war effort and to keep the country running while men were overseas. In the years that followed the war the work done by the women was largely forgotten and the women couldn't get work flying planes. Most were told that the companies didn't have jobs for them, because they were women. Only a few managed to find jobs that allowed them to continue flying. This book is fascinating and well researched, combining interviews with surviving WASP and documents the WASP and gathered and had archived at Texas Woman's University. It is interesting mix of the women's personal stories and details about their training and work that they performed (including ferrying planes across the country from factories to where they were needed for training or transport overseas, test flying new and repaired planes, pulling targets so that soldiers could practice shooting at flying targets with live ammunition, and more. These brave women risked their lives serving the war effort, but were then pushed aside.This book brings to life the forgotten stories of a group of women who served a vital role during WWII, but were then largely forgotten by most of America. According to WASP Dora Dougherty Strather McKeown (who earned a PhD and was one of the women who managed to get a career that involved flying, working for Bell Industries and becoming one of few women at the time to become a certified helicopter pilot) "Nobody Seemed to remember about us. No books were written about us, and we were sort of a forgotten page in history." If you love books like Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly and Code Girls by Liza Mundy this book is a must read!
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  • Annissa Joy Armstrong
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book. It was very well written and contained a lot of information about women pilots and their contributions in aviation during WW ll. The women of WASP were the first women to fly for the US. Katherine Sharp Landdeck did a great job recording this history that a lot of people probably do not know about. It was a very good read for a non fiction book. I believe this book will appeal to a wide variety of readers...people who enjoy womens history, aviation history, WWII history and I enjoyed this book. It was very well written and contained a lot of information about women pilots and their contributions in aviation during WW ll. The women of WASP were the first women to fly for the US. Katherine Sharp Landdeck did a great job recording this history that a lot of people probably do not know about. It was a very good read for a non fiction book. I believe this book will appeal to a wide variety of readers...people who enjoy women’s history, aviation history, WWII history and history of the USA.Thank you to Crown Publishing for the early digital copy via Netgalley for my review.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Apparently, it was a popular thing for young women of middle-class and upper-class to fly and earn their pilots licenses in the late 1930s. The male pilots were reluctant to share the skies with the ladies, but it became necessary as World War II involvement needed more pilots. These ladies ferried new airplanes from factories to military fields. It wasnt until President Jimmy Carters administration that the women received military benefits. The personal lives and aviation details of five women Apparently, it was a popular thing for young women of middle-class and upper-class to fly and earn their pilots’ licenses in the late 1930’s. The male pilots were reluctant to share the skies with the ladies, but it became necessary as World War II involvement needed more pilots. These ladies ferried new airplanes from factories to military fields. It wasn’t until President Jimmy Carter’s administration that the women received military benefits. The personal lives and aviation details of five women are very well researched in this book.
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  • Dennis Hogan
    January 1, 1970
    Finished The Women with Silver Wings: The Inspiring True Story of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II by Katherine Sharp Landdeck. This is a terrific account of the pioneering female aviators who stepped in to fill the need for pilots to ferry new planes being produced in ever increasing numbers to the military for use overseas. Thirty eight women lost their lives in this effort. Additionally, they towed targets, taught new male pilots headed to war. They were some of the most Finished The Women with Silver Wings: The Inspiring True Story of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II by Katherine Sharp Landdeck. This is a terrific account of the pioneering female aviators who stepped in to fill the need for pilots to ferry new planes being produced in ever increasing numbers to the military for use overseas. Thirty eight women lost their lives in this effort. Additionally, they towed targets, taught new male pilots headed to war. They were some of the most accomplished pilots of their era but were largely underpaid and under recognized for their efforts. They weren’t officially in the military so they had no life insurance death benefit and didn’t even qualify for minimal VA benefits until the Carter Administration. These heroes paved the way for women to attend the service academies. Very interesting book.
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  • Shari Suarez
    January 1, 1970
    History books particularly those about the military tend to downplay women's involvement. This book sets out to right those wrongs.The author set out to make everyone aware of the female pilots during WWII and how they helped in the war efforts. However they were never militarized and never received any benefits for their brave service.I found this book fascinating and the perfect accompaniment to Flight Girls by Noelle Salazar.
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  • Pam Walker
    January 1, 1970
    When Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Cornelia Fort was already in the air. At twenty-two, Fort was a failed debutante hoping for a fresh start as a flight instructor in Hawaii. She and her student had just taken off when the bombs began to fall, and they barely made it back to ground that morning. When the US Army put out a call for women pilots to aid the war effort, Fort was one of the first to respond. She became one of 1,900 women from across the nation to converge on When Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Cornelia Fort was already in the air. At twenty-two, Fort was a failed debutante hoping for a fresh start as a flight instructor in Hawaii. She and her student had just taken off when the bombs began to fall, and they barely made it back to ground that morning. When the US Army put out a call for women pilots to aid the war effort, Fort was one of the first to respond. She became one of 1,900 women from across the nation to converge on Sweetwater, Texas, to train for the U.S. Army Air Force in the hope of earning their silver wings. In The Women with Silver Wings, historian Kate Landdeck introduces us to these young women as they meet even-tempered, methodical Nancy Love and formidable, demanding visionary Jacqueline Cochran, the women who first envisioned sending American women into the air, and whose rivalry would define the WASP. For women like Cornelia, it was a chance to serve her country--and to prove that women aviators are just as skilled and able as men. The WASP could not serve in combat, but did train male pilots for service abroad and risked their lives to ferry bombers across the Atlantic. Cornelia herself would not survive the war. But even taking into account these tragic losses, Love and Cochran's social experiment seemed to be a resounding success--until, in 1943, with the tides of the war turning and fewer male pilots needed in Europe, Congress pulled out the rug from under the WASP. The program was disbanded, the women sent home. But the bonds they'd made during their time together never failed, and over the next few decades, they banded together to fight for recognition as the military veterans they were--and for their place in history. Beautifully written and painstakingly researched for over two decades, The Women with Silver Wings is an unforgettable description of these fearless, groundbreaking women and their long fight for justice. I was fortunate to get this as an ARC from NetGalley and thought it was an amazing story.
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  • Aurora
    January 1, 1970
    It's obvious from the very first chapter that this book was a labour of love. With a relentless attention to detail and an understanding gained through hours of work including tracking down news item, letters, photos, documents and interviews with many of the WASP, Katherine Sharp Landdeck captures the passion, the dedication and the disappointments and heartache of a group of women pilots who were all bout forgotten by the country they loved and served. As an aviation enthusiast who has always It's obvious from the very first chapter that this book was a labour of love. With a relentless attention to detail and an understanding gained through hours of work including tracking down news item, letters, photos, documents and interviews with many of the WASP, Katherine Sharp Landdeck captures the passion, the dedication and the disappointments and heartache of a group of women pilots who were all bout forgotten by the country they loved and served. As an aviation enthusiast who has always admired the pioneering women in the aviation industry, I was excited to find this book that tells the story of this iconic group of American aviation pioneers. As I read, I fell in love with the WASP and their determination to serve their country while pursuing their passion for flying and I loved discovering the "famous names" from aviation history who peopled their story - aviation and wartime heroes like Amelia Earhardt, Hap Arnold, Paul Tibbets and Chuck Yeager all of whom, in addition to the accomplishments that made each of them bright stars in the skies of American aviation, also played their roles in the founding an brief life of the WASP.The story of these outstanding women is one that desperately needed to be told so that their lives and sacrifice become a part of the American war story and their courage and determination can inspire many future generations of women, not only in the air and space industry, but in every walk of American life. The Women with Silver Wings should be required reading for every 20th Century American History, Women's Studies and Aviation History courses but, far beyond that, it's a book that everyone with even a passing interest in the last century should add to their "to be read" list, because in addition to being a well written history book, it's just a darned good read.
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  • Barb
    January 1, 1970
    Historian Katherine Sharp Landdeck introduces us to Nancy Love and Jackie Cochran, who made it their mission to persuade the powers-that-be to allow female pilots to help with the war effort. Despite considerable opposition, not only from their families, from military brass and politicians, but also from male pilots, these two women began programs that would send American women into the air. While ferrying planes from production lines to bases where the male pilots would take them into combat, Historian Katherine Sharp Landdeck introduces us to Nancy Love and Jackie Cochran, who made it their mission to persuade the powers-that-be to allow female pilots to help with the war effort. Despite considerable opposition, not only from their families, from military brass and politicians, but also from male pilots, these two women began programs that would send American women into the air. While ferrying planes from production lines to bases where the male pilots would take them into combat, the women also learned how to fly the new planes, trained male pilots on those planes, the women wanted to prove that female aviators were just as skilled and able as the men. Our entire family has always been drawn to the history of aviation, even before our son took flight lessons and eventually became a pilot for the US Air Force. Add to that my efforts to learn more about the women behind the scenes, the women who don't get the attention – and credit, in many cases – that men do who performed the same jobs, and this book sounded right up my alley. It was a fascinating read, although the back-and-forth between the wartime events and the women's backstories, coupled with the alternating sections about Nancy and Jackie, felt a little disjointed. Once I was able to put myself into the right perspective and storyline, though, I was amazed at these ladies' perseverance and determination, not to mention the sacrifices made by so many of them. I have already recommended this book to several other readers who enjoy non-fiction historical accounts like this, and will continue to do so. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    The latest installment in uncovering the stories of the unsung heroes of WWII. When all the men had gone to war in Europe there weren't enough of them left at home to fly transport planes, test new planes or fly them to train new pilots so a brave bold group was formed to handle the load - the W.A.S.P. The program was born out of need but also a desire in these women to fly and from day one they had a battle on their hands. They would need special treatment, weren't strong enough, would just The latest installment in uncovering the stories of the unsung heroes of WWII. When all the men had gone to war in Europe there weren't enough of them left at home to fly transport planes, test new planes or fly them to train new pilots so a brave bold group was formed to handle the load - the W.A.S.P. The program was born out of need but also a desire in these women to fly and from day one they had a battle on their hands. They would need special treatment, weren't strong enough, would just want to find a man and have babies - the list went on and on. Thankfully, they did have some people fighting for them and they soon outperformed and took on any task without complaint. At the end of the war the program was scrapped and everyone was told to disband and return to civilian life without honors. Their service would not be recognized for many years.The author was able to interview many of these ladies in person and got a true accounting of their life and the important service they performed for our country in its time of need. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not normally a big nonfiction reader, but I absolutely loved this book. I was drawn in instantly to the story of American women pilots during WWII. I loved learning about the adventurous spirit of the women and was rooting for them in the same way I root for characters in novels. Katherine Sharp Landdeck does an amazing job bringing these women's story out of the shadows of historical obscurity and making the reader fall in love with their spirit and pluck. The only thing that drops it down I'm not normally a big nonfiction reader, but I absolutely loved this book. I was drawn in instantly to the story of American women pilots during WWII. I loved learning about the adventurous spirit of the women and was rooting for them in the same way I root for characters in novels. Katherine Sharp Landdeck does an amazing job bringing these women's story out of the shadows of historical obscurity and making the reader fall in love with their spirit and pluck. The only thing that drops it down to 4 stars for me is that it started to feel a little draggy at the end, when Landdeck was talking about the women's fight in their later years for recognition. I guess it's just not as exciting to read about women giving testimony in Congress as it is to lose yourself in their airborne exploits! Note: I received a pre-publication copy of this book from the publisher. However, the opinions expressed in this review are wholly my own.
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  • Angie Simmonds
    January 1, 1970
    I really learned a lot reading The Women with Silver Wings. First of all, these women were really badasses! I have never thought of women as being the weaker sex and if you have thought that then you need to read this book. Even knowing how tough women are I have to admit I was still astounded by these women pilot's determination, dedication and fearlessness. The job of many of these women were to ferry airplanes from the manufacturing facility to various locations and military bases across I really learned a lot reading The Women with Silver Wings. First of all, these women were really badasses! I have never thought of women as being the weaker sex and if you have thought that then you need to read this book. Even knowing how tough women are I have to admit I was still astounded by these women pilot's determination, dedication and fearlessness. The job of many of these women were to ferry airplanes from the manufacturing facility to various locations and military bases across the nation. They also taught male pilots how to fly. These women had put in hundreds of hours of training in many different models of airplanes in order to be part of this elite group of civilians that worked alongside the military during World War II. I thrilled at descriptions of these pilots fueling up midflight. I marveled when I read that one of them had climbed onto the wing of a plane while in the air and stitched up a torn wing with a needle and thread. I was blown away to read that one of their trips involved flying an open cockpit plane from Montana to Tennessee in December at over 100 miles an hour! Can you imagine how cold that would be? And when I read that the navigator's maps flew out of the cockpit 20 miles into her flight I thought for sure the whole group was doomed. But then I read that she was able to fly safely with only a compass for navigating and they were never more than 10 miles off course I had to read the paragraph out loud to my husband so I could see his reaction to the paragraph as well. Here was equally blown away Even if World War II or women pilots are not your thing this is a book that you should still read. It's an important part of history and it's just an impressive read. 4.25 stars!
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    World War began with a bomb. When Pearl Harbor was hit by Japanese bombs from above, it forced the United States to join both the German and the Japanese fronts. It also inspired American men, and women, to do their patriotic duty by serving in the military. Over a thousand female pilots joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASP. These Women with Silver Wings helped ferry planes around the country, test new planes, and train new military pilots freeing up more male pilots to fight the World War began with a bomb. When Pearl Harbor was hit by Japanese bombs from above, it forced the United States to join both the German and the Japanese fronts. It also inspired American men, and women, to do their patriotic duty by serving in the military. Over a thousand female pilots joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots, or WASP. These Women with Silver Wings helped ferry planes around the country, test new planes, and train new military pilots freeing up more male pilots to fight the enemy. This is their story.The author has a Ph.D. in history and a lifelong interest in flight. It shows in this well-researched story of the trials and tribulations of being a female pilot in a male-chauvinist world. In the 1940s, women were expected to put marriage and family above all else. Yet these brave women wanted to help the war effort with skills they already possessed.But the stories included in the Women with Silver Wings are much more personal than a dry history textbook. It reads more like historical fiction with romance, adventure and conflict all present on its pages. If you enjoy memoirs or historical fiction, I believe you will enjoy this inspiring tale. 4 stars!Thanks to Crown Publishing and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    This is a superbly researched and written book about the brave young women who were eager to serve their country during World War II by ferrying new aircraft from the factories to the military pick-up point. Having served in the USAF in the mid-70s I could relate to some of the skepticism they encountered not only from the military men but from society in general. As all able-bodied males were off fighting in the war, there was a serious shortage of pilots. These gutsy women rushed in to fill This is a superbly researched and written book about the brave young women who were eager to serve their country during World War II by ferrying new aircraft from the factories to the military pick-up point. Having served in the USAF in the mid-70s I could relate to some of the skepticism they encountered not only from the military men but from society in general. As all able-bodied males were off fighting in the war, there was a serious shortage of pilots. These gutsy women rushed in to fill the void flying 77 different types of aircraft. Even though most of the women pilots were better qualified than the male pilots they were not recognized for their service to their country and designated as veterans until November 1977. The book consists of numerous vignettes of the remarkable female pilots who became known as WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots). The chapters are short and easy to read.Thank you to BookBrowse and Crown Publishing for the advance copy. I am providing an unbiased review.
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  • TJ
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very educational book covering the lives of multiple women pilots during WWII and the creation of the WASP program. What a great bunch of very high achieving young ladies with hearts of gold and souls of steel. Wow, these women were daredevils and just high adrenaline junkies. They knew what they wanted out of life and they would risk it all to get there. Such a talented, smart group of women.If you havent read anything about the WASP program, I would highly recommend this one. This was a very educational book covering the lives of multiple women pilots during WWII and the creation of the WASP program. What a great bunch of very high achieving young ladies with hearts of gold and souls of steel. Wow, these women were daredevils and just high adrenaline junkies. They knew what they wanted out of life and they would risk it all to get there. Such a talented, smart group of women.If you haven’t read anything about the WASP program, I would highly recommend this one. Unfortunately, I had read a previous book on this subject matter and I found this book covered a lot of the same information. It also reads a lot like a text book, it doesn’t dive into an individual story, but it gives an overview of the struggles and successes of several of the ladies. I did truly enjoy several of the chapters late in the book when she covered what happened to the lady pilots and how their lives turned out, those are always the best parts of these true stories. Lots of information in here. Well worth the read, especially if this is your first dive into this subject.I was allowed an ARC from Crown Publishing and NetGalley for my honest unbiased review. This one gets 4 stars.
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  • Sharon Brewer
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Crown Publishing and Net Galley for the chance to read and review this fabulous book! The opinions expressed are entirely my own.This is the story of the brave and enthusiastic women who were part of the Women's Airforce Service Pilots of WW II. These women faced so much adversity, but their love for flying would not allow them to give up. This book is so well-researched, and comprehensive. I felt like I really got to know these women and what was in their heart. I like the way the Thank you to Crown Publishing and Net Galley for the chance to read and review this fabulous book! The opinions expressed are entirely my own.This is the story of the brave and enthusiastic women who were part of the Women's Airforce Service Pilots of WW II. These women faced so much adversity, but their love for flying would not allow them to give up. This book is so well-researched, and comprehensive. I felt like I really got to know these women and what was in their heart. I like the way the author added photographs at the beginning of each chapter. I also liked the ending because the author let the reader know what happened to these women and how hard they had to fight for recognition the rest of their lives. I loved this book, and I would rate it higher then 5 stars if I could. It is just a wonderful book!
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  • Jeanne
    January 1, 1970
    This is truly is an untold story. It starts out like it's going to be a basic nonfiction book about a group of women and their piloting escapades, but very quickly you're brought into the details of these women's lives and suddenly you're right there with them. There were 1100 women trained to fly various types of planes around the country during the war to free up male pilots for combat. It is galling to look back and realize that even in the 70s there were men (and some women) who didn't think This is truly is an untold story. It starts out like it's going to be a basic nonfiction book about a group of women and their piloting escapades, but very quickly you're brought into the details of these women's lives and suddenly you're right there with them. There were 1100 women trained to fly various types of planes around the country during the war to free up male pilots for combat. It is galling to look back and realize that even in the 70s there were men (and some women) who didn't think these women should receive military veteran status so they could be honored as veterans and receive retirement and health benefits. They make me proud to be an American woman and I plan to go to the Air Force Academy museum to see the display on their achievements.
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  • Carol Kean
    January 1, 1970
    Women in aviation are rare birds, but not as rare as we might think. This book is a stunning, comprehensive, in-depth look at dozens of young ladies who felt to the call to fly and acted on it, no matter what obstacles stood in their way. Bessie Colman had to go to France to earn her pilot's when American schools turned her down. This is a long, detailed book, packed full of names and biographies, with never a dull moment. I've been reading this on and off for weeks now. Soon, I hope, I'll sift Women in aviation are rare birds, but not as rare as we might think. This book is a stunning, comprehensive, in-depth look at dozens of young ladies who felt to the call to fly and acted on it, no matter what obstacles stood in their way. Bessie Colman had to go to France to earn her pilot's when American schools turned her down. This is a long, detailed book, packed full of names and biographies, with never a dull moment. I've been reading this on and off for weeks now. Soon, I hope, I'll sift through the highlights and write a more thoughtful review. For now, I will say #loveit! This is a #mustread!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Katherine Sharp Landdeck's detailed account of the day-to-day experiences of the women who flew for the Army Air Forces and the long-term machinations and political maneuvering involved in the evolving alphabet soup of acronyms is riveting. Her extensive research included years of interviewing and becoming friends with dozens of the women; reading their letters, diaries, memoirs, and speeches; combing through newspaper archives, photos, accident reports, and government documents; and Katherine Sharp Landdeck's detailed account of the day-to-day experiences of the women who flew for the Army Air Forces and the long-term machinations and political maneuvering involved in the evolving alphabet soup of acronyms is riveting. Her extensive research included years of interviewing and becoming friends with dozens of the women; reading their letters, diaries, memoirs, and speeches; combing through newspaper archives, photos, accident reports, and government documents; and triple-checking everything. My husband is an air force officer and military history buff, so I enjoyed the opportunity to read about one of his favorite subjects but from a female perspective. It's endlessly astonishing to me how sexist (and racist) beliefs can persist when they are so demonstrably false and utterly ridiculous. Still more astonishing is that they persisted during WWII when sheer practicality should have rendered them moot: women not only could fly anything and everything, they NEEDED to do so in order to maximize the number of men able to fight. (Never mind that women could have also done an excellent job of fighting.) Landdeck's meticulously researched "The Women with Silver Wings" brings this absurdity into sharp focus.Since I'm reading an advance reader's edition (ARC), the endnotes haven't yet been numbered, nor are they marked within the text, but once that happens for the final published version, they will be beneficial, although in some cases it would be nicer if they were footnotes and more easily read without flipping back and forth. Also, the extensive number of women featured in the book makes me wish for some sort of Cast of Characters list with a sentence or two to remind me who's who & has which background. But that's a minor quibble in an otherwise fascinating book.Many thanks to Bookbrowse.com and the publisher for the ARC they sent me in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    For readers who love aviation history and feminist WW2 nonfiction, you will champion The Women with Silver Wings, coming to shelves this April 2020.Learn about the women who ferried planes and trained during the war, never quite receiving the same honors as the men around them. I was stoked to see the Seven Sisters mentioned and found this obscured part of women's history fascinating.See the full review on The Uncorked Librarian here: https://theuncorkedlibrarian.com/apri...
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  • Alicia Woods
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book about brave, amazing women, who went up against every challenge, including the doubts and misogyny of their own countrymen, in order to do what they loved and serve their country in the process. A vital part of fighting the war, these women gave everything they had - many their very lives. I'm grateful for this story being told and am excited to share it with those around me.If not for parts where there is almost word-for-word repeating of facts - to the point that, in the audio Fantastic book about brave, amazing women, who went up against every challenge, including the doubts and misogyny of their own countrymen, in order to do what they loved and serve their country in the process. A vital part of fighting the war, these women gave everything they had - many their very lives. I'm grateful for this story being told and am excited to share it with those around me.If not for parts where there is almost word-for-word repeating of facts - to the point that, in the audio version, I wondered if it skipped backwards - I would give it 5 stars. Still highly recommend.
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  • Jean A
    January 1, 1970
    Terrific read with engrossing narrative that recounts the history of the WASP including the origins of the program as well as the fight for recognition as veterans which did not happen until 1977. Stories of individual WASP provide the hook that keeps the pages turning. Whether you are already knowledgeable about the WASP or just learning of their existence, Katherine Landdeck does a great job of educating whilst entertaining.
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    "The Women With Silver Wings" is a wonderful historical account of women service pilots during WWII. This is a book that will teach you about women and their role during WWII. I think any history buffs and those interested in the contributions of women through time will devour this book. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy free of charge. This is my honest and unbiased opinion of it.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Has anyone ever figured out why most men are afraid of capable women? This interesting chronicle of the American women who paved the way for those coming after to be able to fly as military pilots first and later as commercial pilots (so long as they weren't having their menstrual!). Although demonstrably capable and skilled, they were fobbed off as lowest class pilots during the second World War and neglected by the military and the government afterward. It is both fascinating and frustrating Has anyone ever figured out why most men are afraid of capable women? This interesting chronicle of the American women who paved the way for those coming after to be able to fly as military pilots first and later as commercial pilots (so long as they weren't having their menstrual!). Although demonstrably capable and skilled, they were fobbed off as lowest class pilots during the second World War and neglected by the military and the government afterward. It is both fascinating and frustrating to read all the details of these women. Excellently researched and crafted. I requested and received a free ebook copy from Crown Publishing via NetGalley. Thank you!
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  • Stewart Wolfe
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent history of the first women pilots in the Army Air Corps. These women were willing to step in and lend their flying expertise to winning World War II. This book details their lives and the prejudices they had to overcome while serving their country. My hat is off to these aviation pioneers.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely thrilling book--the true story of the very first women ever to fly for the US Military. A world War II--and beyond--story that will enthrall you, break your heart, and, finally, uplift you all the way to the bluest skies. Highly recommend.
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  • Renee DeMoranville
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book free through a goodreads giveaway and I am so thrilled I won it. I was soon immersed in the stories of these daring women. I am so glad that the author was able to get their history out there. These women must never be forgotten.
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