All the Ways to Here
In this sequel to Future Leaders of Nowhere, Finn and Willa come home from camp to find everything is different. Even as they grow more sure of their feelings for each other, everything around them feels less certain.When Finn gets involved in a new community project, she’s forced to question where her priorities lie at school. Meanwhile, her dad has moved interstate, her mother is miserable, and her home feels like a ghost town.Willa’s discovering how to negotiate the new terrains of romance and school friendships when an accident at home reminds her just how tenuous her family situation is. Suddenly, even with her dad in town, she’s shouldering more responsibility than ever.As they try to navigate these new worlds together, Finn’s learning she has to figure out what she wants, and Willa how to ask for what she needs.

All the Ways to Here Details

TitleAll the Ways to Here
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2017
PublisherYlva Publishing
Rating
GenreGlbt, Romance, Young Adult, Bisexual, Lesbian, Contemporary

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All the Ways to Here Review

  • Lex Kent
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t love this as much as Future Leaders of Nowhere, but it was still a very enjoyable, well written sequel. Do you have to read Future Leaders of Nowhere first? I would absolutely recommend it. I just don’t see how this book would be the same if you didn’t. It picks up where the first left off. These are YA romance books, and for someone who doesn’t love YA (me), these books really are excellent.Willa and Finn are now home from camp and finding out quickly how much harder real life can be. I didn’t love this as much as Future Leaders of Nowhere, but it was still a very enjoyable, well written sequel. Do you have to read Future Leaders of Nowhere first? I would absolutely recommend it. I just don’t see how this book would be the same if you didn’t. It picks up where the first left off. These are YA romance books, and for someone who doesn’t love YA (me), these books really are excellent.Willa and Finn are now home from camp and finding out quickly how much harder real life can be. Willa is dealing with new responsibilities and Finn is struggling with her parent’s separation. Can Willa and Finn deal with the stress of being at home while still keeping their relationship strong?What I’m really impressed with, in both these books, is how well O’Beirne writes teenagers. The way they talk, what they think about, worries, and their reactions, is just so damn realistic to me. Sometimes I find YA writers write teenagers like children or adults, O’Beirne gets it right on, but still makes the story enjoyable for adults. O’Beirne is a pretty impressive writer. I absolutely fell in love with Willa and Finn in the first book. I’m so happy O’Beirne was able to stay true to the characters and keep them just as wonderful. The romance kicked up a little and went from G to PG. And it was still just as sweet as the first book.It is not too often I recommend YA books. I think maybe only 5 this whole year. This series is really wonderful and I absolutely recommend it. Just make sure you read them in order to truly enjoy these books. An ARC was given to me by YLVA, for a honest review.
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  • Tiff
    January 1, 1970
    Every time I pick up an Emily O'Beirne book I am spellbound on how she delivers amazing storylines, dazzling dialogue, and characters that you treasure long after the last page is turned. Emily O'Beirne is the very best at what she does for a variety of reasons. Each book captivates me. Her characters are so developed you feel as if you personally know them. Their dialogue sounds and feels real. To me, dialogue is the make it or break it for a book. You can either write it or you can't. To make Every time I pick up an Emily O'Beirne book I am spellbound on how she delivers amazing storylines, dazzling dialogue, and characters that you treasure long after the last page is turned. Emily O'Beirne is the very best at what she does for a variety of reasons. Each book captivates me. Her characters are so developed you feel as if you personally know them. Their dialogue sounds and feels real. To me, dialogue is the make it or break it for a book. You can either write it or you can't. To make it flow and feel real the whole way through, that takes a mega amount of skill, and this is a skill O'Beirne has in spades. There are two authors that stand at the very top of this genre. Every single one of their books is fabulous. O'Beirne is one of the two. Am I biased? Yeah, I guess I am for the fact that I know when I open one of her books that I am going to be blown away by its awesomeness. I could read one of her books every single month and it still wouldn't be enough. She writes the kind of books that you want to finish just so you can re-read it. Finish that baby and start right back at it again. If you read Future Leaders of Nowhere and adored it as much as I did, this one is for you. Willa and Finn are back navigating the waters of demanding school work, home life, and their new relationship. What a great read, but even more so what amazing characters. Once again Emily O'Beirne steals your heart with another beautiful read.
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  • Kurt
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased, fair reviewThis is going to be a difficult book review to write as I enjoyed the experience of reading this book so much if I try to analyze or critique I will sound like I am under the employ of the author. She describes the emotions and thoughts of the characters so well one feels them to be friends or at the very least known. This includes the minor characters to a lesser degree as well. The two young women's joy is our joy and thei I was given an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased, fair reviewThis is going to be a difficult book review to write as I enjoyed the experience of reading this book so much if I try to analyze or critique I will sound like I am under the employ of the author. She describes the emotions and thoughts of the characters so well one feels them to be friends or at the very least known. This includes the minor characters to a lesser degree as well. The two young women's joy is our joy and their individual issues of being intelligent people, learned but without the years of wisdom orf knowing all of the rules of 'adult society' are keenly felt.The story is a continuation of the author's "Future Leaders of Nowhere" which had Finn meet Willa as rivals who fell for each other. In "All the Ways to Here" there is a continuation and emotional deepening of the relationship. Both girls have to contend with wrenching family issues at the same time being stellar students and 'leaders of somewhere'. Willa and Finn meet each other's friends and family and seemed so perfect in their way of an introvert being paired with an extrovert, both quite intelligent and quick. What is interesting, to me at least, is how I identified with Willa throughout the story.Minor spoilers: (view spoiler)[I don't have too much to say as direct criticism of the book. The author's descriptions of emotions or place settings are marvelous. Set in Melbourne there is not much in the way of Australian slang which is too bad as I enjoy all varieties of English. The main characters do seem to be without faults. Early in the book Willa's grandmother injures herself and is in hospital for a long while. In comes her emotionaly distant and absent father from Queensland. Willa now has so much responsibility and the weirdness going on with her father but feels oddly guilty in putting words to her tension and resentment in a situation most would find maddening. Finn must go through a "will they/won't they" about her parents staying together. How many High School kids could keep themselves together, stay at the top of their school's honor role and maintain an intense "this is the one" relationship? (hide spoiler)]So normally I don't enjoy sequels. I loved this one and could follow this couple, Willa and Finn, on until they were my age. It could be an entire set like a shelf full of Nancy Drew mysteries. Read this book.
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  • Cristina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great sequel riddled with amazing dialogues, interesting characters and a very realistic storyline. In All the ways to here you are not going to find a nice and romantic story, but instead very realistic lives where Finn and Willa have to deal with their problems. The starting point is from the end of Future Leaders, where both characters, Finn and Willa, have to come back to their lives, lives that in Willa’s case can be hard and sometimes navigating the waters of the desperation and This is a great sequel riddled with amazing dialogues, interesting characters and a very realistic storyline. In All the ways to here you are not going to find a nice and romantic story, but instead very realistic lives where Finn and Willa have to deal with their problems. The starting point is from the end of Future Leaders, where both characters, Finn and Willa, have to come back to their lives, lives that in Willa’s case can be hard and sometimes navigating the waters of the desperation and the pressure of the responsibility. Once time Emily o’Beirne create a world with very credible characters perfectly enriched by amazing dialogues.
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  • Jane Shambler
    January 1, 1970
    I have been really looking forward to this sequel. I guess I got my hopes a little too high as I felt it wasn't as good as the first one. But it was still good and worth waiting for.Both Willa and Finn have returned home from camp and now have to face up to the events of real life. Willa with new responsibilities and Finn with her impending parents separation. A lot to deal with for kids anywhere. But the question is can they maintain there budding relationship amongst all that is going on.I lik I have been really looking forward to this sequel. I guess I got my hopes a little too high as I felt it wasn't as good as the first one. But it was still good and worth waiting for.Both Willa and Finn have returned home from camp and now have to face up to the events of real life. Willa with new responsibilities and Finn with her impending parents separation. A lot to deal with for kids anywhere. But the question is can they maintain there budding relationship amongst all that is going on.I like O'Beirne a lot. She definitely talks the talk of teenagers. she appears to get them. Which in my opinion makes the book more authentic. Teenagers aren't predictable in life but O'Beirne seems to capture them on paper. Somehow I don't think our journey with Willa and Finn is finished. There are some unfinished issues that I would not want to guess the outcome. It is a good read, one that will make you ask a few questions. These two girls are extremely intelligent which to me adds to the mix of teenagers. Seems intelligence brings a lot of issues too.If you do read this I would strongly advise you read book 1 first. If you don't a lot will not make sense. Enjoy!*ARC provided by publisher via Ylva Publishing*
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  • Lexxi Kitty
    January 1, 1970
    Book received from Ylva Publishing for an honest reviewI am in the unfortunate situation wherein I enjoyed the book I read but am unsure what to actually write about said book. Edited to add: Oh, and yes you need to read the first book in the series before reading this book here.Well, as I noted somewhere, I think in my status updates, this book, like the prior book in the series, has two point of views – Finn and Willa. Unlike in the prior book – which had the book split roughly evenly in half Book received from Ylva Publishing for an honest reviewI am in the unfortunate situation wherein I enjoyed the book I read but am unsure what to actually write about said book. Edited to add: Oh, and yes you need to read the first book in the series before reading this book here.Well, as I noted somewhere, I think in my status updates, this book, like the prior book in the series, has two point of views – Finn and Willa. Unlike in the prior book – which had the book split roughly evenly in half with the first half of the book seen through one point of view, and the second half seen through the other, this book alternated. Though not every other chapter – occasionally the reader would go from one chapter seen through Finn’s (or Willa’s) eyes to another chapter through their eyes. Other than my initial issue of trying to remember which character was which, and which personalities went with each character – which wasn’t helped by seeing the characters in a new setting – I much prefer the alternating POV instead of the half-and-half approach.In the first book, Future Leaders of Nowhere, various teenagers, roughly around the age of 15 to … some age over 15, 18? I am not sure if there was just one age level or multiple, I forget now, and if multiple what the cut-off age was. Right, sorry, a group of teenagers, roughly around the age of 15, from various schools in Australia ended up at a leadership camp called ‘Camp Nowhere’. At that camp two young women from different schools, but the same city, meet and fell into . . . deep liking (which may or may not have been love).In the second book their story, Willa and Finn’s story, continues. But now they are back in Melbourne, back amongst their fella school students, back among their families and are only able to see each other at certain times. The second book is much more about family, and friends, and individual people’s places in the world, and what they actually wish to prioritize (is the almost thankless task of being student/school captain (what would be called student president in the USA), really worth it for the bit it adds to their resume and college admissions? Should an absentee father be given more of your time? How about a mother who works so much that she never seems to be home? Or a sister who gets on your nerves, or a brother who rarely talks, or … etc.). While, at the same time, the relationship/romance between Finn and Willa continues. Now that they are 16 . . . or 17. I’ve lost track of how old they were in book one and two; and book two picks up immediately after book one so it’s not like their age could advance massively, though time seems to fly in book two, and birthdays do occur. This was a quite enjoyable slice of life, romance, young adult novel. Those looking for sex should look elsewhere, except for heavy passionate kissing.Wow, I’ve not really said anything, eh? Well, as I said, I enjoyed the book but do not have much to say about it. I didn’t hate the book, nor love the book so deeply that I wish to immediately move to Australia and become a 16 year old living under the fear of whatever VCE is. (That comes up a lot – almost as much as ‘semi’s’ came up on Glee. Okay, it came up like three times, much less than semi’s on Glee.)(“The Victorian Certificate of Education or VCE is the credential awarded to secondary school students who successfully complete high school level studies (year 11 and 12 or equivalent) in the Australian state of Victoria.” – hmm, so not only is it an Australian thing, it’s a local state thing. Heh. Though judging from a quick glance and seeing a QCE (for Queensland Certificate of Education, this is probably something nationwide. Must complicate moving between states, though. Potentially. I suppose. I really have no idea how ‘stuff’ like that works, though I know the UK has something also that pops up in British young adult books; also know there’s something like it in New York specifically, since I hear people talk about it occasionally – the closest I had to anything like whatever this ‘thing’ is would be AP classes, which you take, then take a test, if you pass the test you get college credit – which I did; though I think some of these ‘things’ are more geared to ‘pass or you don’t get a high school diploma’ type of thing. I prefer it being geared to possible college credit instead of having one bad day and not being able to graduate high school due to fucking up some tests – see, I’ve no clue what this VCE thing is about, I don’t even know if there are, in fact, tests – heh, I just gazed blankly at a website for the VCE thing and I still don’t know what it is about. I think I might be dim. http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/...).Rating: 4.68November 8 2017
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  • Ted
    January 1, 1970
    It was ok. I have no idea what this book is even about. Besides from life outside of Future Leaders of Nowhere. I literally spent 3 days with this book and after reading it I cannot tell you, dear reader, what to expect when you read this. Finn's intimacy issues? Willa and Finn's father issues? Cause there's no end of that, even it doesn't completely get resolved. For that matter neither does Finn's intimacy hesitancy. Nothing really happens. It's a complete grind. I think the best part about th It was ok. I have no idea what this book is even about. Besides from life outside of Future Leaders of Nowhere. I literally spent 3 days with this book and after reading it I cannot tell you, dear reader, what to expect when you read this. Finn's intimacy issues? Willa and Finn's father issues? Cause there's no end of that, even it doesn't completely get resolved. For that matter neither does Finn's intimacy hesitancy. Nothing really happens. It's a complete grind. I think the best part about this book for me at least was the bit about the LGBT community center. Even so, you don't find out if it's sorted out or not.It's all a bit of dangling plot arc's really. Weird.
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  • Lia
    January 1, 1970
    What I mentioned in my review of Future Leaders of Nowhere, and I will mention again, is how amazing the characters are. They feel so realistic and well-developed and I feel like I really know them now. Again there is a lot of character development in the story. Both characters are incredibly smart and dedicated to their studies (definitely Huffleclaws), but they also deal with family issues and relationship problems."It’s so unfair, she thinks, the way Willa’s life seems to hang on ifs and mayb What I mentioned in my review of Future Leaders of Nowhere, and I will mention again, is how amazing the characters are. They feel so realistic and well-developed and I feel like I really know them now. Again there is a lot of character development in the story. Both characters are incredibly smart and dedicated to their studies (definitely Huffleclaws), but they also deal with family issues and relationship problems."It’s so unfair, she thinks, the way Willa’s life seems to hang on ifs and maybes. No matter how hard she works to keep it steady and afloat."In the first book, you got to see a lot of minor characters and it was mainly about the camp they were going to. Now, a few of those characters return but the setting is completely different. Formerly, family was a bit of a background thing, now it really took main stage. I adored Willa’s Nan and Finn’s siblings were adorable. They were just such a nice addition to the story! I loved seeing Willa and Finn interact with their family and deal with problems in their own ways. But they also help each other.“People are gay. Always have been. Including your daughter. Now, kindly get over it, and join us in this century. I’m halfway through seventy. If I can handle it, so can you.”In the first book Will and Finn get together and in the second book, they go steady. The first book was very sweet when it came to romance, and the second still was very sweet, but it also takes things a bit further. It’s no longer just kisses. What I loved most about this book was that there was no unnecessary romance trouble. Very often I feel like when there is already an established relationship, there is a lot of tension and problems between the two characters in the relationship. This was not at all the case here. There were some problems in the relationship, but I think every couple has some problems, but it never felt forced or unnecessary."A girl like Finn doesn’t need to be school captain to prove herself. She proves herself just by being who she is, brave and believing. That’s what Willa will tell her. Maybe some people don’t know the full wonder of her yet, but they will one day. And right now, Willa’s smitten with being one of those who do."I am giving this book 4 stars because it was an adorable f/f romance with wonderful characters! I loved how there were little news things sprinkled throughout the story about current affairs, such as the Australian referendum on same-sex marriage. It made the story even more realistic! The romance was so cute and I loved how it continued on from the former book. I would highly recommend this book if you like diverse romance with a focus on family! But definitely read Future Leaders of Nowhere first!
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  • ana
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED MORE
  • Maritza
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Ylva Publishing in exchange for an honest review.I love this sequel almost as much as I love the first book! Emily O'Beirne's writing is deliciously exquisite and danm near perfect, IMHO.This novel has Willa and Finn home from leadership camp; back to the realities of life with family, friends, and school. Although Willa is immersed in the day-to-day concerns of her younger siblings, Riley and Jack, and the overall health and well-being of her grandmother, whom they all l I received an ARC from Ylva Publishing in exchange for an honest review.I love this sequel almost as much as I love the first book! Emily O'Beirne's writing is deliciously exquisite and danm near perfect, IMHO.This novel has Willa and Finn home from leadership camp; back to the realities of life with family, friends, and school. Although Willa is immersed in the day-to-day concerns of her younger siblings, Riley and Jack, and the overall health and well-being of her grandmother, whom they all live with, she is very glad to be home. This comes through very early in the novel where Willa expresses the thought, It’s so good to be home, back in the radius of the handful of people life has doled out to Willa. Everyone’s on the map again, placed within reach: Nan’s down the side, wrangling her grapevine into submission. Willa’s brother, Jack, is over the road, killing digital baddies with Tyler. Her sister, Riley, is inside, supposedly cleaning her side of their room. And Kelly and Maida have her surrounded on the slip of a lawn. Even though it’s interrogation time, it’s blissful to lie here again in the slick of protective coating that is her nosy, beautiful best friends. Finn is also glad to be home, though she is worried about her parents separation and how strange it is to come home to a dad-less house. In the course of the novel Willa's grandmother has an accident and the only thing standing between Willa and her siblings going into foster care is the absentee father she barely knows. On top of her worry for her grandmother, Willa must navigate the additional responsibilities of taking care of her younger siblings, her father's presence in the household, her friends, school responsibilities, and her relationship with Finn. While Finn's life is somewhat less dramatic she too must navigate a change in her relationship with her father due to his absence, prioritize her responsibilities to her friends, community activism, school responsibilities, and her relationship with Willa.This sequel is less about the Willa-Finn romance and more about Willa and Finn's lives after leadership camp.Ms. O'Beirne has given us a novel in which the main characters feel so very real and every supporting character has a depth and back story equal to that. Ms. O'Briene didn't just write a story she built a world as rich, complex, and diverse as the one in which we live. I am gratified that the wait for this novel was a short as it was, though I would've waited as long as necessary to read it.
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  • Della
    January 1, 1970
    All the Ways to Here is the second book in the Future Leaders series. I recommend reading this series in proper order for continuity. I enjoyed this read as it filled out the main characters Finn and Willa in their natural habitat.After the in depth game of Future Leaders in the first book we are seeing both characters at home and interacting with family, friends and school.There is plenty of teenage angst and the budding relationship to keep you turning the pages.Ms O’Beirne is a talented write All the Ways to Here is the second book in the Future Leaders series. I recommend reading this series in proper order for continuity. I enjoyed this read as it filled out the main characters Finn and Willa in their natural habitat.After the in depth game of Future Leaders in the first book we are seeing both characters at home and interacting with family, friends and school.There is plenty of teenage angst and the budding relationship to keep you turning the pages.Ms O’Beirne is a talented writer who understands and manoeuvres easily within the teenage culture. I highly recommend this novel.
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  • Bruna Accioly
    January 1, 1970
    i just think it's very rude that is over
  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon
  • Annie Deo
    January 1, 1970
    I previously reviewed  Future Leaders of Nowhere (here) and fell in love with Finn & Willa and co, so imagine my excitement when the author contacted me to offer a digital copy of its sequel for review. :D My only concern was whether or not All The Ways To Here would live up to my high expectations, and I'm so relieved and thrilled to report that it did indeed! <3For me, sequels after the couple have gotten together are a tricky thing - it's easy to lose interest once the unresolved sexua I previously reviewed  Future Leaders of Nowhere (here) and fell in love with Finn & Willa and co, so imagine my excitement when the author contacted me to offer a digital copy of its sequel for review. :D My only concern was whether or not All The Ways To Here would live up to my high expectations, and I'm so relieved and thrilled to report that it did indeed! <3For me, sequels after the couple have gotten together are a tricky thing - it's easy to lose interest once the unresolved sexual tension becomes resolved and they're all schmoopy and in love. I find that a lot of writers tend to make up for this by throwing in numerous obstacles like new love interests, stupid misunderstandings and manufactured drama to avoid the relationship becoming stagnant, but that just makes it worse!Fortunately, All The Ways To Here expertly avoids those common pitfalls and actually manages to make me all the MORE invested in Finn/Willa, even when they spend chapters apart! The obstacles to true love running smoothly are perfectly in character and were set up in the first book - they have to juggle being at different schools, various leadership responsibilities and extracurricular activities, Willa's duty to her younger siblings and Finn visiting her father interstate, among other issues that crop up. But there was never any question of their desire to be a couple and it was simply a matter of how they would work through the problems in their way so they could be together. I don't think I've ever loved a YA couple more than these girls, they are just simply the best. It's so endearing to see Finn easily take Willa's brother and sister under her wing, unquestioning that they had to be Willa's first priority and making playdates for all of them to spend time as a group instead of being sullen about not coming first. And watching Willa work to overcome her shyness so she could get to know Finn's parents and friends was heartwarming, considering how hard she finds socializing! Teens in YA can sometimes be complete brats and prone to making asinine decisions - a defense I hear all too often is something along the lines of 'well, the story would be over if they didn't make this stupid choice'. This book shows how you can depict a teen couple with realistic struggles, who don't have it all together and are still trying to figure their lives out, with interesting dilemmas and dramatic developments, who actually possess common sense and maturity! PRAISE BE TO THE WRITING GODS. Of course, Finn and Willa aren't perfect - I wouldn't be so fond of them if they were! The former is working through hangups from her first relationship and the latter is prone to bottling up her emotions and then lashing out when she can't contain it anymore. But these flaws are so well-written and understandable, I completely sympathized even as I winced and crossed my fingers for the girls to work it out. I've talked a lot about the main two girls, but another thing I enjoy about theFuture Leaders books is the vibrant and lively cast of supporting characters. Everyone is so well-drawn and believable, no matter how small their role! A lot of times, I admit that my main investment is in the couple we're meant to be rooting for, but I ended up being interested in Finn's interaction with her teachers (lol, Mr Granger), and fellow students (especially the rivalry with Zehra) as well as Willa navigating the strange new world of friends at Gandry and having her erstwhile father coming back into her life, with all the heartache and complications that entails.In short: I can't recommend this highly enough (although note that you do need to read the first book in order to properly enjoy this one). Emily O'Beirne has an amazing ability to create realistic teenage characters with relatable issues, an easy-to-read writing style filled with warmth and humor, and incorporates topical issues like the marriage equality vote and need to protect LGBTQ safe spaces without crossing the line into preachy after-school special. The only downside is that it had to end!Disclaimer: I received a digital copy free from the author in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jane Clements
    January 1, 1970
    O’Beirne is a wonderful writer whose major talent lies in finding the beauty in the small details of everyday life. She is also skilled in creating a distinct voice for each of her characters through their dialogue. Most of the time it was clear who was speaking, even without attribution. This is the sequel to Future Leaders of Nowhere, one of my favourite books this year. If you haven’t read it, then this book will not be as enjoyable, and may not even make complete sense.Willa and Finn have re O’Beirne is a wonderful writer whose major talent lies in finding the beauty in the small details of everyday life. She is also skilled in creating a distinct voice for each of her characters through their dialogue. Most of the time it was clear who was speaking, even without attribution. This is the sequel to Future Leaders of Nowhere, one of my favourite books this year. If you haven’t read it, then this book will not be as enjoyable, and may not even make complete sense.Willa and Finn have returned home from camp and are trying to find the room to develop their relationship in between the other demands on their time. They are still the same sweet couple that we grew to love in the first book. O’Beirne doesn’t manufacture a crisis from nowhere in order to perpetuate the sexual tension in their as yet unconsummated relationship, everything that happens follows more less organically from what we already know of their lives.In spite of this, and in spite of O’Beirne’s undoubted talent, this books feels like the second book in a trilogy (but, apparently it is not). It feels a bit like treading water until we get into the really interesting stuff.I enjoyed All the Ways to Here but I also have to admit to feeling a bit disappointed – there were so many things I wanted to know. (view spoiler)[What’s their ‘first time’ like? Do they have a first time? What happens when they leave school? Do they go to university together? (hide spoiler)]If leaving your readers wanting more is a sign of success, then O’Beirne has been very successful here. I want more.Note: I was given an advance copy by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    Finn and Willa met at the Future Leaders of Nowhere camp, the first book. This sequel explores their budding relationship as they juggle school and family drama and curfews and their teenage hormones. My favourite part of romance novels is how a couple comes to be, so I was a little worried that I'd find an established relationship dragging. This was absolutely not the case. There is so much drama and relationship development that you can barely keep up with it all. My god, also, Finn and Willa Finn and Willa met at the Future Leaders of Nowhere camp, the first book. This sequel explores their budding relationship as they juggle school and family drama and curfews and their teenage hormones. My favourite part of romance novels is how a couple comes to be, so I was a little worried that I'd find an established relationship dragging. This was absolutely not the case. There is so much drama and relationship development that you can barely keep up with it all. My god, also, Finn and Willa are the sweetest things in the history of the world. The world. Their affection for each other, the way they think the sun rises and sets on each other, it just oozed of the page and put a huge grin on your face. You cannot be sad or stressed reading this book. While the first book focuses on Willa and Finn, this book explores so many other characters in depth, ones that we've only heard mention of in the first book or ones that we've only briefly met at camp. The relationships are complex and beautiful - Willa's Dad and the kids, Finn's parents. Finn and Willa's relationship was healthy too, not without struggles of course, but it was nice to see teenagers have a nice healthy relationship. I loved this book! I can't wait to read the next Emily O'Beirne! I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • MJ
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Ylva Publishing in exchange for an honest review.All the Ways to Here is a wonderful followup to the introduction of Finn and Willa in The Future Leaders of Nowhere. Our gals have returned from camp to their regular lives, and spend the school year dealing with significant family, school and community responsibilities, while still carving out time a bit of with each other.Less about their budding attraction, this second book in the series is more about Willa and Finn's ind I received an ARC from Ylva Publishing in exchange for an honest review.All the Ways to Here is a wonderful followup to the introduction of Finn and Willa in The Future Leaders of Nowhere. Our gals have returned from camp to their regular lives, and spend the school year dealing with significant family, school and community responsibilities, while still carving out time a bit of with each other.Less about their budding attraction, this second book in the series is more about Willa and Finn's individual lives, but also about how they build on the foundational blocks of their relationship. It’s scratches gently and authentically at angsty teen issues like family disruption, the pressure of being a high achieving student, and navigating a newish romantic relationship. Emily O’Beirne continues to deliver terrifically authentic characters with equal parts sass and sincerity. She continues to share a wonderful ear for dialogue and a way of making her characters fully relatable while still having uniquely individual voices. She’s also masterful at weaving in larger concepts like consent without having them feel at all preachy. It just feels like how two gals getting to know each other should figure things out. Bravo!
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  • Colleen Corgel
    January 1, 1970
    Willa and Finn are back in the follow up to this summer's excellent Future Leaders of Nowhere. Everyone is back in school, and the camp has changed their perceptions on what they want from life. Finn begins to see that her life is not necessarily about what she can do in the school, while Willa is learning to ask for things for herself. On top of the adorable romance between Finn and Willa, All Ways to Here, covers such things as activism, teens who are caretakers, and sexuality. The novel is ab Willa and Finn are back in the follow up to this summer's excellent Future Leaders of Nowhere. Everyone is back in school, and the camp has changed their perceptions on what they want from life. Finn begins to see that her life is not necessarily about what she can do in the school, while Willa is learning to ask for things for herself. On top of the adorable romance between Finn and Willa, All Ways to Here, covers such things as activism, teens who are caretakers, and sexuality. The novel is able to handle Finn's insecurities about sex with grace; it doesn't feel unnatural when Willa tells her that she is willing to wait because she is shown to just be so happy to be with Finn to the point that she's amazed that Finn wants to stay with her. The larger points of the book, like Willa suddenly dealing with the prospect of losing her Grandmother and thus the kids, and Finn's grappling with what she wants her priorities are, are very good and provide just the right amount of tension for the teens. Overall, this is a feel good story that is left somewhat open-ended. I like that choice as we know that the teens had to work hard to get where they are at the end of the book, but they are ever moving forward. Because that's who Willa and Finn are.
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  • Mazzie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review. Emily O'Beirne just cannot write a bad novel! I've been a big fan of hers since even before her debut novel. She excels at writing young adult/new adult novels that just feel so real. I normally am not big fan of young adult novels in general because I just cannot relate to most of them. However, Emily is a big exception because I can relate to her writing so much. I don't know how she does that, but kudos! This novel is actually a sequel to Fu I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review. Emily O'Beirne just cannot write a bad novel! I've been a big fan of hers since even before her debut novel. She excels at writing young adult/new adult novels that just feel so real. I normally am not big fan of young adult novels in general because I just cannot relate to most of them. However, Emily is a big exception because I can relate to her writing so much. I don't know how she does that, but kudos! This novel is actually a sequel to Future Leaders of Nowhere. It pretty much kicks off not long after the ending of the first novel and focus on Finn and Willa dealing with their daily lives of being a student plus difficult situations with their families. This novel is not exactly romantic, even though it does have elements of romance. It's more of a "real life" type of novel where the characters face conflicts hat many people deal with in real life. Nothing too dramatic but easy to relate with. The best quality of this novel is the dialogue. Emily writes dialogue so well and it doens't feel weird or like it only exists in books. You can easily see the dialogue in the novel happening in life too. Absolutely recommend for anyone to read. Start with the first novel though!
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  • R
    January 1, 1970
    All the Ways to Here is a continuation of the previous book, Future Leaders of Nowhere. The main characters, Finn and Willa, are back home and both face problems within their family. Finn’s parents are still separated and Finn’s worries a divorce might be imminent. She also tackles problems outside of her school responsibilities that might hinder her leadership role. Willa’s grandmother ends up in a hospital and she is forced to ask her absent father to come back home to help them. Finn and Wil All the Ways to Here is a continuation of the previous book, Future Leaders of Nowhere. The main characters, Finn and Willa, are back home and both face problems within their family. Finn’s parents are still separated and Finn’s worries a divorce might be imminent. She also tackles problems outside of her school responsibilities that might hinder her leadership role. Willa’s grandmother ends up in a hospital and she is forced to ask her absent father to come back home to help them. Finn and Willa must also contend with their feelings for each other and whether to take their relationship to the next level. The characters are diverse with interesting personalities. The dialogue is well written in a realistic manner. The development of the characters from the previous book to this one is done in a very sensible and mature manner. Finn and Willa both grow as individuals and as a couple. They learned from past mistakes and effectively communicate with each other when minor problems arise. I applaud the author for allowing her teenage characters to show restraint, respect to peers and adults alike, and taking a decidedly grown up responsibility to help those they love.
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  • Sascha Broich
    January 1, 1970
    *ARC for review*So, Finn, Willa and the others are back to normalcy - and all the family problems we learned about at Camp Nowhere.Willa has to struggle with all the unexpected chores she has to do because her Nan got injured.Being bad at expressing emotions herself, she learns that it comes from her dad. Another problem that adds to the stress, as he comes to help out.I can't remember having that much homework and we definitely hadn't had to write essays as a part of it. Because it occurs also *ARC for review*So, Finn, Willa and the others are back to normalcy - and all the family problems we learned about at Camp Nowhere.Willa has to struggle with all the unexpected chores she has to do because her Nan got injured.Being bad at expressing emotions herself, she learns that it comes from her dad. Another problem that adds to the stress, as he comes to help out.I can't remember having that much homework and we definitely hadn't had to write essays as a part of it. Because it occurs also in Harry Potter I think it's the British school system. Not really endearing.Meanwhile Finn learns that being year captain is way more boring than exciting work. Plus, she worries about her parents: divorce or not? And then she has the self-imposed task with the survival of the LGBT center that collides with her school captain job. Which leads to the question: what does she want to do? Things that look good on a resume or things that really help.tl;dr: Emily O'Beirne delivered just another sequel you want immediately a sequel to.
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  • Sandra Golz
    January 1, 1970
    I waited for this book right since it was announced. And even though I needed some time to wind my brain around the new surroundings (home living and complications far away from camp) I really loved this book. I still love Willa and Finn and now I love all other characters as well. Willa's family and friends are so lovely though their life gets a bit complicated when Willa's father arrives. It great to get to know Willa even more, to fall in love with her again and again. Finn's family was intro I waited for this book right since it was announced. And even though I needed some time to wind my brain around the new surroundings (home living and complications far away from camp) I really loved this book. I still love Willa and Finn and now I love all other characters as well. Willa's family and friends are so lovely though their life gets a bit complicated when Willa's father arrives. It great to get to know Willa even more, to fall in love with her again and again. Finn's family was introduces in the first book and we get to know what happens to her mother and father and their relationship. Everything felt so real. It was so addictive to follow along with them. First I didn't like the fast changing of PoV because I was used to the first book which was slpitted in half telling us first about Finn then about Willa. This time the PoV changes frequently. But once I got used to it, I really liked it. All in all this book is just as gorgeous as the first one was. I am really looking to read more of O'Beirnes work.
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    It's nice to see these characters out of the camp environment, and it didn't disappoint! This sequel is a great follow up for the first novel, which is refreshing for being a sequel. Just like in the first one O'Beirne made both Finn and Willa's perspectives and feelings spot on without being too dramatic. Learning more about each of their separate lives in their own zones made getting to know the characters even better. Both characters have their own issues but Finn and Willa fit together well It's nice to see these characters out of the camp environment, and it didn't disappoint! This sequel is a great follow up for the first novel, which is refreshing for being a sequel. Just like in the first one O'Beirne made both Finn and Willa's perspectives and feelings spot on without being too dramatic. Learning more about each of their separate lives in their own zones made getting to know the characters even better. Both characters have their own issues but Finn and Willa fit together well and O'Beirne does a great job showing that.
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  • S B
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of Emily O'Beirne, really liked Future Leaders of Nowhere and was looking forward to this sequel. This book continues Willa and Finn's story after returning from camp, we see Willa struggle to keep her family going and Finn's family try to find themselves again. There is some teen angst, family issues, relationship issues, friend issues to keep the story moving along. I like the voice that the author gives to the teenagers, it feels authentic. Hoping for another in the series.I re I am a big fan of Emily O'Beirne, really liked Future Leaders of Nowhere and was looking forward to this sequel. This book continues Willa and Finn's story after returning from camp, we see Willa struggle to keep her family going and Finn's family try to find themselves again. There is some teen angst, family issues, relationship issues, friend issues to keep the story moving along. I like the voice that the author gives to the teenagers, it feels authentic. Hoping for another in the series.I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jaie
    January 1, 1970
    I really love Emily O'Beirne's writing. Her books are so immersive and her characters are so complete. I thoroughly enjoy reading them, and look forward to new books! That said, I thought this book wasn't quite as good as Future Leaders of Nowhere. It took me a few starts to really get into the story. Just not a lot happened. I'm very glad that Finn and Willa had such honest high school stressors and nothing over the top, but it wasn't as dramatic or catchy a read as other books. It felt realist I really love Emily O'Beirne's writing. Her books are so immersive and her characters are so complete. I thoroughly enjoy reading them, and look forward to new books! That said, I thought this book wasn't quite as good as Future Leaders of Nowhere. It took me a few starts to really get into the story. Just not a lot happened. I'm very glad that Finn and Willa had such honest high school stressors and nothing over the top, but it wasn't as dramatic or catchy a read as other books. It felt realistic, but a bit slow. *ARC ebook received from Ylva in exchange for review*
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    I love how Emily O'Beirne writes sequels to her books that actually are about the characters from the previous book. I enjoyed Willa's and Finn's story in the first - I actually reread it to refresh my memory before I read this one - and liked to see where there story went. The characters were well developed in the first part but since I already knew them it helped to give them another layer of depth. I really enjoyed this book but I don't think it would work well as a standalone story.
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  • Adrian
    January 1, 1970
    Was inveigled to read the first of the pair, "Future Leaders of Nowhere," by a friend who enjoyed it thoroughly. Though I tend to avoid young adult fiction, having survived to adulthood with semi-success, I was intrigued to follow the characters into the second phase of their tale. Again, the plot was well wrought, age appropriate and had me hearkening back to my youth with nostalgia. I was kindly furnished with an ARC by Ylva and the author, which was appreciated.
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  • Dr E
    January 1, 1970
    Achingly sweet in a good way. This is a beautiful first love story. Stands alone, but it would be better if you read the first book so you know who the characters are. The author is excellent, the writing is both assured and engaging, but best of all it’s authentic and that’s hard to do when the characters are teenagers. I really enjoyed reading this book.
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  • AJ Sneed
    January 1, 1970
    absolutely loved this sequel! there was a great intermingling with the characters that drew you in and made you want to read more. This was a stay up late to finish for me. There was a great development from the first book. looking forward to reading more from this author!
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  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote my review of this lovely book, and just posted it to my blog Trish Talks Texts.Loved spending more time with Finn & Willa. Thanks to author for advancing a copy.Review on blog soon.
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